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FUSHIA COLOR IS MINE AND PEGS RELATIONS
BLUE IS CLUES TO HUDSON JOHNSON
GREEN IS KNOWN MICHAEL JOHNSON DNA INFORMATION AND CONNECTING INORMATION

Haplogroup I  -The I, I1, and I1a lineages are nearly completely restricted to northwestern Europe. These would most likely have been common within Viking populations. One lineage of this group extends down into central Europe. Haplogroup I dates to 23,000 years ago or longer. Lineages not in branches I1a, I1b or I1c are found distributed at low frequency throughout Europe  Group White Oak http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hjohnson/haplogroup.i.html#Group_White_Oak

Purple is my Cousin Joe Matlock’s Research

Maroon is connecting of Johnson surname researcher to A. Euell Johnson

Haplogroup I  -The I, I1, and I1a lineages are nearly completely restricted to northwestern Europe. These would most likely have been common within Viking populations. One lineage of this group extends down into central Europe. Haplogroup I dates to 23,000 years ago or longer. Lineages not in branches I1a, I1b or I1c are found distributed at low frequency throughout Europe Group Sessile Oak http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hjohnson/haplogroup.i.html

 

Olive is the DNA LINE of Leonard Johnson and Todd Johnson

Haplogroup I2A -This subgroup of Haplogroup I is found within the Balkans countries at it's greatest frequency and diversity. These countries probably harbored this subset of Haplogroup I as a refuge during the Last Glacial Maximum. Group Norway Spruce  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hjohnson/haplogroup.i1b.html

 

Lime is the Color assigned to this DNA GROUP OF JOHNSON RESEARCHERS and will be added to Current Files of Johnson and Allied Families in Faquier Co. Va. Halifax Co. Va. Pittsylvania Co. Granville Co. NC

 

Haplogroup R1b1   -Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroup containing the Atlantic modal haplotype . Group Elm

 

Julian Bentley Johnson Jerry Johnson <nodigits@sbcglobal.net> James Granville Johnson <bobmastr@zipnet.us> Judy: For William Thomas Johnson  <jmje36@aol.com>Floyd Junior Johnson: Ronald K. Johnson<jronson@msn.com>

 

 

Gold is the Color for descendants of Colonel Richard Johnson

 

Turquoise is the DNA of Jeffery Michael Johnson

Haplogroup E3a - Haplogroup E3a is an Africa lineage. It is currently hypothesized that this haplogroup dispersed south from northern Africa within the last 3,000 years, by the Bantu agricultural expansion. E3a is also the most common lineage among African Americans

 

My Notes On This Group: The Roman Empire was the first to use troops all over the world they left blood groups ever where they went from Countries of Africa to England: The Roman Empire was one of the VAST spreading Empires in the World to first use troops of other Countries it conquered. The use of using other troops from Conquered Countries spread with each developing Empire.

 

Red is the County lines and Parish Lines: These lines can and will change people in a County or in a Parish. This is to serve as a Time line to show changes, in lines or in changes where families moved to from this area.

 

Notes: Some Quaker dates have been translated Before the 1752 calendar change, the first month of the year was March. The correct date is inserted
before the quoted excerpts below. 
From: Mary E. Stewart  

 

In 1752 the new year began to be counted from Jan 1. Before that it ran from March 26-March 25, Julian Calender changed. So a date in July 1750 would be earlier in the same "year" as one in Feb 1750 (which once 1752 rolled around, would be thought of as the next year). From: Barbara Schenck

 

Rose Color is for Haplogroup R1b1   -Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroup containing the Atlantic modal haplotype . Researchers matching this DNA ARE; James Russell Johnson, Samuel Frank Johnson, C. Thomas Johnson and Stephen Alexander Johnson http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hjohnson/Pedigrees/1195_et_all.htm.

Haplogroup E3b1a -  This lineage is estimated to have originated in north-eastern Africa about 23,000 years ago. Some of its branches exited Africa during the Paleolithic, and today it can be found in Europe, the Middle East, and north and east Africa: DNA Of Researcher Brett Johnson

 

Haplogroup R1bi is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re colonized after the last glaciail maximum 10-13 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroups containing the Atlantic modal haplotype: Group is Aspen; Color is Light Orange Researchers are Jane Johnson Williams, James Johnson born Ca 1718 died 1785 Brunswick Co. Va.

 

Haplo groups R1b-R1b1C is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded through out Europes as humans re colonized after the las glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroups containing the Atlantic modal haplotype. Group is Black Oak: Color is Brown: Researcher is Dean Johnston: Thomas Johnson reside Pits.Co Va 1776 moved to Washington Co.

 

These files come from numerous Johnson-Johnston-Johnstone-Jonson-Jonston researchers and Sent to Tony L. Johnson who compiled the information” Please share with Other researchers”

                      

Report made by Tony L. Johnson a descendant of Hudson Johnson and Agness Johnson of Bartons Creek, Dickson Co. Tn, Big Creek Hawkins Co Tn and Buffalo Creek of Henry Co.Va.

 

 

 

This file will basically deal with the known connections to families that came to Humphreys and Dickson County Tennessee, this will be the Shropshire families, The Mayo families, The Turner Families, and the Terisha Johnson families and their cousin lines and there Neighbors on Rockfish River.

 

WHERE TO FIND THE HISTORY OF FAMILIES ON ROCKFISH RIVER

The Rockfish River flows into the James River at the intersection of present day Albemarle County, Buckingham and Nelson County: See notes on Cabell family lines

Note Rockfish River deeds in Albemarle County then goes back into Goochland County

Rockfish River has also been the border for Buckingham County, Amherst and Albemarle Counties.

Albemarle County formed 1744 from Goochland County

Goochland County Formed 1727-1728 from Henrico County

1634 Henrico County

 

 

 

The Rockfish River is formed in Nelson County, Virginia by the confluence of its North and South Forks, both of which rise in the Blue Ridge Mountains near the Blue Ridge Parkway. It flows generally southeastwardly through Northern Nelson County; in its lower course the river is used to define the boundary between Nelson and Albemarle Counties. It enters the James River from the northwest on the common boundary of the two counties, about 8 mi (13 km) southwest of Scottsville.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockfish_River

 

 

Following is Notes from other Counties that come into Albemarle County

 

When the county (Albemarle) was organized, settlements had been making within its present limits for 12 to 13 years. Williamsburg being the Capitol of the Virginia Colony, and its public business being transacted there, it was natural that the first great roads of the country should trend in that direction. There can be little doubt that on was opened along the James River, but that leading to the more Northern potions of the County was the Three Notched Road. It was cleared on the track it pursues now, following the watershed between the South Anna and the James and still bears that name (Three Notched Road) through the tree marks on account of which it was given have not been seen for 3 or 4 generations. It passed the county line where it does now, not far from Boyd's Tavern came up the Rivanna on its North side crossed at Secretary's Ford, coincided with what is now the main street of Charlottesville, crossed Ivy Creek and Mechum's River where it does still but at the point diverged from what is the main road at present. It continued in a straight line to Woods's Gap (now Jarman's Gap) instead of striking the Ridge at Rockfish Gap. At the mouth of Woods's Gap was the first settlement in that part of the county and for some years the chief route of travel passed over it to the Valley. In the diary of Thomas Lewis dated 1746 in which he describes his journey to Orange County to join the surveyors appointed to run the line between the Northern Neck and the rest of t he Colony. He states the he crossed from Augusta County at Woods's Gap and stopped at Michael Woods's both on his departure and his return. As late as near the close of the Revolution when Rockfish Gap was much used the prisoners of the Convention Army as already mentioned were upon their removal taken across the Blue Ridge at Woods's Gap. The Three Notched Road was the dividing line between the parishes of Fredericksville and St. Anne's. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

The Richard Woods or Dick Woods Road as it is frequently called is one of the oldest in the county. It diverged from the Three Notched Road just west of the  D.S. passed Richard Woods place at the mouth or Taylor's Gap to the little stream called pounding Branch, crosses at the mouth of Taylor's Gap to the Little stream called pounding branch crossed Mechum's River at the Miller School and continued thence to Rockfish Gap. The place Pounding Branch went in early times by the name of Little D.S. A tan yard was located there which at first was named Simpson's and afterwards Grayson's. Near the point the road turned off described in old deeds as the road to Amherst Court house the same that still exists running  through Batesville and passing the Nelson County Line at what was formerly known as Harlow's Tavern on Lynch's Creek. Tradition related that Richard Woods in laying out the road called by his name followed a well marked buffalo trail, and the fact of its being established by some sagacious engineers of nature account for the gentle grade for which it has been distinguished. It seems that the road through Israel's Gap was not made till near the end of the last Century. At that time William Woods known as surveyor Billy, was summoned by the County Court to show cause why he had not opened a road from Israel's Gap into Richard Woods road. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Richard Woods

Dick Woods Road

Pounding Branch

Taylor's Gap

Rockfish Gap

Lynch's Creek.

 

1727 June 16: to 1731 The First patents were taken out on June 16 1727.On that day George Hoomes obtained a grant of 3,100 acres on the far side of the Mountains called Chestnut, and said to be on the line between Hanover and Spotsylvania Counties. Nicholas Meriwether a grant of 13,762 acres at the first ledge of the Mountains called Chestnut, and said to be on the same lines. That was the first appropriation of the Virginia soil of Albemarle County as it is at present. These locations occurred in the line of the South Anna River up which the increasing population had been slowly creeping for a number of years. The Patent to Nicholas Meriwether included the present seat of Castle Hill, and the boundaries of the grant as it was termed by way of eminence, were marks of great notoriety to surveyors, and other interested in the description of adjacent lands, for a long period afterwards. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

George Hoomes

Chestnut Mountain

Nicholas Meriwether 1727

The Nicholas Meriwether families are those of Major Thomas Johnson into the Meriwether families of Nicholas Meriwether the first.

Castle Hill

South Anna River

 

The next patent for 26,000 acres was obtained nearly two years later by Dr. George Nicholas. This land was situated on the James River, and included the present village of Warren. In the Following year 1730, five additional patents were issued one to Allen Howard for 400 acres on the James River on both side of the ROCKFISH at its mouth: one to Thomas Carr for 2,800 acres on the Rivanna at the junction of its forks, and up along the north fork, one to Charles Hudson for 2,00 acres on both sides of the Hardware, the beginning evidently of the Hudson Plantation below Carter's Bridge, one to Secretary John Carter for 9,350 acres on the Great Mountain on Hardware in the fork of the James, and to this day called Carter's Mountain, and one to Francis Eppes the Grandfather of Mr. Jefferson's son-in-law of the same name for 6,400 acres on the branches of the HARDWARE, ROCKFISH and other branches of the James. One of the branches of the Hardware still known as Eppes Creek. The same year Nicholas Meriwether located 4,190 acres more adjoining his former tract and running over the Southwest Mountain on Turkey Run, taking out an inclusive patent for 17,952 acres in one body. From the recital of this point, it appears that Christopher Clark was associated in the first grants, although it was made out to Nicholas Meriwether alone. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Dr. George Nicholas.

Allen Howard

Thomas Carr

Charles Hudson

Who is Charles Hudson and Martin King and Christopher Clark which families are they off of.

Hudson Plantation

Carter's Bridge

John Carter

Carter's Mountain

Francis Eppes

Southwest Mountain

Turkey Run,

Christopher Clark

 

 

In 1731 only three patents were obtained with the present county of Albemarle, one by Charles Lewis for 1,200 acres on both side of the Rivanna at the mouth of Buck Island Creek. One by Charles Hudson for 540 acres on the west side of Carter's Mountain, and one by Major Thomas Carr for 2,000 acres on the back side of the Chestnut Mountains. Several other patents were taken out the same year along the Rivanna within the present limits of Fluvanna County one which was by Martin King, whose name is still kept in remembrance in connection with the road which runs from Woodridge to the Union Mills, where was a Ford also called by his name.

FROM PAGES 2 and 3 of Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Charles Lewis

Buck Island

Martin King,

 

The main body of land on which the Coles family resided was granted to Francis Eppes in 1730, who received a Patent for 6,500 acres. He devised it to his sons Richard and William. They sold 3,000 acres to JOHN COLES, but their deed was never admitted to record, because proved by only 2 witnesses. In 1777 Frances Eppes, son of Richard Eppes, with his wife Elizabeth made a conveyance of the tract to Mr. Coles and acknowledged it before Thomas Jefferson and George Gilmer as magistrates. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Thomas Jefferson

What we know: that Thomas Jefferson is a Randolph descendant whose lines are on early records of Tuckahoe Creek, we also know that the Randolph’s and Boones have been intermarrying since 1100 AD.

 

John Coles father John Cole came to this Country for Enniscorthy Ireland and established himself in Hanover County Va. Where he married Mary Winston. His Children were Walter Coles, Sarah Coles, Mary Coles who was the wife of John Payne and mother of Dorothy Payne, who was wife of President Madison. John and Isaac Payne who lived in Halifax County and was members of Congress from that district. John Payne Settled in Albemarle County on the land mentioned above. He married Rebecca E. Tucker who first drew breath of life in the historical city of Jamestown. His Children were Walter, John, Isaac, Tucker, Edward, Rebecca who was wife of Richard Singleton of South Carolina, Mary Eliza Coles the wife of Robert Carter, Sarah Cole the wife of Andrew Stevenson, Elizabeth and Emily the wife of John Rutherford of Richmond. John Coles died in 1808 and his wife in 1825 Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Mary Winston

What are the connections on the family of Mary Winston as Patrick Henry is connected to the Winston families as is John Symes his half brother who married a Walker.

John Payne

Then we have the Payne families how are they connected to Ralph Payne who does have a brother in Colonial Virginia named Thomas Payne. Ralph Payne of Cox’s creek son married Mary De Montague and had several sons with her. Mary De Montague was also married to 3 other men.

 

Walter Coles was a magistrate of the County, but soon resigned, his home was at Woodville the represent residence of Charles Shaw where he died in 1854 at the age of 82. He married first Eliza COCKE the daughter of BOWLER COCKE of Turkey Island. And 2nd marriage was Sarah Swan daughter of John Swann of Powhatan. His children were Walter Coles, who succeeded his father at Woodville, who married Ann C. Carter, and who was the father of Dr. Walter Coles of St. Louis, and of Sarah Coles and Elizabeth Coles, still residing near the old home, and Edward Coles who was given a farm about 5 miles south of Charlottesville, which his father bought from William T. Henderson in 1806, who married Letita daughter of Rezin Wheat and who died in 1883. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Walter Coles

 

BOWLER COCKE

Bowler Cocke is a descendant of LTC Richard Cocke of Henrico Co. Va.

 

John Coles married Selma Skipworth of Mecklenburg County. His home was Estouteville where he died in 1848. He left 3 sons John Cole, who lived near Warren, Peyton Coles who married his cousin Isaetta and succeeded his father at Estouteville, where he died in 1887, and Tucker Coles whose present residence is Viewmount. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Selma Skipworth

Estouteville,

Viewmount.

 

Isaac A. Coles was a member of the Albemarle County Bar for a time President Thomas Jefferson's secretary, and a member of the House of Delegates. He lived at Enniscorthy, he married Mrs. Julia Strickler and had 2 children Isaetta Coles, and Strickler Coles. He died in 1841 and his wife in 1876. Tucker Coles also represented the county in the House of Delegates. He married Helen Skipworth of Mecklenburg and died with out children at Tallwood. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

President Thomas Jefferson

President Thomas Jefferson grew up on Tuckahoe Creek and is a Randolph Descendant

Helen Skipworth

 

Edward Coles the youngest of John Cole’s children was the private secretary of President Madison, he sold the plantation on Rockfish River left him by his father John Coles and in 1818 removed to Illinois, carrying with him all his slaves, giving them their freedom and settling them by families and on farms near Edwardsville. He was appointed by Mr. Monroe the 1st Governor of the Territory of Illinois, was elected its Second Governor when it became a State and having made an earnest and successful struggle against a party seeking to make it a slave State. He removed to PA in 1832. He married Sarah L. Roberts and died in 1868. He had 3 children, one of who was Roberts Cole who came to Virginia, lived on the Old Clarkston Farm on the South Fork of the Hardware River and was a Captain in the Confederate army. Captain Roberts Cole fell on Roanoke Island in 1862. His remains were brought for interment to the Coles Cemetery at Enniscorthy. FROM  Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

1730 January 11 Allen Howard. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on the north side the Fluvanna on each side Rock Fish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 14, 1728-1732 (pt.1 & 2), p. 56 (Reel 11).

Allen Howard

1730 Sept 28: Frances Epes:  Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Eppes. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 6500 acres on the branches of Hardware River Rockfish River and other branches of the Fluvanna. Source: Land Office Patents No. 13, 1725-1730 (v.1 & 2 p.1-540), p. 485 (Reel 12).

Frances Epes: 

Notes Check on Frances Eppes as I think he is connected to the Hatcher and Elam and Isham Families

1731 Era of: Three families named Lewis apparently not related have lived in Albemarle County. The first of the name entering lands in its present Limits was Charles Lewis of Goochland who in 1731obtained a patent for 1200 acres on both sides of the Rivanna at the mouth of Buck Island. He also entered nearly 3,000 acres in the Rich Cove. As nearly as can be ascertained this Charles Lewis was the son of John Lewis and Isabel Warner. In 1717 he married Mary Howell and his children were John Lewis, Charles Lewis, Elizabeth Lewis the wife of William Kennon, James Lewis, Mary Lewis, Howell Lewis and Ann Lewis. His home was the place that has since borne the name of Mounteagle. To his son Charles Lewis he transferred his land on Buck Island in 1766, the son reconvening it to his father and mother, and the survivor for life. Charles Lewis Jr. purchased, chiefly from his cousin Robert Lewis more then 18 acres on the North fork of the Hardware river, including what is now RED HILL DEPOT, which he gave to his son Isham Lewis. He died in 1782, His wife was Mary Randolph, daughter of Isham Randolph of Dungeness and sister of Peter Jefferson’s wife, and his children were Charles Lilburn Lewis, Isham Lewis, Mary Lewis the wife of Colonel Charles Lewis of North Garden and secondly the wife of Charles Wingfield Jr. Jane Lewis the wife of CHARLES HUDSON, Elizabeth Lewis the wife of ROBERT HENDERSON, Ann Lewis the wife of RANDOLPH JEFFERSON. Frances LEWIS the second wife of John Thomas, and Mildred Lewis the wife of EDWARD MOORE. Isham Lewis died unmarried in 1790, leaving his estate to his two nephews John Lewis Moore and Charles Lewis Thomas. Charles Lilburn Lewis married Lucy JEFFERSON sister of President and his children were Randolph Lewis, Isham Lewis, Lilburn Lewis, Jane Lewis the wife of Washington Griffin. Martha Lewis and Ann M. Randolph lived on his Plantation, Buck Island the north side of the Rivanna, but in 1805 is sold to David Michie and he moved to Goochland County. Lilburn Lewis also lived on the north side of the river and in 1806 disposed of his place to Hugh Nelson. His wife was Jane WOODSON by whom he had five children among them Mary H. Lewis the wife of Charles Palmer, and mother of Dr. William Palmer, the compiler of the Calendar of the State Papers of Virginia. All the daughters of Charles Lilburn Lewis, except Jane and Mary emigrated to Livingston County Ky. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Charles Lewis of Goochland

Mary Howell

John Lewis

Isabel Warner

son Isham Lewis

cousin Robert Lewis

Buck Island.

Rich Cove.

Isham Randolph of Dungeness

The Isham families are the kinsman of Col. William Randolph married to an Isham Female

Charles Wingfield Jr.

Charles Wingfield is the kinsman of the families of Nicholas Meriwether the first.

Peter Jefferson

The Jefferson families are the line of President Thomas Jefferson who grew up on Tuckahoe Creek which he is a Grandson of Sir William Randolph and Mary Randolph will be his kinswoman

Elizabeth Lewis HENDERSON

ROBERT HENDERSON

RANDOLPH JEFFERSON

The Jefferson families are the line of President Thomas Jefferson who grew up on Tuckahoe Creek which he is a Grandson of Sir William Randolph and Mary Randolph will be his kinswoman

John Thomas

Washington Griffin

David Michie

Jane WOODSON

Charles Palmer,

 

Robert Lewis a nephew of the First Charles Lewis above mentioned lived at Belvoir on the east side of the South West Mountain. He was the son of John Lewis and Frances Fielding and a brother of Fielding Lewis. Washington’s brother in law. He married Jane Meriwether a daughter of Nicholas Meriwether the large landholder and he was himself on of the largest land holder in the County. In 1736 he entered upwards of 4,000 acres in North Garden and in 1740 nearly 6,500 near Ivy Depot, he died in 1765. His Children were John Lewis, Nicholas Lewis, Robert Lewis Charles Lewis, William Lewis, Jane Lewis the wife of Thomas Meriwether, Mary Lewis the wife first of Samuel Cobb and next to Waddy Thomson, Mildred Lewis the wife of Major John Lewis Ann Lewis the wife of another John Lewis, both of these Gentleman of Spotsylvania County and Kinsman, Elizabeth Lewis the wife of William Barrett, and brother of Mildred's husband. John Lewis the eldest son received the main portion of his estate in Gloucester County. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

John Lewis

Robert Lewis

Frances Fielding

Fielding Lewis

Belvoir

North Garden

William Barrett

Nicholas Lewis lived at the Farm adjoining Charlottesville on the east, a gift from his grandfather Nicholas Meriwether. He was a public spirited man, a Captain in the Revolution, a Magistrate, Surveyor and Sheriff of the County, possessed of a sound judgment and kindly spirit, appealed to on all occasions to compose the strife’s of the neighborhood, the trusted friend of Mr. Jefferson, and the adviser of his family during his long absences from home. He married Mary Walker the oldest daughter of Dr. Thomas Walker and died in 1808. His children were Nicholas M. Lewis, Thomas W. Lewis, Robert Warner Lewis, Jane Lewis the wife of Hudson MARTIN, Elizabeth Lewis the wife of William D. Meriwether, Mildred Lewis the wife of David Wood, Mary Lewis the wife of Isaac Miller and Margaret Lewis wife of Charles L. Thomas. Nicholas Lewis married his cousin Mildred Hornsby of Kentucky and doubtless emigrated to that State. Robert Lewis married Elizabeth Wood and removed from the County. Thomas W. Lewis lived at Locust Grove, the northern part of his father’s farm. He was appointed a magistrate in 1791 and died in 1807. In his will he directed that the families of his servants should not be separated and expressed the wish that circumstances had permitted their emancipation, as according to his view all men were born free and equal. He married Elizabeth Meriwether daughter of Nicholas Meriwether and sister of his brother in Law William D. Meriwether, and his children were Nicholas H. Lewis, Margaret Lewis the wife of James Clark, Mary Lewis the wife of James Leitch and secondly to David Anderson, Lydia Lewis the wife of Samuel Minor, Thomas Lewis, Charles Lewis Elizabeth Lewis the wife of John C. Wells, Jane Lewis the wife of Walker Meriwether and next to Dr. Richard Anderson, and Robert W. Lewis of Castalia, By far he greater number of this family emigrated in 1837 to Pike County Missouri. In 1804 Mary removed with her husband Isaac Miller to Louisville Ky. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Dr. Thomas Walker

NOTES: I noticed a couple of glitches:Thomas Walker died in 1794 not 1808 (his son John died in 1809 so perhaps there was a mix-up). From: GUY M BENSON

David Wood

Hudson MARTIN

Isaac Miller

Charles L. Thomas

Mildred Hornsby

Elizabeth Wood

Locust Grove

James Clark,

James Leitch

David Anderson,

Samuel Minor

John C. Wells

Walker Meriwether

Dr. Richard Anderson

Robert Lewis son of Robert Lewis married a Miss Fauntleroy and removed to Halifax County. Charles Lewis lived in the North Garden, where James G. White now resides. He was one of the first to offer his services at the out break of the Revolutionary War. He was Captain of the first volunteer company raised in Albemarle, Lt. Col. of the first Regiment formed, and afterwards Colonel of the 14th Virginia. He died in 1779 while in command of the Guards at the Barracks near Charlottesville. His wife Mary Lewis, daughter of Charles Lewis Jr. of Buck Islands and his children Howell Lewis, Charles Warner Lewis, who died young, Mary R. Lewis the wife of Edward Carter, Jane Lewis the wife of John Carr, Sarah Lewis the wife of Benjamin Brown, Ann Lewis the wife of Matthew Brown, and  Susan Lewis the wife of Joel Franklin. Mrs. Lewis was married the 2nd time to Charles Wingfield Jr. and died in 1807. Howell Lewis lived at the homestead and died in 1845. His wife was Mary Carr daughter of Thomas Carr, and his Children Thomas Fielding Lewis, Howell Lewis of Mechunk, Mary Lewis wife of Clifton Harris, and Sarah Lewis wife of Ira Harris, William Lewis son of Robert Lewis lived at Locust Hill near Ivy Depot. He was a Lt. in the Revolutionary army. He died in 1780. His wife was Lucy Anderson daughter of Edmund Anderson Meriwether was the famous explorer of the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Coast and while acting as Governor of Missouri Territory died by his own hands near Nashville Tenn. in 1809. Reuben Lewis studied medicine, lived on his part of his father place, and married his cousin Mildred Dabney, and died without children in 1844. Mrs. Lucy Lewis was married the 2nd time to Colonel John Marks and with him removed to Wilkes County Georgia in 1787. On the death of Colonel Marks she returned to Locust Hill where she departed this life in 1836. By her last marriage she had one son John Hastings Marks who died in Baltimore and one daughter Mary who became the wife of William Moore and lived in Georgia. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Miss Fauntleroy

James G. White

Edward Carter,

John Carr,

Benjamin Brown,

Howell Lewis of Mechunk

Clifton Harris,

Ira Harris,

William Lewis son of Robert Lewis

Notes: . You said: William Lewis son of Robert Lewis lived at Locust Hill near Ivy Depot. He was a Lt. in the Revolutionary army. He died in 1780. His wife was Lucy Anderson daughter of Edmund Anderson Meriwether was the famous explorer of the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Coast . . ."

William Lewis married Lucy Meriwether, daughter of Elizabeth Thornton and Thomas Meriwether and sister of Francis Meriwether, the gentleman I mentioned in my post. William and Lucy had a daughter named Jane who married Edmund Anderson. From: GUY M BENSON

Locust Hill

Ivy Depot.

Colonel John Marks

William Moore

 

The second Lewis Family sprang from David Lewis who with his brother in law Joel Terrell in 1734 entered 3,000 acres just west of the University. The next year his brother Abraham Lewis entered 800 acres including the land the University now occupies. These brothers belonged to the Hanover County. Abraham Lewis never lived in Albemarle County but David Lewis at once settled on the hinder part of the present Birdwood farm, so that when the county was organized his residence was a well known place in the County. He was an active Man a Captain in the Militia, one of the early Magistrates, and bore his part in clearing the road and executing other works of public convenience. He died in 1779, at the great age of 94. He married 3 times, his first wife being a sister of Joel Terrell, his 3rd wife Mary McGrath the widow of Dr. Hart of PA. by his first wife he had 8 children and by his 3rd wife 3: William Terrell Lewis, Susan Lewis wife of Alexander Mackey who lived for a time on Ivy Creek near the crossing of Whitehall Road, Hannah Lewis the wife of James Hickman, probably the son of Edwin Hickman second Sheriff of the County. Sarah Lewis the wife of Abraham Musick, who lived in Mechum's Depot Vicinity, where his son Ephraim also lived, and thence emigrated to Ky, David Lewis, John Lewis, Joel Lewis, Ann Lewis the wife of Joel Terrell  Jr. and then to Stephen Willis, Elizabeth Lewis the wife of John Martin. James Lewis and Mariam Lewis the wife of Gabriel Madison. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

David Lewis Hanover County.

Abraham Lewis Hanover County.

Joel Terrell

Mary McGrath

Birdwood farm

James Hickman,

Abraham Musick

Mechum's Depot

Stephen Willis

John Martin

Gabriel Madison.

William Terrell Lewis kept a tavern on the Staunton Road about 3 miles west of Charlottesville, called at First Terrell's and subsequently Lewis's Ordinary. He married Sarah Martin and had 11 children. All the family moved to North Carolina and later he himself went to Nashville where he died in 1802. 3 of his sons Micajah Lewis, Joel Lewis, and James Lewis were in the battle of Kings Mountain, and Micajah Lewis was killed at Guilford Courthouse. A great great Granddaughter Mrs. Patty L. Collins has in these last days been in the dead Letter Office at Washington, where she is held in high repute for her marvelous skills in deciphering bad chirography. David Lewis Jr. was a man of great enterprise and ability. He owned numerous parcels of land in MECHUM'S depot section, and carried on a brisk mercantile business in that vicinity. He also removed to North Carolina just before the Revolution. Though twice married he seems to have left sons, as in the final settlement of his affairs in Albemarle County in 1794, his legatees all bore other names. John Lewis was twice married first to Sarah Taliaferro and 2nd to Susan Clarkson, no doubt a sister of Peter Clarkson. He had 12 children among them was Taliaferro Lewis, a brave soldier of the Revolution, Charles C. Lewis who descendants William T. Lewis a resident of Louisville Miss. compiled a history of the family, Jesse P. Lewis and David Jackson Lewis who was a man commanding presence, measuring 6 feet 4 inches, was  a Soldier in the Whiskey Insurrection of 1794 and active magistrate of the county, and the father of 11 children, he lived North of the Rivanna on the Hydraulic Road, and in 1818 removed to Breckenridge County Ky. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

William Terrell Lewis

Sarah Martin

Sarah Taliaferro

Susan Clarkson,

Peter Clarkson

 

Jesse Pitman Lewis was also a soldier of the Revolution. His wife was Nancy daughter of Manoah Clarkson. His home on the Staunton road, above the University. He died in 1849 and with him the name of Old David Lewis's line in the county passed away as he left only daughters./ These were Jane Lewis the wife  of Nelson Barksdale, Mary Lewis the wife of Julius Clarkson and 2nd to John H. Craven, Elizabeth Lewis the wife of Reuben Maury, Sophia Lewis the wife of MICHAEL JOHNSON and Sarah Lewis the wife of Alexander St. C. Heiskell Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Jesse Pitman Lewis

Manoah Clarkson

Nelson Barksdale,

Julius Clarkson

John H. Craven,

Reuben Maury

Sophia Lewis the wife of MICHAEL JOHNSON

(My Notes Michael Johnson whose he off of? What Lines as Michael Johnson d 1718 on Tuckahoe Creek)

Alexander St. C. Heiskell

James Lewis the son of David Lewis Sr. was in his day a figure of great prominence in the County. He was a gallant soldier in the Revolution a magistrate a contractor a large Land holder the owner and keeper for some years of the Old Stone Tavern in Charlottesville, the agent of President Monroe, and much employed both by the first Courts and his fellow citizens in the appraisement and division of estates. He married Lucy Thomas daughter of John Thomas, by whom he had 11 children. In 1818 he emigrated to FRANKLIN COUNTY Tennessee. In 1836 he returned to visit Albemarle County and married the second time to Mary Marks daughter of Peter Marks and at last finished his course in Tennessee at the age of 93. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Lucy Thomas daughter of John Thomas

Mary Marks daughter of Peter Marks

The head of the 3rd Lewis Family was John Lewis who was one of the earliest settlers in the County. He entered land on Totier Creek in 1741. When the location of the old Courthouse was fixed, he obtained a license to conduct an Ordinary at the place. He seems to have married a daughter of Samuel SHELTON, and had 2 sons and a daughter Jane Lewis who became the wife of Richard Davenport, and removed to Georgia. John Lewis the elder son died in 1801 and left 3 children, Sarah Lewis, John Lewis and Waddy Lewis who died in 1824. And Elizabeth. Owen Lewis the other son died in 1805 and his children were William Lewis, John Lewis and Hardin P. Lewis, Howell Lewis, Robert Lewis, Nicholas Lewis Daniel P. Lewis, Zachariah Lewis and Sarah Lewis who married John Tillman and removed to Tennessee. Most of the sons were considerable land owners in the Southern part of the county, particularly on the lower Hardware River. Some of them also transacted a lucrative business in transporting freight on the James River, and the canal. Hardin P. Lewis emigrated to Alabama. In 1821 Robert Lewis in a quarrel fatally stabbed Thompson Noel a tavern keeper in Scottsville and fled the Country. It is said he went to Memphis Ten. And in course of time acquired a large fortune. A great granddaughter of the first John Lewis was the 1st wife of Christopher Gilmer and a great grandson of Zachariah Lewis recently died in Nelson County Va. (era of 1901) immediately above the mouth of the Rockfish River. A similarity of names suggests a relationship between this Family of Lewis's and the First on mention above. FROM  Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Totier Creek

Samuel SHELTON,

Richard Davenport,

John Tillman

 

Notes: The Shelton families are the kinsman of William Matlock lines of Byrd Creek, they are also married to Patrick Henry and his families

 

By the Will of his Uncle Isham Lewis who died in 1790, Charles L. Thomas became the owner of more than 1800 acres on the North Fork of Hardwar River, where Red Hill Depot now stands. His home was where the family of John B. Townley now resides. Before his death in 1815 he leased the eastern part of the place  to his brother John L. Thomas during the lives of his parents for their support and that of his sisters. His wife was Margaret Lewis the youngest daughter of Nicholas Lewis of the Farm. And his children were Mary Thomas, Walker Thomas the wife of Alexander Clayton, Nicholas L. Thomas, Charles Thomas, Robert Warner Thomas, Frances Elizabeth Thomas the wife of Dr. Charles H. Meriwether, and 2nd to James Hart and John J. The western part of the place was divided among the children who in 1830 and years following sold their portions and emigrated to Montgomery County Tennessee. John L. Thomas passed his life on the place leased to him by his brother. He was appointed a magistrate in 1838 and died unmarried in 1846. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Isham Lewis

brother John L. Thomas

Charles L. Thomas

Margaret Lewis the youngest daughter of Nicholas Lewis

Alexander Clayton,

James Hart

Red Hill Depot

 

Need to Check but Red Hill is where Patrick Henry moved after selling his Plantation on Leatherwood Creek in Henry Co. Va. Land was First in Pittsylvania Co. Va. Patrick Henry was also married to the kinswoman of Martha Dandridge Custis Wasington wife or GEneral george Washington

 

1733 ERA OF

Charles Lynch is said was a native of Ireland. Taking Offense while a mere youth at some ill- treatment he determined to quit home and Country, and with this purpose took passage on a vessel bound for America. As the ship was leaving her moorings he repented the step and leaping in the sea struck out for land. He was however rescued by the sailors from his perilous position and after the usual voyage of those days, safely reached the shore of the New World. Coming to Virginia and exerting the energy and perseverance that belonged to his nature, he soon began a successful career. He commenced entering land with in the present county in 1733, and in the next 17 years had obtained patents for 6,500 acres in different section on hardware and on the Rivanna, on Moore's Creek and on the waters of Mechum's not far from the Blue Ridge. He established his home on the Rivanna, on the Place now known as Pen Park. The ripple in the river at that point was beyond question Lynch's Ferry or Lynch's Ford which is often mentioned in the early records. He was one of the Original magistrates of Albemarle County and had previously been one in Goochland County. He served as Sheriff in 1749 and was a representative of the County in the House of Burgess. His last entry of land was made in 1750, and he embraced 1,600 acres on the James opposite to Lynchburg. To this lands he removed at that time, but did not long survive the change, as he died in 1753. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Charles Lynch wife Sarah Clark was the daughter of Christopher and Penelope Clark. She joined the Friends Church about the time of their removal to Lynch's Ferry on the Rivanna to Lynch's Ferry on the James River. A Quaker meeting house called South River was built in 1754 on her land on Lynch's Creek a branch of the Blackwater, 3 or 4 miles south of Lynchburg. Her children were Charles Lynch, John Lynch, Christopher Lynch and Sarah Lynch the wife of Micajah Terrell. John Lynch was the founder of Lynchburg. Charles Lynch was the clerk of South River Meeting till the beginning of the Political ferment prior to the Revolution, when the warmth of his patriotism surmounted the pacific principles he had espoused and he became a Colonel in the Revolutionary Army. His busy promptitude in dealing with outlaws and violent Tories during those disturbed time gave rise to Lynch Law. Mrs. Lynch was married the 2nd time to John Ward of Bedford. Besides the imprints of this family in Lynchburg, they left their memorial in the names of this County. Lynch's River and Lynch's Creek a tributary to the Rockfish River. FROM  Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Charles Lynch

Moore's Creek

Lynch's Ferry

Lynch's Ford

Sarah Clark

daughter of Christopher Clark

Penelope Clark

Notes Penelope Johnson Clark is the daughter of Edward Johnson of Powhite Swamp in St. Peters Parish of 1680 era to abt. 1704 St. Peter's Parish Records.

Micajah Terrell.

John Ward of Bedford

Notes Penelope Johnson Clark is the daughter of Edward Johnson of Powhite Swamp in St. Peters Parish of 1680 era to abt. 1704 St. Peter's Parish Records.

 

1733 June 20: John Bolling.Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 250 acres on the north side of Fluvanna River above Rockfish River beginning at Samuel Spencer’s corner. Source: Land Office Patents No. 15, 1732-1735 (v.1 & 2 p.1-522), p. 29 (Reel 13).

John Bolling.

Need to Check on this but Bollings are related to the Cocke families of Colonial Virginia.

Samuel Spencer

1734 ERA of

Presbyterians  were settled into the county while it was yet Part of Goochland County. The Colony of Scotch Irish who came over the Blue Ridge in 1734 under the auspices of Michael Woods, brought with them the faith of their fathers. Among these were the families of Wallace, Kinkead, Stockton, McCord, and Jameson. Further to the south along the bases of the Ridge were the Morrison’s, McCues, Montgomery's, Reids and Robertson's. These last were the Founders of Rockfish Church located in the forks of Rockfish River. About 1746 James McCann, who had patented the land in 1745, conveyed to John Reid, James Robertson and Samuel Bell on acres 35 poles, for the Rockfish Church and for a school for the inhabitants of that vicinity. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Michael Woods

James McCann,

John Reid,

James Robertson

Then which family of Robertson is James Robertson above?

Samuel Bell

Among the families first mentioned 2 churches were established, the first was Mountain Plains, which was built near the confluence of LICKING HOLE CREEK and  MECHUMS  RIVER and called after Michael Woods's Plantation and which still exists as a BAPTIST CHURCH. The second was the D.S. Church which was situated upon the southwest face of the hill on the summit of which was S.W. Cailbeck recently resided. These communities and other in Virginia and North Carolina received  the visits of several Presbyterian ministers in early days, beginning with that of Reverend James Anderson in 1738. IN 1745 John Woods was sent to the Presbytery of Donegal in Pennsylvania to persecute a call for the services of Reverend John Hindman in the churches of Rockfish and Mountain Plains, but his errand seems to have been unsuccessful. Mr. Hindman was no doubt the same man who became an Episcopalian, and was the first rector of Augusta Parish, dying there a year of 2 after entering the office. A call is still extant dated March 1747 and signed by 57 persons who solicited the labors of reverend Samuel Black in the church of Mountain Plains and among the inhabitants of Ivy Creek. The place of Worship for the people last mentioned was the D.S. Church, which was probably erected shortly after Reverend Black accepted the call. He was the first Presbyterian Preacher who settled in the county. In 1751 he purchased from Richard Stockton four hundred acres on both side's of Stockton's Creek and there he resided until his death in 1770/ Descendants hearing his name still live on a part of the Old place. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

LICKING HOLE CREEK

MY NOTES: SO LICKINGHOLE CREEK at or near Where MICHAEL WOOD’S LIVED. THESE LANDS CAME INTO ALBEMARLE COUNTY WHEN IT WAS FIRST FORMED. WHERE DID THIS LAND GO TO DID IT STAY IN ALBEMARLE COUNTY?

Also of Note the Lickinghole Creek Church was a Baptist Church?

MECHUMS  RIVER

Reverend James Anderson

John Woods

Reverend John Hindman

Reverend Samuel Black

Ivy Creek.

Stockton's Creek

Richard Stockton

The first Woods who settled in Albemarle County was Michael Woods who was born in Northern Ireland in 1684 and with his wife Mary Campbell and most of his children came to this country sometime in the era of 1720. Landing on the banks of the Delaware, he spent some years in Lancaster County PA, thence ascended to the Valley of Virginia and crossed the Blue Ridge by Woods Gap in 1734. In 1737 he entered more the 1300 acres on Mechum's River and Lickinghole Creek, and on the same day purchased 2,000 acres patented two years before by CHARLES HUDSON and situated on the head waters of Ivy Creek. It is believed he was the first settler in Western Albemarle County and perhaps anywhere along the east foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia. His home was near the mouth of Woods Gap. He died in 1762 and was interred in the family burying found about a hundred yards from the dwelling. His tombstone was standing just after the Civil War, when it was broken to pieces and disappeared, but a fragment discovered a few years ago indicated the year of his birth. His will is on record in which are mentioned 3 sons and 3 daughters. Archibald Woods, John Woods, William Woods, Sarah Woods the wife of Joseph Lapsley of Rockbridge, Hannah Woods the wife of William Wallace, and Margaret Woods the wife of Andrew Wallace. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Mary Campbell

Andrew Wallace

Michael Woods

Notes on Michael Woods and his lands on Lickinghole Creek and it goes from Goochland Co to Albemarle Co.

CHARLES HUDSON

Again who is this Charles Hudson who owned lands that were on Lickinghole Creek?

Michael Woods

1737 June 10: Michael Woods: State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Wood. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on the heads of Ivy Creek on other branches of the North River on the south side of the North River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p. 350 (Reel 15).

1737 June 10: Michael Woods. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Wood. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 187 acres on both sides of Mechams River and Beaver Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p. 352 (Reel 15).

1737 June 10: Michael Woods Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Wood. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on both sides of Lickinghole Creek a branch of Mechams River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p. 344 (Reel 15).

1737 June 10:  Michael Woods: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Wood. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 350 acres on both sides of Mechams River adjoining William Wallace &c. Source: Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p. 351 (Reel 15).

1755 Sept 10: Michael Woods Jr. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Wood. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 300 acres on the branches of Ivy Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 31, 1751-1756 (v.1 & 2 p.1-751), p. 695 (Reel 29).

1756 Aug 16: William Wallis: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Wallace. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 300 acres on the branches of Meechums River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 33, 1756-1761 (v.1, 2, 3 & 4 p.1-1095), p. 293 (Reel 31-32).

1762 Michael Woods: Gen. note Part of index to Albemarle County Wills and Administrations (1748-1800) Note pp. 129-130. Will pro. 11 June 1762. p. 132. Inv. & appr. rec. 8 July 1762. Note Will Book 2, 1752-1785 (Reel 34)

1764 June 27: James Hamilton: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Hambleton, Hamlenton, Hammilton. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 400 acres on both sides of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 35, 1762-1764 (v.1 & 2 p.1-556), p. 502 (Reel 35).

1767 Sept 10: Thomas Walker. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 212 acres on the branches of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 37, 1767-1768, p. 227 (Reel 37).

1777 Michael Woods: Gen. note Part of index to Botetourt County Wills and Administrations (1770 - 1800) Note p. 73-74. Inv. & Appr. rec. 14. May 1777. Note Will Book A, 1770-1801 (Reel 20)

1785 Dec 2: Michael Wallace: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Related See also the following surname(s): Wallis. Note Location: Albemarle County. Grantee(s): Wallace, Michael and Wallace, Josiah. Description: 208 acres on both sides of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Grants X, 1785, p. 534 (Reel 64).

1798 Sept 13: William Page: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 84 acres on both sides of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 40, 1797-1798, p. 448 (Reel 106).

1799 Feb 21: John Blair: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 100 acres on the side and at the foot of the Blue Ridge on the waters of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 42, 1798-1799, p. 213 (Reel 108).

1801 May 29: Ephraim Music: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 57 1/2 acres on the waters of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 49, 1802, p. 188 (Reel 115).

1806 May 14: Peter Belew: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 44 1/2 acres on the south side of the Blue Ridge, on the waters of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 55, 1805-1806, p. 427 (Reel 121).

1806 May 31: William Woods: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Related See also the following surname(s): Wood. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 16 acres on the head waters of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 55, 1805-1806, p. 493 (Reel 121).

1810 Dec 17: James Henderson: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 145 acres on the waters of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 61, 1810-1811, p. 395 (Reel 127).

1816 Dec 30: Garlandl Maury: Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 47 acres on the waters of Lickinghole Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 66, 1816-1817, p. 233 (Reel 132).

Archibald Woods,

John Woods,

William Woods,

Sarah Woods the wife of Joseph Lapsley of Rockbridge,

Hannah Woods the wife of William Wallace,

Margaret Woods the wife of Andrew Wallace

 

Archibald Woods, whose wife's name was Isabell, was one of his father's executor's and in 1767 joined with John Woods, his co executor, in conveying nearly 700 acres of Land on Ivy Creek to Reverend James Maury. In 1771 he purchased land on Catawba Creek in Botetourt County, now Roanoke County, and removed thither about that time. He died in 1783, his children were James Woods, who removed to Fayette County KY, John Woods, Archibald Woods, Andrew Woods, and Joseph Woods, and Joseph Woods died in Roanoke County in 1840, devising half his property to the Presbytery of Montgomery. The descendants of John Woods are still citizens of that County, his grandson John W. Woods, being the present Judge of Roanoke City and James P. Woods its present Mayor. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Reverend James Maury

Catawba Creek

 

John Woods lived on the Mechums River, not far above the Depot of that name. In 1745 he was sent as a Commissioner to prosecute before the Presbytery of Donegal in PA, a call which the churches of Rockfish and Mountain Plains had given to Reverend John Hindman. He is the only one of the Original family, the dates of whose life are certainly known. He was born Feb 19th, 1712 and died Oct. 14th 1791. He married Susanna Anderson daughter of Reverend James Anderson whom he knew as a child in PA, and whom years later he returned to woo as his wife. His Children were Michael Woods, James Woods, Susan Woods, Mary Woods, Luta Woods, and Ann Woods. Michael Woods lived on his father’s farm on Mechum's River till about 1801, when he removed to a Farm in NELSON County on the South Fork of the Rockfish River, recently occupied by Charles Harris (1901 era). His wife was Esther Carothers of Rockbridge and his children were William M. Woods, Mary Woods the wife of Hugh Barclay, Susan Woods the wife of Nathaniel Massie, John Woods, James Woods, and Samuel Woods. William M. Woods was twice married first to Louisa Dabney daughter of William S. Dabney Sr. and secondly to Martha Scott daughter of Charles A. Scott. He left 8 children who removed to Mississippi. His brothers John Woods, James Woods, and Samuel Woods who married Sarah Rodes daughter of John Rodes, emigrated to Marion County Missouri. James Woods (1748-1823) was an Officer in the revolutionary army, he married Mary Garland daughter of James Garland of North Garden and removed to Garrand County KY, where he had a family of 12 children. Susan Woods became the wife of Daniel Miller who removed to KY and from whom descended General John Miller, who fell on the Federal Side, Mary Woods was the wife of John Reid, Luta Woods the wife of Samuel Reid, and Ann Woods the wife of James Reid and afterwards the 2nd wife of her cousin William Woods. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Susanna Anderson daughter of Reverend James Anderson

Esther Carothers of Rockbridge

Mary Woods the wife of Hugh Barclay

Susan Woods the wife of Nathaniel Massie

Louisa Dabney daughter of William S. Dabney Sr

Martha Scott daughter of Charles A. Scott

Sarah Rodes daughter of John Rodes,

Mary Garland daughter of James Garland

Susan Woods wife of Daniel Miller

Mary Woods was the wife of John Reid

Luta Woods the wife of Samuel Reid

Ann Woods the wife of James Reid

 

William Woods no doubt the oldest of the family born in 1706 succeeded his father at Mountain Plains, the old homestead. He seems to have been unfortunate in his business affairs. Twice he mortgaged his property first to Thomas Walker, and then to a number of Valley men among whom were his brother- in- law John Bowyer, and his nephew Samuel McDowell. At length in 1774 he made sale of it to Thomas Adams of Augusta County. At that time he was living in Fincastle County. His wife was Susanna Wallace a sister of his brother in Law William Wallace, and his children were Adam Woods, Michael Woods, Peter Woods, John Woods, Andrew Woods, Archibald Woods, William Woods, Sarah Woods the wife of a Mr. Shirkey, Susan Woods and Mary Woods the wife of George Davidson. All the children except William Woods migrated to Missouri. Adam Woods, Peter Woods, and Andrew Woods, became Baptist preachers. Archibald Woods is mentioned in Henning’s Statues as a trustee of the towns of Boonesboro and Milford KY and in that State he died in 1838 at the age of 89. William Woods remained in Albemarle County, he lived on Beaver Creek about a mile north of Crozet, an this account as there were two other William Woods’s contemporances, he was commonly known as Beaver Creek Billy (Woods). In many respects he was a remarkable man, in his spheres somewhat of a born ruler, of fine sense and great decision. Many amusing stories have been told on his management of men and things, particularly of his fostering care over Mountain Plains Church. He died in 1836, 92 years of age. He was married 3 times, first to his Cousin Sarah Wallace, next to his cousin Ann Reid, and 3rd to Mrs. Nancy Richardson. He had one son William Woods who married Mary Jarman and died in 1829. Their Children were James who lived on Beaver Creek who married Ann Jones of Bedford and died in 1868, William who lived near Crozet married Nancy Jones, the daughter of John Jones, and died in 1850, Peter A. who was a merchant in Charlottesville and Richmond, and Married Twymonia Wayt and afterwards Mrs. Mary Poage Bourland of Augusta County, and died in 1870. Thomas D. who married Miss Hagan lived near Pedlar Mills in Amherst County and died in 1894 and Sarah J. was the wife of Jesse P. Key. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Thomas Walker

brother- in- law John Bowyer,

nephew Samuel McDowell.

Thomas Adams of Augusta County- Fincastle County

Susanna Wallace a sister of his brother in Law William Wallace

Mary Woods the wife of George Davidson

Beaver Creek

Mrs. Nancy Richardson

Ann Jones of Bedford

Nancy Jones, the daughter of John Jones

Twymonia Wayt

Mrs. Mary Poage Bourland of Augusta County

Miss Hagan

 

According to credible evidence Michael Woods and his wife Mary Campbell had two sons and two daughters in addition to those just mentioned, Michael Woods, Andrew Woods, Magdalen Woods, and Martha Woods. Michael Woods lived southwest of Ivy depot till 1773, when with his wife Anne he removed to a plantation in Botetourt, on the south side of James River a few miles below Buchanan. He died in 1777, leaving eleven children, among who were Samuel Woods, from who descended Rev. Neander M. Woods of Memphis and reverend William H. Woods of Baltimore and William Woods, William Woods remained in Albemarle County and became a Baptist Minister, on which account he was known as Baptist Billy. His home was also southwest of Ivy. He represented the county in the House of Delegates in 1799 and in 1801 removed to Livingston County Kentucky where he died in 1819. His wife Joanana Shepard daughter of  Christopher Shepard and his children Micajah Woods, David Woods, Mary Woods, John Woods, and Susan Woods the wife of Henry Williams. Micajah Woods resided in Albemarle County was appointed a magistrate in 1816, served as Sheriff in 1836, and while filling that office died at his country seat near Ivy in 1837. Micajah Woods was married twice first to Lucy walker, and then secondly to Sarah Rodes the daughter of John Rodes, and widow of William Davenport. Micajah Woods’s children by his first wife were Martha Woods the wife of John Wilson, Mary Woods who died young, and by the William S. Woods who died unmarried and Dr. John R. Woods still pleasantly remembered in the Community. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Joanana Shepard daughter of  Christopher Shepard

Susan Woods the wife of Henry Williams

Lucy walker

Sarah Rodes the daughter of John Rodes, and widow of William Davenport

Martha Woods the wife of John Wilson,

 

Andrew Woods lived at the foot of the Blue Ridge near Greenwood Depot a few hundred yards south of the brick mansion, long the home of Michael Wallace's family. He owned nearly 500 acres  in that vicinity and nearly 900 at the foot of Armor's Mountain. He sold his property in 1765 and removed to Botetourt County. He was one of the first magistrates of that County and was appointe3d Sheriff in 1777. His home was about 9 miles south of Buchanan, not far from the Mill Creek Church. He died in 1781.His wife was Martha Poage the daughter of Robert Poage of Augusta County and his children  were James Woods who lived and died in Montgomery County on the North Fork of Roanoke, and whose descendants removed to Nashville Tenn. Robert Woods, Andrew Woods, Archibald Woods who all removed to the vicinity of Wheeling in Ohio County, Elizabeth Woods married David Cloyd of Rockbridge, Elizabeth Woods married David Cloyd of Rockbridge  Mary Woods the wife of James Poage, who removed to Mason County Ky, and then on to Ripley Ohio, and Martha Woods married the wife of  Henry walker of Botetourt County, Archibald Woods married his cousin Ann Poage daughter of Thomas Poage of Augusta County represented Ohio County in the House of Delegates and the Constitutional Convention of 1788, and when he died in 1846 he had been for many years the senior magistrate of that County. The writer of these notes is his grandson: Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Greenwood Depot

Michael Wallace

Armor's Mountain

Martha Poage the daughter of Robert Poage of Augusta County

Elizabeth Woods married David Cloyd of Rockbridge

 

Is there any relationship to Joseph Cloyd a founding farther of Rogersville in Hawksin Co. Tn who with Hudson Johnson layed out the town

 

Elizabeth Woods married David Cloyd of Rockbridge

Martha Woods married the wife of Henry Walker of Botetourt County

Ann Poage daughter of Thomas Poage of Augusta County

1735 Josias Clapham: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on both sides of Rockfish River North Branch near the Blue Mountain,. Source: Land Office Patents No. 15, 1732-1735 (v.1 & 2 p.1-522), p. 454 (Reel 13).

1735 Jan 10: Josias Clapham: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on both sides of Rock Fish River North Branch near the Blue Mountain. Source: Land Office Patents No. 16, 1735, p. 436 (Reel 14).

Josias Clapham

1735 Jan 10: Thomas Meriwether: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Merewether, Meriwether. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on both sides of Rock Fish River north branch near the Blue Mountains. Source: Land Office Patents No. 16, 1735, p. 506 (Reel 14).

Thomas Meriwether

1735 Jan 10: Allen Howard: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on the north side of Rockfish River adjoining his own land. Source: Land Office Patents No. 16, 1735, p. 439 (Reel 14).

Allen Howard:

1735 March 15: James Holeman: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Holman. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on both sides of Rockfish River and Green Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p. 31 (Reel 15).

1735 March 15: James Holman: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Holeman. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 336 acres on Rock Fish River adjoining his own land. Source: Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p. 24 (Reel 15).

James Holeman

The Richard Woods or Dick Woods Road as it is frequently called is one of the oldest in the county. It diverged from the Three Notched Road just west of the  D.S. passed Richard Woods place at the mouth or Taylor's Gap to the little stream called pounding Branch, crosses at the mouth of Taylor's Gap to the Little stream called pounding branch crossed Mechum's River at the Miller School and continued thence to Rockfish Gap. The place Pounding Branch went in early times by the name of Little D.S. A tan yard was located there which at first was named Simpson's and afterwards Grayson's. Near the point the road turned off described in old deeds as the road to Amherst Court house. The same that still exists running through Batesville and passing the Nelson County Line at what was formerly known as Harlow's Tavern on Lynch's Creek. Tradition related that Richard Woods in laying out the road called by his name followed a well marked buffalo trail, and the fact of its being established by some sagacious engineers of nature account for the gentle grade for which it has been distinguished. It seems that the road through Israel's Gap was not made till near the end of the last Century. At that time William Woods surveyor Billy, was summoned by the County Court to show cause why he had not opened a road from Israel's Gap into Richard Woods road. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Richard Woods

Dick Woods Road

Israel's Gap

 

The Buck Mountain Road was made in primitive times This name was applied to the series of roads which start From Rockfish Gap, bend along the base to the Ridge and Bucks Elbow to Whitehall, pass over Mormon’s River at Millington to Free Union and Earlysville cross the North Fork of the Rivanna at Burnt Mills, and enter the Barboursville Road at Stony point. It still follows the route on which it was originally laid out except slight deviations for short distances to  avoid some obstacle or gain easier grade. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Buck Mountain Road

Rockfish Gap,

Bucks Elbow

Mormon’s River

1737 Feb 9: Edwin Hickman: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Hichman, Hitchman. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on a branch of Rockfish River near the Blue Mountains. Source: Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p. 511 (Reel 15).

1737 Feb 9: Edwin Hickman: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Hichman, Hitchman. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on a branch of Rockfish River near the Blue Mountains. Source: Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p. 514 (Reel 15).

Edwin Hickman or Edwin Hichman, Edwin Hitchman

1738 June 16: James Hendricks: State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on the branches of Rockfish River near Blue Mountains. Source: Land Office Patents No. 17, 1735-1738, p. 531 (Reel 15).

James Hendricks

 

1738 Sept. 12 William Mayo: Goochland Co: 400 acres on the branches of Rockfish River near the Blue Mountains: Land Office Patents # 18: 1738-1739 pg 109 on reel 16

 

William Mayo:

 

Albemarle County History Pg 269: The Mayo's have had a place in Albemarle Co. from the beginning. Colonel William Mayo, the county surveyor of Goochland Co. obtained a patent for 800 acres on the branches of Rockfish River near the Blue Mountains in 1738. The patent of Dr. William Cabell for 4800 acres on both sides of the Fluvanna River obtained the same year adjoined this entry of Mayo. Among the first deeds recorded in Albemarle is one from Ann Mayo conveying this land to Robert Barnett in 1748.

 

Notes These are the Mayo lines that will come into Humphreys Co. Tn. Sarah Mayo will go to Saylors Creek of Amelia Co as the wife of a Mr. Scott.

 

Research Notes: 1724-25 Joseph Scott of New Kent Co. was granted 400 acres on Licking Hole Creek in Henrico CO., his brother Edward Scott received a grant for licking hole creek the same Day.

 

Research Notes; Joseph Scott married Sarah Mayo in Goochland Co. Dec 8 1734 her father was Major William Mayo who gave them 1.600 acres in 1739 in Amelia Co. Va. Sarah Mayo after his death married Robert Jones in Amelia Co

 

Note Joseph Scott was a Burgess and a Lawyer/Attorney

 

Research Notes: 1730 Sept 28: Goochland Co.: William Mayo 9350 Acres on the Southside of James River extending from the Upper Manacan Creek to Deep Creek: Land Office Patents # 14: 1728-1732 prt 1 & 2: pg 138 on reel 11: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Research Notes: 1723 Sept 5: Henrico Co: Joseph Mayo 300 acres on the south side of James River: Beh.and c. parting said Mayo and Joseph Hooper: Land Office Patents # 11 1719-1724 pg 238 on reel 10: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Research Notes: 1731 June 26: Joseph Mayo: Goochland Co: 400 acres above Willis River ( aka Willis's Creek) on the Southside of James River: Land Office Patents # 14 1728-1732 part 1 & 2 pg 175 on reel 11: Library of Virginia Archives Section.

 

Research notes: 1731 Aug 25: William Mayo: Goochland Co: 2850 acres on both sides of Willis River aka williss Creek on the South side of James River: Land Office Patents # 14 1728-1732 part 1 & 2, on pg 274 on reel 11: Library of Virginia Archives Section.

 

Research Notes: 1734 Aug 20: William Mayo: Goochland Co: 3000 acres on both side of Deep Creek on the South side of James River: Land Office Patents # 15 1732-1735 vol. 1 & 2 pg 284 on reel 13: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Research Notes: 1736 May 18: Historical Roadways of Virginia O.S. pg 53: Goochland Co.: Grand Jury Sworn: Against overseer of the road from the River Road down to Sarah Johnson's against the road from Major Mayo's to the Ridge Road against the overseer of the road from Dover Fferry to the main road on the North side of the river. Against Mr. Scott for not keeping Jones's Creek Bridge in repair.

 

Notes: 1730  Sept 28: Goochland Co: William Mayo: 9350 acres on the South side of James River extending from the Upper Manacan Creek to Deep Creek: Land Office Patents # 14: 1728-1732 pt 1 & 2 pg 138 on reel 11: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Notes: 1734 Feb 27: Prince George Co: William Mayo: 6778 acres on the Upper Side of Flatt Creek between the lines of Bolling, Pride, Morton, Stephens: Land Office Patents # 15, 1732-1735 vol 1 & 2 pg 452 on reel 13: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Notes: 1734 Aug 20: Goochland Co; William Mayo: 3000 acres on both side of Deep Creek on the South Side of James River: Land Office Patents # 15, 1732-1735 vol 1 & 2, pg 284 on reel 13: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Notes :1738 Sept 12: William Mayo: Goochland Co: 400 acres on the branches of River near Blue Mountains ; Land Office Patents # 18 1738-1739 pg 113 on reel 16

 

Research Notes: 1738 Sept 12: William Cabbell: Goochland Co.: 4800 acres on both sides of Fluvanna River including an island in said river adjoining Willam Mayo: Land Patents # 18 1738-1739 pg 134 on reel 16: Library of Virginia Archives Section;

 

Research Notes: 1739 March 26: William Mayo: Goochland Co: 400 acres adjacent to the North side of Fluvanna River beginning above the mouth of Gilberts Creek: Land Office Patents # 18 1738-1739 pg 214 on reel 16: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Research Notes: 1740 Aug 20: William Mayo: Goochland Co: 4740 acres on both sides of Willis River: Land Office Patents # 19, 1739-1741 pg 708 on reel 17: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Research Notes: This is one of mine and Peg's Great Grandfather's off our Mayo Lines which line come into Dickson and Humphreys Co. TN

 

What is Interesting is Sarah Mayo Scott will go into Amelia County with her husband, this is the same travel pattern of the children of Benjamin Johnson and Lucrettia Massey’s children will follow, One Gideon Johnson and brothers will go to lands on Saylors Creek owned by the Michael Holland of Henrico and St. Peter’s Parish.

 

Notes: 1741 Jan 30: Col. William Mayo: Goochland Co. 350 acres on both sides of Fluvanna River including Slaughters Island: Land Office Patents # 20 1741-1743 vol. 1& 2 pg 95 on reel 18: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Notes: 1741 Feb 30: Col. William Mayo: Goochland Co. 350 acres on both sides of Fluvanna River above Buffalo Island. Land Office Patents # 20, 1741-1743 vol. 1 & 2 pg 94 on reel 18: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Notes: 1744 March: William Randolph and George Carrington : Goochland Co: "Church Wardens of Parish of Southam" : 340 acres on the southside of James River adjoining William Mayo, William Randolph Esquire.

 

Notes: 1745 Sept 20: Goochland Co: Joseph Mayo: 100 acres on the south side of Fluvanna River adjoining Wm. Mayo: land Office Patents # 24: 1745-1746 pg 46 on reel 22: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Notes: 1745 Sept 20: Goochland Co: Joseph Mayo 1450 acres on both sides of Fluvanna River above Buffalo Island: Land Office Patents # 24 1745-1746 pg 48 on reel 22: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

The Mayo's have had a name and place in Albemarle County from the Beginning. Colonel William Mayo the County Surveyor of Goochland County obtained a patent for 800 acres on the Branches of Rockfish River near the Blue Mountains in 1738. The Patents of Dr. William Cabell for 4,800 acres on both sides of the Fluvanna River obtained the same year adjoined this entry of Mayo. Among the first deeds recorded in Albemarle County, is one from Ann Mayo, conveying this land to Robert Burnett in 1748. In 1749 Philip Mayo of Henrico County entered 400 acres on the branches of Hardware River, situated in the Limestock belt and long known as Limestone Survey/ In 1752 he sold this land to Peter Jefferson, Joshua Dry, Arthur Hopkins, Thomas Meriwether, Daniel Scott and William Stith, President of William and Mary College. It is presumed that in making this purchase these gentleman had in mind some project for Utilizing the mineral it contained. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

James Mayo died in 1777 leaving 11 sons and 2 daughters. The most of them no doubt lived in Goochland County. One of them, Thomas Mayo who belonged to that County bought in 1779 from Thomas Collins 400 acres on Edge Creek the small branch of Moore’s Creek that runs on the east side of the Teel Place. Four years later Thomas Mayo sold part of his tract to his brother Richard George Mayo. If Richard George Mayo ever lived on it, he removed elsewhere, as in 1809 his brother Joseph Mayo, as his attorney sold it to another brother James Mayo. James Mayo died in 1821, in his 83 year. His was Mary Hughes daughter of Stephen Hughes and his Children John W. Mayo, Stephen Mayo, Claudius Mayo, James E. Mayo, Catherine Mayo the wife of William Thompson, and Nancy Mayo the wife of John Harris. FROM  Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Colonel William Mayo

Notes: 1788 July 4, '88.  Wm. Hatcher to Jane L. Mayo; sec., Robert Mayo.

MARRIAGE BONDS IN GOOCHLAND COUNTY William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 8, No. 2. (Oct., 1899), pp. 91-96: My Lines coming into Humphreys Co. Tn

Dr. William Cabell

Robert Burnett

Philip Mayo of Henrico County

Limestock belt or Limestone Survey

Peter Jefferson,

Joshua Dry,

Arthur Hopkins,

Thomas Meriwether,

Daniel Scott

William Stith

 

In the latter part of the last century Robert Rives who married Margaret Cabell, daughter of Colonel William Cabell, transacted an extensive business at Warminster, Nelson County Va. in the enterprising spirit which inspired his undertakings. He journalists. Beside his editorial labors on the Richmond Examiner, Edward Rives published a number of works, and died in Lynchburg in 1772. On account of an article which appeared in the Southern Opinion, of which he was one of the editors Henry was shot by James Grant in Richmond in November 1868 and his remains were brought for interment in the family burial ground in Albemarle County. FROM  Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Robert Rives

Edward Rives

 

 

Albemarle County History: Pgs 304,305 & 306 In the latter part of the last century Robert Rives, who married Margaret Cabell daughter of Colonel William Cabell, transacted an extensive business at Warminster, Nelson County in the enterprising spirit which inspired his undertakings, he established a branch house in Milton, soon after the founding of that town, under the firm of Brown, Rives & co. The partners were James Brown, of Richmond, Robert Rives and Robert Burton. Robert Rives also became the owner of large and valuable tracts of land in Albemarle Co. For the Bolling Spring Plantation, which he bought from John Patterson of Baltimore in 1818 he gave 60,000 dollars the largest sum perhaps ever paid for any farm in this region. His sons William C. Rives, George Rives, Henry Rives, Robert Rives, and Alexander Rives all resided in Albemarle Co.

 William C. Rives in 1819 married Judith Walker daughter of Francis Walker who inherited Castle Hill as her portion of their father's estate. About the same time he became a member of the Albemarle Co. bar. His carrier in public is a matter of history. He did service in the legislature, in The United States Senate and as a minister to France. He was regarded as one of the most finished orators of his day. After his retirement he was occupied in writing a history of the Life and Times of James Madison. He died in 1868.

 George Rives married Mary Eliza Carter daughter of Robert Carter. His home was at Sherwood on the north side of the Hardware, below Carter's bridge. He married a second time to Maria Tucker daughter of Professor George Tucker and died in 1874.

 Henry Rives received from his father a plantation on Green Mountain in 1827.

 Robert Rives married Elizabeth Pennill and resided at the old Nicholas place near Warren. He died in 1867

 Alexander Rives was admitted to the bar in 1829 and made his home for many years at Charleston which he purchased in 1833 from the trustees of Charles L. Bankhead. He was a member of both houses of the Legislature, and of Congress and soon after the war was appointed Judge of the United States Court for the western District of Virginia. He was twice married first to Isabel Wydown and next to Sarah Watson of Louisa Co. and died in 1885.

 Paulina Rives a daughter of Robert Rives was the wife of Richard Pollard who lived in the southern part of the county. Their Children were Margaret Pollard the wife of James P. Henderson, Virginia Pollard, Rosalie Pollard, James R. Pollard, Lucy Pollard, Richard Pollard, Edward A. Pollard and Henry Rives Pollard. Edward and Henry were both journalists, his editorial labors on the Richmond Examiner. Edward Pollard published a number of works, and died in Lynchburg. On account of an article which appeared in Southern Opinions, of which he was one of the editors Henry was shot by James grant in Richmond on Nov. 1868 and his remains were brought for internment in the family burying ground in Albemarle Co.

 

James Brown, of Richmond,

Robert Rives

What is the connected of the Rives family of George Rives “The trader in 1660 colonial Virginia. As the Rives are the Reaves and Reeves families: Charlotte Rives of Reverend George Reeves married to General James Randolph Robertson and Reeves are connected to the Turner Families of Humphreys Co. Tn.

Robert Burton

Castle Hill

Judith Walker daughter of Francis Walker

Mary Eliza Carter daughter of Robert Carter.

Maria Tucker daughter of Professor George Tucker

Isabel Wydown

Sarah Watson of Louisa Co

Paulina Rives wife of Richard Pollard

 

 

 

Era of 1738

Reference has been made to the entry of bodies of land extending over a wide area. It may be further stated that Major Thomas Carr patented altogether upwards of 5,000 acres, George Webb of Charles City in 1737 upwards of 7,000 near a mountain north of Earlysville still called by his name. Secretary John Carter in 1738 10,000 acre with the present limits of Amherst County. John Chiswell in 1739 nearly 30,000 on Rockfish River mainly with in the present bounds of Nelson County. William Robertson in 1739 more than 6,000 on Naked and Buck Creeks. Robert Lewis in 1740 more than 6,000 acres on Ivy Creek. Ambrose Joshua Smith in 1741 more than 4,000 on Priddy's Creek. Samuel Garlick of Caroline in 1741 and in 1746 3,600 acres on Buck Mountain Creek. Reverend Robert Rose in 1744 and 1746, 36,000 acres with in the present Counties of Amherst and Nelson. Reverend William Stith, President of William and Mary College from 1740 to 1755 nearly 3,000 acres. Dr. Arthur Hopkins in 1743 and 1765 nearly 4,000 acres on Totier and Ballenger's Creeks. Allen Howard in 1742 more than 2,000 acres on the lower waters of Rockfish.

FROM PAGE 7 of Albemarle County History by Reverend Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Major Thomas Carr

George Webb of Charles City

John Chiswell

Notes is this John Chiswell who is married to a sister of John Robinson, is he a relative of the Chiswell families by Col. Richard Johnson in 1680 era whose lands go into Spotsylvania County by William Johnson

John Chiswell is married to a RANDOLPH daughter of William Randolph

William Robertson

Naked Creek

Buck Creek

Ambrose Joshua Smith

Priddy's Creek

Samuel Garlick of Caroline

Buck Mountain Creek

Reverend Robert Rose

Reverend William Stith,

Dr. Arthur Hopkins

Totier Creek

Ballenger's Creeks

Allen Howard

 

 

 

William Randolph, son of William Randolph and Mary Isham, was born November 1681. He married Elizabeth Peyton Beverley (1 Jan. 1691/2 - 26 Dec. 1723), daughter of Peter Beverley and Elizabeth Peyton, 22 June 1709.William Randolph, a member of the Colonial Council of State (1728-42), an Henrico County clerk sheriff, and treasurer of the colony, took the oath of militia colonel May 1740. William died 19 October 1742, age 61, leaving a will in Goochland County naming four children and son-in-law John Chiswell (will dated 17 Oct. 1742, recorded 16 Nov. 1742).
Children of William and Elizabeth (Beverley) Randolph 3› Beverley Randolph [RA.1.1] (c.1706-1750) married Elizabeth Lightfoot, daughter of Francis Lightfoot, in December 1737, leaving no children. He represented the College of William and Mary in the Virginia House of Burgesses (1742-49). His will provided for his wife, Elizabeth, and mentioned brothers Peter and William Randolph (will dated 22 Sept. 1750, & recorded Dec. 1750). 3› Peter Randolph [RA.1.2] (c.1712- 8 July 1767) married Lucy Bolling 20 July 1738. See their family

 

William Randolph, son of William Randolph and Mary Isham

 

The Randolph’s are the families of President Thomas Jefferson and Sir William Randolph of Tuckahoe Creek.

Elizabeth Peyton Beverley

Elizabeth Lightfoot, daughter of Francis Lightfoot,

Peter Randolph

William Randolph

Lucy Bolling

 

Era of 1741

During the next three years a number of Ordinaries were licensed Gile Alegre to keep one on the Mechunk. Daniel Scott and John Lewis each, one at the Courthouse. William Battersby opposite the Courthouse. John Anthony in the Glendower Section. James Fenley, Isaac Bates and Gideon Marr in Buckingham. William Morrison in the Rockfish Valley. Charles Bond on Briery Creek a branch of the Lower Hardware River. Joseph Thompson in the vicinity of Palmyra. Hugh McGarrough not far from Afton and John Hays probably in the Same Neighborhood. William Cabell at his ferry at Warminster. Daniel Scott was licensed to establish a ferry from the Courthouse landing to the opposite side of the river. William Battersby one from his lands to the mouth of the Totier Creek on Daniels Scott's land.

From Page 10 of Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Gile Alegre

Mechunk

Daniel Scott

John Lewis

William Battersby

John Anthony

Glendower Section.

James Fenley,

 Isaac Bates a

Gideon Marr in Buckingham

William Morrison

Charles Bond on Briery Creek

Joseph Thompson

Palmyra.

Hugh McGarrough

John Hays

William Cabell

 

The Cabells are related to the William Hatcher Families of Swift Creek.

Warminster

 

1742 Feb 12: Goochland Co: William Mayo: 800 acres on the branches of Rockfish River near the Blue Mountains: Land Office Patents # 21, 1742-1743 vol 1 & 2 pg 214 on reel 19: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

1742 ERA ROCKFISH

The Kinkeads were early settlers in the western part of the county. As far as can be made out, there were 3 brothers of the same name. David Kinkead, Joseph Kinkead, and James Kinkead. In 1746 David Kinkead patented nearly 800 acres on the North Fork of Rockfish River and the next year 400 more on Stockton’s Creek. By entry and purchase together the family connection became the owners of not far from 3,000 acres in the vicinity. Joseph Kinkead, James Kinkead, and John Kinkead, probably sons of Joseph Kinkead appear as subscribers to the call of Reverend Samuel Black in 1747. The home of Joseph Kinkead and James Kinkead were situated about half mile west of Immanuel Church, on the place now owned by Reverend Dabney Davis. An Old graveyard a few hundred yards south of Mr. Davis’s house is still known in the neighborhood as the Kinkead burying ground, a broken down wall and a few rough stones are all that mark the spot. James Kinkead died in 1762 leaving 3 sons. Thomas Kinkead, John Kinkead, and James Kinkead and probably 2 more, Matthew Kinkead, and Andrew Kinkead, and a daughter the wife of Nina Clyde. Joseph Kinkead died in 1774 his children were Jean Kinkead wife of Hugh Alexander, John Kinkead, Ruth Kinkead wife of Andrew Grier. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Stockton’s Creek

David Kinkead

Joseph Kinkead

Joseph Kinkead

Nina Clyde

Jean Kinkead wife of Hugh Alexander,

Ruth Kinkead wife of Andrew Grier.

 

Hugh Alexander Kinkead had a mill which at on time was a noted centre in that section, roads were made to it from ever quarter. It was built on Stockton’s Creek not far from the foot of the hill west of Hillsboro. In subsequent years it was known as Keye’s and still later as Humphrey’s Mill. It is supposed Andrew Grier was one of the early merchants of that vicinity. He was the owner of nearly 600 acres adjoining Yellow Mountain which likely in liquidation of his debts, he conveyed in 1766 to Jeremiah Parker and Richard Warden merchants in Philadelphia. In the course of year’s part of this land passed into the hands of John Lob Ban Jr. and part into the hands of Dr. Peter B. Bowen. A Grandson of Joseph Kinkead married a daughter of Adam Dean, another early settler on Stockton’s Creek and in December 1898 there died in Greenbrier County Adam Dean Kinkead doubtless their son at the age of 92. All of the kindred bearing the name seem to have removed from the county before the close of the last century. Its latest appearance on the record occurs 1784 when a Jean Kinkead the widow of James Kinkead sold to Abner Wood a parcel of land in what is known as Piper and Patrick neighborhood. She was at that time a resident of Rockbridge County. In the Black call the name is spelled Kincaid. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Adam Dean,

Joseph Kinkead

Abner Wood

 

1742 ERA cove

The Brown’s of Browns Cove were a Hanover County Family, its Head Benjamin Brown and his eldest son Benjamin Brown patented a large area of the land in Louisa County, both before and after its establishment in 1742. They began to obtain grants in Albemarle County also soon after its formation. From 1747 to 1760 they entered more than 6,000 acres on both sides of Doyle’s River. Benjamin Brown Sr. married Sarah Dabney who according to Dr. Charles Brown’s will was descended from the Jennings that left the enormous estate in England, which such a multitudinous posterity in this country has coveted and which prompted Dr. Charles Brown to cross the great sea twice in his old age. Benjamin Brown died in 1762 leaving 11 children, Benjamin Brown, William Brown, Agnes Brown, Barzillai Brown, Benajah Brown, Bernis Brown, Bezaleel Brown, Brightberry Brown, Elizabeth Brown wife of John Price, and Lucretia Brown wife of Robert Harris. Passing these names under review, one can imagine the delight of the old gentleman in the iterating alliterations of B.B. and how assiduously he searched the scriptures and the lives of the Saints, to attain his pet ideal. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Browns Cove

Benjamin Brown

Doyle’s River

Sarah Dabney

Dr. Charles Brown

Lucretia Brown wife of Robert Harris

Elizabeth Brown wife of John Price,

 

Benjamin Brown and William Brown were their father’s executors and appear to have had their portions and residence in Hanover and Louisa Counties. Barzillai Brown sold out in Albemarle County settled in Shelby County Kentucky in 1809. Benajah Brown also disposed of his interests and removed to Buckingham. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Bernard Brown had his home at the foot of Buck’s Elbow not far from Whitehall. He was the first of the family to depart this life dying in 1800. He and his wife Elizabeth had 12 children. Robert Brown, Reuben Brown, Bernard M. Brown, Charles Brown, Thomas H. Brown, Ira B. Brown, Asa B. Brown, Benjamin H. Brown, Bezaleel Brown, Francina Brown wife of John Rodes, Lucy Brown wife of  Nathaniel Thompson Sr. and Sarah Brown. Robert Brown and Reuben Brown emigrated to Sumner County Tn. Bernard M. Brown married Miriam Maupin daughter of David Maupin and had 9 children, among them were Thompson Brown, Sarah Brown wife of Clifton Brown, and Pyrena Brown wife of Thomas Maupin. Charles Brown practiced medicine in Charlottesville in the early part of the century. He lived where Dr. W.G. Rogers now resides till 1822, when he removed to the farm on Ivy Creek, which he bought from Crenshaw Fretwell and on which his son Ezra Brown still resides. He married his cousin Mary Brown daughter of Bezaleel Brown and had 9 children. He died in 1879 having attained the remarkable age of 96 years. Thomas H. Brown married first Mildred Brown and next Lucy Goodman daughter of Hudson Fretwell. Bezeleel Brown married Elizabeth Michie daughter of John A. Michie, and his children were Cynthia Brown wife of William H. Brown, France Brown, Addison Brown, Williamson Brown, Mary Brown wife of George Kemper, Martha Brown wife of Charles H. Parrott and John A.M. Brown. He was cut off in the prime of his days in 1825. The family of Bernard Brown was remarkable in one respect, he had 3 sons Charles Brown, Thomas H. Brown, and Ira B. Brown were magistrate of the county 2 of them served as Sheriff Charles Brown in 1841 and Thomas H. Brown in 1849. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Buck’s Elbow

Francina Brown wife of John Rodes,

Lucy Brown wife of  Nathaniel Thompson Sr

Crenshaw Fretwell

Lucy Goodman daughter of Hudson Fretwell

Elizabeth Michie daughter of John A. Michie,

Martha Brown wife of Charles H. Parrott

 

Bernis Brown was on of the early Methodist preachers in the county and Country, entering the ministry some years before the close of the last Century. He married Henrietta Rhodes daughter of John Rhodes and died in 1815, leaving 8 children Sarah Brown wife of Thomas Jones, Henrietta Brown wife of John Ruff, Ann Brown wife of John Dickerson, Bernis Brown, Tyree Brown, Benjamin T. Brown who married Lucy Richards, Elizabeth Brown the wife of Charles Carthrae and John R Brown. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Bernis Brown

Henrietta Rhodes daughter of John Rhodes

 

Bezaleel Brown was an officer in the Revolutionary Army at Yorktown, was a magistrate of the county, and served as Sheriff in 1805. He died in 1829. His wife Mary had 6 children, William T. Brown, Bezaleel Brown, Elizabeth Brown wife of Jess Garth, Lucy Brown wife of her Cousin Reuben Brown, Bernard  Brown’s son Sarah Brown the of Charles Parrott, and Mary Brown wife of Dr. Charles. William T. Brown married Mary Jarman daughter of James Jarman and died in 1877. His children were Lucy Brown, Sarah Brown wife of John R. Early, and Mary Brown wife of Dr. William E. Bibb. Bezaleel Brown was appointed a magistrate in 1835, was a member of the House of Felgates from 1844 to 1847, and died in 1878. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Elizabeth Brown wife of Jess Garth

Mary Jarman daughter of James Jarman

Sarah Brown wife of John R. Early

Mary Brown wife of Dr. William E. Bibb.

 

Brightberry Brown and his wife Mary had 5 sons Horace Brown, Clifton Brown, William Brown, Nimrod Brown, and Brightberry Brown. He died in 1846. Horace Brown lived at the head of the Cove, just beneath Brown’s Gap and his house on account of its bracing air, quiet seclusion and generous fare was a favorite resort of the Methodist clergy during the heat of summer. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

This family of Brown from their early settlement, their prominent part in public affairs, the high character generally prevalent among them and the lasting impress they have made on the natural scenery of the county, is one of the most noted in its History. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

 A numerous family of the same name Andrew Brown, who in 1789 bought land in North Garden from John Everett. He lived in a house which is still standing, about a quarter of a mile west of North Garden Depot. He died in 1804, and the place was well known for many years after as the residence of his wife Mary. His children were 13, Elizabeth Brown wife of Joel Yancey, John Brown, James Brown, Anderson Brown, Nancy Brown, Lucy Brown wife of Ralph Thomas, Sarah Brown wife of Absalom Johnson, Nelson Brown, Mary Brown wife of Martin Moore, Margaret Brown wife of James Kinsolving, Williamson Brown, Maurice Brown, and Damaris Brown wife of Benjamin W. Wheeler. John Brown married Martha the widow of  John P. Watson, who had devised to her his real estate nearly 500 acres lying east of North Garden Depot, she however in 1816 joined with her second husband in a deed to James Leigh, that it might be reconvened to him. He died in 1845 and his children were John A. Brown, William Brown, Catharine Brown wife of Jerome B. Wood, Sarah Brown wife of John M. Carr, Ann Brown wife of George W. Rothwell, Charles Brown, Martha Brown wife of Benjamin F. Ammonett and Mariett Brown wife of Elijah J. Bettis. Anderson Brown and his wife Susan had 10 children, among them were Sarah Brown wife of D.C. Rittenhouse, Mary Jane Brown wife of James A. Watson, and the late Andrew J. Brown of Charlottesville. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Andrew Brown

John Everett.

Sarah Brown wife of Absalom Johnson

Mary Brown wife of Martin Moore,

Margaret Brown wife of James Kinsolving,

Damaris Brown wife of Benjamin W. Wheeler.

John Brown married Martha the widow of  John P. Watson

Williamson Brown

 

Interesting as the Williamson family is intermarried to the Mayo families

 

A Benjamin Brown was associated with David Ross in the purchase of a large number of lots in Charlottesville when they were originally sold. He died about 1799 and John Brown of Louisa County was his Executor. It is probable Benjamin Brown lived in Louisa County and may have been the oldest son of Benjamin Brown Sr. of Brown’s  Cove. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

David Ross

 

Another Benjamin Brown was a lawyer of the Albemarle Bar at the beginning o the century. He was the owner at different times of the plantations of Meadow Creek and Moorsebrook at which latter place his son Robert M. Brown a prominent attorney of Amherst was born. He married Sarah E.W. Lewis daughter of Colonel Charles Lewis of North Garden. After selling Moorsebrook to R.B. Starshley in 1812 he removed to Amherst County. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Meadow Creek

Moorsebrook

Sarah E.W. Lewis daughter of Colonel Charles Lewis

 

Matthew Brown who is said was not related to the last mentioned Benjamin Brown married Ann the sister of Benjamin Brown’s wife. For a few years subsequent to 1804 he resided on a 1,000 acres which he purchased from John M. Sheppard of Hanover County, and which were situated in North Garden on the north side of Tom’s Mountain, he also removed to Amherst County. At a later date he was a contractor for erecting the buildings of the University. He was the grandfather of Judge Thompson Brown of Nelson County, Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Matthew Brown

John M. Sheppard of Hanover County

Tom’s Mountain,

 

1743 March 30: Stephen Johnson :Goochland CO: 400 acres on the south side of Rockfish River; Source  Land Office Patents # 21, 1742- 1743, v. 1 & 2 p 1-674: pg 230, reel 19 : Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

Stephen Johnson: Goochland CO:

 

Notes: See  deeds below as the widow Johnson and Upton are mentioned in deeds below.

 

1745 Era of Rockfish River

Michael Thomas in 1745-1748 patented 600 acres on Hog Creek and Rockfish River. He seems however to have resided on the James River. At the resumption of the records in 1783 he was active as a magistrate of the county and was appointed Sheriff in 1789. He was greatly harassed by suits brought against him as incumbent of that office, owing to the mal-administration of his deputies Edward Moore and Menan Mills. Perhaps these annoyances incited the old gentleman to seek the balmy consolations of Matrimony a second time. At all events he entered into those bonds with Elizabeth Staton in 1792, and in writing to the Clerk for a license he state that he was unable to visit the county seat himself, but sent his son Ralph Thomas and his grandson John Carroll to act in his behalf. He died in 1802. His children appear to have been Michael Thomas, Joseph Thomas, Jesse Thomas, Ralph Thomas, Edward Thomas, James Thomas and a daughter who was the wife of a Carroll. The future of the family is unknown except that Joseph Thomas died in 1797 and Michael Thomas in 1826. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Hog Creek

Michael Thomas

Edward Moore

Menan Mills.

Elizabeth Staton

son Ralph Thomas

grandson John Carroll

 

John Thomas came to the county of Amherst, he was married twice first to Frances Henderson daughter of the elder John Henderson and secondly to Frances Lewis daughter of Charles Lewis Jr. of Buck Island. He lived for a time on a tract of land which he received from his second father in law on Ivy Creek and which he sold in 1788 to Robert Draffen and afterward on the land of his son Charles L. Thomas near Red Hill. He died in 1847. His children by the first marriage were Warner Thomas, Norborne K. Thomas, James Thomas, Elizabeth Thomas the wife of a Wood, and Lucy Thomas wife of James Lewis, those by the second wife were Charles L. Thomas, John L. Thomas Virginia Thomas and Margaret Thomas wife of Julius Clarkson and secondly to Robert Cashmere. In the early part of the Century Warner Thomas, Norborne Thomas and John L. Thomas did business in Richmond as commission merchants under the firm of N.K Thomas and Co. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

John Thomas

Frances Henderson daughter of the elder John Henderson

Frances Lewis daughter of Charles Lewis Jr. of Buck Island

Lucy Thomas wife of James Lewis,

 

About 1815 they purchased the Cole land on the North Side of Toms Mountain a 1,028 acres, 200 they sold to Stephen Moore and the remainder was assigned to John L. Thomas when he retired from the firm in 1818 Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

By the will of his Uncle Isham Lewis who died in 1790 Charles L. Thomas became owner of more the 1,800 acres on the North fork of Hardware where Red Hill Depot now stands. His home was where the family of John B. Townley now resides. Before his death in 1815 he leased the eastern part of the place to his brother John L. Thomas during the lives of his parents for their support and that of his sisters. His wife was Margaret Lewis the youngest daughter of Nicholas Lewis of the Farm and his children were Mary Walker Thomas wife of Alexander Clayton, Nicholas L. Thomas, Charles Thomas, Robert Warner Thomas, Frances Elizabeth Thomas the first wife of Dr. Charles H. Meriwether and secondly of James Hart and John J. The western part of the place was divided among the children who in 1830 and some years following sold their portions and emigrated to Montgomery County Tn. John L. Thomas passed his life on the place leased him by his brother. He was appointed a magistrate in 1838 and died unmarried in 1846.Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Isham Lewis

Charles L. Thomas

Margaret Lewis daughter of Nicholas Lewis

James Hart

 

Era of 1746

When the county was organized, settlements had been making within its present limits for 12 to 13 years. Williamsburg being the Capitol of the Virginia Colony, and its public business being transacted there, it was natural that the first great roads of the country should trend in that direction. There can be little doubt that on was opened along the James River, but that leading to the more Northern potions of the County was the Three Notched Road. It was cleared on the track it pursues now, following the watershed between the South Anna and the James and still bears that name (Three Notched Road) through the tree marks on account of which it was given have not been seen for 3 or 4 generations. It passed the county line where it does now, not far from Boyd's Tavern came up the Rivanna on its North side crossed at Secretary's Ford, coincided with what is now the main street of Charlottesville, crossed Ivy Creek and Mechum's River where it does still but at the point diverged from what is the main road at present. It continued in a straight line to Woods's Gap (now Jarman's Gap) instead of striking the Ridge at Rockfish Gap. At the mouth of Woods's Gap was the  first settlement in that part of the county and for some years the chief route of travel passed over it to the Valley. In the diary of Thomas Lewis dated 1746 in which he describes his journey to Orange County to join the surveyors appointed to run the line between the Northern Neck and the rest of t he Colony. He states the he crossed from Augusta County at Woods's Gap and stopped at Michael Woods's both on his departure and his return. As late as near the close of the Revolution when Rockfish Gap was much used the prisoners of the Convention Army as already mentioned were upon their removal taken across the Blue Ridge at Woods's Gap. The three Notched Road was the dividing line between the parishes of Fredericksville and St. Anne's .Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Notes Fredericksville Parish is the Strong hold of the lands of Widow Ann Johnson wife of the late Thomas Johnson

 

The Buck Mountain Road was made in primitive times This name was applied to the series of roads which start From Rockfish Gap, bend along the base to the Ridge and Bucks Elbow to Whitehall, pass over Morrman's River at Millington to Free Union and Earlysville cross the North Fork of the Rivanna at Burnt Mills, and enter the Barboursville Road at Stony point. It still follows the route on which it was originally laid out except slight deviations for short distances to  avoid some obstacle or gain easier grade. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

ERA of 1746

Another road had the name three notched in early times, it was the cross road leading to Carter's bridge to Red Hill Depot. At present it is only a neighborhood road, but when the county seat had its location near Scottsville being the highway thither for all the northwest part of the County. It occupied a place of highest importance and was one of the earliest cleared. As settlements extended up the James River in what is now Nelson and Amherst County they necessarily sought a way of access to the Courthouse. Accordingly one of the first roads established was that which was known as the River Road, crossing the Rockfish River at the Limestone Ford near Howardsville and at another higher up called Joplings and proceeding along the brow of the river hills to the county seat. In 1746 Reverend Robert Rose petitioned the County Court for the clearing of a road from Tye River to the Rockfish River. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

1746 Jan 12: James Nevill: Goochland CO : 3,226 acres on both sides of the south fork of Rockfish River adjoining Stephen Johnson: Source Land Office Patents # 25, 1745-1747 pg 486, reel 23 : Library of Virginia Archives Section.

James Nevill

(how related to De Nevilles)

Stephen Johnson

 

1743 March 3: Stephen Johnson :Goochland CO: 400 acres on the south side of Rockfish River; Source  Land Office Patents # 21, 1742- 1743, v. 1 & 2 p 1-674: pg 230, reel 19 : Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

 

1746 Aug 28: Goochland Co: John Thornton: 400 acres on the South Side of Rock fish River: Land Office Patents # 24, 1745-1746 pg 370 on reel 22: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

John Thornton

 

Notes: 1755 Sept 10: Albemarle Co: John Thornton: 190 acres on the South Side of and adjoining Rockfish River: Land Office Patents # 32, 1752-1756 vol 1 & 2 pg 650 on reel 30: Library of Virginia Archives Section

Notes: John Thornton is married to Sarah Eaton who re married one Charles Johnson see will of William Eaton 1759 in Granville Co. NC

 

Notes: also this takes us right back to Rockfish River of Amherst County: Amherst County is also where Terisha Johnston married Susanna Turner Granddaughter of Terisha Turner, who signed the will of John Sorrell: See Amherst County Notes on Rockfish River:


Notes: 1755 Sept 10: Brunswick Co: John Thornton 481 acres on the North side of the Reedy Creek: Land Office Patents # 31, 1751-1756 vol 1 & 2 pg 746 on reel 29: Library of Virginia Archives Section

 

John Thornton is the families of Frances Thornton and off those of William Thornton the Immigrant, his kinsmen are the Wormley families of Colonial Virginia, and Samuel Washington the half brother of General George Washington.

 

1746 Sept 25: Thomas Upton Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on both sides of Bryery Branch of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 24, 1745-1746, p. 487 (Reel 22).

 

Thomas Upton

Bryery Branch

 

1747 Era: Samuel Black was a Native of Ireland, and coming to this Country as a student of theology, was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of New Castle. He was settled as pastor over 2 churches in Donegal Presbytery in PA in 1743 he began to visit Virginia as a missionary and in 1747 received a call from Mountain Plains Church and the people of Ivy Creek who formed the D.S. Church. In 1751 he purchased from Richard Stockton 400 acres on MECHUMS River, where he made his home until his death in 1770. For a time he taught school in connection with his ministerial duties. His wife’s name was Catharine Shaw and his Children were Samuel Black, James Black, Margaret Black, Mary Black, Sarah Black, John Black and William Black. James Black became the owner of 600 acres on Stockton's Creek not far from Rockfish Gap, where he kept a Public House and where in the fall of 1777 he had as a Guest General George Rogers Clark. He and his wife Eleanor sold out in 1780, and seem to have removed from the County. John Black and his wife Elizabeth in 1789 sold to Menan Mills 130 acres adjoining the home place. After this time the only member of the Family whose course can be traced is Samuel Black the eldest son. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Samuel Black

Catharine Shaw

Menan Mills

 

Samuel Black became a prominence, prospered in his affairs, was active as a Magistrate for some years and died in 1815. He and his wife Mary had 6 sons & 3 daughters. Samuel Black, William Black,  Dorcas Black the wife of Charles Patrick, Catherine Black, Mary Black the wife of John Ramsay, James Black, John Black, Joel Black and Daniel Black. The 2nd son William Black married Matilda Rowe, and died in 1809 leaving 7 children Samuel Black who died unmarried in 1846, Jane Black the wife of Caleb Abell, Andrew Black, James Black, Thomas Black who died unmarried in 1878, John Black and Mary Black. Andrew Black died in 1875, his wife Sarah was the daughter of Nicholas Merritt and his children William Black, Nicholas Black, Mary Black the wife of Willis Piper, Elizabeth Black t he 2nd wife of James H. Rea, and Cynthia Black. James Black married Rosanna a sister to Andrew Blacks wife and died in 1876.Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Dorcas Black the wife of Charles Patrick

Catherine Black

Mary Black the wife of John Ramsay

William Black married Matilda Rowe

 

1747 Era

Albemarle County History  pg  234: The Jamesons were settled at an early day on the Moorman's river both above and below Whitehall. John Jameson took out a patent for land on the north side of that stream in 1741 and Samuel Jameson his brother or son, on the branches of Spring Creek in 1747. In 1765 Samuel Jameson purchased the land in the old Woods Gap from Archibald Woods who had entered it in 1756. His son Alexander Jameson sold it in 1809 to David Stephenson of Augusta Co. Samuel Jameson died in 1788, he and his wife Jean had nine children four of who were Alexander Jameson, Thomas Jameson, John Jameson, and Samuel Jameson. Samuel Jameson Jr. died about 1805. His wife’s name was Margaret and his children were Hannah Jameson wife of William Harris, Jane Jameson wife of William Maupin, Elizabeth Jameson wife of a Harris, Catharine Jameson wife of Nathan Mills, Mary Jameson wife of Nehemiah Brickhead, William Jameson and Samuel Jameson. Some of the sons of this family were mighty hunters, as is manifest from their frequent reports of wolf scalps to the County Court.

 It is supposed that Thomas Jameson who was a physician in busy practice in Charlottesville the early part of the century, was a scion of this stock. In 1806 he lived on the lot on which the family of J.J. Conner resides at present and which he purchased from William G. Garner. In one of his conveyances it is described as being on the upper street leading out to Jameson's Gap, that being evidently the name of what is now called Turk's Gap. He married Evalina Alcock the daughter of William Alcock and sister of the second wife of John Kelly. In 1815 he sold his residence to Mr. Kelly and it is believed emigrated West Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

John Jameson

Samuel Jameson

Whitehall.

Spring Creek

Archibald Woods

David Stephenson of Augusta Co

Hannah Jameson wife of William Harris

Jane Jameson wife of William Maupin

Elizabeth Jameson wife of a Harris

Catharine Jameson wife of Nathan Mills

Mary Jameson wife of Nehemiah Brickhead,

married Evalina Alcock the daughter of William Alcock

John Kelly

 

ERA OF 1747

About the time of reverend Black's settlement in Albemarle County, Reverend  Samuel Davies commenced his work in Hanover County. He had at first no little trouble with the State Authorities, whose intervention was invoked by some bigoted ministers of the establishment under the old repressive laws against non conformity. He however boldly and skillfully appealed to the provisions of the English At of Toleration, which he claimed applied to the colonies no less than to the Mother Country, and was soon able to pursue his labors without molestation. He gathered several congregations, reaching from Hanover County through Louisa and Goochland in Charlotte County. In 1755 the Presbytery of Hanover was formed. At their first meeting they received a petition from the people of Albemarle near Wood's Gap asking for preaching and Mr. Davies himself being appointed spent with them the 2nd Sunday of March 1756. From that time through a number of years they had besides the services of Reverend Black, those of Reverend Davies, John Todd, John Brown, John Martin,  Henry Patillo and others. These ministers occasionally preached to the people of Buck Island at Mr. Lewis's unquestionably at Mounteagle, to those living between the Secretary's Ford and the mountains, no doubt in Charlottesville Courthouse and at the D.S. Church to those at North Garden and at Mr. Garland's and to those at the Cove at GEORGE DOUGLAS'S Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Reverend  Samuel Davies

Mounteagle,

GEORGE DOUGLAS

 

As years passed on ministers born and educated in Virginia settled in the county. In 1769 reverend William Irvin who had been a Pupil at Mr. Todd's school in Louisa County, became the pastor at COVE CHURCH. In 1770 Rev. Samuel Leake accepted a call to the D.S. Church. The next year (1771) Mr. Irvin extended his labors to Rockfish and Mountain Plains churches. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Rev. Samuel Leake

Mr. Irvin

 

 

The Presbytery of Hanover convened with considerable frequency in the churches of the County. It meets at Rockfish Church in 1772, 1773 and 1775, At the Cove Church in 1793, 1794, 1799,1800 and 1803. At The D.S. Church in 1771, 1772, 1775, an 1792. The last time it meets at the D.S. Church was in Oct. 1809, holding night sessions at the house of John R. Kerr. A that meeting Reverend Thomas Lumpkin a young Minister who had taught school for a short time in the neighborhood was to have been ordained and installed as a pastor, but unhappily he had died the proceeding month. The membership of this church was or much reduced by deaths and removals, that 2 years later its organization was dissolved. The ground on which it stood and which had been conveyed to the congregation in 1773 by Joel Terrell, passed into the hands of Jesse Lewis, who within the memory of some now living removed the old building. Two meetings of the Presbytery were held in Walkers Church. The first occurred in 1814, when they convened at night at the house of Captain Meriwether. At that time is received, under its care John Robertson, the father of Judge W. J. Robertson, as a candidate for ministry. The second meeting took place in 1819 and at night sessions were held at the house of John Rogers. It met at Mountain Plains in, and for the last time in Oct. 1828 when they held night sessions at the house of William Woods of Beaver Creek.

Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

John R. Kerr.

Reverend Thomas Lumpkin

Joel Terrell

Jesse Lewis,

John Robertson, the father of Judge W. J. Robertson

John Rogers.

 

 

 

1747 ERA ROCKFISH RIVER

The name Rea is found in the county at the time of its formation. In 1747 Fergus Rea bought a portion of the Chiswell patents on Rockfish River. About the same time John Rea was the owner of land on the Rivanna near Maring King’s Ford, the present Union Mills. Whether these persons were related to those hereafter mentioned does not appear.

 

Andrew Rea, Thomas Rea and Samuel Rea were considerably interested in real estate during a period of 1744 to 1788. At the first of these dates Andrew Rea entered a small tract on the South side of the Rivanna a short distance above the mouth of Ivy Creek and at the time was the owner of land adjoining. Beyond doubt he gave name to the ford so called though it should be written Rea not Ray, in the patent it is written REAY. Thomas Rea owned land on the head waters of Mechum’s River near Round Mountain and subsequently purchased in the vicinity of Rea’s ford and on Meadow Creek not far from the old poor house. Samuel Rea also had a place near Rea’s ford and in 1788 bought on Beaver Creek between Crozet and Whitehall. All 3 were married, the name of Andrew Rea’s wife being Mary that of Thomas Rea’s wife was Ursula, and that of Samuel Rea’s wife was Jane Maupin daughter of Daniel Maupin and his wife Margaret Via. These persons it is likely were brothers. Samuel Rea’s children were Daniel Rea, Andrew Rea, Thomas Rea, Robert Rea and Margaret Rea wife of Ezekiel McCauley. Robert Rea married Elizabeth Maupin daughter of Daniel Maupin and his wife Mary Elizabeth Dabney, lived on Beaver Creek neighborhood and died in 1831. In a report of Bernard Brown of person listed to work on the roads near foot of Buck’s Foot in 1792 Andrew Rea and Thomas Rea are mentioned and in an order of Court on the same subject made in 1823 occur the names of Robert Rea, Thomas Rea and Bland Rea. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

John Rea or John Rhera, John Ray or John Reay

Andrew Rea,

Thomas Rea

Samuel Rea

Rea’s ford

Jane Maupin daughter of Daniel Maupin

Margaret Via.

Margaret Rea wife of Ezekiel McCauley

Elizabeth Maupin daughter of Daniel Maupin

Mary Elizabeth Dabney,

Buck’s Foot

 

Thomas Rea 3rd son of Samuel Rea lived beneath Buck’s Elbow and died in 1850. His wife Ann Ballard daughter of Bland Ballard and his children Daniel Rea, Jane Rea wife of Garland Maury, Bland  Rea Jemima Rea wife of Richard Beckett, Ann Rea wife of John Bales, Samuel Rea and Margaret Rea wife of George Wolfe. Bland Rea married Sarah Alexander and next to Elizabeth Jones daughter of Colonel John Jones. IN his youth he was associated with Benjamin Ficklin in the manufacture of tobacco, but afterwards settled as a farmer near the old homestead and died in 1868. His children were John A. Rea, Joseph Rea, William Rea, James Rea, Mary Rea the wife of Bernard Tilman, and Maria Rea wife of Oscar Lipscomb. FROM  Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Buck’s Elbow

Jane Rea wife of Garland Maury,

Jemima Rea wife of Richard Beckett

Ann Rea wife of John Bales

Margaret Rea wife of George Wolfe

Bland Rea married Sarah Alexander

Elizabeth Jones daughter of Colonel John Jones

 

1747 March 29 Ivy Creek and of Rockfish River

Whereas it is agreed or proposed that ye Inhabitants of Ivy Creek and ye Mountain Plain Congregation joyn together with ye Congregation of Rockfish, to call and to Invite Reverend Samuel Black now residing in ye bounds of ye Reverend Mr. John Craig’s congregation to be our minister and Pastor to administer ye ordinances of ye Gospel among us. All we whose names are hereunto affixed do promise and oblige ourselves to pay yearly and ever year ye several sums annexed to our names for ye outward support and Incouragement of ye said Mr. Samuel Black during his abode and continuance among us, for ye one half of his labor in ye administration of Gospel Ordinances to us in an orderly way, according to ye rules and Practice of our Orthodox Reformed Presbyterian Church as witness our hands

Michael Woods

William Woods

Archibald Woods

William Wallace

Andrew Wallace

John Woods Sr.

John Greer

Thomas Lockhart

Peter Hairston

Adam Gaudylock

Michael Woods Jr.

William McCord

John Gamble

Davis Stockton

Hugh Dobbins

David Lewis

James Gamble

John Monday

Thomas Evins

Thomas Wrighte

William Little

Samuel Jameson

John Lockhart

Hendry Burch

Thomas Alexander

Patrick Woods

John McCulloch

William Ogans

William Chamberlain

Thomas Graig

John Thompson

John Corban

Hendry Carr

James Weir

Robert McNeilly

John Dicky

William Norris

John Woods Jr.

John Jameson

Benjamin Wheeler

W. Bucknell

John Burrisse

James Kincaid

Andrew McWilliams

George Dawson

John McCord

Archibald Woods

William Whiteside

William Bustard

Thomas Whiteside

Matthew Mullins

Richard Stockton.

Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

1751 Sept.: ALBERMARLE CO: Thomas Jopling on N. Side South Fork of Br of Rockfish River adj. the widow Upton and the widow Johnson CPv6: Johnson database on rootsweb.com

Thomas Jopling

Widow Upton

This is the widow of Thomas Upton and the Widow of Stephen Johnson

 

Notes: Thomas Upton; Publication 25 September 1746. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on both sides of Bryery Branch of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 24, 1745-1746, p. 487 (Reel 22).

 

1755 Sept: Albemarle Co. Va.: Ralph Joplin on both side of Rockfish River adj. a Stephen Johnson, Thomas Joplin and Mary Upton (See 1743 Goochland patent to Stephen) CPv6: Johnson database on Rootsweb.com

Notes: Mary Upton died Will is in Albemarle County

 

Widow Johnson

THE FOLLOWING IS JUST NOTES ON THE TERM BRYERY CREEK

 

Notes: Robert Aldin Publication 21 September 1674. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Middlesex County. Description: 100 acres on the Dragon Swamp on both sides the Bryery Branch. Source: Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 524 (Reel 6).

 

Notes: John Lindsey  Publication 10 June 1674. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Middlesex County. Description: 700 acres on the Dragon Swamp, betwixt the white oak swamp and Bryery Branch. Source: Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 518 (Reel 6).

 

Notes: Christ. Robinson Publication 5 June 1678. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Robinson, Robertson, Robison. Note Location: Middlesex County. Description: 300 acres lying betwixt Daniel Longs land Henry Niccolls his land Thomas Gordwells land and the Bryery Branch. Source: Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 646 (Reel 6).

Notes this is Nicholas Robinson to son Christopher Robinson whose son is Isaac Robinson- Robertson who moved into Prince George and lands go into Brunswick County, Isaac Robinson is the Father of John Robinson married to Mary Gower.

Era of 1749

The first of the Rodes name to settle in Albemarle County was John Rodes and his coming occurred in 1749. In that year he bought from James Armor 400 acres on the North fork of the Rockfish River and in the conveyance was described as of St. Martin's Parish Louisa County Va. He also purchased land on Moorman's River. He died in 1775. His wife was Mary Crawford, and he left 5 daughters and 4 sons. David Rodes, Clifton Rodes, Charles Rodes and John Rodes. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

John Rodes

James Armor

Mary Crawford,

David Rodes came to the County in 1756 and lived on the North side of Moorman's river. Besides managing his plantation, he conducted a store. He was appointed a magistrate and served as Sheriff, probably in 1776 and 1777. He was twice married it is believed first to Mary Mills daughter of Matthew Mills and 2nd to Susan Anderson daughter of Nelson Anderson. He died in 1794 and his widow became the wife of James Kerr. His children all of whom were born of the first marriage were John Rodes, Matthew Rodes, Charles Rodes, Mary Rodes the wife of Robert Douglass, Elizabeth Rodes the wife of Horseley Goodman, Nancy Rodes the wife of William Dulaney, Ann Rodes he wife of James Ballard, Lucy Rodes the wife of Joseph Twyman, Mary Rodes the wife of James Ballard and the wife of William Walden. the Douglass, Yancey, Walden and probably the Dulaney families removed to Ky. John Rodes died unmarried in 1823. Matthew Rodes succeeded to his fathers place. He was appointed a magistrate in 1816. By becoming Security, he was involved in financial difficulties and his property was sold to pay his debts, it was however redeemed by his son David Rodes. He died in 1834. His wife was Nancy Blackwell and his children were David Rodes, Mary Rodes, Robert Rodes, Henrietta Rodes the wife of Clement P. McKennie, Gills Rodes the wife of Robert Guy, Ann Rodes the wife of Daniel Fish Fishburne, Elizabeth Rodes the 2nd wife of Nathaniel Massie, Mildred Rodes and Judith Rodes. David Rodes died about 1816, he was deputy Clerk of the county and afterwards removed to Lynchburg. In 1822 he married Martha Yancey daughter of Joel Yancey of Bedford County. General Robert K. Rodes of the Confederate Army who fell at Winchester in 1864 was his son. Robert Rodes succeeded to the homestead, was twice married first to Margaret Duke daughter of Richard Duke, and secondly to Hardenia Williams of Nelson County and he died in 1874. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

David Rodes

Mary Mills daughter of Matthew Mills

Susan Anderson daughter of Nelson Anderson

Susan Anderson Rhodes widow wife of James Kerr

Mary Rodes the wife of Robert Douglass,

Elizabeth Rodes the wife of Horseley Goodman,

Nancy Rodes the wife of William Dulaney,

Ann Rodes he wife of James Ballard,

Lucy Rodes the wife of Joseph Twyman,

Mary Rodes the wife of James Ballard and the wife of William Walden

Clifton Rodes first lived at the foot of Buck's Elbow on a place he bought in 1769 from Mathew Mullins and afterwards sold to Cornelius Maupin. In 1773 he purchased from William Lewis a plantation near Ivy Depot, which he made hi home until 1788, when he sold it to George Nichols and not long after removed to KY. He was a magistrate of the county and served as sheriff in 1783. His wife was Sarah Waller and 3 of his children were married in Albemarle County, John Rodes to Jean Stapleton, daughter of Thomas Burch, Dorothy Rodes to David Kerr, and Mary Rodes to Joseph Burch a brother of John Rodes, wife and the Grandfather of  Rev. J.J. Bullock and the wife of Vice President Breckenridge. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Clifton Rodes

Mathew Mullins

Cornelius Maupin

William Lewis

George Nichols

Sarah Waller

Jean Stapleton, daughter of Thomas Burch,

Dorothy Rodes to David Kerr

Mary Rodes to Joseph Burch

Charles Rodes resided where his father first bought lands, on the water of Rockfish River. The lands now lie in Nelson County. From his family the Methodist Church in that vicinity is commonly known a Rode's Church. He died in 1798. Mrs. McClunn who resides near Batesville is his Granddaughter, and William Rodes who lives at Brooksville his great Grandson. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Charles Rodes

John Rodes lived on the South side of Moorman River and died in 1810. His wife was Sarah Harris, daughter of Robert Harris and his children Robert Rodes Tyree Rodes, Clifton Rodes, John Rodes, Charles Rodes Mary Rodes Ann Rodes the wife of John Garth, Henrietta Rodes the wife of Rev. Bernia Brown, and Sarah Rodes the first wife of William Davenport and next to Micajah Woods. Robert Rodes was a Captain in the Revolutionary army and made prisoner at the capture of Charleston S.C. He married Eliza Dulanaey and removed to Madison County Ky. Tyree Rodes emigrated to Giles County Ten. Clifton Rodes lived near Ivy Depot on a farm which was given to him by his father and which he sold in 1810 to George Pickett of Richmond. In 1807 he was appointed a magistrate of the county. He married Elizabeth Jouett daughter of John Jouett and was the administrator of the Jouett estate. After the sale of his property he removed to KY. John Rodes succeeded to the paternal estate south of Moorman's River. He was also appointed a magistrate in 1807 and served as Sheriff in 1832. He died in 1839. His wife was  Francina Brown a daughter of Bernard Brown, and his children Sidney Rodes was of Samuel C. Woods, who emigrated to Missouri, Tyree Rodes, Virginia Rodes the wife of W.C.Smith, Jacintha Rodes the wife of J. Smith, Frances Rodes the wife of Garland Brown, and Lucy Ann Rodes the wife of James Payne. Ryland Rodes married Sarah Woods, and lived and died in Nelson County. John D. Rodes married Mrs. Ann Durrett Morris and died with out children.  William Rodes married E.C. Yancey of Rockingham County and lived on the old home place which after his death in 1822 devolved to his sons Thomas Rodes and John William Rodes. Tyree Rodes removed to Tennessee Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

John Rodes

Sarah Harris, daughter of Robert Harris

Ann Rodes the wife of John Garth,

Henrietta Rodes the wife of Rev. Bernia Brown,

Sarah Rodes the first wife of William Davenport and next to Micajah Woods

Elizabeth Jouett daughter of John Jouett

Lucy Ann Rodes the wife of James Payne

ERA OF 1749

Another Branch of the Wood’s family though beyond question of the Same Stock ( Of Woods) came to that County a few years later, James Woods, Samuel Woods, and Richard Woods, were most probably brothers. James Woods first appears in 1749, when he patented 200 acres on Stockton's Creek. He lived on the North fork of the Rockfish River and at his house the District Committee met in 1775 to devise measures in furtherance of the Revolution. Samuel Woods lived in the same section. Samuel Woods was one of the original purchasers of lots in Charlottesville. Samuel Woods died in 1784, his children were Barbara Woods the wife of George Martin, Margaret Woods the wife of Richard Netherland who removed to Sullivan County tn. John B. Woods, Mary Woods the wife of Benjamin Harris, Jane Woods the wife of Joseph Montgomery, and Elizabeth Woods the wife of William B. Harris. Richard Woods lived on the north side of Taylor's Gap, on the road from D.S. to Rockfish Gap by the way of Miller School, a road which he is said to have laid out and which is still called by his name. He dealt largely in real estate both in Charlottesville and the county. Richard Woods was married twice, first to Margaret, and secondly to Eliza Ann Stuart the sister of Colonel John Stuart of Greenbrier. Richard Woods children were William Woods, George Matthews Woods, Richard Woods, and Elizabeth Woods the wife of James Brooks. Richard Woods died in 1801. William Woods succeeded his father at the homestead near Taylor's Gap. William Woods was the County surveyor from 1796 to 1828, whence he was generally known as Surveyor Billy. He was appointed a magistrate in 1816, he succeeded Micajah Woods as the Sheriff and was a ruling Elder in the Mountain Plains Church. William Woods and his brother George Woods gave much attention to improving the breed of horses, bringing to the county a number of sires from the stud of JOHN RANDOLPH of Roanoke. William Woods wife was Elizabeth Warwick daughter of Jacob Warwick of bath County, but he died without children in 1850. George Woods lived on the opposite side of the road from his brother, he filled for many years the office of Commissioner of the Revenue for St. Anne’s and died in 1847. George Woods married Jane Matthews the daughter of Sampson Matthes of Bath County and his children were John Woods, Sampson L. Woods, William Woods, Andrew Woods, J. Warwick Woods, George Woods, Mary Woods the wife of Tillotson Janney and Martha Woods the wife of Dr. Day. The daughters and their husbands removed to Lewis County. Richard Woods was the Deputy Surveyor under his brother, and died unmarried in 1822. He place was near Miller School and is now in t he possession of Thomas G. Michie. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Barbara Woods the wife of George Martin

Margaret Woods the wife of Richard Netherland who removed to Sullivan County tn

Mary Woods the wife of Benjamin Harris,

Jane Woods the wife of Joseph Montgomery

Elizabeth Woods the wife of James Brooks

Elizabeth Woods the wife of William B. Harris

Jane Matthews the daughter of Sampson Matthes of Bath County

Elizabeth Woods the wife of James Brooks

Elizabeth Warwick daughter of Jacob Warwick of bath County

 

1751 ERA COVE Church

A family of Douglass was living in the Cove neighborhood as early as 1751, 2 of which were James Douglass and George Douglass, probably brothers. They were among the first members of the Cove Presbyterian Church. George Douglass died in 1785.

 

Three brother named Douglass resided in the North part of the county in 1761, Charles  Douglass, Thomas Douglass, and John Douglass. Their farms were situated on Barboursville Road near the Orange County line. Charles Douglass married a daughter of Robert and Mourning Adams, and died in 1823. His children were Robert Douglass and Charles Douglass, to who he gave lands he owned in Kentucky and who removed to that State, Ann Douglass the wife of Joseph Timberlake, Judith Douglass wife of John Dickerson and Sarah Douglass. Thomas Douglass died in 1830 leaving 4 children, James Douglass, Achilles Douglas, Nancy Douglass and John Douglass. Achilles Douglass was appointed Magistrate in 1796 and acted a prominent part in affairs of the County. He served as Sheriff in 1823. He married Nancy Bowcock daughter of Jason Bowcock and died in 1844. His home the latter part of his life was on the north fork of Priddy’s Creek near the present station of Burnley’s. John Douglass Jr. married Mildred Bowcock a sister of Achilles Douglass’s wife. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

James Douglass

George Douglass,

Robert and Mourning Adams,

Ann Douglass the wife of Joseph Timberlake

Judith Douglass wife of John Dickerson

Nancy Bowcock daughter of Jason Bowcock

Priddy’s Creek

 

Albemarle County History  pg 179, 180: John Dickerson was settled in the north part of the county, while it yet belonged to Louisa Co. He lived on the North fork of the Rivanna not far from Piney Mountain. He died in 1788. He and his wife Mary had 3 sons, John Dickerson, William Dickerson, and Thomas Dickerson. Thomas Dickerson died in 1807, his wife name was Mildred and his children were Frances Dickerson the wife of Reverend John Goodman, the wife of William Thurman, the wife of John Crossthwait: Thomas Dickerson, Wiley Dickerson who married Nancy Watts the daughter of Reverend Jacob Watts, Griffith Dickerson and Lucy Dickerson. Another Wiley Dickerson son of one of the brothers married in 1789 Mary Carr the daughter of John Carr, he died in 1847, his children were William Dickerson, Willis Dickerson, Malinda Dickerson the wife of George W. Turpin, Martha the wife of Richard Simms , Brockman the wife of B.C. Johnson, Mary Dickerson the wife of Elisha Thurman and Sarah Dickerson the wife of Archibald Duke.

 

John Dickerson

Piney Mountain.

Frances Dickerson the wife of Reverend John Goodman

William Thurman,

John Crossthwait:

Nancy Watts the daughter of Reverend Jacob Watts

Mary Carr the daughter of John Carr,

Martha the wife of Richard Simms

Brockman the wife of B.C. Johnson,

Mary Dickerson the wife of Elisha Thurman

Sarah Dickerson the wife of Archibald Duke.

 

1755 Feb 12: William Heard Description: 80 acres on the south branch of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 32, 1752-1756 (v.1 & 2 p.1-715), p. 465 (Reel 30).

 

William Heard

 

1755 July 10: Thomas Henderson Description: 81 acres on the north side of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 31, 1751-1756 (v.1 & 2 p.1-751), p. 506 (Reel 29).

 

Thomas Henderson

 

1755 Sept 10: Albemarle Co; Terry Turner (Terisha Turner) 400 acres on the north side and adjoining Rockfish River: Land Office Patents # 31: 1751-1756: vol 1 & 2 pg 687 on reel 29: Library of Virginia Archives Section

Terry Turner (Terisha Turner)

Will of John Sorrel Amherst County Va Will Book 2 page 140: Witnesses to his will are Charles Martin, Terisha Turner, Benjamin Moore, Ephraim Blaine, Samuel Anderson. Probated Sept 1 1783 Amherst County.

Note Terish Turner (Terry Turner)  is either the Grandfather of Uncle to Susannah Turner Johnston wife of Terisha Johnston as Terisha Turner The ancient died in 1804: Susannah is the daughter of  Rueben Turner and ? Hamner

Terisha Turners Son his lands will be on Nutbush Creek first recorded in Granville CO. NC then these lands go into Bute Co NC to Warren Co NC and to current Vance Co. NC. This Turner can be found on the Nutbush Creek Tax List for Warren Co. NC as can Terisha Johnston who is married to Susannah Turner

1755 Sept. 10: John Thornton: Albemarle Co Description: 190 acres on the south side of and adjoining Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 32, 1752-1756 (v.1 & 2 p.1-715), p. 650 (Reel 30).

John Thornton

Sarah Eaton daughter of William Eaton of Granville Co. NC her first husband was John Thornton they owned lands in Brunswick Co currently in Mecklenburg Co Va. And in Granville Co NC.  Sarah Eaton Thornton re married Charles Johnston of Bute Co. NC, whose l ands will go into Warren Co. NC when it formed.

 

1755 Sept. 10: John Morrison Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 22 acres on the branches of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 31, 1751-1756 (v.1 & 2 p.1-751), p. 690 (Reel 29).

John Morrison

 1755 Sept. 10: John Douglass  Description: 400 acres on both sides of Rockfish Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 31, 1751-1756 (v.1 & 2 p.1-751), p. 733 (Reel 29).

John Douglass 

Douglass  Surname

John Johnson of Nutbush Creek bought his lands abt 1755 from John Robertson husband of Mary Gowere in Brunswick Co Va. Thses lands are on the States Lines of Virginia. These lands go into Mecklenburg Co Va, and Nutbush Creek is in Granville Co. NC Deeds then into Bute Co. NC then into Warren Co. NC and then into current Vance Co. NC.

The lands of Nutbush Creek are being sold by Stephen Johnson, Therisha Johnson and John Johnson see Mecklenburg Co. Files. The  Douglass surname is connected to one of Terisha Johnston’s daughters who died in Henderson Co Tn, where her father Terisha Johnston moved to. Len Henley Johnson off this lines died in Humphreys Co. Tn he was married to a Mary Turner

Also of notes is a Miles Johnson lived on Nutbush Creek in Mecklenburg Co. Va.

1755 Sept. 10: Albemarle Co Ralph Joplin Description: 90 acres on both sides of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 31, 1751-1756 (v.1 & 2 p.1-751), p. 695 (Reel 29).

 

1755 Sept: Albemarle Co. Va.: Ralph Joplin on both side of Rockfish River adj. a Stephen Johnson, Thomas Joplin and Mary Upton (See 1743 Goochland patent to Stephen) CPv6: Johnson database on Rootsweb.com

 

Ralph Joplin

Thomas Joplin

1751 Sept.: ALBERMARLE CO: Thomas Jopling on N. Side South Fork of Br of Rockfish River adj. the widow Upton and the widow Johnson CPv6: Johnson database on rootsweb.com

This is the widow of Thomas Upton and the Widow of Stephen Johnson

Stephen Johnson

This must be the son of the first Stephen Johnson as his wife is a widow in 1751.

Mary Upton

Notes: Mary Upton when she died her Will is in Albemarle County

1746 Sept 25: Thomas Upton Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Goochland County. Description: 400 acres on both sides of Bryery Branch of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 24, 1745-1746, p. 487 (Reel 22

xxxx

1756 Aug 16: Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 127 acres on a branch of Rockfish River called the Bermudian. Source: Land Office Patents No. 33, 1756-1761 (v.1, 2, 3 & 4 p.1-1095), p. 86 (Reel 31-32).

Bermudian

1756: One of the original patentees of land in the county was Solomon Hancock in 1756, he obtained the grant of 400 acres between the Hardwareand Totier Creek: Four years later he sold part of it to Giles Tompkins and removed to Halifax County. In 1777 he sold the remainder to William Tompkins, son of Giles: Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Solomon Hancock

Hardware Creek

Totier Creek

Giles Tompkins

William Tompkins

David Hancock in 1834 purchased from John R. Campbell 1100 acres on both sides of the Rivanna above the mouth of Buck Island Creek. He died in 1858. His children were David Hancock who married Janetta Thurman, Dr. Charles Hancock married Catharene Thurman, Gustavus Hancock married Lily Wimbert and lived on the James River below Howardsville, and Virginia Hancock was the wife of Dr. Francis Hancock of Richmond. David Hancock died in 1872, Mrs. Virginia died in 1884, Dr. Charles Hancock died in 1885, and Gustavus Hancock died in 1898 all leaving families. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

David Hancock

Janetta Thurman

John R. Campbell

Buck Island Creek.

Dr. Charles Hancock married Catharene Thurman

Gustavus Hancock married Lily Wimbert

Dr. Francis Hancock of Richmond

1760 Sept. 10: Albemarle CO.: James Johnston: 58 acres on both side of north branch of Hickory Creek: Source land Office Patents no 33, 1756 -1761 ( v. 1 & 2 p.1-1095) pg 900, reel 31-32: Library of Virginia Archives

Hickory Creek

James Johnston 58 acs on both sides of a North br of Hickory Cr adj Charles Smith Sep 10, 1760 [regranted in Amherst Co. 1772 to John Laurence] CPv6 research of Linda Starr

Notes: 1768 July 20: John Sorrel,. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 95 acres on the south branch of the Cove Creek and the north branch of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 37, 1767-1768, p. 378 (Reel 37).

                    __________________________________________________________________

1761 Albemarle Co. was divided the southwestern part forming Amherst Co and the Southeastern part forming Buckingham.

.

1761 ERA of Rockfish River
The name of Thurman and Thurmond in the early records were interchangeable. John Thurman began to purchased land on Cove Creek in 1761. William Thurman on Green Creek in 1774 and Richard Thurman and Phillip Thurman on Buck Mountain Creek and Doyles River in 1776. Those of the name in Buck Mountain region seem to have disposed of the property and removed from the county about 1790. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

John Thurman

Cove Creek

William Thurman

Green Creek

Richard Thurman

Phillip Thurman

Buck Mountain Creek

Previous to the latter date Benjamin Thurman was settled on the west side of the South west Mountain near Hammock’s Gap which is now generally called after this family Thurman’s Gap. Benjamin Thurman married Nancy Carr daughter of Gideon Carr and his children were Fendall C. Thurman, Susan Thurman wife of John Rothwell, Sarah Thurman wife of Austin Sandridge, Mary Thurman wife of John Gentry, Ann Thurman wife of Micajah W. Carr, Elisha Thurman and Lucy Thurman. Fendall Thurman married Ann Royster of Goochland County, sold his lands to his brother Elisha Thurman and in 1827 emigrated to West Tennessee. He was father of Edward Thurman, Janetta Thurman wife of David Hancock and Catharine Thurman wife of Dr. Charles Hancock, Elisha Thurman married Mary Dickerson and his children were Fendall D. Thurman, William Thurman, Ann Thurman wife of James Wheeler, Mary Thurman wife of John Carr, Thomas Lindsay Thurman, Caroline Thurman wife of William H. Peyton. Benjamin Thurman and Theodore Thurman. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Hammock’s Gap or Thurman’s Gap

Benjamin Thurman

Nancy Carr daughter of Gideon Carr

Susan Thurman wife of John Rothwell

Sarah Thurman wife of Austin Sandridge

Mary Thurman wife of John Gentry

Ann Thurman wife of Micajah W. Carr,

Janetta Thurman wife of David Hancock

Fendall Thurman married Ann Royster of Goochland County,

Catharine Thurman wife of Dr. Charles Hancock

Ann Thurman wife of James Wheeler

Mary Thurman wife of John Carr

Caroline Thurman wife of William H. Peyton

Thurman Surname

Research Notes: Is this the same Thurman Families of those related to off spring of Michael Johnson Died 1718-19 :

Thomas Thurmond married Mary Poly Spencer Johnson daughter of Benjamin Johnson and Ann Norvell:
Benjamin Johnson died Murray Co. Tn
Thomas Thurmon’s brother William Thurmon married sister Nancy Johnson
Lucinda Thurmond married Norvell Johnson and
Spencer Johnson b 1790 married Mary Poly Thurmond
So Benjamin Johnson and Anne Norvell lived in what was Nelson County Va. he died in Maury County TN
His Daughter married ? Gardner
And had a son named George Gardner who in 1850 is in Nelson County Va.
His Daughter also married William Thurmond
Who had sons Jordan Thurmond who in 1850 lives in Nelson County Va
Son Benjamin Thurmond who in 1850 lives in Campbell County Va.

 

1761 Amherst County formed 1761 from Albemarle County:

1761: The First occurrence was rendered necessary by the Partition of the county in 1761. The territory on the South Side of the James River was cut of to form the County of Buckingham. That part which lay north of the James and west of the Rockfish River from its mouth up to Green Creek and thence  west of a line running directly to the house of Thomas Bell and continuing thence to the Blue Ridge was constituted as Amherst County. At the same time there was added to Albemarle County and Louisa County lying west of a Line, beginning at the boundary between Albemarle and Louisa on the ridge between Meschunk and Beaverdam Swamp and running along said ridge till intersected by an east Course from the Widow Cobb's plantations and thence a direct course to the Orange County line Opposite the Plantation of Ambrose Coleman. When this arrangement took place it left the Courthouse on the extreme southern border, and rendered attendance there at unnecessarily inconvenient to the people residing in the Northern section of the County. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

Green Creek

Meschunk

Beaverdam Swamp

Widow Cobb's

1762 Era

Albemarle County History  pg  235: The first Jarman name settled in this county was Thomas Jarman who obtained a grant of land on Moorman's River in 1762. His children were Elizabeth Jarman the wife of Zachariah Maupin, Mary Jarman the wife of Benajah Brown, William Jarman, Martha Jarman the wife of Daniel Maupin, Frances Jarman wife of John A. Michie and James Jarman. James Jarman had his residence on the east side of the road in Brown's Cove about a mile south of Doylesville. He was appointed a magistrate in 1819 and was frequently employed in the county business of his district. He died in 1847, and was succeeded in the homestead but his sons Miletus Jarman who departed this life in 1874 Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Thomas Jarman

Elizabeth Jarman the wife of Zachariah Maupin

Mary Jarman the wife of Benajah Brown

Martha Jarman the wife of Daniel Maupin

Frances Jarman wife of John A. Michie

 

 William Jarman established him self in 1790 near the present Mechum's Depot. He soon after built the mill at that place which was for many years known by his name and on the site of which one has existed ever since. IN 1805 he and Brightberry Brown undertook the construction of Brown's Turnpike, beginning at a point called Camping Rock, crossing the ridge at Brown's gap descending through Brown's Cove and terminating at Mechum's Depot. A formal acceptance of it took place the next year by Commissioners appointed from both sides of the mountain. William Jarman died in 1813, he married Sarah Maupin daughter of John Maupin and had 5 sons and 6 daughters. In 1819 James Jarman his eldest son sold his half of the land on the Turnpike to Ira Harris for 100 dollars. His son Thomas Jarman bought the land on the summit of the Ridge at the old Woods Gap and since his purchase the gap has generally gone by his name. His daughter Mary Jarman became the wife of the younger William Woods of Beaver Creek and mother of Peter Woods formerly one of the merchants of Charlottesville Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

Mechum's Depot

William Jarman

Brightberry Brown

Camping Rock,

Sarah Maupin daughter of John Maupin

Notes: the Maupin’s are the families of Leonard Johnson

Ira Harris

1762 March 25: William Morrison: Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 250 acres on Cub Creek a branch of Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 34, 1756-1765, p. 979 (Reel 33-34).

William Morrison

Cub Creek

Hiccory Creek or Hickory Creek

1749 September 5 Charles Lewis: Albemarle Co: Description: 400 acres on both sides of Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 27, 1748-1749, p. 313 (Reel 25).

1750 Nov 3:  Charles Lewis: Albemarle Co: Description: 400 acres on both sides of Hiccory Creek of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 29, 1749-1751 (v.1 & 2 p.1-532), p. 337 (Reel 27).

1762 Sept 2: Joseph Morrison Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 98 acres under the Ragged Mountain. Source: Land Office Patents No. 35, 1762-1764 (v.1 & 2 p.1-556), p. 41 (Reel 35).

Joseph Morrison

Ragged Mountain

1762 Sept 25: Ezrea Morrison Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 127 acres on the ridges and in the Coves of a mountain at the head of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 35, 1762-1764 (v.1 & 2 p.1-556), p. 46 (Reel 35).

Ezrea Morrison

ERA OF 1764

William Grayson was a Native of Spotsylvania County and came to Albemarle County some time before the Revolution. In 1764 he bought land on the head of MECHUM'S river from Speaker JOHN ROBINSON, who was selling off the immense tracts of land in the ROCKFISH valley patented by his brother in law John Chiswell. Having sold this property a few years after he purchased from Gamaliel Bailey and Obediah Martin at what was then known as Little D.S. where the old Richard Woods road forks with that passing through Batesville and where his descendants have been living ever since. In 1804 he sold a small parcel at this place to William Simpson, who established there a tan yard that for many years went by his name, and afterwards by the name of Grayson. and that was one of the most noted landmarks in that neighborhood. Simpson in 1818 sold it to Joseph Grayson a grandson of William Grayson above. William Grayson died in 1829 having attained the remarkable age of 97 years old. His wife was Ann Smith daughter of Thomas Smith his Children where John Grayson, Thomas Grayson, Martha Grayson, Elizabeth Grayson who was the wife of Joseph Sutherland, Susanna Grayson the first wife of Isaac Woods, and 2nd to a Tomlin. Joseph Grayson married Rhoda White daughter of Daniel White and died in 1867. His children were Thomas Grayson who married Mary Jones daughter of john Jones, Ann Grayson who married James H. Shelton, France Grayson, Elizabeth Grayson who married Benjamin F. Abell, John Grayson and William Grayson. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

JOHN ROBINSON

Brother in law John Chiswell.

William Grayson

1765 July 26: Thomas Morrison Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 73 acres on Long Meadow Branch of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 36, 1764-1767 (v.1 & 2 p.557-1083), p. 843 (Reel 36).

ERA 1766

About 1766 William Smith, John Smith and Charles Smith of Hanover County purchased lands on the head waters of Mechum's and Rockfish Rivers. They were probably brothers. Charles Smith settled on Taylor's Creek and William Smith and John Smith on Whiteside’s, where they both bought from Morans, William Smith from Nicholas and John Smith from John Moran. Charles Smith died in 1771, William Smith in 1801, and John Smith in 1808. The names of John Smiths wife was Elizabeth, and his children were Thomas Smith, William Smith, Mary Smith the wife of Francis Montgomery, Nancy Smith the wife of David Burgher, Joel Smith, Martha Smith, Elizabeth Smith the wife of Robert Page, and Charles Smith. Joel Smith married Martha Patrick the daughter of Charles Patrick, and his children was Mary Smith the wife of John Massie, John P. Smith, Elizabeth Smith the wife of John Wallace, Harriet  Smith and Thomas J. Smith. All of this family except Mrs. Wallace and her husband removed to KY. Charles Smith lived at the foot of Armor's Mountain on the border of Nelson County and died in 1842. His wife was Mary Bailey and his children William Smith, Joel Smith, Robert P. Smith, Frances Smith and Jane Smith. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

In 1769 Thomas Smith purchased a part of the John Chiswell patent on the head waters of MECHUM"S River. He died in 1783. His children were Thomas  Smith, John Smith, Ann Smith wife of William Grayson, Sarah Smith the wife of Nicholas Crawford, Lawrence Smith, Mary Smith the wife of (David ?) Buster, Susan Smith and daughter (Ursula?) the wife of a Ray. His son Thomas Smith died in 1791. His wife’s name was Susan and his children were Nancy Smith the wife of James Lobban, Bolling Smith who removed to Lincoln County Missouri. Elizabeth Smith the wife of Nicholas Merritt, Mary Smith, Martha Smith, and Sebanah Smith. The children of Nicholas Smith and Elizabeth Merritt were Rhoda Smith the wife of Thomas Grayson, Thomas Smith, Susan Smith the wife of James Black, James Smith and Retta Smith the wife of Jeremiah Dollins. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

1768 July 20: Rachel Morrison Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 32 acres on the South Fork of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 37, 1767-1768, p. 357 (Reel 37).

1769 July 14: William Morrison Jr: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 66 acres on the south branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 38, 1768-1770, p. 787 (Reel 38).

1768 July 20: John Sorrel, Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 95 acres on the south branch of the Cove Creek and the north branch of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 37, 1767-1768, p. 378 (Reel 37).

Era of 1769

John Farrar lived on the southeast part of the County and died in 1769. His Children were Perrin Farrar, Catharine Farrar Jopling, Sarah Farrar Spencer, William Farrar, Peter Farrar, Thomas Farrar, Elizabeth Farrar, and Richard Farrar. Perrin Farrar, Peter Farrar, and Richard Farrar, were all owners of land on Green and Ivy Creeks on branches of the Lower Rockfish River. Perrin Farrar died about 1793 leaving 8 children.

Richard Farrar married Susan Shelton of Louisa County Va. and died in 1807. He was a ruling Elder in the COVE CHURCH, his children were Joseph FARRAR, Landon Farrar, John S. Farrar, Lucinda Farrar, the wife of Samuel L. Wharton, Elizabeth Farrar the wife of George Wharton both of whom emigrated to Davidson County Ten. and Sophia Farrar the wife of Dr. Samuel Leake and the mother of Honorable Shelton F. Leake. John S.  was appointed Colonel of the 47 the regiment in 1815, and he died in 1832 and left 9 children, Richard L., Matthew G, Elizabeth, Martha, Marcellus, Sarah the wife of Alexander K. Yancey, Sophia the wife of George W. Piper, Lavina and Susan. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

MY NOTES: FARRAR's CONNECT TO TEMPERANCE BAILEY, Daughter of Cecily Reynolds. WHICH CONNECT TO PETER MONTAGUE TO FAMILIES OF GEORGE WASHINGTON AND DANDRIDGE: SHELTONS CONNECT TO MATLOCK WHICH CONNECT TO WINSTON WHICH  CONNECT TO PATRICK HENRY AND HIS BROTHER JOHN SYMMES and then BACK TO THE DANDRIDGE CONNECTIONS.

1770 Aug 27: Rachel Morrison: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 32 acres on the head branches of Shoemakin a branch of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 39, 1770-1771, p. 195 (Reel 39).

1771 ERA Rockfish

Reverend William Irvin was one of the early Presbyterian ministers of the county. He received his education in part of the school of Reverend John Todd in Louisa County. He was received by the Presbytery in Hanover in 1769 and settled as pastor of the Cove and Rockfish Churches in 1771. He married Elizabeth Holt daughter of Joseph Holt, who served in the Revolution as 1sy Lt. in 4th Virginia and who purchased land from Colonel Charles Lewis on the Staunton Road west of Ivy Depot, where he resided in 1794. Mr. Irvin bought part of this land from his father in law but sold it in 1783 and the same year purchased from Charles Martin a farm on the South fork of the Hardware River, where J. Goulet Martin now lives, and where he made his home until his death in 1809. His relation to Rockfish Church was dissolved in 1776 and he then devoted his time to preaching at the Cove, D.S. and Mountain Pains Churches. In July 1793 his old preceptor Reverend John Todd, met with a tragic death on his return from a Presbytery at the Cove Church. The road on the east side of Persimmon Mountain passed then as it does still along the bed of the South Hardware for a short distance, there the venerable minister was found laying in the stream with life extinct. Whether he was smitten with an apoplectic stroke or whether his horse took fright and startling, suddenly threw him was not known.  It is said he was accustomed to ride a spirited horse. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Mr. Irvin had 10 children, some of whom attained a degree of eminence in the world. Joseph Holt Irvin, Margaret Irvin, Elizabeth Irvin wife of Dabney C. Gooch, Nancy Irvin wife of Thomas W. Gooch, Sarah Irvin wife of Robert Sangster, John Irvin, William W. Irvin, James Irvin, Thomas Irvin, and David Irvin. Joseph Irvin was admitted to the Albemarle County Bar in 1796, and married Elizabeth Cole daughter of William Cole of North gardens and died in 1805. He left 2 daughter one of whom Susan Irvin was married first to Colonel Thomas Wood, and was the mother of Dr. Alfred Wood and Mrs. Jeremiah A. Early, and secondly to John Fray. John Irvin lived on the old place was a magistrate of the county and died in 1828 leaving 8 children all of whom removed to Campbell and Prince Edward Counties. William Irvin became a member of the Albemarle County bar, but immigrated to Lancaster Ohio, where he was appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court, elected to Congress in 1828. Thomas Irvin joined his brother in Ohio and became Judge of Lancaster Circuit. David Irvin was also a lawyer received the appointment of Governor of Wisconsin Territory and afterwards settled in Texas where he was left by the war with only shreds of a large fortune, and where he died. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

1771 Era: Evan Shelby was an immigrant from Wales and at first settled in Maryland near Hagerstown. There his son Isaac Shelby was born in 1750, In the year 1771  father and son were both in Southwestern Virginia in the neighborhood of Bristol, and there the home of Evan Shelby continued to be during his life. It is natural to suppose that his wife, whose maiden name was Letitia Cox accompanied them to their new home in the West. Whether she was visiting friends in Albemarle or was passing through on a journey at the period of her last sickness, it is impossible now to ascertain. But the plain well preserved inscription on her tombstone leaves no doubt that this vicinity was the place of her death. A tradition in the Floyd family states that about 1680 Nathaniel Davis who was a Native of WALES, married a child Nicketti the daughter of an Indian Chief Opechancanough the brother of Powhattan. Robert Davis was a son of these parents and an ancestor of Jefferson Davis President of the Confederacy and a granddaughter of Robert Davis was the wife of Evan Shelby. Probability is lent to this account by the fact that Robert Davis had a son Samuel Davis who would thus be the Uncle to Letitia Shelby. Samuel Davis was the owner of several tracts of land in Albemarle County on the North Fork of Rockfish River, on Green Creek and on both sides of Moore's Creek adjoining the Carter Lands. At the time of her death Letita Cox Shelby may have been visiting this man. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

1771 Feb 16: Rachel Morrison: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 53 acres or both sides of Burmuding of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 39, 1770-1771, p. 321 (Reel 39).

1771 Aug 3: Ezra Morrison: Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 180 acres on the south branches of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 40, 1771-1772, p. 534 (Reel 39).

1772 Aug 1: Rachel Morrison: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 150 acres on the branches of Stony Creek of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 40, 1771-1772, p. 751 (Reel 39).

ERA OF 1773

The First Baptist Church in the county was organized in Jan. 1773. This even took place in the Lewis Meeting House, which stood on old David Lewis's place, on the elevated ground south of Staunton Road, about where the house of Mrs. Humbert now stands. The Church commenced wit a membership of 48 persons, George Twyman who lived just south of Earlysville, was one of its original members and at a meeting held 2 months later as Moderator. The Influence of the Presbyterian polity under which doubtless many of its members had grown up in was apparent in their earliest proceedings. The original organization was erected by 2 ministers and an Elder and at subsequent meetings it was determine that the feeling of the Church concerning elders and deacons should be made known. It was several years without a Pastor but was occasionally supplied by such ministers as John Waller, and Elijah and Lewis Craig. This Church was variously called by the names of Albemarle, Buck Mountain, and Chestnut Grove. IN 1801 they took possession of the Old Buck Mountain Church of Establishment, which had been disused by the Episcopalians. When the place of worship was claimed by its former owners, they removed to the union church in Earlsville in 1833, and in 1879 erected the present building about a mile west of that Place. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Andrew Tribble was chosen their Pastor in 1777 and ordained by Lewis Craig and others. How long Mr. Tribble continued in that relationship is not known. He purchased a farm of 175 acres a short distance below the D.S. Tavern which he sold in 1785 and it is likely he performed his pastoral duties until that time. William Woods, distinguished as Baptist Billy, was ordained at Lewis's Meeting House by Messers Tribble and Benjamin Burgher in 1780 and became the Pastor when the Work of MR. Tribble ceased. In 1798 Mr. Woods became a candidate for the Legislature, ands as the Law of Virginia at that time prohibited a Minister from holding Civil office, he relinquished his ministerial calling at Garrison's meeting House in November of that year. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

When the Church was first formed it was the bounds of the DOVER ASSOCIATION, which then embraced the whole State, In 1791 the Albemarle Association was formed which included the Territory South of the Rapidan and west running from Barnett’s Ford on the Rappahannock to the mouth of BYRD CREEK on the James. Up to this time 8 churches had been founded, 4 of which lay with in the present limits of the County ( Albemarle) Totier in 1775, Ballenger’s Creek about the same time, Priddy's Creek in 1784, and Whiteside now Mount Ed in 1788. Martin Dawson became a minister soon after 1774 and preached for many years at Tootier Church which was situated near Porter’s Precinct, and was commonly known as Dawson's Meeting House. His labors however extended largely over the whole county. Benjamin Bugher who lived on the Headwaters of the MECHUMS River, was for a long period the pastor at Mount Ed Church. In 1822 he Benjamin Fickklin and John Goss had advertised to begin a protracted meeting on a certain day at Mountain Plaines, but on that very day of the appointment Mr. Burgher rested from his early labors.Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

1775 Jul 17: The Convention which met on July 17th of that year, formed 16 districts in the colony in which troops should be raised for its defense. In one of these Albemarle County was associated with Buckingham, Amherst and East Augusta Counties. The Committee of the district convened on Sept. 8 1775 at the house of James Woods in Amherst County. There were present from Albemarle County Charles Lewis and George Gilmer, from Amherst County William Cabell, John and Hugh Rose, from Buckingham County John Nicholas, Charles Patterson and John Cabell, and from Augusta County Sampson Matthews, Alexander McClanahan and Samuel McDowell. Thomas Jefferson was the other delegate from Albemarle County but he was absent at the Continental Congress, of which he had been appointed a member the previous June. At this meeting it was resolved that two Companies of minuteman should be enlisted in each of the Counties of Albemarle, Amherst and Buckingham and four in that of Augusta County. That these 10 companies should constitute a battalion under George Matthews of Augusta County and after the Rev. War he became Governor of Georgia. Colonel was Charles Lewis of Albemarle County, Lt. Colonel Daniel Gaines of Amherst County, as Major was Thomas Patterson of Buckingham County as Commissary. This battalion was raised and went to camp November 11th 1775, three miles from Rockfish Gap, and continued in training till Dec. 6th 1775. Inquiry fails to find any local tradition of the place of its camp but it is said that the grounds at that distance from the Gap and admirably fit for military exercises may be found on the main road between Hebron and Rhodes Churches. Charles Lewis appears as Colonel of a battalion the next year and was ordered by the Competition in May to North Carolina. He was afterwards Colonel of the 14th Virginia Regiment and at the time of his death in 1779 Commander of Charlottesville Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Soldiers from Albemarle fought on all the important battle fields of the war, Long Bridge, Trenton, Stony Point Brandywine, Germantown, Saratoga, Monmouth, Savannah, Charleston, Camden ,King's Mountain, Cowpens, Guilford, Eutaw, and Yorktown. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

Era of 1776

The barracks Road was laid out during the Revolution and has since been a noted way, through much deflected from its original course. It started from the West end of high Street ran on the highland south of the ravine crossed by the present road near Kellytown. Remains of the stone fences lining it can still be seen- passed over Preston Heights not far from the mansions of Colonel Preston and General Rosser, forking on the summit with the road to Carr's Ford continued past Colonel Duke's and the colored settlement of Georgetown to the ridge east of Ivy Creek and descended to the ford of the Creek past old Ivy Church. Near town, a branch of the Barracks Road diverged from its main course on the eastern slope of Preston heights and ran into the Three Notched road not far from the Junction Depot. The Present location of the Barracks Road immediately west of Charlottesville was fixed about the Beginning of the Century. A contention respecting it arose between Isaac Miller and john Carr, Clerk of the District Court,  and owner of adjoining lands. After several views and reports on the subject it was finally determined according to the ideas of Mr. Miller, whose residence at the time was Rose Valley or near the Mason Garden. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

1776 May 16: Amherst County: John Snead petitions for Ferry across the Rockfish River:

Note John Snead name is in Henry County, and Charlotte Co. Records. After this date near Johnson families: Thomas Snead is also in 1704 St. Peters Parish Records.

1777 Era: General George Rogers Clark the famous conqueror of the North West Territory first saw light in Albemarle County. His Grandfather Jonathan Clark of King and Queen County joined with Hickman, graves and Smith as already mentioned in patenting more than 3,000 acres of land on the north side of the Rivanna River opposite of the Free Bridge. In the division of this land, the upper part fell to Jonathan Clarks family and in a house situated a short distance from the present residences of Capt. C. M. McMurdo, John Clark the son of Jonathan Clark lived and where George Clark was born. The wife of John Clark and mother to George Clark was Ann Rogers a sister of Giles Rogers, George Rogers and Byrd Rogers all of who possessed land in Albemarle County in the Buck Mountain region. The birth of George Rogers Clark occurred in 1752 and when he was about 5 years of age his father moved to Caroline County where a Kinsman had devised to him a handsome estate. It is not known that in his active and entire life that general Clark was again in the county of his birth but Once. In the fall of 177 he traveled from Kentucky to Richmond to procure means for setting on foot and expedition to Illinois, which he had already conceived and which he carried out the next year. His route lay through the Cumberland Gap and the Holston Country. He came down the Valley and crossed the Blue Ridge at Rockfish Gap or one of the gaps just above. He states in his diary that he spent the night at a Mr. Black's who was beyond question James Black a son of the old Presbyterian minister, who kept a tavern on the place afterwards owned by Alexander Garret and his son Dr. Bolling Garret. On his was to Richmond next day he passed through Charlottesville where he tarried long enough to purchase a pair of shoes. During this visit to Richmond he became acquainted with Mr. Jefferson and deeply impressed him with his vigorous and heroic qualities. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

1779 ERA COVE CHURCH

The different Gentry  families in Albemarle County seem to have sprung from the  same head. Nicholas Gentry died in 1779 leaving  11 children, Moses Gentry, David Gentry, Nicholas Gentry, Mary Hinson, Robert Gentry, Benajah Gentry, Nathan Gentry, Martin Gentry, Elizabeth Haggard, Jane Timberlake, and Ann Jenkins. Moses Gentry bought land in 1778 from Samuel Gay on the Old Lynchburg Road north of Garlands Store. He was a ruling Elder in the Cove Church. He died in 1810, his children were Claiborne Gentry, Nicholas Gentry who married sisters Jane Maxwell and Mary Maxwell daughters of Bezaleel Maxwell, Frances Gentry wife of Thomas Fitzpatrick, and Joanna Gentry wife of Joseph Walters. Addison Gentry a son of Nicholas Gentry married  Lucy  Leake a sister of Shelton F. Leake. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Prior to 1778 David Gentry and Martin Gentry were owners of land on Doyle’s River, which afterwards sold to Benajah Brown. A son of one of the brothers probably was Richard Gentry, who in 1784 married Jane Harris a daughter of James Harris and removed to Kentucky, and whose descendants held a reunion at Crab Orchard in August 1898. And from one of them in all likelihood came George Gentry who died in 1818, whose home was not far from Free Union, whose wife’s name was Elizabeth, and whose children were James Gentry, George Gentry, William Gentry, Frances Gentry wife of Nathaniel Tate, Austin Gentry, Aaron Gentry, Christopher Gentry, Martha Gentry wife of John Walton, Elizabeth Gentry wife of Edward Ballard, and Nancy Gentry wife of Edward Walton. The children of Christopher Gentry and his wife Sarah were Martha Gentry wife of Joel Maupin, Mary Gentry wife of Frances Via, France Gentry wife of Thomas Gibson, Elizabeth Gentry wife of James Dunn, Paschal Gentry, Henry Gentry, and Dicey Gentry wife of Garrett White. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Benajah Gentry lived on Biscuit Run where he commenced to Purchase land in 1764. In 1817 he transferred his property to his son Robert Gentry, although his death did not occur till 1830. Martha Gentry the wife of Elijah Dawson, son of Rev. Martin who removed to Callaway County Missouri and Elizabeth Gentry wife of  William Goodman, were daughters of Benajah Gentry. Robert Gentry married Mary Wingfield daughter of Francis Wingfield and was the father of Albert Gentry. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Robert Gentry believed to be the son of Nicholas Gentry bought in 1766 from Martha widow of Samuel Arnold, a place on the head waters of Ivy Creek, which he and his wife Judith Joyner sold in 1776 to John Woodson. Philip Joyner whose daughter was the wife of Robert Gentry, and who once owned the land the University stands on, devised the land to his 2 grandsons, Charles Gentry and Jesse Gentry. They sold the one in 1775 and the other in 1783 and appeared to have migrated to North Carolina. Whether Robert Gentry just mentioned was the same with the son of Nicholas is unknown. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

The VIA Surname is connected to the Johnson research of Leonard Johnson

1779 John Watson purchased land in the Northwestern part of the county on Rocky Creek. He was succeeded by his son John Watson who was distinguished as John Watson of High Top, the latter died in 1833.

 

About 1790 John Watson who is known as of Milton, came to the County from Amherst County. He was the son of James Watson formerly of James City County. He settled in Milton and closely identified with its interests from its foundation. He was appointed a magistrate in 1800 and served as Sheriff in 1825. In 1813 he purchased from Brown, Rives & Co. Forest Hill a plantation on the south side of The Rivanna below Milton, containing upwards of 1,000 acres. He made this his residence until his death in 1841. His wife was Jane Price daughter of Richard Price, and his children Eliza Watson wife of Ira Garrett, James Watson, Richard Watson, John W.C. Watson, Isabella Watson wife of Charles Shaw, Matthew P. Watson Egbert R. Watson, and Ellen Watson wife of John C. Stinton. J. Richard Watson married Ann Clark daughter of James Clark, was a merchant in Charlottesville and a hotel keeper at the University and died at Forest Hill in 1867. John W.C. Watson was admitted to the Albemarle County bar in 1830 he married Catharine a sister of professor John A.G. Davis and removed to Holly Springs Mississippi. He represented that State in the Confederate Senate during the War. Matthew P. Watson married Eliza Norris daughter of Opie Norris and removed to Southwest Virginia. Egbert Watson spent his life in Charlottesville as on of the leading lawyers at its bar, and Judge of the Circuit Court at the close of the war. He was thrice married first to Mary Norris daughter of Opie Norris secondly to Jane Creigh of Greenbrier and thirdly to Elizabeth White daughter of Isaac White. He died in 1887. Dr. Daniel E. Watson a kinsman of this family came to the county from Amherst County and in 1837 bought from France B. Hart the plantation in the RICH COVE, on which he resided till his death in 1882. He was appointed a magistrate in 1838. He married Mary Harris daughter of Henry T. Harris. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Joseph Watson an immigrant from Ireland in 1832 bought the Andrew Leitch agent of the Dinsmore estate, Orange Dale, where he lived until his death several years ago. His wife was Ellen Leitch a sister of Samuel Leitch Jr. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

1780 July 14: Amherst Co.: Robert Johnson: 300 acres on the branches of Meriwether Branch of Rockfish River: Source Lad Office Patents B 1779-1780 pg 437, reel 43: Library of Virginia Archives section.

1780 July 20: Michael Morrison: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 48 acres on the north branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents E, 1775-1776, 1780-1781 (v.2 p.463-930), p. 161 (Reel 46).

1787 Feb 2 Power of Attorney John Small of Henry Co gives power of Attorney to James Denny ( also spelled Doonly) to sell a tract of land in Amherst Co Va  on the east side of Rockfish River under the Pilate Mountain that joins James Woods. Signed John Small: Witn: William Amos, George Mabry, proved 1787 Aug 13:

Pilate Mountain

Era 1783:

As early as 1783, just  after the Revolutionary Was a movement was begun to  establish a grammar school in Albemarle. This appears from the letter of Mr. Jefferson, written the last day of that year. In it he narrates the efforts he had made to secure a teacher, some literary character of the IRISH nation, or some person for Scotland " from that country we are sure of having a sober attentive men". A charter was obtained from the Albemarle Academy in 1803, but thought trustees were elected, nothing further was accomplished. Mr. Jefferson was President of the United States, and had the affairs of the Country on his hands, the mainspring was therefore wanting. In 1814 he was appointed a trustee. Agitation at once commenced, plans were devised a site was pitched upon the town of Charlottesville selected. But the project was soon enlarged, Albemarle Academy grew into Central College. The legislature made this change of name in 1816, and provided for Appointment by the Governor of 6 visitors, who should choose professors, and superintend the affairs of the new institution. The visitors were Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, James Monroe, Joseph C. Cabell, David Watson and John H. Cocke. The next year and was brought from John M. Perry, the present site of the University and on Oct. 6th, 1817 the corner stone of Central College was laid. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

The  design received a start and like the letting out of waters could not be stopped. Matters ripened fast. In Feb. 1818 the Legislature enacted that the Governor should appoint Commissioners, one from each Senatorial district of the State who should meet in the month of August in the that year at a tavern in Rockfish Gap on the Blue ridge and settle the site of a university, a plan for its construction, the sciences to be taught, the number of professors, and a legislative bill for organizing and  managing the institution. That body was appointed and consisted for the following gentleman: Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Spencer Roane, Creed Taylor, Peter Randolph, William Brockenbough, Archibald Rutherford, Henry E. Watkins, Armistead T. Mason, Hugh Holmes, John G. Jackson, William H. Cabell, Nathaniel H. Clairborne, William A.E. Dade, William Jones, James Breckinridge, Philip  C. Pendleton, Archibald Stuart, Thomas Wilson, M.C. Taylor, Philip Slaughterm John Johnson, R. B. Taylor and ______________ Faulkner. All except the last three met at the tavern designated, which was the predecessor of the present Mountain Top, and  was kept at the time by two brothers named Leake, kinsman to the late Honorable Shelton F. Leake. Their hail of assembly was a low white washed room, furnished with a deal dining table, and split bottom chairs. The Commissioners were Men of distinction, yet with them as with others local predilections had their weight. Jefferson who was chosen President strongly endeavored to secure Central College as the site. Two other places were proposed, Staunton and Lexington. After mature consideration the vote was taken, and stood 16 for Central College three for Lexington and 2 for Stauntion. The work was virtually accomplished on Jan. 25th 1819. Central College was by the legislature transmuted into the University of Virginia.

Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville

1783 Sept 1: Amherst Co. Va: Will Probated: John Sorrell: Witnesses were on 25 March 1778 (?) Charles Martin, Terisha Turner, Benjamin Moore, Ephrain Blane, Samuel Anderson 

Research Note: Terisha Turner ( Terry turner) is the Grand father  to Susannah Turner married to Terisha Johnston died aft 1840 in Henderson Co. Tn.

 

See http://www.sorrellsgenealogy.com/richardsorrells.html States John Sorrell was born abt 1697 died 1783 Children Identified in the Will; " Wife is Mary Coleman Sorrell: Daughter Katy Howard: Grand Daughter Mary Ann Snead and her two oldest children Francis and John Sneed: Grandson Martin Dawson: Grandsons Thomas and William Dawson: Great Grand Son: John Sorrell Dawson son of my Grandson John Dawson and wife Sally: John Sorrell Dawson brother is Pleasant Dawson when he comes of age, his brother Benjamin Dawson:::: A great Grandson Martin Dawson son of grandson John Dawson and wife Sally: Great grand daughter Susanna Dawson daughter of grand son John Dawson and wife Sally, also another Great grand daughter Mary Dawson. Great grand daughter Priscilla Dawson, Nancy Dawson, and Betsy Dawson. Peter Lyons is executor of this will. Amherst Co. Will Book 2 page 140.

Tradition relates, that the immigrant Hamner bore the name of Nicholas Hamner, that he came from Wales and settled in Middlesex County and that he had six or seven sons. Three of them fixed their homes in Albemarle County, The first who appears on the records is William Hamner. In 1759 he bought lands from Thomas Fitzpatrick nearly 500 acres on the South fork of the Hardware River not far from jumping Hill. The same year he obtained a patent for nearly 200 acres on the North Fork of Hardware River, and acquired near by upwards  of 700 acres. All of which he sold in 1782 to Colonel John Old. In 1777 he purchased from  Dr. James Hopkins about 1500 acres on the Totier, He died in 1785. William Hamner and his Wife had 11 children Jeremiah Hamner, Turner Hamner, Richardson Hamner, Henley Hamner, Samuel Hamner, Mildred Hamner wife of Joseph Moon, Elizabeth Hamner the wife of Thomas Fitzpatrick, Mary Hamner the wife of a Perry, Susan Hamner the wife of Reuben TURNER, Rebecca Hamner the wife of James Turner and of David Strange. Jeremiah Hamner and Henley Hamner lived in Biscuit Run Valley, Turner Hamner at the mouth of Eppes Creek, Samuel Hamner near Jumping Hill, Jacob Moon the Turner and the Strange Families on Totier. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

Though the Turners soon removed to Amherst County. Jeremiah Hamner married Rebecca Harper daughter of Castleton Harper and died in 1815. Most if his children emigrated to Georgia and Alabama, but his daughter Mary Hamner remained in Albemarle County as the first wife of Samuel Barksdale who died in 1817. She married it is believed to a Morris probably a daughter of Hugh Rice Morris, for the Totier region and his children were William, Elizabeth who married Rice Garland, Henley, Morris, Samuel, Jane, the wife of a Thomas, Rhoda the wife of James Nimmo. William died in 1831 and his children were John T. Jesse B, Susan the wife of a Rice, Martha the wife of Jacob Waltman, Austin and Samuel who emigrated to Tennessee and William, Morris and Samuel married sisters named Lucas and about beginning of the century removed to Charlotte County. The latter was the father of James G. and Thomas L. ministers in the Presbyterian Church. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

The Second of the brothers was Robert Hamner, who died in 1750. In 1772 his son Nicholas Hamner conveyed to William Hamner 270 acres at the mouth of Eppes Creek which was devised to him by his father. In 1784 he purchase lands North of Glendower, which is still the residence of his grandson. In 1794 he was associated in business with Samuel Dyer at Warren, where he died soon after his wife Agnes, daughter of Giles Tompkins, and his children Susan Hamner the wife of John L. Cobb of Bedford and mother of Nicholas Hamner Cobb a former Chaplain of the University and the first Episcopal Bishop of Alabama, Nicholas who married Mary Garland the daughter of Edward Garland, Edmund who married Charlotte Clarkson the daughter of Manoah Clarkson, James who married Isabell Maxwell, Elizabeth married a Scruggs of Buckingham and Nancy the wife of Samuel Childress. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

The Third of the brother is believed to be John Hamner who lived in the Biscuit Run valley and first appears as a purchaser of land in 1778. He married Mary WINGFIELD daughter of Charles and Rachel Wingfield and his children are Charles W. Hamner of Buckingham from whom descended James Hamner and Wade Hamner of Lynchburg, John Hamner who married Susan Fretwell, Francis Hamner who married Sarah Eubank, Thomas Hamner who  married Maria Garland daughter of Edward Garland and removed to Lewis County West Virginia, Mary Hamner and Susan Hamner who were married to Meekins Carr and John Carr who emigrated to Dickson County Tennessee. Elizabeth Hamner  the wife of Samuel S. Gay and Sarah Hamner the wife of David Gentry. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

My Notes on William Hamner he is married to Elizabeth Henley the daughter of Leonard Henley who in 1745 Sept; Leonard Henley crossing Drinking hole Run on the N side Little Drinking Hole on the line dividing this Co. from Goochland, in slashy ground adj. John Martin, Johnson, Shoemaker, Robert Hardwick & sd Henley’s own line Sep 1745 CPv5 Research of Linda Starr:: Leonard Henley also owns lands in 1744 March 15: Leonard Henley: Goochland Co: 30 acres on the Branches of Tuckahoe Creek: Land Office Patents @ 22 1743-1745 vol 1 & 2: pg 220 on reel 20: Library of Virginia Archives section. Also 1745 Sept 20: Leonard Henley: Goochland Co: 400 acres on both sides and near the head  of a branch Called Phil’s Creek: Land Office Patents # 22, 1743-1745 vol 1 & 2 pg 509 on reel 20 Library of Virginia archives Section.

We also know that William Hamner and Miss Henley's daughter Married one Stephen Reuben Turner and they have a daughter Susannah Turner that marries Terisha Johnson, who moves to the Nutbush Creek area of Lunenburg and Granville County NC. The area of Nutbush Creek changes to Butte County NC to Warren County NC and to Present day Vance County NC. Their Grandson is Len Henley Johnson of Humphreys County Tn.

1788 March 20: Thomas Morrison Jr:. Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 67 acres on the south branch of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Grants No. 15, 1787-1788, p. 580 (Reel 81).

1789 July 29: Amherst County: Seymore Shropshire: Grantee: 140 acres on a South Branch of the North Fork of Rockfish River. Land Grant # 20 1788-1789 pg 59 on reel 86

 

NOTE: 1828 Samier Seymore Shrophire died he is the son of Winkfield Shropshire who was born in 1728 in Salisbury District of Rockingham Co.NC. his known children are John Shropshire b May 18 1767 and died June 16 1846: James Shropshire ca 1763 married to a Batchelor: Joel’s Shropshire abt 1761 died 1818 in Dickson Co. Tn married to Mary “ Polly” Johnson daughter of Hudson and Agnes Johnson: Sarah Shropshire b ca 1769 married to Thomas Chandler. http://www.hctgs.org/Families/shropshire/aqwg03.htm

 

Notes:  Samier Seymore Shropshire Born abt 1745 Rockingham Co. NC died on Rockfish Creek in Nelson Co. Va. formed from Amherst Co. Va. Rockingham not formed in 1745, but there is a Salisbury District in this time era.

 

Notes it appears Seymore came back to Rockfish River Amherst Co. Va when he obtained the land patent. Note a Jane Murrell is also on this Rockfish Rive, who also left the Matrimony Baptist Church in Rockingham Co. NC

 

Notes the Families of General; John Randolph Robertson also went into NC. from Brunswick Co.-Mecklenburg Co.

1790 July 20: William Johnson: Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Related See also the following surname(s): Johnston, Jonson. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 130 acres on some of the head waters of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Grants No. 22, 1789-1791, p. 422 (Reel 88).

Notes: 1790 July 20: Wm Johnson CGB 22:422;1: 130a Albemarle / hd wo Rockfish Riv http://users.rcn.com/deeds/Albemarle.txt

1793 July 11: John S. Dawson Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 17 acres joining the lands of John Morrison, decd., John Thurmond, and John Sorrel, dec.d. Source: Land Office Grants No. 28, 1792-1793, p. 539 (Reel 94).

1794, William Johnson, & Letty to Sam’t Hiser of Augusta, 60 lbs, 130A Head waters Rockfish, pres: James Anderson, Jno Dillon, John Heizer. Signed “Lettice” Albemarle Co VA DB 11, 294. Albemarle Co VA DB 1793-1795, p 30 from Sherrie Boone
 
Sam’t Hiser
James Anderson,
Jno Dillon

John Heizer

1794 Aug 21: James Morrison Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 30 acres on the south branches of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Grants No. 30, 1793-1799, p. 392 (Reel 96).

1794 May 15: Thomas Morrison: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 124 acres on the south fork of Burmuding a branch of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Grants No. 30, 1793-1799, p. 499 (Reel 96).

About 1830 a few years before and after a number of turnpikes were undertaken, The first was the Staunton and James River, having a charter of incorporation  and extending from the place names Scottsville. It crossed the ridge at Rockfish Gap, and ran through Batesville and Israel's Gap, following for the most part the course of old roads. As far back as 1790 a lottery was authorized by the Legislature to be managed by Francis Walker, William Clark, Nicholas Lewis, John Breckenridge, George Divers, William D. Meriwether, Charles Irving and Isaac Davis to raise not extending four hundreds pounds for the purpose of cutting a road from Rockfish Gap to Nicholas’s and Scott's Landings, what was accomplished in pursuance of this act is not known. The Staunton and James River Turnpike was for a number of years the route of a heavy transportation, passing from the Valley to connect with the James River and Kanawha Canal. Later when plank roads became the fashion of the day, it was converted into a Plank Road Company. Under  its auspices some alterations were made in the grades, particularly avoiding the hills between Kidd’s Mill and North Garden, and between Hart's and Garland's Stores, and an inconsiderable portion near Hughes's Shop was covered with plank, but the coming of the railroads and the temporary nature of the construction destroyed the public interest in its maintenance. The building and support of good roads over which the produce of the farm is to be hauled and rapine and comfortable transit to be enjoyed, constitute a lesson the people have yet to learn. The Staunton and James River Turnpike was abandoned in 1867 and taken back by the County as a common road. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

Albemarle County History pg 96: The only reference to the war of 1812 in the records Occurs in 1866, where an enumeration of the family of James Michie Jr, was presented to the Court. It was there stated that in the contest the gentleman was a corporal in the company of Captain Estes, of the Virginia militia and that a land warrant for 160 acres was issued to his descendants on that account. It is ascertain upon inquiry that a cavalry company from the county commanded by Colonel Samuel Carr and of which Dr. Frank Catt was Surgeon, and an infantry company of which Achilles Broadhead was Captain, were also called into service. From the same source it is learned that William Wertenbaker was a private in Captain Este's company, and Henry Turner the father of the venerable William H. Turner served in the Cavalry. To what point these troops were marched is not known, but as the enemy never l landed on the soil of the State, no occasion happened for their employment in action. In a letter dated Sept. 1814 and written by William Writ, who commanded an artillery company in camp on York River, he says "Frank Gilmer, Jefferson Randolph, the Carr’s and others, have got tired waiting for the British and gone  home"

1839 Era: The first bridge across the Rockfish at Howardsville seems to have been erected in 1839. Prior to that time the river had been crossed at the neighboring fords. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

Albemarle County History pg 95: In 1859 a parcel of land belonging to Mrs. Sophia Johnson containing several springs and lying in a ravine north of Observatory Mountain, together with the right of way for pipes, was condemned for the use of the University.

 

ERA of 1901

Albemarle County has somewhat the shape of a Lozenge. Its Northwest border follows the crest of Blue Ridge. Its boundary on the southwest leaves the Ridge a little North of ROCKFISH GAP, runs a course of South thirty degrees east tell it strikes Rockfish River at the mouth of Green Creek, and then coincides with that river to its junction with the James River. The angle at the south instead of coming to a point is irregularly truncated by the James River, that river forming its border for about 15 miles. The southeastern boundary stats from the lower end of Scottsville, and has a course of north thirty degrees east to the western side of the town of Gordonsville, whence that on the northeast runs north seventy one degrees west till it intersects the top of the Blue Ridge. Its greatest length from north to south is about forty miles and its greatest breadth about the same distance. It has an area of slightly over 750 square miles. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Its surface is greatly diversified, Parrel with the Blue Ridge, the Southwest Mountain traverses its entire extent at an interval of 18 or 20 miles. This range is continuous, except where it breaks to afford a passage for the Rivanna, hardware and Rockfish Rivers. Its highest point Peter's Mountain occurs where it enters the county on the North east having an altitude of perhaps 1500 feet. In its course southward it maintains an elevation of 1000 or 1200 feet until it passes the hardware, when it gradually declines and exhibits a prominence but little different from the surface of the surrounding country. This Mountain is for the most part a single ridge and has none of the lateral offshoots so characteristic of the Blue Ridge, unless for a short distance on the west side of its northern portion. Here and there occur low depressions in its crown, which supply a natural and convenient way for roads. North of the Rivanna are three of these depressions, the most northerly The Turkey Sag so named the Turkey Run a branch of Priddy's Creek which rises at its western base. The Next Stony Point Gap opposite the village of that name and the third Hammock's Gap or Thurman's Gap, which separates Monticello from the continuation of the range called Carter's Mountain. South of the Hardware the range bears the name of Green Mountain. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

In the Northwest part of the County and still more in the southwest, irregular and massive formation raise their heads on High, which from their disorderly appearance pass under the name of the Raged Mountain, jutting from the ridge near the western corner is a huge spur, denominated Buck's Elbow. Across Moorman's River to the north is another lofty spur the Pasture Fence Mountain, so called with out doubt because it contained one of the first enclosures for grazing. It is peculiar feature of this spur as it is of the Whole Blue Ridge that in summer it is covered with a luxuriant growth of blue grass. In its former days large planters commonly owned farms on these Mountains for the special purpose of pasturage. Along the eastern foot of the Pasture Fence lies a rich and beautiful valley which from one of its first settlers is named Brown's Cove and which is watered by and affluent Moorman's River called in early times its North Fork but know known as Doyle's River. Bordering the Cove on the east is a succession of smaller eminences, Pigeon Top, Fox's Mountain and High Top, while scattered towards the northeast are numerous elevations some having the appearance of ridges and some rising as solitary peaks, bearing the names of Currants, Long, Green, Buck and Piney Mountains. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Just west of where the University now stands is a small range with a higher summit at either end, which was originally called Piney Mountain. the north end has the name of Lewis's Mountain and the south Observatory Mountain, from its being the site of the astronomical department of the University. At a short interval southwest of this range are heaped up for some miles great mountainous masses rugged and broken. That might well be termed by the way of evince the ragged Mountains. These heights are skirted on the east by a range which runs with a good degree of continuity to the extreme southwest of the county called on the north side of the Hardware River, Dudleys Mountain, and on the south Gay's, Fan's and Appleberry's Running off from the Ragged Mountains in a westerly direction is a range bearing the names of Martin's and Israel's Mountains indented by Taylor's, martin's and Israel's gap , while south and southeast of Israel's Gap tower aloft some of the loftiest summits in the county. Castle Rock, High Top Chalk and Heard's Mountain's. Some views of the immense piles are truly grand and magnificent. In the midst of these gigantic heaps are found reaches of comparatively level country of prime fertility, one lying along the north fork of the Hardware River called North Garden, another on the South Fork called South Garden and third Rich Cove, separated by a slight elevation from the South Garden on the South. The Section north of the James River is varied by gently sloping hills and that east of the South west Mountains stretches away to the east an extensive plain, and being covered with forest, is known as Flatwoods. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Beside the James River the county is cut throughout its entire breadth by two streams, and is washed at its southwest corner by a third all of considerable size. In the summer the volume of water they discharge is much reduced so much at times that during a remarkable drought in 1806, James O. Carr who was then attending school at Milton was able to stop the entire current of the Rivanna with his hand: but being Mountain streams that is having their sources near the foot of the Blue Ridge or its outlying Spurs, the become speedily filled by heavy rains and the melting snows of winter, frequently rush down with the fury of a torrent and overflow all the low grounds along their banks. The most northerly of these water courses is the Rivanna, which has two forks uniting about 4 miles north of Charlottesville and forming the main stream. The North Fork is made up near the north line of the county by the union of Swift Run and Lynch's River, both of which rise in Greene County near the blue Ridge. It flows southeast and south to its junction with the south fork augmented by Marsh Run, Herring's Run Priddy's and Foster's Creeks flowing into its north side and by BEAVERDAM, Jacob's Run and Flat branch coming from the south. The South Fork is formed by the confluence of Moorman's and Mechum's Rivers and being fed on its north side by Buck Mountain, Naked, Fishing and Powell's Creeks and on its south by Ivy creek, runs eastwardly about five miles to its junction with the north fork. Buck Mountain Creek has a large branch on its west side called Piney Run. Moorman's River rises in the deep ravine between the Blue Ridge and Pasture Fence Mountain known as Sugar hollow and runs a south and then an east course receiving on its north side Doyle's River and Rocky and Ward's Creeks. Mechums River has a greater length some of its head waters springing beyond the County line in Nelson and interlocking with branches of the North Fork of Rockfish River. It has also a more tortuous channel but its general trend is east of North. It receives on its North side Virgin Spring Branch, Stockton's Beaver and Spring Creeks and on its south Whiteside’s Creek, Pounding Branch, and Broadaxes Creek. The Rivanna proper flows south turn to the east in its passage through the South West Mountain for about 4 miles and then runs southeast to the county line. When passing through Fluvanna County it empties into the James at Columbia. In its course through Albemarle it receives Red Bud, Mountain Falls, Carroll and Limestone Creeks on the North, and Meadow, Moore’s, Henderson’s and Buck Island Creeks on the south. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

The Hardware divides into two forks, which join just above its passage through the Southwest Mountain. The North Fork also divides not far from Red Hill Station the south and middle prongs heading near each other on the either side of Tom's mountain while the North prong rises in the Vicinity of Tailors gap. Just before reaching the junction it receives on its north side Sowell's Branch. The South Fork has its source south of Castle Rock and Northwest of Covesville. It makes its way in different directions among the mountain, but its general course is northeast. Its northern tributaries are Jumping Branch and Black Walnut. Its southern Raphine and Eppes Creeks. A well known branch of the latter is Beaverdam, which has recently acquire celebrity from the Soapstone Works successfully operated on its banks. After the union of its forks the hardware pursues a southeast course crosses the county line about three miles north of Scottsville and empties into the James in Fluvanna County. It is enlarged on its northern side by Murphy’s and Turkey Runs and on its southern by Harris Creek, formerly known as Little Eppes and by Cole's Creek formerly called Hudson's Creek. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

The southwestern line of the County is intersected by the head waters of Lynch's, Taylor's, Hickory and Cove Creeks all Branches of the Rockfish River. On the east side of Appleberry's Mountaineer, Ivy, Green and Hog Creeks, debouching into the same stream. Two Creeks of moderate size water the southern part of the county, and fall into the James one at Warren called Ballenger’s Creek. The other about 2 miles above Scottsville called Totier. Both are fed by a number of branches, Meschunk Creek takes its rise not far from Gordonsville, flows southwest and southeast and passing out of the County joins the Rivanna opposite Union Mills. The source of the South Anna are also in Albemarle located not far from that of the Meschunk. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Most of the names given to the features in Albemarle County scenery belonged to them of the earliest times. In the patents first issued the mountain and streams were already indicated by names and they were generally those which still bear. Who gave them, or why in many cases they were given must now be reckoned among the things unknown. Sometime they were suggested by natural circumstances, and sometimes derived from persons who were owners, or occupiers of the neighboring lands. The later have undergone more changes that others because with the lapse of years the names of former residents passed out of remembrance, and those of their successors were applied in their stead. As settlements were made in Different parts of the county at the same time, it has happened that names frequently repeated. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

The Southwest Mountain on which the first lands were entered was originally called Chestnut Mountains. It was also spoken of as Little Mountain. Particular portions had local names for the most part taken from owners or first settlers as Peter's, Carter's, Lively's Sugar Loaf, Monticello. Green Mountain no doubt derived its name from the color of its luxuriant vegetation. The Blue Ridge bore that name from the first planting of  the county. The earliest inhabitants called it the Blue Ledge and the Blue Mountains and occasionally the Great Mountain in opposition to the Little Mountain and occasionally the South Mountain in opposition to the North Mountain on the west side of the Valley. Buck's Elbow and Pasture  Fence at was Smith's Pasture Fence Mountain have always been so called. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

Brown’s Gap and Brown's Cove were named from the family that largely settled in that region. Turk's Gap was first called Jameson's and Jarman's bore the name of  Woods. all from families who lived near by. Rockfish Gap has always had that name acquiring it from the river which rises in part at its base. Pigeon Top  was once called Jameson's Mountain and may have obtained it’s later name form a roost of that bird. Fox's Mountain took its name from a family that lived on it, High Top from its Lofty peak. Currants and Webb’s Mountains were named from persons who possessed the adjoining lands, and Buck mountain and the creek of the same from the abundance of deer that roamed the forests. Piney Mountain was first called Poindexter's Mountain from the man who entered the land at its foot. Yellow Mountain at one time went by the Name of Epperson’s. Castle Rock was denominated from its huge towering form, Chalk Mountain from the light colored rocks which face its crest and Heard's Appleberry, Fan's Gay's Dudley's from primitive settlers in their vicinity. In early times the Mountains north of Moorman's river and south of Mechum's were called Ragged Mountains from their disordered appearance, and not from the garments of their inhabitants as has some times been suggested. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

The Hardware River has always borne that name. Rivanna was in use from the first according to the fashion in vague of honoring Queen Anne with the names of rivers recently discovered. In the earliest patents and deeds it was more frequently called the north fork of the James River, as the James above the Rivanna passed under the name of South Fork or more euphuistically, the Fluvanna. In some instances the Rivanna was simply North River and the Fluvanna the South. The crossing of the Rivanna at the Free bridge was known at the beginning of the century Moore's Ford or Lewis's Ferry according to the stage of water and its north fork was sometimes called, down to a quite recent date, the Little River. Red Bud was first named Levy’s Mill Creek or swamp. In early days swamp seemed to be interchangeable with creek, no doubt from the rubbish of logs and leaves which for ages had obstructed the channels of the smaller streams. Priddy's, Buck Mountain and Rocky Creeks and Jacob's and Piney Runs had those designation from the beginning. The names of Meadow and Ivy Creeks obtained from the earliest times. Moorman's River was named for Thomas Moorman one of the first patentees on its banks and Mechum's from a George Mechum who was an owners of land near its head. The north fork of Mechum's was called Stockton's Creek and its South Fork now regarded as the main stream Stockton's Mill Creek from a numerous family occupying their margins. The middle ford was always termed Virgin Spring Branch. Union Run was first named Mountain Falls Creek, afterwards from being a favorite feeding place of Wagoner’s who brought their produce to Milton it acquired the name Camping branch. Carroll's Creek was original title of that stream. Limestone was first Called Plum Tree Branch then Scales Creek and finally its present name from Washington the only vein of Limestone in the County. Buck Island Creek was also designated from the beginning. It is a mistake to writer Buckeyeland as if derived from the deer eyed tree. The name was taken from in island in the Rivanna opposite its mouth and as in case so many objects of  natural scenery was suggested by the great numbers of deer found everywhere in the country. There were tow other tributaries of the Ravenna below Milton in early times though their names are never heard at present Henderson's and Miller's branches. Moore's Creek has been called from the first. The same is true of Biscuit Run but the names of its branches Plum Orchard on the east and Cow Branch on the west have slipped from the memory of men. A small prong of Moore's above Biscuit Run once had the name of Edge’s Creek it is forgotten now. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

There were 3 Beavernames in the County, one running into Mechunk Creek another into Lynch's river and the third into Eppe's Creek. Besides Ivy Creek that passes the depot of that name, there is another which empties into the Rockfish River. An affluent of Priddy's Creek and one of Ballengers Creek, were both called wolf trap. Wolf Pit was a branch of Beaver Creek, and a cavity on the west side of South West Mountain had the same name.  Mountain was the designation, not only of the present mountain of that name but also of Lewis's Mountain neat the University and of an eminence near afton. A branch of the lower Rockfish was called Buck Island, besides the stream so named that flows into the Rivanna. A Turkey Run empties into Priddy's Creek and another of that name enters into the Hardware River. There were 3 Round Top Mountains, one in the Buck Mountain regions, another not far from Batesville and another near the University. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

White Hall was an election precinct under the successive names of Glenn's Store, William Maupin's Store, Maupin's Tavern, Miller's Tavern, Shumate's Tavern, till at length the present name was established in 1835. For a long time Batesville went by the name of Oliver's Store. Mechum's depot was anciently known as Jarman's Mill and afterwards as Walker's Mill. Ivy Depot was formerly  called Woodville. Th name of  Glendower at first was Scott's Mill  then Dyer's and then Dawson's. Woodridge was for many years denominated McGehee's Old Field. Besides Stony Point on Barboursville Road there was a Stony Point not fro from Scottsville. Free Union formerly went by the name of Nixville and it is still so spoken of by older citzens. Petersburg is appellation of a hamlet on Pridddy's Creek between Southern Railroad and the Barboursville Road. Cartersburg is a straggling collection of house on the hill south of Rio Bridge. Brownton and Lemon Hill stand for places not far from Glendower. Albemarle County History by Reverend  Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va

 

 

As already intimated the Former denizens of teh forest were frequently alluded to in the names by which objects were distinguished. When the county was first occupied, game of ever kind abounded. Traces of the buffalo still remained. A trail is said to have run up Rockfish River to Rockfish Gap. It is also reported that the old Richard Woods road closely followed a buffalo trail. A tract of land belonging to the webb entry, sold in 1769 to Isaac Davis.

Albemarle County History by Reverend Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

HICKORY CREEK FAMILIES

JOHNSON AND ALLIED FAMILIES OF HICKORY CREEK

Albemarle County, Virginia, formed in 1745 from Goochland County

1749 September 5 Charles Lewis: Albemarle Co: Description: 400 acres on both sides of Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 27, 1748-1749, p. 313 (Reel 25).

Charles Lewis:

1750 Nov 3:  Charles Lewis: Albemarle Co: Description: 400 acres on both sides of Hiccory Creek of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 29, 1749-1751 (v.1 & 2 p.1-532), p. 337 (Reel 27).

1750 Nov 3:  John Burns Albemarle Co: Description: 400 acres on both sides of Hiccory Creek of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 29, 1749-1751 (v.1 & 2 p.1-532), p. 338 (Reel 27).

John Burns

1750 Nov 3:  James Lewis Description: 400 acres on both sides of Hiccory Creek of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 29, 1749-1751 (v.1 & 2 p.1-532), p. 333 (Reel 27).

1758 Sept 28: John Burns: Albemarle Co: Description: 394 acres between Rockfish River and Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 33, 1756-1761 (v.1, 2, 3 & 4 p.1-1095), p. 492 (Reel 31-32).

1758 Dec 15: Charles Smith: Albemarle Co: Description: 400 acres on Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 33, 1756-1761 (v.1, 2, 3 & 4 p.1-1095), p. 523 (Reel 31-32).

1760 July 15: Thomas Henderson: Albemarle Co:  Description: 239 acres on the head of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 34, 1756-1765, p. 574 (Reel 33-34). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.

Notes: Thomas Henderson

1760 Sept. 10: Albemarle CO.: James Johnston: 58 acres on both side of north branch of Hickory Creek: Source land Office Patents no 33, 1756 -1761 ( v. 1 & 2 p.1-1095) pg 900, reel 31-32: Library of Virginia Archives

James Johnston 58 acs on both sides of a North br of Hickory Cr adj Charles Smith Sep 10, 1760 [regranted in Amherst Co. 1772 to John Laurence] CPv6 research of Linda Starr

Amherst County formed 1761 from Albemarle County

1761 (Prior to) Albemarle CO.; James Johnson one who had an interest in Old Albemarle Co: First Settler of Amherst Co.

1762 March 25: William Morrison: Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Albemarle County. Description: 250 acres on Cub Creek a branch of Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 34, 1756-1765, p. 979 (Reel 33-34).

1762 Sept 25:  AMHERST CO: Charles Smith Description: 150 acres on the Branches of Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 35, 1762-1764 (v.1 & 2 p.1-556), p. 3 (Reel 35).

1763 Aug 30: James Gammell: Albemarle Co: Description: 264 acres on both sides of Hickory Creek of Rockfish River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 35, 1762-1764 (v.1 & 2 p.1-556), p. 353 (Reel 35). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.

Notes: James Gammell

1764 May 7 (?) Amherst Co: Deed Bk A:200. BENJ. MOORE, Amherst, to JOHN DAWSON, Amherst, 20 lbs for 100 acs, Fork of Cove and Hickory Creek of Rockfish. Lines: JOHN LYON, JOHN SORRELL, JOHN CRAWFORD.

Notes: Benjamin Moore:

Notes: John Dawson

Notes: John Lyon

Notes: John Sorrell

Notes: John Crawford

1767 July 10:  Willoughby Pugh: Albemarle Co: Description: 99 acres on mountains at the heads of branches of Hickory Creek and Hardware River. Source: Land Office Patents No. 36, 1764-1767 (v.1 & 2 p.557-1083), p. 1053 (Reel 36). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41.

Notes: Willoughby Pugh

1767 Sept 10:  James Douglas  Location: Amherst County. Description: 46 acres on the southeast side of  Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 37, 1767-1768, p. 79 (Reel 37).

Notes: James Douglas

1767 Sept 10:  James Douglas  Location: Amherst County Description: 58 acres on a small branch of Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 37, 1767-1768, p. 79 (Reel 37).

 

1768 July 20: John Sorrel,. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 95 acres on the south branch of the Cove Creek and the north branch of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 37, 1767-1768, p. 378 (Reel 37).

 

1769 July 14: William Morrison Jr: Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 66 acres on the south branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 38, 1768-1770, p. 787 (Reel 38).

Notes: William Morrison Jr:

1769 July 14:  John Lackey Jr:  Location: Amherst County. Description: 53 acres on the south branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 38, 1768-1770, p. 769 (Reel 38).

Notes: John Lackey Jr:

1770 May 12: Edward Moseley: Amherst County. Description: 185 acres on the head branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 39, 1770-1771, p. 6 (Reel 39).

Notes: Edward Moseley

1772 June: John Laurence both sides North Br of Hiccory Cr adj Charles Smith June 1772. Granted James Johnson in Albemarle Co. 1760 CPv7 research of Linda Starr

Notes: John Laurence or John Lawrence

1772 June 20: John Laurence Description: 58 acres on both sides of the north branch of Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents No. 40, 1771-1772, p. 658 (Reel 39).

1774 April 11: Louisa County Book: D, Page: 182, Grantor: Richard Chapman, , Grantee: Robert Douglas, ,
Richard Chapman of Hanover Co, St. Pauls Parish, Robert Douglas of Louisa Co., Trinity Parish; £200 for 1,300 acres of land in Trinity parish; Beg. On Martha Johnsons corner and running on her line to Bickertons line, then on Bickerton's line to Bolings line, then to Dashpers line, to Raglands line, Major Johnsons line, to Hughes line to beginning. It being the remaining part of a tract of land lying on both sides of Hickory creek, patented by the late Col. Nicholas Meriwether and willed to Mrs. Jane Chapman, mother to this Richard Chapman[ see DB A, pg 409). NO M&B

25 March 1780. Will of John Sorrell, Amherst Co. To my wife, MOLLY COLEMAN SORRELL, Dwelling house, grounds, one negro woman, Sall, orchards, horse and side saddle, household and kitchen furniture, milk cows, 600 pounds gross pork, one hundred weight of beef , one bushel of salt, five barrels corn, one barrel of wheat, six pounds of sugar, ten pounds of tallow, and two pair of shoes which she is to have each year she lives my widow. The house to be kept in repair at the expense of my estate.

To my daughter, KATY HOWARD, and her heirs forever, thirty pounds currency .

To my granddaughter, MARY ANN SNEED, and her two oldest children, FRANCES and JOHN SNEED ten pounds currency to them and their heirs forever to be paid three years after my death.

To my grandson, MARTIN DAWSON, one hundred pounds currency, to be paid four years after my death, and likewise twenty shillings each year he continues a preacher of the Gospel, which is to be paid yearly.

To my grandsons, THOMAS and WILLIAM DAWSON, each ten pounds currency to be paid five years after my death. To my great grandson, JOHN SORRELL DAWSON, son of my grandson, JOHN DAWSON and SALLY , his wife, that part of my land I now live on lying on the north side of Hickory Creek provided he the said JOHN SORRELL DAWSON pay his brother PLEASANT DAWSON one hundred pounds currency within one year after PLEASANT comes of age, and to his brother BENJAMIN DAWSON the like sum to be paid within two years after BENJAMIN comes of age. If JOHN S. DAWSON should refuse to pay his brothers, then the land shall be publicly sold and the money divided among the three brothers.

To my great-grandson , JOHN SORRELL DAWSON, my negro DINAH , to be possessed by him when he comes of lawful age.

To my great-grandson, PLEASANT DAWSON, my negro, BEN and to BENJAMIN DAWSON, my great-grandson, I give my negro, GOLIATH, when they come of lawful age. To MARTIN DAWSON, son of JOHN DAWSON and SALLY his wife, my negro boy SQUIRE, to be possessed by him when he comes of lawful age.

I give to my great-granddaughter, SUSANNA DAWSON, daughter of my grandson JOHN DAWSON and SALLY, my negro , FANNY, to be possessed by her when of lawful age or day of marriage. To my great-granddaughter, MARY DAWSON, daughter of my grandson JOHN DAWSON and SALLY, my negro RACHEL, to be possessed by her when of lawful age or day of marriage. To my great-granddaughter, PRYSILLA DAWSON, daughter of JOHN and SALLY DAWSON, my negro DICY, to be possessed by her when of lawful age or day of marriage. To my great-granddaughter, NANCY DAWSON, daughter of JOHN and SALLY DAWSON, my negro WINNEY, to be possessed by her when of age or day of marriage. To BETSY DAWSON, daughter of JOHN and SALLY DAWSON, my negro MILLY.

To my grandson, JOHN DAWSON, son of MARTIN DAWSON and wife, PRYSILLA, the remainder of my lands, negroes, stocks of all kinds, their increase to him and his heirs forever.

I appoint my two grandsons, JOHN DAWSON and MARTIN DAWSON and PETER LYONS executors of this my last will and testament. Witness my hand and seal this twenty fifth day of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty. Signed, JOHN SORRELL (seal).

Witnesses: CHARLES MARTIN, TERISH TURNER, BENJAMIN MOORE, EPHRAIM BLANE, SAMUEL ANDERSON. Probated 1 September 1783, AMHERST CO. VA.

Contributed by Thelma Faye Prince on May 30, 1997

 

1780 July 20: Michael Morrison: Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-. Note Location: Amherst County. Description: 48 acres on the north branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents E, 1775-1776, 1780-1781 (v.2 p.463-930), p. 161 (Reel 46).

Notes: Michael Morrison

1780 July 20: Capt. John Dawson: Location: Amherst County. Description: 146 acres on the north branches of Rockfish River and on both sides west of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents E, 1775-1776, 1780-1781 (v.2 p.463-930), p. 322 (Reel 46).

Notes: Capt. John Dawson

1780 July 20: Thomas Sowell: Location: Amherst County. Description: 46 acres on the north branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents E, 1775-1776, 1780-1781 (v.2 p.463-930), p. 264 (Reel 46).

Notes: Thomas Sowell

1780 July 20: Thomas Sowell” Location: Amherst County. Description: 50 acres on the north branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents E, 1775-1776, 1780-1781 (v.2 p.463-930), p. 260 (Reel 46).

1780 July 20:  Michael Morrison: Amherst Co: Description: 48 acres on the north branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Patents E, 1775-1776, 1780-1781 (v.2 p.463-930), p. 161 (Reel 46).

1780 July 20:  Charles Yancey: Amherst Co: Description: 132 acres on the head branches of Hickory and Taylors Creek. Source: Land Office Patents E, 1775-1776, 1780-1781 (v.2 p.463-930), p. 316 (Reel 46).

Charles Yancey

1781- 1783 John Sorrel Note Place of residence: Bedford County. Note Lists: I, p. 20. Summary The certificates issued by the commissioners of the provision law include date, a description of the item impressed including its value, and the name of the owner of the item. Court booklets and lists compiled by the county courts contain excerpts from the court proceedings and lists of authenticated certificates. The commissioner’s books recorded the date payment was authorized, the name of the claimant, and a description of the property. Other Format Available on microfilm. Public Service Claims. Court Booklets and Lists (reels 1-4) (arranged by county). Biog./Hist. Note During its session begun in May 1780 the General Assembly passed an act authorizing the governor to impress supplies needed by the American army. The governor appointed commissioners of the provision law in each locality to carry out the terms of the act. The commissioner, when he impressed property, gave the owner a certificate describing what was taken. Between 1781 and 1783 county courts held special sessions at which certificates were presented and authenticated, and booklets listing authenticated certificates were compiled and sent to Richmond for settlement. Two commissioners appointed to settle the claims recorded those for which they authorized payment, and warrants were issued by the auditor of public accounts. Related Work These records are part of Auditor of Public Accounts. Administration of State Government: Military Expenditures - Public Claims. Impressed Property Claims and are housed in the Library of Virginia.

 

1785 July 5: Benjamin Harris: Location: Amherst County. Description: 49 acres on both sides of Hickory Creek Source: Land Office Grants Q, 1785, p. 444 (Reel 57).

Notes: Benjamin Harris

1785 Oct 5:  Benjamin Harris: Albemarle Co: Description: 150 acres on the head of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants R, 1785, p. 620 (Reel 58). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-.

1785 Nov 7; Amherst Deed Book F, p. 21
JNO.
THURMOND, Albemarle, to JNO. THURMOND, JR, AC, for 20 sh, 125 acres – part of 250 acres Cub Creek, branch of Hickory. Lines: Col. CHAS. LEWIS – divided by consent between GUTTRIDGE & JNO. THURMOND, JR. – line chopt by JNO. THURMOND. http://www.art-rageous.net/ThurmondDeeds-Amherst.html

Notes: Jno Thurmond or Jonathan Thurmond

Notes: Col. Charles Lewis

Notes: Guttridge

1787 July 30: Benjamin Harris: Albemarle Co; Description: 154 acres on the branches of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 11, 1787, p. 633 (Reel 77). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-.

Benjamin Harris

1793 June 27 Zachariah Roberts Amherst Co. Description: 65 acres on Hiccory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 28, 1792-1793, p. 442 (Reel 94).

Zachariah Roberts

1793 July 27: Matthew Harris Location: Amherst County. Description: 40 acres on the waters  of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 28, 1792-1793, p. 613 (Reel 94).

Notes: Matthew Harris

 

1797 Dec 18 Amherst Deed Book H:343. 18 Dec. 1797. JNO. S. DAWSON and wife, JANE, to JNO. DAWSON for 80 lbs N side Hicory, part of tract left to JNO. S. by will of JNO. SORRELL, deceased, Amherst Co. Lines: ZACH ROBERTS, grantor, on a ridge near Rock Spring, JNO. DAWSON. Wit: MARTIN DAWSON, JNO. LYON, JNO. BAILEY, JR.

 

Notes: Jane Dawson

Notes Zachariah Roberts

Notes: MartinDawson

Notes: Jonathan Lyon

1798 Jan 29   Amherst Deed Book H, p. 324
JNO. THURMOND & wife SALLY, AC, to GEO. BLAINE,
Albemarle, for L250, 125 acres Cub Creek, branch of Hickory. Lines: grantor, GUTRIDGE THURMOND, MORRISON. Wit: SAML. MURRELL, SAML. ANDERSON. http://www.art-rageous.net/ThurmondDeeds-Amherst.html

Notes: Sally Thurmond

Notes: George Blaine

Notes: Samuel Murrell

Notes: Samuel Anderson

1798 Sept 3:  John Morris:  Location: Amherst County. Description: 60 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 40, 1797-1798, p. 460 (Reel 106).

Notes: John Morris

1798 Nov 9: Samuel Anderson and John Bailey: Albemarle Co: Description: 90 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 40, 1797-1798, p. 564 (Reel 106). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-.

Notes: John Bailey:

1798 Nov 9: Samuel Anderson And John Bailey: Location: Amherst County. Description: 90 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 40, 1797-1798, p. 564 (Reel 106).

1802 March 18:  Richard Hair: Amherst Co: Description: 300 acres on both sides of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 48, 1801-1802, p. 491 (Reel 114).

Notes: Richard Hair:

1802 June 24: Richard Hair: Amherst Co: Description: 180 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 50, 1802-1803, p. 153 (Reel 116).

1802 June 28:  Samuel Perkins Amherst County: Description: 234 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 50, 1802-1803, p. 164 (Reel 116).

Notes: Samuel Perkins

1803 March 13: John Farrier: Amherst Co: Description: 136 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 51, 1802-1803, p. 250 (Reel 117).

Notes: John Farrier

1803 Aug 8: Samuel Perkins: Amherst Co: Description: 93 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 51, 1802-1803, p. 462 (Reel 117).

1803 Aug 8: Samuel Perkins: Albemarle Co: Description: 93 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 51, 1802-1803, p. 462 (Reel 117). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369

1804 June 11: Samuel Bailey: Albemarle Co: Description: 34 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 53, 1804, p. 100 (Reel 119). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-.

Notes: Samuel Bailey:

1806 Oct 1: Amherst Deed Book K, p. 490
GEO. BLAIN JR, AC to GUTRIDGE
THURMOND, AC, for L175, 275 acres Hickory Creek; branch of Rockfish. Lines: grantee, JNO. BAILEY, JNO. S. DAWSON, JNO. MORRISON – 125 acres of it deeded to him by JNO. THURMOND; 150 acres of it deeded to him by his father GEO. BLAIN SR, 150 acres pat. to MATT. HARRIS and by him conveyed to GB, SR. Wit: THOS. & JNO. THURMOND, TERISHA BAILEY. http://www.art-rageous.net/ThurmondDeeds-Amherst.html

Notes: Gutridge Thurmond

Nelson County formed 1807-1808 from Amherst County

1810 October 1, From Samuel W. Anderson Sr. to Samuel Bailey
Nelson County, Virginia Deed Book 1, p. 271-272
This Indenture made this the first day of October in the year of our Lord eighteen Hundred and Ten, between Samuel Anderson Sr of
Albemarle County of the one part and Samuel Bailey of the county of Nelson of the other part. Witnesseth that the said Samuel Anderson for and in consideration of the sum of two hundred Dollars paid to him in hand at and before the sealing and delivering of these presents, have granted bargained and sold, and doth by these presents grant bargain and sell unto the said Samuel Bailey his heirs & C one certain tract or parcel of Land lying and being in the County of Nelson, on the south side of Buck Creek mountain on the waters of Hickory creek, containing by survey one hundred and nine acres, be the same more or less, and bounded as followeth, to wit: Beginning at an ash corner, to William Morrison Dec'd and Richard Hase (?), and running thence new lines North twenty one degrees, West Sixty poles to a White oak [the following is inserted in the margin at this point: North seventy two degrees West ninety four poles to a chestnut oak, South forty four degrees West, sixty poles to a Black oak, South] fifty degrees East, one hundred and twenty poles to pointers; South seventy seven degrees, East seventy five poles to pointers; North seventy six degrees East fourteen poles to pointers in William Morrison's dec'd line; thence with his line North five degrees West, sixty six poles to pointers; South seventy seven degrees East thirty eight poles to pointers; North eight degrees, West twenty four poles to the beginning. To have and to hold forever, against the claim or Claims of any person or person whatsoever that shall lay any claim or title to the said Land. In Witness whereof the said Samuel Anderson hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year above mentioned.

Samuel W. Anderson (seal)

Signed sealed and delivered In presence of us--
Terisha Bailey
Thomas
Thurmond
John
Thurmond

At a Court held for Nelson county the 28 day of January 1811 This Deed was proved in court by the oath of Terrisha Bailey, Thomas Thurmond and John Thurmond, three subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be Recorded.

Teste Spotswood Garland http://www.art-rageous.net/SamAnderson2SamBailey1810.html

Notes: Buck Creek Mountain

Notes: William Morrison Dec'd

Notes: Terisha Bailey

Notes:  Thomas Thurmond

1812 Feb: 22: Nelson Co. This Indenture made the twenty second day of February, 1812, between John Bailey and Frances his wife and several  (unreadable) of the one part and Samuel S. Perkins & Fanny his wife of the other part, witnesseth  that the said John Bailey and wife and Samuel Anderson for an in consideration of the sum of 40 dollars paid to them in hand have granted, bargained and sold and by these presents do grant, bargain and sell unto the said Samuel Perkins and Fanny his wife and to their heirs or assigners forever one certain tract or parcel of land lying and being on the waters of Hickory Creek in Nelson Co. and containing by a late survey forty acres more or less and bounded as follows (various surveying measurements listed)

To have to to hold the aforesaid tract or parcel of land to the said Samuel Perkins and Fanny his wife and their heirs forever and the said John Bailey and Frances his wife & Samuel Anderson for themselves and their heirs doth conversant with the said Samuel Perkins and Frances 
his wife and their heirs that the said John Bailey and Frances his wife, and Samuel Anderson and their heirs aforesaid tract of land together with all and  (?) the apurtenances thereto belonging to the said John Bailey and Frances his wife and Samuel Anderson their heirs and assignees shall 
and will warrant and forever defend.  In witness whereof the said John Bailey and Frances his wife and Samuel Anderson have here unto set their hands and all of their seals the day and year above written.
signed John & Frances Bailey
In presence of: Samuel Anderson
John Lyon                       
Terisha Bailey                                     
Samuel Bailey
Thomas Thurmond
 
At a court held for Nelson Co. the 24th day of Feb., 1812, this deed of 
Bargain and sale was proved in court by the oaths of Terisha Bailey, 
Samuel Bailey, Thomas Thurmond sustaining witnesses thereto and ordered 
to be recorded.
Signed Spotswood Garland Clerk http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/nelson/land/deeds/d-and04.txt

1816 March 8: Samuel Perkins: Albemarle Co. Description: 21 3/4 acres on the waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 65, 1815-1816, p. 434 (Reel 131). Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , reels 369-.

Notes Samuel Perkins

Notes: Francis Bailey wife of John Bailey

1836 Aug 31: Nelson Co. Henry T. Harris: Description: 230 acres on waters of Hickory Creek. Source: Land Office Grants No. 86, 1836, p. 339 (Reel 152).

Notes: Henry T. Harris

The southwestern line of the County is intersected by the head waters of Lynch's Creek, Taylor's Creek , Hickory Creek and Cove Creeks all Branches of the Rockfish River. On the east side of Appleberry's Mountaineer, Ivy, Green and Hog Creeks, debouching into the same stream. Two Creeks of moderate size water the southern part of the county, and fall into the James one at Warren called Ballenger’s Creek. The other about 2 miles above Scottsville called Totier. Both are fed by a number of branches, Meschunk Creek takes its rise not far from Gordonsville, flows southwest and southeast and passing out of the County joins the Rivanna opposite Union Mills. The source of the South Anna are also in Albemarle located not far from that of the Meschunk. Albemarle County History by Reverend Edgar Woods, ISBN # 1-933268-51-4: Published 1901 by Michie Company Printers Charlottesville Va.

 

The County on the Southwest Corner of Albemarle Co is Nelson Co. then Amherst