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"State Troops and Volunteers"
"A Photographic Record of North Carolina's Civil War Soldiers"
Volume 1
by
Greg Mast
© 1995 by the NC Division of Archives and History

This is a wonderful book, which should be in every library in the state, as it is especially interesting to those of us researching our family histories, as well as those interested in the study of the War Between the States. Mr Mast spent years locating, documenting, researching and reproducing photographic portraits of NC's Confederate Soldiers and their families. Each photgraph is accompanied by the name of the descendant who has possession of the picture, as well as a little history of those photographed. He has also included short histories of the Militias, Volunteers and Regiments. My copy of the book was purchased, just recently, at Walden Books.

Photos of special interest to those researching Cleveland, Rutherford, Lincoln & Gaston counties.

Page 1, 1.2.7 Major Franklin Hull, Catawba or Lincoln County
Page 1, 1.2.8 Hiram Charles Sherrill, Lincoln County
Page 47, 2.64 Second Lieutenant Thomas N Craig and his brother, Private James Milton Craig, Company H, 23rd Regiment of NC Troops, "The Gaston Guards"
Page 66, 2.121 Private James Wilkerson, Company C, 34th Regiment of NC Troops, "The Rutherford Rebels"
Page 66, 2.122 Captain James Overton Simmons, Company I, 34th Regiment, "The Rutherford Band"
Page 66, 2.123 Second Lieutenant David B Harrill, Company B, 34th Regiment of NC Troops, "The Sandy Run Yellow Jackets"
Page 69, 2.135 Private Marquis L Beam, Company I, 38th Regiment of NC Troops, "The Cleveland Marksmen"
Page 179, 4.1.57 Brothers, Peter M Mull & Ezra Mull of Company F, 55th Regiment of NC Troops, "The South Mountain Rangers", along with brother William Henry Mull, probably of Company B, 11th Regiment of NC Troops
Page 257, 5.2.52 Private Lewis B Flack, Company G, 50th Regiment of NC Troops "The Rutherford Farmers"
Page 301, 5.3.21 Private William T Blanton, Company H, 28th Regiment of NC Troops "The Cleveland Regulators" (This photo is wonderfully clear!)
Page 303, 5.3.28 Second Lieutenant Oliver Perry Beam, Company I, 38th Regiment of NC Troops "The Cleveland Marksmen" (This photo is remarkable, Mr Beam was very handsome.)
Page 303, 5.3.29 Brothers, Seaton Gayles Durham & Richard John Durham, Company E, 12th Regiment of NC Troops "The Cleveland Guards"
Page 304, 5.3.33 Private William B Wright, Company B, 34th Regiment of NC Troops "The Sandy Run Yellow Jackets"
Page 306, 5.3.40 Sergeant John A Payne, Company H, 23rd Regiment of NC Troops "The Gaston Guards"
Page 334, 5.4.1 Private David Rufus Paysour, Company B, 28th Regiment of NC Troops "The Gaston Invincibles"
Page 336, 5.4.7 Corporal George Washington Lookadoo, Company B, 34th Regiment of NC Troops "The Sandy Run Yellow Jackets"
Page 347, 5.4.37 Private John Young Shitle, Company I, 48th Regiment of NC Troops, Cleveland County
Page 350, 5.4.43 Second Lieutenant Robert Patton Dickerson, Company C, 34th Regiment of NC Troops "The Rutherford Rebels"


"Covered with Glory"
by Rod Gragg,
©2000
HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.
10 East 53rd Street
New York, New York 10022

The Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863 was the bloodiest battle of the War Between the States with 51,112 men listed as dead, wounded or missing. The North counted 23,049 while the Army of Northern Virginia lost 28,063. Leading the charge on that fateful summer day was the 26th North Carolina, a well-seasoned fighting machine consisting mostly of young farmers:
Company A, the "Jeff Davis Mountaineers", Ashe County
Company B, the "Waxhaw Jackson Guards", Union County
Company C, the "Wilkes Volunteers", Wilkes County
Company D, the Wake Guards", Wake County
Company E, the "Independent Guards", Chatham County
Company F, the "Hibriten Guards", Caldwell County
Company G, the "Chatham Boys", Chatham County
Company H, the "Moore Independents", Moore County
Company I, the "Caldwell Guards", Caldwell County
Company K, the "Pee Dee Wild Cats", Anson County.
Occasionally one runs across a book so well written you feel as though you are living with the characters. One such book is "Covered with Glory"
Mr. Gragg introduces us the to soldiers of the 26th from its first muster. We travel with the Regiment and get to know its young soldiers intimately. We see their daily struggle to survive and watch them fight the battles that led to the engagement at Gettysburg.
This book is a must read for the historian, and general public who hunger to understand the war that pitted brother against brother.
Genealogists will find many wonderful clues to their heroic ancestors. I recommend this book highly.


These pages, and the work thereof, are the exclusive property of Judith Parker-Proctor and may not be reproduced in any format for sale or profit by any individual, business, organization, internet service, or other entity.

© 1998 Judith Parker-Proctor, All rights reserved

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