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[NI0002] Pat served in the U.S. Navy-Flag Ship of the 6th Task Fleet in Mediterranean as part of
Admiral Sherman’s Fleet. He attended Navy school of Music at Wash. Rank was Musician Seaman 1st
Class.

After Daisy died, Pat was sent to the Taylor Home in Oklahoma City, OK. He ran away from this home shortly after his arrival. Court records exist from 8 October 1938, as well as 6 September 1939.

It appears that when Daisy died, Pat went to the Taylor Home, ran away, met Carl (Abe) Green who took him in. Carl seems to have found the father, Jasper Fleming, had him release Pat into Carl's custody, and then proceed to have Jasper relinquish his parental claim on Pat.

Pat was born at the Provident Association, 525 West Washington Street, Oklahoma City, OK.

[NI0004] Census checks:
1920 Oklahoma Soundex:
No Daisy Hall
no Daisy w/David Hall
no Daisy Gilliland
no J. S. Gilliland
no Sallie Gilliland
no Rachel Gilliland
no Daisy Fleming
Jasper Fleming: 1-40y w/hired man in Jackson Co.
1-46y w/wife and 7 kids 6-18y Ellis Co.

1900 Oklahoma Soundex:
no Gilliland J. S.
no Gilliland with daughter Daisy

1900 Arkansas Soundex
no Gilliland w/daughter Daisy

1900 Missouri Soundex
no Gilliland w/daughter Daisy


1929 Oklahoma City Directory:
Jasper L. Fleming (Daisy) paper hanger, 520 W. California Ave
520 W. California Ave--Mrs. Eudora Fore (widow of J.W.) janitress, 1st National Bank Building
California Avenue West: 1st South of W. Grand Ave., beg. S. Santa Fe Ave. Extends beyond limits.
500 block--between S. Walker and S. Dewey Aves.

1930 Oklahoma City Directory:
Mrs. Daisy Fleming r. rear 508 W. Reno Ave. [Jasper not listed]
508 W. Reno Ave: (rear) William L. Hunter (Viola) oil field worker

1929 - 1930 David Hall: 1-laborer, married to Velma O., h 3301 Classen Blvd.
1-David F. (Martha J) laborer, h 2900 S. Stiles Ave.

1931 Oklahoma City Directory:
Fleming, Jasper L (Daisy) painter, r. 415 W. Chicksaw Ave.
415 W. Chicksaw Ave: Woodard, Dan'l W. (Edna) repairman C E Fletcher. (h)

1932 Oklahoma City Directory
Daisy not listed under Fleming, Hall, or Gilliland
J L Flemmings, painter, r 222 1/2 SW California Ave. No wife listed.
222-224 SW California Ave--Downey Furniture Co.
222 1/2 SW California Ave: I P Bridges
Fidelity Hotel

July 31, 2001: According to mother, she remembers Daisy's parents' surname to be Brown. Possibly Daisy's father died at an early age, and her mother remarried. Look under Brown in various Census records.

[NI0005] Ref.: “Who’s Who In the West” Vol. 9, 1965-66. GRAY, Vard Vernett, social
worker; b. West Branch, Mich., June 26, 1897; s. Henry P. and Ada (Cooper) G.; A. B., Hastings Coll.,
1921; grad. McCormick Theol. Sem., 1924; B. D. Chgo Theol. Sem., 1926; M. S., U. Chgo., 1926, U.
Denver. 1945; m. Ruth M. Van Huisseling, Oct. 10, 1935; children—Ralph, Genevieve (Mrs. R. T.
Huffaker.) Margaret (Mrs. Pat Hall). Engaged in religious activities, 1922-35; chaplain Silver City (N.
M.) Civilian Conservation Corps Dist., 1935-37; sr. Social worker Words Projects Asminstrn., La
Junta, Colo.,
1939-41; case worker Senver Sept. Pub. Welfare, 1941-42 county welfare dir., Colorado Springs,
Colo., 1942 Mem. State Advisory Mental Health Council, Mem. Neb State Christian Endeavor Soc. (Pres. 1929), Colo. County Welfare Cirs. Assn. (pres. 1947,) Am. Assn. Social Workers (pres. Colorado
Springs Chpt. 1944-46,) Colo. Conf. Social Welfare (pres. 1953-54,) Nat. Conf. Social Work,
Am. Pub. Welfare Assn., Nat Council Local Pub. Welfare Adminstra., Acad. Certified Social Workers,
Mason Club: Pikes Peak Region Torch (Cir, 1962-63.) Home 216 E. Caramillo. Office: 27 E.
Vermijo Ave., Colorado Springs, Colo.
In 1967 Vard retired after 25 years of service with the El Paso Co. Dept. of Public Welfare and took on
a new job as Senior Supervisor with the New Mexico State Dept. of Public Welfare. He there met a
Soseph Olds Gray who was b. July 30, 1908 Pickaway County, Ohio to Meldrum and Eleanor (Olds)
Gray. Meldrum’s father name was David S. Gray who removed from Pennsylvania to Ohio. These
names do not however seem familiar in our family.
2nd m. of Vard Oct. 10, 1935 in Las Vegas, New Mexico to Ruth Mathilde Van Huisselling, b. Sept. 22,
1908, dau. of John and Mathilde (Henningsen) Van Huisseling. Mathilde was born in Denmark and
came to this country at an early age with her sister and mother. Ruth was one of two children and her
sister Mildred was killed in an auto accident at age 11. In 1966 Mathilde is still living. No children
born to Vard and Ruth.

[NI0047] RALPH LORADO GRAY, a twin, b. Aug. 26, 1924 Aurora, Ill. Served in the service as Seaman 1st
Class R. M. 1943-45 and was stationed from Conn., to Calif. M. Aug. 26, 1949 at Erongaricuaro,
Michoacan, Mexico to Maria Victoria del Rosario Rodriquez Mejia, a Tarascan Indian girl, b. Oct. 7,
1922 at Erongaricuaro, Michocan, Mexico, dau. of Andres and Luz (Mejia) Chauez Rodriquez.
Andres was a musician.

[NI0075] Custer County Chief: Thursday, July 3, 1919
"Supervisor Ralph Johnson with his wife and two daughters, left Broken Bow on Friday of last week by auto for their old home in New York state. They expect to be absent about two months and will visit many points of interest in the east."

Custer County Chief: Thursday, September 18, 1919
"Ralph Johnson & family returned from their three months' auto trip on Friday of last week. Their trip took them through the New England states as far east as Connecticut. They spent considerable time at their old home at Greene, N.Y. where a family reunion was held during their stay. Mr. Johnson reports a wonderful trip and has many good things to say about the fine roads to be found in the eastern section of the country."

Custer County Chief: Thursday, December 2, 1920
"Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Johnson enjoyed a visit during the past two weeks from Mrs. Johnson's sister and daughter, Mrs. Clara Page and Miss Breta, of Greene, New York. The ladies were en route to California for the winter and resumed their journey Tuesday morning. The were accompanied by Miss Harriet Johnson, who will also enjoy the southern climate during our coldest months. The party will make their headquarters at Redlands."

[NI0084] Albert lived with his parents (Ralph) until he became of age, learning the carpenter's trade. In 1857 he went to Nebraska where, with his brother William, he engaged in carpentering and contracting. The two brothers acquired considerable land, mostly lying a few miles east of Fremont. They preempted part of it and located the balance with land warrants given to their Uncle Gurdon for service in the War of 1812 (see Gurdon Johnson 2nd). These lands are, for the the most part still (1940) in the possession of their descendents. Returning to New York, Albert engaged in farming with his father until 1877 when he returned to Fremont and developed his own land. He retired about twelve years before his death, taking up his residence in Fremont where he lived until his death. He was a well-known worker in the Congregational Church.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Fremont Tribune: October 30, 1909:

Death of Albert Johnson

Well-known Fremont Man Passes Away--Funeral Sunday

Albert Johnson, a well-known Dodge county farmer and one of the most prominent members of the Congregational church of Fremont, died yesterday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock after an illness of three weeks. The funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 from the family residence, 249 West Tenth street. Rev. Buss will officiate.

Albert Johnson was born March 17, 1835 in Coventry, Chenango County, New York. He first came west in the year 1857 and took a homestead east of Fremont, which he owned until the day of his death. After residing on it a short time he went to Omaha where he worked several years, returning then to his native state. The love of the west was strong within him, however, and in 1877 he returned to Nebraska and Dodge county to make this his home during the remainder of his years. About twelve years ago he retired from active farm life and took up his residence in town, enjoying the fruits of his years of toil. The deceased is survived by four children, his wife having died a year ago last August. The surviving sons and daughter are: Mrs. Magdalina Seeley of this city, Henry A., Ralph J., and Robert B. Johnson all of Broken Bow.

Mr. Johnson was admired by all who knew him as an upright, God-fearing man who was not afraid to stand out before the world and acknowledge the leadership of his Savior. For fully a quarter of a century he was a member of the Congregational church here, and rain or shine, hot or cold be the weather, seldom was it, indeed, that his accustomed seat in the church was empty. He was a man of the highest integrity and loyalty to principles. Quiet and unostentatious, he clung over to the standard of truth and model citizenship. He was a liberal contributor to his church and to the Young Men's Christian Association. In political views, Mr. Johnson was a staunch prohibitionist and stood with that party.

_________________________________________________________________________________

From "History of the Elkhorn Valley Nebraska: An Album of History and Biography," 1892:

"Albert Johnson, whose farm home is on section 19, of Elkhorn township, first looked upon the fair and fertile domain of Dodge County in the autumn of 1857, thirty-five years ago, when he located on land constituting his present farm, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, which claim however he did not improve at once, but went to Omaha where he engaged as a carpenter and contractor, remaining four years. After that he went to Chenango County, New York, and went to farming and there remained until the spring of 1877, when he came back to Dodge County, Nebraska, and commenced the improvement of his own land. At first he erected a shanty, 12x14 feet, and moved his wife and four children into the same, temporarily while he was building a story and one half house, 18x24 feet. He has since added a wing 14x24 feet: built a barn 38x50 feet, cribs, shedding, granary, tool-house and a milk-house. His premises are furnished with the purest of water, by the use of drive wells and windpower. He has added to his land until he now has four hundred acres, one hundred being under the plow. He has a fine orchard of sixty trees, besides a large amount of shade trees. The first years he was in the country, he sustained great loss by high water from the floods of the Elkhorn river and Rawhide Creek. In 1881, he shipped two car-loads of cattle into the country from New York, of which number he lost a good many during a severe snowstorm. He met with one reverse after another, in his operations and using his own language, 'would have gone to the wall, had it not been for help received from friends in New York.'

"Mr. Johnson was born in New York State, March 17, 1835, the son of Ralph and Betsy Johnson, natives of Connecticut and the parents of five children: William, George, deceased; Clarissa, deceased; Joseph and Albert. Our subject remained in New York with his parents until he was of age, when he learned the carpenters trade, at which he worked until he came West. His education was limited, and what he has was obtained at the public schools. In 1863 he paid a substitute to enter the Union army in his stead.

He was married in 1863, to Adaline Vanness daughter of Henry and Magdaline Vanness, natives of New York, and whose family consisted of five daughters: Elizabeth, Mary, Adaline, deceased; Margaret, Henrietta.

In October, 1881, death claimed our subject's companion, and for his second wife he married Harriett Moore, daughter of Godfrey and Harriett Moore, natives of New York. The date of this marriage was October 25, 1883. In our subject's present wife's family were the following children: Elizabeth, deceased; Mary, Sarah, John, James L., deceased; Caroline P., and Harriett. The father and mother are both deceased. By his first marriage our subject had four children: Henry A., Ralph, Magdaline V., and Robert B.

He and his wife are members of the Congregational Church. Politically, our subject is a supporter of the Prohibition party."

[NI0085] From the Chenango American, August 4, 1881: "Mrs. Henry Van Ness wishes us to express her warmest thanks to those of our kind people who so lovingly administered to the wants of her invalid daughter, Mrs. Albert Johnson, who was seriously injured in this village on Saturday of last week."

[NI0108] Lansing Mrs. Maria, p o Greene, farmer, res lot 109, 150 acres, b
Greene; parents, Samuel and Clarissa Walker; husband,
James Lansing, b Greene, 1821, died 1879; parents, Peter
and Jane Lansing.

From History of Chenango and Madison Counties New York, page 1209

The late Mrs. James Lansing, mother of the present generation of children, was a sister of the late Samuel and Simeon Walker, and was born at Stillwater, on the farm now owned by Albert Rogers. She was one of a family of seventeen children--nine boys and eight girls.

[NI0109] Buried in lot 28, space W 1/2, Sylvan Lawn Cemetery

[NI0110] Some sources show Mary's middle name as Ann, some show it as Adelia.

Bio from:
Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, ed by William Adams, pub 1893
History of the Town of Ellicottville - Chapter XXVI (26)
Pages 597 & 598

Surnames: NORTHRUP, LANSING

Halsey F. NORTHRUP was born in South New Berlin, Chenango county, in 1844. He obtained a thorough education, especially in mathematics and early engaged in land surveying, civil engineering, and teaching. In the spring of 1868 he came to Ellicottville and taught the Union School one year, and practiced his profession during vacation. He then gave his whole attention to land surveying until 1875, when he began surveying for the oil pipe line companies. In the winter of 1877-78 he was employed by the Tide Water Pipe Line Company. He made the preliminary examination of the route, secured the right of way, made the surveys and maps, and examined the titles of the lands over which the line passes, which has required nearly all his time, much care, and great research. He is still the civil engineer of this company in charge of all surveying, engineering and right of way matters. This great line is 285 miles long, passes in a generally direct line, and the pipe of wrought iron is six inches in diameter. The oil is propelled from seven stations. The greatest altitude above tide water is 2,600 feet at Summit, Potter county, Pa. He purchased about 3000 acres of wild lands in different sections of Cattaraugus county, which he has been selling out in parcels. He owns twenty-one oil wells in Allegany county, which are managed by his partner. He is also the present president of the village of Ellicottville. In 1874 he married Mary LANSING, of Greene, N. Y., and has a son and two daughters.

[NI0111] Obituary, Chenango American newspaper, Greene, New York, 2 September 1926:

Elsie Lansing, widow of the late Truman Jackson, died at her home in this village Wednesday, Aug. 25, 1926, after an illness extending over a number of years, aged 77 years. She is survived by one son, Charles Jackson of Superior, Wis., one daughter, Mrs. Paris Van Auken of Greene; also three sisters, Mrs. Clara Page of Greene, Mrs. Ralph Johnson of Broken Bow, Neb., and Mrs. Charles Blackmon of Painesville, Ohio.

The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at the Central Baptist Church, Rev. Ralph Gould, pastor, officiating. Burial in Sylvan Lawn.

Among those from out of town attending the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Johnson of Broken Bow, Neb., Charles Jackson of Superior, Wis., Mrs. Grace O'Neill of Mount Vernon, N.Y., Miss Mabel Northrup of Ellicottville and Mrs. Burt Lansing and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Willis of Syracuse.

[NI0112] Burial record:
Page: 186
Name: T. H. Lansing
Birth Date: 1850
Death Date: 1918
Cemetery: Oak Hill
Town: Cedar Rapids
Tombstone Records of Linn County, Iowa

[NI0113] Transcribed from "The Chenango American" newspaper, published July 31, 1919, Greene, Chenango County, New York, p.1, column 3. (accompanied by picture)

The Lansing Family Reunion.

The Lansing family and a few invited guests enjoyed a happy reunion and basket picnic on the FairGrounds Thursday afternoon of last week, July 24, 1919. The weather was ideal for a picnic, and about seventy-five were present.

The late Mrs. James Lansing, mother of the present generation of children, was a sister of the late Samuel and Simeon Walker, and was born at Stillwater, on the farm now owned by Albert Rogers. She was one of a family of seventeen children--nine boys and eight girls. The oldest person attending the picnic was Mrs. Ruth Walker, who is 85 years of age.

Mrs. Clara Lansing Page conceived the ideas of having the remaining members of the family get together, and how well she succeeded was evidenced by the number present, those from a long distance being Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Johnson and two daughters, Misses Adaline and Harriet Johnson, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Johnson and daughter, Miss Clara Johnson of Broken Bow, Neb; Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Blackmon and daughter Miss Margaret Blackmon, of Painesville, Ohio; Mrs. Elsie Jackson of Ypsilanti, Michigan; Mr. William H. Lansing and Mrs. Thomas H. Lansing of Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Mr. Eugene H. Gilmore, of Omaha, Neb; Prof and Mrs. John W. Lumbard and three daughters, Elizabeth, Katherine and Margaret Lumbard of Whit Plains, NY; Mrs. Herbert H. Lansing of Syracuse; Mr. and Mrs. Edward VanValkenburgh of Oxford; Mr. and Mrs. Henry VanValkenburgh of Binghamton; Mr. Albert Manwarren, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Manwarren and three children, Dorothy, Henry and Marjorie Manwarren, and Mr. George Manwarren of Windsor, N.Y.; Mr. and Mrs. Otto Weckworth and daughter, Miss Augusta Weckworth, or Union, N.Y.; Miss Mabel Northrup and Mrs. Arthur Northrup and two children, Grace and Artis Northrup, of Ellicottville, N.Y.; Mrs. Frank J. O'Neill and son, Ned, of Mt. Vernon, N. Y.; Mrs. Frank Willis and three daughters, Bertha, Breta and Clara Willis, of Syracuse, N.Y.; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Terry and two daughters, Miss Charlotte Terry and Mrs. B. J. Nash, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tifft, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Carter and three children, Dorothy, Lowell, and Mary, of Binghamton; Miss Breta Page of Rochester, N.Y.; Miss Lillian Purdy, Smithville Flats.

Those present from Greene were Mrs. Ruth Walker, Mrs. Clara Page, Mrs. Charles A. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ritchmyer, Mrs. Louis Whitmore and son, Paul Whitmore, Mrs. Harriet Rolfe, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Carter, Miss Bertha Carter, Mrs. William P. Ashley, Mr. Howard Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. J.F. Denison.

[NI0114] In 1953, lived at 168 East High Street, Painesville, Ohio.

[NI0115] Burial record:
Page: 186
Name: Wm. H. Lansing
Birth Date: 1862
Death Date: 1920
Cemetery: Oak Hill
Town: Cedar Rapids
Tombstone Records of Linn County, Iowa

[NI0117] form. G.; civil engineer; form. oil producer; engineer and right of way agent for
Tidewater Pipe Line since 1878; pres. of village; trustee of M. E. ch. since 1882.


NORTHRUP family of Ellicottville

Posted by Laura Greene on Tue, 23 Mar 1999

Surname: NORTHRUP, LANSING

NORTHRUP Family of Ellicottville
Bio from:
Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus Co. NY, pub 1893
History of the Town of Ellicottville - Chapter XXVI (26)
Pages 597 & 598

Halsey F. NORTHRUP was born in South New Berlin, Chenango county, in 1844. He obtained a thorough education, especially in mathematics and early engaged in land surveying, civil engineering, and teaching. In the spring of 1868 he came to Ellicottville and taught the Union School one year, and practiced his profession during vacation. He then gave his whole attention to land surveying until 1875, when he began surveying for the oil pipe line companies. In the winter of 1877-78 he was
employed by the Tide Water Pipe Line Company. He made the preliminary examination of the route, secured the right of way, made the surveys and maps, and examined the titles of the lands over which the line passes, which has required nearly all his time, much care, and great research. He is still the civil engineer of this company in charge of all surveying, engineering and right of way matters. This great line is 285 miles long, passes in a generally direct line, and the pipe of wrought iron is six inches in diameter. The oil is propelled from seven stations. The greatest altitude above tide water is 2,600 feet at Summit, Potter county, Pa. He purchased about 3000 acres of wild lands in different sections of Cattaraugus county, which he has been selling out in parcels. He owns twenty-one oil wells in Allegany county, which are managed by his partner. He is also the present president of the village of Ellicottville. In 1874 he married Mary LANSING, of Greene, N. Y., and has a son and two daughters.

[NI0118] Became a teacher.

[NI0119] Obituary for Truman H. Jackson; Chenango American, Greene, NY, June 11, 1908:

The death of Truman H. Jackson occurred at his home about 2 miles east of this village, on Sunday afternoon, aged 56 years, from paralysis. Several years ago Mr. Jackson was stricken with a shock of paralysis and since that time has been in poor health, although the greater part of the time he was able to be about. During the intervening time he has suffered several shocks, the last one coming a few weeks ago, and from which he never rallied. The deceased was a son of the late Oliver Jackson, and the greater part of his life had been spent in Greene, where he was looked upon as an enterprising and honorable citizen. He is survived by a wife, one daughter, Mrs. Paris Van Auken, and one son, Charles O. Jackson, of this town, besides a mother, two brothers, Andrew and Edward Jackson, and one sister, Mrs. E. A. Jenks, all of this town. His funeral will be held from his late home this (Wednesday) afternoon at 1:30 o'clock Rev. O. Lee Warren of the Baptist Church, officiating. Burial in Sylvan Lawn cemetery.

[NI0120] Obituary:

Greene: Greene, May 10 [1910].

Albert Page, one of the best known citizens of Greene, died Sunday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frank Willis, in Hartford, Conn., where he was visiting when taken ill about two weeks before his death. His family was with him during the last few days. Mr. Page was sixty-eight years of age and leaves his wife, Mrs. Clara Lansing Page, and two daughters, Mrs. Bernice Willis, of Hartford, Conn., and Miss Breta Page of Greene. The body was brought to Greene last night and the funeral will be held at two o'clock Wednesday afternoon and burial will be in Sylvan Lawn cemetery. Mr. Page has for many years been prominent in business circles here. At one time he was in the grocery business with E. D. Morse, and later conducted a grocery store where William Kelly's store is now. Of late years he has been associated with the Greene Manufacturing company of which he was the vice president. He had been a faithful member of the Baptist Church nearly all his life, and for some time had been a trustee. At the time of his death he was a deacon.

Article in Chenango American, May 12, 1910, page 1:

Death of Albert Page

Albert Page died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frank A. Willis, at Hartford, Conn., Sunday, aged 67 years. He was in New York on one of his regular trips for the Greene Mfg. Co., of which he was the vice-president, and feeling ill, went to the home of his daughter, where he gradually failed until the end.

Albert Page was a son of the late Solomon Page, who was one of the early settlers in this section; he has always been identified with the business interests of Greene, being one of the organisers of the Greene Mfg. Co. He was a deacon and trustee of the Baptist Church. Deceased is survived by his wife, who was Miss Clara Lansing, a daughter of the late James Lansing, and two daughters, Mrs. Frank A. Willis of Hartford, Conn., and Miss Breta Page of Greene.

The funeral will be held this (Wednesday) afternoon at two o'clock at the home on Washington street, Rev. O. Lee Warren, pastor of the Baptist Church, conducting the service. The bearers, four nephews, Mr. Maurice E. Page and Mr. Elmore G. Page of Binghamton, Mr. O. T. Page of Whitney's Point, and Mr. Erford L. Page of Greene. Interment in the family plot in Sylvan Lawn.

[NI0121] Greene: Greene, Sept 3.

The Misses Bernice and Breta Page gave a linen and china shower Saturday afternoon at their home on Washing Street for their cousin, Miss Clara Jackson, who is to be married to-day to Mr. Paris Van Aukin. Amusing contests were held on the lawn and refreshments were served. Among those who were present were: Miss Jackson, Missees Bernice and Breta Page, Mrs. Lousie Baldwin, Miss Marguerite Morse, Charlotte Smith, Lucile Crandall, Anna Ford, Florence Bryant, Tima Graves, Ina Brown, Nellie Whitmore, Lena Bolt and Katharine Boynton, nearly all of these having been classmates of Miss Jackson in the Greene High school, from which she graduated in 1902.

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In 1910 Bernice lived in Hartford, Conn. with her husband Frank A. Willis.

[NI0122] Greene: Greene, Sept 3.

The Misses Bernice and Breta Page gave a linen and china shower Saturday afternoon at their home on Washington Street for their cousin, Miss Clara Jackson, who is to be married to-day to Mr. Paris Van Auken. Amusing contests were held on the lawn and refreshments were served. Among those who were present were: Miss Jackson, Missees Bernice and Breta Page, Mrs. Lousie Baldwin, Miss Marguerite Morse, Charlotte Smith, Lucile Crandall, Anna Ford, Florence Bryant, Tima Graves, Ina Brown, Nellie Whitmore, Lena Bolt and Katharine Boynton, nearly all of these having been classmates of Miss Jackson in the Greene High school, from which she graduated in 1902.


As of August 16, 1938, lived in Chicago.

[NI0126] Western Union Telegram
Painesville, Ohio. Oct 9 1951

Margaret enters hospital October 16th. I need someone to help me and be with me and would love to have you come. Will pay your fare. I am well. Need no waiting on. Wire reply collect so can make plans.

Aunt Hattie. 513 PM.

[NI0128] From the Painesville Telegraph, Painesville, Ohio, December 14, 1933.

H.H. Daughters, Expert in Merchandising, Dies

Is Summoned At Age of 39 After An Illness of Ten Weeks

Death today claimed the life of Harold H. Daughters, who this morning at 4:15 succombed to [unreadable]mia, which had confined him to his bed for more than 10 weeks.

Mr. Daughters, originator of the open counter display system for hardware stores, died at Lake County Memorial hostpital where he was brought Sunday from Lakeside hospital in Cleveland. For a month he had been a patient at Lakeside where he had been taken after six weeks' illness from the home of his wife's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Blackmon, 168 E. High St. He was 39.

A number of business firms, including Sears-Roebuck & Co., Stanbaugh-Thompson and the Kresge Co., at various times sought Mr. Daughters' services as a manager and superintendent. He was also in business for himself on two occasions, once as H. H. Daughters and Co., merchandising engineers and counselors, and as proprietor of Daughter's candy shop. His own two successful business ventures were in Painesville.

Although a great portion of his business life was lived outside Painesville as manager of stores in Youngstown, Detroit, and Union City, N. J., Mr. Daughters was widely known here, where he was chairman of one of the most successful fall festivals ever sponsored by the Better Business Board of which he was a member. He attended the First Church, Congregational, was a charter member of the Rotary club here, as well as a member of the Duluth club, was at one time a member of the local Elks' lodge and was a member of the Masonic order.

Born in Mooreshill, Ind., May 8, 1894, Mr. Daughters, when he was 12, moved to Cincinnati, where he attended public schools. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Daughters, who at one time lived at th ehome of their daughter, Mrs. Harley Barnes, on Mentor Ave. here.

For 10 years Mr. Daughters was employed by the Kresge Co. as manager of stores in Columbus, O and Duluth, Minn. About 1925 he went in business for himself as a merchandising engineer and counselor here, specializing in hardware store trade. In 1925, Stanbaugh-Thompson of Youngstown adopted his plan of open display of merchandise, which is so widely used now and is simply display of articles on uncovered tables that customers may examine goods before purchasing and at the same time have a display in full view.

For one year, 1928, Mr. Daughters operated Daughters' candy shop on Main St. here. In 1929 he left Painesville to accept a position as superintendent of the Sears-Roebuck & Co.s' retail store in Detroit, the largest store in its chain. A few months after he was made superintendent, he was promoted to the managership of the store, a position he held until 1932.

From Detroit, Mr. Daughters went to Union City, N.J., to supervise and direct opening of a new store and serve as its manager. He left Union City in September of this year to accept a position in Chicago where he was to head a chain of hardware stores. Ill health prevented his acceptance of the position.

Mr. Daughters, whose hobby was his family, was dearly loved and deeply revered by all his friends and acquaintances, particularly his employees who discussed with him their personal affairs as well as business matters because of his deep understanding and his fair dealings. From his employees at Detroit, who have kept in constant touch with his wife here daily by telephone to learn of his condition, Mr. Daughters yesterday received cards expressing hope for a speedy recovery.

Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Margaret Blackmon Daughters; four children, Harold Jr., Robert, Jane and Charles; three sisters, Mrs. Harley Barnes, city, and Mrs. Harry Hartlieb and Mrs. Roy Wilson of Cincinnati; and one brother, Roscoe, of Boston, Mass.

Funeral services will be conducted by the Rev. Willis A. Warren, pastor of the First Church, Congregational, whom Mr. Daughters admired, at Fiser's funeral home at 62 S. St. Clair St. Monday at 1:30 p.m. Interment will be in Evergreen cemetery.

[NI0130] Birthday 12/19, year unknown.

[NI0133] WALKER - CLARK
In Oxford 29th ult (Mar 1846), Mr Wm Walker, to Miss Mary E Clarke, all of Norwich

[NI0135] James Walker of Killingly, Connecticut. Born December, 1752 or January, 1755. Married about 1774 or 1775 to Sarah Shapley of Killingly, a woman of sterling Scot ancestry. She is buried in the old cemetery near upper Genegantslet, about two miles east of Greene, New York. This James Walker was a patriot of the first order; following as his Revolutionary war record: enlisted in 1775 at Plainfield, New Hampshire, in company commanded by Captain Seely in regiment of the New Hampshire line; served one year, was in expedition against Canada under general Montgomery in an attack on Quebec, retreated with the Army. His need and Revolutionary record were attested to by James Walker, Jr., of Oxford, New York, and T. Dewey Walker of Greene, New York.

Turned out as a volunteer under Ethan Allen in NY, 1775 against the British at
Ticonderoga; served about one month. Next turned out as a volunteer under Captain Abel Stafford to go to Bunker Hill. Went part of the; way and heard that the battle was over and went home. Enlisted in December, 1776 under Captain Stockwell at Granville, New York. Went to Whithall to keep garrison; got injured just before the battle of Saratoga and was carried home. Next, he turned out in August, 1777; was in the battle of Bennington and several skirmishes. Was with the army until the surrender of Burgoyne in October, 1777.

The above facts are from his Declaration for Pension, when he was living in Greene, New York, April 21, 1818. From these statements it seems that he was living in New Plainsfield, New Hampshire when he enlisted and after the war, moved to Granville, New York, where he lived for five or six years. Then he moved to Elm Hill near Lake George, where he lived for several years. Later, he must hive moved to Greene. He was finally allowed a pension of $55.33 annually.
(http://home.twcny.rr.com/paulwalkerfamily/page8.html 4 June 2001)

[NI0138] James Walker, born May 30, 1788. Married Jane Paget, April 3, 1806. Had eleven children, lived in Oxford, New York, and was one of its first pioneer settlers.

Oxford Times - Reel 7 (July ,1862- [stopped Dec 31, 1864])
WALKER
In this town, on 17th Jan, 1864, Mr. James Walker, aged 76 yrs.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nychenan/mscdeath.htm

[NI0145]
Descendents of John Padget


First Generation

1. John Padget was born in South Cave, Yorkshire, England. He married Hannah Wilson
(Yorkshire, England - 1 Jun 1822, Oxford, NY), daughter of ? Wilson and Martha. John
and Hannah came to America in 1772 and settled in Oxford, Chenango County, NY in the
1790's. John died in 1817 in Oxford, NY.
Children:
i. Hannah Padget (born and died in England)
2. ii. John Padget, Jr. (1768, England - 26 Nov 1834, Oxford, NY)
3. iii. James Padget (1771, England - 24 Nov 1848, Oxford, NY)
iv. William Padget (1774 - Fall 1800, Oxford, NY)
4. v. Hannah Padget (1776 - 6 Nov 1835, Oxford, NY)
5. vii. Martha (Mattie) Padget (1779 - 22 Nov 1842, Oxford, NY)
6. vi. Nancy Padget (1781, Albany County, NY - 15 Apr 1871, Oxford, NY)
7. viii. Robert Padget (1782 - 15 Dec 1867, Oxford, NY)
8. ix. Jane (Jinny) Padget (8 Jul 1790, Troy, NY - 16 Apr 1872)




Second Generation

2. Descendents of John Padget, Jr. and Anna Preston

3. James Padget (1.John) was born in 1771 in England. He married (1) Eleanor Bartle.
She and their child both died. James married (2) Abigail Havens. James died 24 Nov
1848 in Oxford, NY.
Children by Abigail Havens:
9. i. Eleanor B. (Nellie) Padgett (1812, Oxford, NY - 1863)
10. ii. Beulah S. Padgett (1815, Oxford, NY - 20 Jul 1853, Oxford, NY)
11. iii. Hannah W. Padgett (1816, Oxford, NY - 1 Dec 1852)
12. iv. Nelson T. Padgett (1818, Oxford, NY - 12 Mar 1876, Greene, NY)
13. v. James Padgett, Jr. (1 Dec 1819, Oxford, NY - 18 Feb 1890, Oxford, NY)
14. vi. Peter B. Padgett (1822, Oxford, NY - 13 May 1896, Oxford, NY)

4. Descendents of Hannah Padget and David Shapley

5. Descendents of Martha Padget and Thomas Garner Shapley

6. Nancy Padget (1.John) was born in 1781 in Albany County, NY. She was unmarried.
Nancy died 15 Apr 1871 in Oxford, NY.
Children:
15. i. Wealthy Padgett (1811 - )
ii. John Padgett (1814 - 23 May 1893, Oxford, NY) [Unmarried]
iii. Robert Padgett (1817 - 7 Dec 1896) [Unmarried]

7. Descendents of Robert Padget and Susannah Shapley

8. Jane Padget (1.John) was born 8 Jul 1790 in Troy, NY. She married James Walker, Jr.
(1788 - 17 Jan 1864). Jane died 16 Apr 1872.
Children:
16. i. Jane Walker (1807 - )
17. ii. Lovisa Walker (1809 - )
18. iii. James Walker, 3rd (1814 - 1853)
19. iv. William Walker (1816 - )
20. v. Sarah Walker (1819 - )
21. vi. Hannah Walker (1821 - )
22. vii. Willis Walker (1824 - 4 Jun 1892, Oxford, NY)
23. viii. Daniel Walker (1827 - )
24. ix. Julia M. Walker (1829 - 30 Mar 1887)
25. x. Willard Walker (1832 - )




Third Generation

9. Eleanor (Nellie) B. Padgett (3.James, 1.John) was born in 1812 in Oxford, NY. She
was unmarried. Eleanor died in 1863.
Children:
26. i. Abigail E. Padgett (1833 - )

19. Bulah S. Padgett (3.James, 1.John) was born in 1815 in Oxford, NY. She married
Aaron M. Wooster (1818 - ) on 22 Apr 1849. Beulah died 24 Jul 1853 in Oxford, NY.
Children:
i. Beulah Wooster (1849 - )
27. ii. George Wooster (1851 - )
iii. Dora Wooster (1853 - )

11. Hannah W. Padgett (3.James, 1.John) was born in 1816 in Oxford, NY. She married
Stephen L. Avery on 30 Mar 1851. Hannah died 1 Dec 1852.

12. Nelson T. Padgett (3.James, 1.John) was born in May 1818 in Oxford, NY. He married
(1) Emily Clark (1825 - ) and (2) Julia Walls (15 Jun 1831 - 30 Jul 1902). Nelson died
12 Mar 1876 in Greene, NY.
Children by Emily Clark:
i. Walter Padgett (1857 - )

13. James Padgett, Jr. (3.James, 1.John) was born 1 Dec 1819 in Oxford, NY. He married
Samira Russell. James died 18 Feb 1890 in Oxford, NY.
Children:
i. Samira Adela Padgett (1850 - )
28. ii. Adelia Padgett (1852 - )
29. iii. Ward B. Padgett (1853 - 23 Apr 1933)
iv. Florence (1854 - died young)
30. vi. Peter B. Padgett (1865 - )
31. vii. Cora B. Padgett (1866 - )
32. viii. Homer G. Padgett (1872 - 10 Apr 1937)
[Also Watson and Anson, died young.]

14. Peter B. Padgett (3.James, 1.John) was born in 1822 in Oxford, NY. He married Sarah
C. Anderson (1837 - 1911) on 8 Jan 1861 in Sherburne, NY. Peter died 13 May 1896
in Oxford, NY.
Children:
i. Nelson C. Padgett (1864 - 8 Feb 1913)

15. Wealthy Padgett (6.Nancy, 1.John) was born in 1811. She married Job Nelson Stafford
(1 Apr 1812 - 1841, Oxford). [Job was the son of Abel Stafford and Rachel Chappel,
the grandson of Isaac Stafford and Keziah Slater, and the second cousin of Frances
Ingersoll, who married Silas Edgar Padgett. (#xx on Descendents of John Padget, Jr. )]
Children:
33. i. Samuel Smith Stafford (1837 - )
34. ii. Richard L. Stafford (1839- )
35. iii. Wealthy Ann Stafford (1844 - )
36. iv. Elmore Stafford (1851 - 1905)

16. Jane Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1807. She married William B. Miller.
Children:
i. Mary J. Miller (1836 - )

17. Lovisa Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1809. She married (1) Porter Bingham and
(2) Nathan Bailey.
Children by Porter Bingham:
i. Celestia Bingham (1835 - )

18. James Walker, 3rd (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1814. He married Phebe Ann Carhart
(1818 - 1893) in 1863. James died in 1853.
Children:
37. i. Christine A. Walker (1839 - )
38. ii. James L. Walker (1840 - )
39. iii. Clarence D. Walker (1842 - )
iv. Aldora (Dora) Walker (1844 - 1882)
40. v. Frederick (Frank) C. Walker (1846 - )
vi. Laura O. Walker (1849 - )
vii. Loyal W. Walker (1840 - )

19. William Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1816. He married Zeruah Mowry
(1820 - 1884).

20. Sarah Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1819. She married William S. Beardsley
(1815 - ).
Children:
i. Ella Beardsley (1851 - )
ii. James L. Beardsley (1853 - )
iii. Merrit F. Beardsley (1857 - )
iv. Ella S. Beardsley (1867 - )

21. Hannah Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1821. She married Elam Barstow
(1827 - ).
Children:
i. Martland D. Barstow (1854 - )
ii. Evander Barstow (1857 - )
iii. Ida May Barstow (1863 - )

22. Willis Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1824. He married Mary Ann Bowers
(6 Sep 1818, CT - Jan 1913) on 27 Mar 1845. Willis died 4 Jun 1892 in Oxford, NY.
Children:
41. i. Mary J. Walker (1843 - bef. 1913)
ii. Willis Howard Walker (1847 - )
iii. Delos Wayland Walker (1848 - ) [Living in Burson, CA in 1913]
iv. Melvin L. Walker (1855 - )

23. Daniel Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1827. He married Frances Adelia Main
(1832 - 1864).
Children:
i. Randall N. Walker (1856 - )
ii. Frank (or Henry ) Walker (1857 - )

24. Julia M. Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1829. She married George Lamphere
(Dec 1827 - 7 Jan 1864, Oxford, NY). George fought in the Civil War. Julia died 30
Mar 1887.
Children:
i. George Elliot Lamphere (1853 - )
ii. William D. Lamphere (1857 - )
iii. Julia E. Lamphere (1860 - )
iv. Mary J. Lamphere (1862 - )

25. Willard Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1832. He married Hannah Mary Main
(1834 - 1904).
Children:
i. Flora Walker
ii. Ray E. Walker




Fourth Generation

26. Abigail E. Padgett (9.Eleanor, 3.James, 1.John) was born in 1833. She married
Theodore Baker (1826 - ) on 24 Jul 1854.
Children:
i. Sarah Alice Baker (1855 - )

27. George Wooster (10.Beulah, 3.James, 1.John) was born in 1851. He married Mary A.
Gaffrey (1857 - ) on 14 Apr 1875 at Sidney Plains, NY.
Children:
i. Goldie Wooster (1880 - 7 Feb 1889, Bainbridge, NY).

28. Adelia Padgett (13.James, 3.James, 1.John) was born in 1851 or 1852. She married
William Mead.

29. Ward B. Padgett (13.James, 3.James, 1.John) was born in 1853. He married his second
cousin, Eleanor (Nora) Wheeler (#45 on Descendents of Hannah Padget), on 15 Nov
1880 at Oxford, NY. Ward died 23 Apr 1933.
Children:
42. i. Minnie Padgett (1886 - 1930)
43. ii. Linn W. Padgett (24 Oct 1894 - Sep 1981, Oxford, NY)

30. Peter B. Padgett (13.James, 3.James, 1.John) was born in 1865. He married
Flora G. Curtiss (1868 - ) on 30 Mar 1892 at McDonough, NY.
Children:
i. Dever Padgett
44. ii. Ralph Victor Padgett (3 Jul 1900, McDonouth, NY)
iii. Floyd Padgett (5 Oct 1902 - Apr 1970, Johnson City, NY)

31. Cora B. Padgett (13.James, 3.James, 1.John) was born in 1866. She married (1)
William R. Gordon (1863 - ) on 10 Sep 1884. She married (2) a Mr. Cluff.
Children:
i. Eugene Cluff
ii. Russell Cluff

32. Homer G. Padgett (13.James, 3.James, 1.John) was born in 1872. He married Luella J.
Hovey (1875 - 1966) on 16 Nov 1898 at Oxford, NY. Homer died 10 Apr 1937.
Children:
45. i. Helen M. Padgett (1900 - )
ii. Jesse L. Padgett (1903 - )

33. Samuel Smith Stafford (15.Wealthy, 6.Nancy, 1.John) was born in 1837. He married
Mary Gilbert.

34. Richard L. Stafford (15.Wealthy, 6.Nancy, 1.John) was born in 1839. He married
Celia Wells.

35. Wealthy Ann Stafford (15.Wealthy, 6.Nancy, 1.John) was born in 1844. She married
Lyman W. Van Tassell (22 Feb 1835, Oxford, NY - ) on 26 Dec 1860.

36. Elmore Stafford (15.Wealthy, 6.Nancy, 1.John) was born in 1851. He married Harriet
Horton. Elmore died in 1905.

37. Christine A. Walker (18.James, 8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1839. She married Richard
Turner (1841 - ) in 1864.

38. James L. Walker (18.James, 8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1840. He married Julia
Anderson in 1863.

39. Clarence D. Walker (18.James, 8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1842. He married
Elizabeth Riley (1842 - ).

40. Frederick (Frank) C. Walker (18.James, 8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1846. He married
Eliza (or Effie) Kelley (1839 - ) in 1874.

41. Mary J. Walker (22.Willis, 8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1843. She married James
Hopkins (1844 - ) in 1865. Mary died before 1913.

Fifth Generation

42. Minnie Padgett (29.Ward, 22.James, 3.James, 1.John) was born in 1886. She married
Arthur Smith (1885 - 1972). Minnie died in 1930.
Children:
i. Nina Smith (1902 - )
ii. Marion Smith (1908 - ) [Married a Mr. Howe]
iii. Hazel Smith (1915 - )
iv. Ruth Smith (1922 - )

43. Linn W. Padgett (29.Ward, 22.James, 3.James, 1.John) was born 24 Oct 1894. He
married Eva Carkhuff (4 Feb 1897 - 18 Jun 1986, Oxford, NY) on 23 Mar 1918 at
Guilford, NY. Linn died in Sep 1981 at Oxford, NY.

44. Ralph Victor Padgett (30.Peter, 13.James, 3.James, 1.John) was born 3 Jul 1900 in
McDonough, NY. He married Ruth Angeline Fowlston (3 Dec 1901, NY - ).
Children:
i. Richard Padgett (10 Mar 1929, Norwich, NY) [Married Darlene Bell Walker]

45. Helen M. Padgett (32.Homer, 22.James, 3.James, 1.John) was born in 1900. She
married a Mr. Grosse.



Return to Padgets of Oxford
Return to Genealogy
Return to Trogholm

http://www.enter.net/~torve/trogholm/geneal/padget/jopadget.htm

16. Jane Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1807. She married William B. Miller.
Children:
i. Mary J. Miller (1836 - )

17. Lovisa Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1809. She married (1) Porter Bingham and
(2) Nathan Bailey.
Children by Porter Bingham:
i. Celestia Bingham (1835 - )

18. James Walker, 3rd (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1814. He married Phebe Ann Carhart
(1818 - 1893) in 1863. James died in 1853.
Children:
37. i. Christine A. Walker (1839 - )
38. ii. James L. Walker (1840 - )
39. iii. Clarence D. Walker (1842 - )
iv. Aldora (Dora) Walker (1844 - 1882)
40. v. Frederick (Frank) C. Walker (1846 - )
vi. Laura O. Walker (1849 - )
vii. Loyal W. Walker (1840 - )

19. William Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1816. He married Zeruah Mowry
(1820 - 1884).

20. Sarah Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1819. She married William S. Beardsley
(1815 - ).
Children:
i. Ella Beardsley (1851 - )
ii. James L. Beardsley (1853 - )
iii. Merrit F. Beardsley (1857 - )
iv. Ella S. Beardsley (1867 - )

21. Hannah Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1821. She married Elam Barstow
(1827 - ).
Children:
i. Martland D. Barstow (1854 - )
ii. Evander Barstow (1857 - )
iii. Ida May Barstow (1863 - )

22. Willis Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1824. He married Mary Ann Bowers
(6 Sep 1818, CT - Jan 1913) on 27 Mar 1845. Willis died 4 Jun 1892 in Oxford, NY.
Children:
41. i. Mary J. Walker (1843 - bef. 1913)
ii. Willis Howard Walker (1847 - )
iii. Delos Wayland Walker (1848 - ) [Living in Burson, CA in 1913]
iv. Melvin L. Walker (1855 - )

23. Daniel Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1827. He married Frances Adelia Main
(1832 - 1864).
Children:
i. Randall N. Walker (1856 - )
ii. Frank (or Henry ) Walker (1857 - )

24. Julia M. Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1829. She married George Lamphere
(Dec 1827 - 7 Jan 1864, Oxford, NY). George fought in the Civil War. Julia died 30
Mar 1887.
Children:
i. George Elliot Lamphere (1853 - )
ii. William D. Lamphere (1857 - )
iii. Julia E. Lamphere (1860 - )
iv. Mary J. Lamphere (1862 - )

25. Willard Walker (8.Jane, 1.John) was born in 1832. He married Hannah Mary Main
(1834 - 1904).
Children:
i. Flora Walker
ii. Ray E. Walker

http://www.enter.net/~torve/trogholm/geneal/padget/jopadget.htm

[NI0152] Oxford Times - Reel 5 (May 1, 1850 - May 14, 1856)
BARSTOW - WALKER
In Oxford, on the 15th inst (May 1853), by the Rev W. W. Meech, Mr. Elam S Barstow of Guilford, to Miss Hannah W Walker of Oxford.
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nychenan/marriage.htm

[NI0153] Oxford Times/Republican - Reel 4 (12/4/1842-12/18/1845 scattered; 8/14/1845-4/24/1850)

BEARDSLEY - WALKER
In this town on 25th ult (Mar 1849) by Rev Wm S Smith, Mr Wm L Beardlsey to Miss Sarah Walker, all of Oxford

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nychenan/marriage.htm

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BEARDSLEY, Sarah W. of Oxford 1885

Chenango County, New York will Vol Y page 393

Sarah W. BEARDSLEY of Oxford
probated 8 August 1885

Will:

I Sarah W. BEARDSLEY of the town of Oxford Chenango County New York being of sound mind and memory do declare this to be my last will and testament.

I. I give, devise and bequeath to Louise M. BEARDSLEY wife of my son James L., all of my property both real and personal wherever situated of which I may die seized and possessed to have and to hold the same forever.

Lastly I hereby appoint said Louise M. BEARDSLEY to be the sole executrix of this my last will and testament and I hereby revoke any and all former wills by me made.

I witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 8th day of Aug 1883.

Sarah W. (X) BEARDSLEY

Witnesses to mark
S. S. STAFFORD Oxford, New York
Mary A. PERKINS

Chenango County ss:
I hereby certify that the foregoing is a correct record of the last will and testament of Sarah W. BEARDSLEY deceased and of the proofs thereof and that said will and proofs have been duly recorded this 20th day of May 1885
W. T. JEWL, Surrogate

from http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec?htx=message&r=rw&p=localities.northam.usa.states.newyork.counties.chenango&m=183

[NI0160] Betsy was a country school teacher.

[NI0161] William Johnson was a carpenter, working much with his father Ralph around Greene, Coventry, and Colesville. His uncle Gurdon received two land warrants for his services in the second war (1812) with England. One of these warrants was given to William. On March 15, 1857 he left for the West for the purpose of taking up some land.

[NI0168] William Eugene Johnson was engaged in various anti-liquor activities during his life, as well as writing books, pamphlets, and editing prohibition periodicals. From 1906 to 1912 he was special officer among Indians, but was shortly promoted to Chief Special Officer of that service. In that service he secured the conviction of more than 4,400 offenders. He secured convictions in 97% of his cases that came to an issue. While in this service he began to be known as "Pussyfoot" Johnson, because of his cat-like policies in pursuing law-breakers in the Indian Territory.

[NI0172] Died of cholera infantum

[NI0176] Lived in Roxbury, Connecticut at time of "Camp Pussyfoot."

[NI0195] Graduated from Hastings College 1914? http://www.hcalumni.edu/html/news3b.stm

[NI0231] JOHNSTON, R, 27, of Coventry, was married to STODARD, Hepsa, 20, of Greene, on Feb. 10, 1849 by Rev. A G Orton, Greene, NY

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nychenan/greene1.htm

[NI0234] Was a judge in Williams County, Ohio in 1839. Lived in Little St. Joseph.

[NI0235] Lived in Starrucca, PA

[NI0238] Educated at Norwich, NY Academy; taught school in Kentucky. In 1852 moved to Greenville, AR where he resided until 1861.

[NI0239] Lived in Indiana

[NI0241] grave moved from Van Ness Burying Ground, Coventry Road, Chenango County, NY to Sylvan Lawn Cemetery.

[NI0243] Fremont Evening Tribute: September 1, 1908

Death of Mrs. A. Johnson

Leading Church Woman succombed after Long Illness

Mrs. Harriet Moore Johnson, wife of Albert Johnson, 215 West Tenth Street, died after a long illness at the family home, Monday evening, August 24, at 9:30 o'clock. Mrs. Johnson was born at Johnstown, New York, February 8, [1839?]. She was united in marriage with Mr. Albert Johnson on October 25, 1883 at her native city, and came immediately to Fremont. The family residence was upon the home farm east of the city; whence eleven years ago removal was made to the present address. Mrs. Johnson was an estimable woman possessed of the qualities of character and was ever active and efficient in the work of the First Congregational Church of which she has been a beloved member for twenty four years. She leaves besides her husband, three step-sons, and one step-daughter, Messrs. Henry, Ralph and Bruce Johnson of Broken Bow, and Mrs. Magdalene Seeley of Fremont. All are expected to be present at the funeral obsequies which will be held at the family residence, Wednesday, September 2, at 1:30 p.m. Rev. William H. Buss officiating.

[NI0244] http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyfulton/Cemeteries/AlBushCem.html

[NI0252] Joseph died between Colchester and New London.
In the Revolutionary War he enlisted in Captain Webb's company, 4th Conn. Regiment, commanded by Col. John Durkee. His enlistment was for three years (March 1, 1777). He was appointed corporal March 1, 1778, and discarged March 1, 1780.

[NI0253] Jerusha died of small pox while living with her son Ralph in Coventry, NY.

[NI0254] Member of the 4th regiment Conn. Troops; served at the Siege of Boston.

[NI0257] Elisha Johnson and Solomon Scoville were executors of Joseph Johnson's estate of Colchester, CT.

[NI0259] Clarissa became interested in missionary work with Native Americans and was given charge of the Union Mission in Arkansas. There she met and married Rev. Dr. Marcus Palmer Palmer.

[NI0260] An injury on his head resulted in deafness and he was regarded as "queer." In later years he lived with his brother Ralph on the Coventry farm, doing much of the farm work while working at his trade as a carpenter. Ralph was drafted in the war with England in 1812 but Gurdon enlisted as a substitute in his place. He served as a private in Asa Copeland's company of the 2nd (Sanford's regiment, Conn. State Troops). His service began Sept. 18, 1813, and terminated Nov. 1, 1813. For his services he was given two land warrants. These came to his brother Ralph who gave them to his four sons, William, Joseph, George, and Albert. William and Albert purchased the interest of the other brothers and located the land about two and a half miles east of Fremont, Nebr. These lands are still owned by the descendents of William and Albert.

[NI0264] 1810 Census shows Jacob Cutler in Colchester, CT with two sons and one daughter under 10 years old. Jacob was a heavy drinker and they took in boarders to support the family.

[NI0271] Joseph was from Manchester, CT

[NI0272] Drowned to death.

[NI0274] Francis was from East Windsor, CT

[NI0275] Member of the DAR through Crpl. Joseph Johnson (Lineage book 62, page 259. No. 61747).

[NI0293] William Converse acted as a U. S. agent for the Cherokee and Choctaw Indians for some time, learning their language. He became wealthy and made large contributions to the Republic of Texas. In 1839 he went to New Orleans where he engaged in the commission business as Converse and Given, later changed to Converse & Co., having as his partners his brother Thomas M. Converse and his son William P. Converse Jr. The firm became the leading wholesale grocers in the southwest, dabbling in the promotion of railways.

[NI0294] Julius was educated in the Military Institute at New Haven but a physical defect prevented his engaging in a military career. He engaged with his father in the commercial firm of W. Pl. Converse & Co. He made and lost a fortune. He moved to Medway, MA where he worked in local politics and held various local offices. He never married.

[NI0358] Death info from "From Raft to Railroad" p. 268, deaths in town of Greene, 1849.

[NI0361] p. 151 http://moa.cit.cornell.edu/moa/moa_adv.html
This is Cornell University: Making of America, and you can access a book written by SV Talcott which has information on the Lansing family.
Go to Index
Author -- Talcott
Pick S. V. Talcott
Genealogical Notes of New York and New England Families

[NI0366] Obituary

Mrs. Lowell G. Hotchkiss

"Elizabeth Van Ness, wife of Lowell G. Hotchkiss, died at her home on South Chenango Street, Friday evening, after a long and painful illness.

Mrs. Hotchkiss was a daughter of the late Henry and Magdalene Van Ness and was born in the town of Greene, September 15, 1837. AFter a common school education she spent several years teaching in Greene and vicinity. On October 24, 1860, she was married to Lowell G. Hotchkiss, and began keeping house in the neighborhood where she was born (near the Coventry line) always living there until March 1, 1903, when they moved to their home in this village, which they had owned for some years, where they have since resided.

Mrs. Hotchkiss united with the Congregational Church at Coventry when quite young, and was a loyal and faithful worker there for over forty years, at one time bein superintendent of the Sunday School. Upon moving to this village she united with the Congregational Church here and assisted in the work of that society as much as her health would permit.

Mrs. Hotchkiss is survived by her husband, Lowell G. Hotchkiss, one daughter, Mrs. Frank Tifft, and one granddaughter, Mrs. Guy E. Carter; also two sisters, Mrs. William Ryder of Cortland, and Mrs. Albert Manwarren of Windsor.

The funeral was held at the house Monday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. Geo. R. Foster, pastor of the Congregational Church, conducting the services. Among those attending from out of town were Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ryder and Mr. John Upham of Cortland; Mr. and Mrs. Albert Manwarren, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. A. Manwarren, and Mrs. H. L. Moseley, of Windsor; Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Van Valkenburgh, of Oxford; and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Van Valkenburgh, of Binghamton; Mrs. Thomas L. Terry and Miss Elnora Gilmore of Port Dickinson; Mrs. Arthur Palmer, of Oneonta; Miss Margaret Sherman, of Westford; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Tifft, Mrs. Jooh Cohoon and Miss Lizzie Cohoon of Brisben; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hayes, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Kelley, Miss Alice Beardsley, and Mrs. Jerome Watrous, of Coventry."

[NI0389] From the Records of the Reformed Dutch Church of Albany, part 6

[Baptised] Mar. 3. bo. Feb. 6. Margarita of Thoms. Burnside and Arriaantje T. Eyk. Wit. Andries and Elis. Stoll.

[NI0413] Page 262.--"In the name of God, Amen. I, JOHN UPHAM, of Claverack, in Albany County, being very sick. It is my express will and desire that my well beloved wife Wintie shall remain and be Master of all my estate, real and personal, during her being my widow. I leave to my son John my gun as a birthright, he being my heir at law. I leave to my son John all my real estate, dwelling house, barn, barracks, and buildings situate at Claverack and elsewhere. After the death of my wife, I leave all the rest of my estate to all my children, Eme, Magdalene, Gestis, Mary, Elizabeth, Bata, Susanna, and John. I make my wife Wintie and Richard Esselstyn and Jacobus Phillip, Michael Horton and John Price, executors."
Dated April 10, 1777. Witnesses, Richard Morris, attorney, David Spoor, Lewis Morris, 3d, Gent.
Proved, October 16, 1778.

Source: Genealogy.com, Abstracts of Wills Vol IX 1777-1783 .

[NI0422] Notes for Thomas Burnside:
FROM: ANCESTORS & DESCENDANTS of JAMES LE
ROY BURNSIDE& EMILY MARIE UNDERWOOD
Researched Compiled and Edited by Walter Clark Armstrong
Washington D.C. 1971

Thomas b 30 July 1750 probably Albany County, N.Y. d 20
July 1827 age 77 years, Otsego County. m
(1) 7 Nov. 1773 Albany County to Arrianne Ten Eyck b 31
May 1755. d 15 Jan. 1806. m (2) 1819/
20 to Mrs. Nancy Coon. Resided in Town of Watervliet until
about 1774 and then in New Scot-
land - Bethlehem area. Moved to Town of Milford, Otsego
County about 1792. Served in
the Revolutionary War.
==============
FROM: EARLY HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MILFORD

AND OTHER PARTS OF OTSEGO CO.
From 1773 to 1903

by EZRA STEVENS

Schenevus Creek and Junction
Thomas Burnside and family

In 1788 when the Schenevus Valley was hardly known to the
white population, a gentleman from Albany County wended
his way through the dense forest from the said county with a
determination to reach the Susquehanna River for the sole
purpose of making a permanent settlement for himself and his
family, and master the adversities which must be endured in a
wilderness country.

Thomas Burnside of Scotch-Irish origin was a strong,
resolute, and adventurous gentleman. He found his desired
home and was well pleased with his selection. He found the
Collier settlement on the west side of the river, but he
preferred the east side, and commenced on the Schenevus
Creek. He made a beginning by erecting a log cabin, and
returned to Albany for his family bringing them back for a
permanent home. Mr. Burnside reared a large family and all
proved to be respectable citizens and ornaments in society.
His family consisted of himself and wife and fourteen children
(some of his children were born in Milford).

I will give their names and dates of birth.
Thomas Burnside, Sr. Born July 30, 1750
Arian Burnside, born May 31, 1755


Birth and names of their children:
Mary Burnside, born April 28, 1774 in Albany County
Margaret Burnside, born February 6, 1776 in Albany County
Andrew Burnside, born July 9, 1778 in Albany County
Gloud Burnside, born March 14, 1780 in Albany County
Jane Burnside, born November 9, 1781 in Albany County
James Burnside, born August 28, 1783 in Albany County
Arian Burnside, born March 12, 1786 in Albany County
Thomas Burnside, Jr. , born August 27, 1787 in Albany
County
Sarah Burnside, born January 16, 1789 in Albany County
John Burnside, born April 18, 1791 in Albany County
Elizabeth Burnside, born August 29, 1794 in Albany County
Catherine Burnside, born July 27, 1796 TWIN in Albany
County
Martha Burnside, born July 27, 1796 TWIN in Albany
County
George Burnside, born July 9, 1798 in Albany County

This constitutes the Thomas Burnside family, the first settler
of the Schenevus valley, of the town of Milford. The whole
family remained in the valley for a long time although some
went up in the town of Maryland and finally scattered to
different states. But few remain in the town of Milford at the
present time.



The reader will see at a glance that the Burnsides were quite
numerous in the Schenevus Valley.

[NI0423] From: "Ancestors and Descendants of James LeRoy Burnside", by Walter Clark Armstrong, Washington
D.C., 1971.

Gloud Burnside--b abt 1710 Tyrone County, Northern
Ireland. m Margaret Stewart probably in Ireland. Emi-
grated to America about 1740 with his family and brothers.
Gloud settled in the Town of Watervliet, Albany County,
N.Y. Both Gloud and Margaret died subsequent to 1759
because in that year they were witnesses at the baptism
of their grandchild Margaret who was the oldest child of
their son James.

From: "HISTORY OF OTSEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK: 1740-1878 Published by Everts & Fariss,
Philadelphia in 1878.

"Gloud Burnside emigrated from Ireland and settled in this country in 1765, together three other brothers,
he settling first in the New England States and his progeny in the State of New York. The descendants of
Gloud all settled in New York State, the other brothers of Gloud settling, one in Pennsylvania, another in
Massachusetts, and a third in North Carolina. The origian of the name "Burnside" is as follows: The
original name of the family was Wallace, but from a custom in Scotland, that a family residing by a stream
(Berne) they were called Thomas by the side of the Berne, and hence the name, when changed about,
"bernside, or burnside." The family was originally of Scottish origin, but previous to Gloud's birth had
migrated to the county of Tyrone, Ireland, whence they emigrated to America." (From Biographical
Sketches of General Samuel Burnside and Thomas Burnside)

Gloud Burnside must have emmigrated before 1765, as he was present at the baptism of his
grand-daughter, Margaret Burnside, daughter of James and Debora Janse Burnside, July 22, 1759,
Reformed Dutch Church, Albany. Gloud and three brothers, James, Thomas, and John came to the US
probably about 1734. James to Georgia, Gloud to New England, one to Pennsylvania, one to Louisiana.
Information provided by Dorris W. Berning, 15941 Fairfield Avenue, Detroit, Michigan, April 19, 1950

REFERENCES

Genealogies of the first settlers of Albany, N. Y. by
Jonathan Pearson, 1872.

Genealogies of the first settlers of Schenectady, N. Y.
by Jonathan Pearson, 1873.

Records of the Dutch Reformed Church Albany, N.Y.
published in the Holland Society Yearbooks 1922 - 1927.

Records in the possession of Keryl Velmore (Doc) Camp-
bell of Sidney N.Y. resulting from his research of public docu-
ments, from information contained in his awn family records,
and from data in the possession of other members of the
Burnside family residing in New York State.

Family records in the possession of descendants of
James Le Roy Burnside.

Records indicate that the Burnsides were originally
Wallaces of the Wallace Clan of Scotland. In old Latin docu- ments the term "Wallensis" or "Walensis" was used to designate
the Welsh but in Scotland it was used more particularly for
the Britons of Strathclyde who were of the same stock. From
this word the name Wallace is derived. As names became
more definitive, certain of the Clan who lived by the side of
a small stream or "burn" were referred to as John by the burn-
side, or Thomas by the burn-side in order to distinguish them
from others of the same given name. Eventually they became
known as John Burnside, Thomas Burnside, etc.

Some of the Burnsides emigrated from Scotland to
Northern Ireland. Why and when is not known. Keryl V. (Doc)
Campbell (see references above) submits the following possible
explanations--1. In 1640, Northern Ireland, or Ulster, was
very thinly populated and underdeveloped. At that time,
King James I of England offered many inducements for English

9

and Scottish farmers, artisans, etc. to settle there. His efforts
met with considerable success, and the Burnsides may have
gone to Northern Ireland at that time. Or 2 - King James was
Catholic and the Scots were mostly Protestent. This gave rise
to much trouble between the two, and some of the Scottish
Clans rose against King James. The Scots were decisively de-
feated by a much larger English Army following which King
James sent his henchman, Judge Hunphries, into Scotland
with a large body of sheriffs to hold what was afterward known
as the "Bloody Assize of 1687" at which 300 or more of the
Scottish leaders were hanged and their properties confiscated.
However, a considerable number of Scots managed to escape
the country ahead of the sheriffs and flee into Northern Ireland,
France, and Holland. Our Burnside ancestors may have been
among them.

At any rate there were Burnsides in Northern Ireland
prior to 1697 because in that year the progenitor of our branch,
John Burnside, was recorded as a Ruling Elder of the Presby-
terian Church in Clogher, Tyrone County. He apparently did
not emigrate to America but four of his sons did, namely
Gloud, Thomas, John, and Andrew. Our branch descends from
Gloud.


**************************
228. Gloud Burnside, born 1710 in Ireland; died Aft. July 22, 1759 in New York. He was the son of 456. John Burnside. He married 229. Margaret Stewart.

229. Margaret Stewart, died Aft. July 22, 1759 (Source: (Present at baptism of granddaughter in 1759)).

Notes for Gloud Burnside:
From: "Ancestors and Descendants of James LeRoy Burnside", by Walter Clark Armstrong, Washington D.C., 1971.

Gloud Burnside--b abt 1710 Tyrone County, Northern
Ireland. m Margaret Stewart probably in Ireland. Emi-
grated to America about 1740 with his family and brothers.
Gloud settled in the Town of Watervliet, Albany County,
N.Y. Both Gloud and Margaret died subsequent to 1759
because in that year they were witnesses at the baptism
of their grandchild Margaret who was the oldest child of
their son James.

=======================================
From: "HISTORY OF OTSEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK: 1740-1878 Published by Everts & Fariss, Philadelphia in 1878.

"Gloud Burnside emigrated from Ireland and settled in this country in 1765, together three other brothers, he settling first in the New England States and his progeny in the State of New York. The descendants of Gloud all settled in New York State, the other brothers of Gloud settling, one in Pennsylvania, another in Massachusetts, and a third in North Carolina. The origian of the name "Burnside" is as follows: The original name of the family was Wallace, but from a custom in Scotland, that a family residing by a stream (Berne) they were called Thomas by the side of the Berne, and hence the name, when changed about, "bernside, or burnside." The family was originally of Scottish origin, but previous to Gloud's birth had migrated to the county of Tyrone, Ireland, whence they emigrated to America." (From Biographical Sketches of General Samuel Burnside and Thomas Burnside)
==================

Note added in History of Otsego book:

Gloud Burnside must have emmigrated before 1765, as he was present at the baptism of his grand-daughter, Margaret Burnside, daughter of James and Debora Janse Burnside, July 22, 1759, Reformed Dutch Church, Albany. Gloud and three brothers, James, Thomas, and John came to the US probably about 1734. James to Georgia, Gloud to New England, one to Pennsylvania, one to Louisiana. Information provided by Dorris W. Berning, 15941 Fairfield Avenue, Detroit, Michigan, April 19, 1950 Children of Gloud Burnside and Margaret Stewart are:
114 i. James Burnside, born Abt. 1730 in Ireland; died October 1780 in New Scotland, Albany, New York; married (1) Deborah Janse; married (2) Catherine Warren.
ii. William Burnside
Notes for William Burnside:
FROM: ANCESTORS & DESCENDANTS of JAMES LE ROY BURNSIDE& EMILY MARIE UNDERWOOD
Researched Compiled and Edited by Walter Clark Armstrong Washington D.C. 1971


William b date unknown, probably in Northern Ireland. Family records refer to him as second son.
m 11 Apr. 1772 to Mary Hudson of Albany County. Resided in Town of Watervliet and of
Bethlehem, Albany County. Served in the French and Indian War 1767 and in the Revolutionary
War. Moved to Canada about 1791.

Thomas Burnside, born July 30, 1750; died July 1827 in Milford, Otsego Co; married Arrianne (Arian) Ten Eyck November 7, 1773 in Albany Co. New York; born May 31, 1755; died January 15, 1806.

Notes for Thomas Burnside:
FROM: ANCESTORS & DESCENDANTS of JAMES LE ROY BURNSIDE& EMILY MARIE UNDERWOOD
Researched Compiled and Edited by Walter Clark Armstrong Washington D.C. 1971

Thomas b 30 July 1750 probably Albany County, N.Y. d 20 July 1827 age 77 years, Otsego County. m
(1) 7 Nov. 1773 Albany County to Arrianne Ten Eyck b 31 May 1755. d 15 Jan. 1806. m (2) 1819/
20 to Mrs. Nancy Coon. Resided in Town of Watervliet until about 1774 and then in New Scot-
land - Bethlehem area. Moved to Town of Milford, Otsego County about 1792. Served in
the Revolutionary War.
==============
FROM: EARLY HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MILFORD
AND OTHER PARTS OF OTSEGO CO.
From 1773 to 1903

by EZRA STEVENS

Schenevus Creek and Junction
Thomas Burnside and family

In 1788 when the Schenevus Valley was hardly known to the white population, a gentleman from Albany County wended his way through the dense forest from the said county with a determination to reach the Susquehanna River for the sole purpose of making a permanent settlement for himself and his family, and master the adversities which must be endured in a wilderness country.

Thomas Burnside of Scotch-Irish origin was a strong, resolute, and adventurous gentleman. He found his desired home and was well pleased with his selection. He found the Collier settlement on the west side of the river, but he preferred the east side, and commenced on the Schenevus Creek. He made a beginning by erecting a log cabin, and returned to Albany for his family bringing them back for a permanent home. Mr. Burnside reared a large family and all proved to be respectable citizens and ornaments in society. His family consisted of himself and wife and fourteen children (some of his children were born in Milford).

I will give their names and dates of birth.
Thomas Burnside, Sr. Born July 30, 1750
Arian Burnside, born May 31, 1755


Birth and names of their children:
Mary Burnside, born April 28, 1774 in Albany County
Margaret Burnside, born February 6, 1776 in Albany County
Andrew Burnside, born July 9, 1778 in Albany County
Gloud Burnside, born March 14, 1780 in Albany County
Jane Burnside, born November 9, 1781 in Albany County
James Burnside, born August 28, 1783 in Albany County
Arian Burnside, born March 12, 1786 in Albany County
Thomas Burnside, Jr. , born August 27, 1787 in Albany County
Sarah Burnside, born January 16, 1789 in Albany County
John Burnside, born April 18, 1791 in Albany County
Elizabeth Burnside, born August 29, 1794 in Albany County
Catherine Burnside, born July 27, 1796 TWIN in Albany County
Martha Burnside, born July 27, 1796 TWIN in Albany County
George Burnside, born July 9, 1798 in Albany County

This constitutes the Thomas Burnside family, the first settler of the Schenevus valley, of the town of Milford. The whole family remained in the valley for a long time although some went up in the town of Maryland and finally scattered to different states. But few remain in the town of Milford at the present time.



The reader will see at a glance that the Burnsides were quite numerous in the Schenevus Valley.

==================

From: HISTORY OF OTSEGO COUNTY, NY

"A remarkable incident in the family of Thomas Burnside, showing longevity and endurance, is that in his family of fourteen children, every one grew to manhood and womanhood, and themselves raised families, and two now survive over eighty years of age.

John Burnside, born Abt. 1742.
Notes for John Burnside:
FROM: ANCESTORS & DESCENDANTS of JAMES LE ROY BURNSIDE& EMILY MARIE UNDERWOOD
Researched Compiled and Edited by Walter Clark Armstrong Washington D.C. 1971


John b abt 1742. d 28 July 1819 age 77 years, Town of Maryland, Otsego County, N.Y. m (1) 26 Aug.
1770 to Mary Hall. She d 15 Aug. 1812. m (2) 22 Dec. 1815 to Mrs. Patty Johnson of Kortright,
Delaware County, N.Y. Resided in Town of Watervliet and in the New Scotland - Bethlehem
area of Albany County. Moved to Town of Maryland, Otsego County N.Y. about 1797.
Served in the French and Indian War 1767 and in the Revolutionary War. Buried in Maryland,
N.Y. cemetery.

Margaret Burnside, born August 2, 1752.
Notes for Margaret Burnside:
Margaret b 2 Aug. 1752. m John Wands of Town of
Bethlehem, Albany County, N.Y. b about 1740.
d about 1824. He came from Scotland as a sold-
ier in the British Army and settled in New Scot-
land, Albany County in 1762. Resided in New
Scotland - Bethlehem area

Hannah Burnside, born March 16, 1758.
Notes for Hannah Burnside:
Hannah b 16 Mar. 1758. d 5 Mar. 1820. m Judge
Ephraim Hudson Jr. b 1757. d 5 May 1805. Re-
sided Town of Watervliet, Albany County. Moved
to Cherry Valley, Otsego County, N.Y. about 1786.
A daughter apparently born, married, resided and died
in Northern Ireland.


***********************************************************************************
Gloud is said to be of Watervliet, Albany Co., NY. Gloud came to the United States ca 1740, settling in Albany Co. He may have also lived for a time in Stillwater, Saratoga Co., NY (?).
The reason his and his wife's death is estimated at "after July 22 1759" is because they were recorded as witnesses to the baptism of a granddaughter, probably in or near Albany co., NY. Location of their graves are unknown. http://genforum.genealogy.com/burnside/messages/518.html

[NI0424] death info from http://genforum.genealogy.com/burnside/messages/255.html


Children of GLOUD BURNSIDE and MARGARET STEWART are:

JAMES BURNSIDE, b. Abt. 1730, probably in Chogher, Tyrone Co. Ireland; d. Abt. October 1780, New Scotland, Albany Co., NY.

WILLIAM BURNSIDE, b. Bef. 1754, probably in Northern Ireland; d. unknown (probably in Canada).

THOMAS BURNSIDE, b. July 30, 1750, Albany Co. NY; d. July 20, 1827, Milford, NY; bur. Maryland, Otsego Co. NY.

MARGARET BURNSIDE, b. August 02, 1752.
Notes for MARGARET BURNSIDE:
(M29) Note: BBD questions if the record she has for M29 is the same person as M30 (dau. of James Burnside J18, who married James Wands on June 11th, 1782). Regardless, recorded for M29 is: That this Margaret was probably born in Albany co., NY - She may have lived in New Scotland and Bethlehem of Albany Co.

HANNAH BURNSIDE, b. March 16, 1758; d. March 05, 1820; m. JUDGE EPHRIAM JR. HUDSON, Abt. 1778.
Notes for HANNAH BURNSIDE:(H4)
Notes for JUDGE EPHRIAM JR. HUDSON:
The information of Hannah, dau. of Gloud & Margaret, marrying this man and another information recorded here other then her birth, is according to LDS. Where LDS obtained the information is beyond me.

According to "Ancestors and Desc. of James LeRoy Burnside and Emily Marie Underwood": Hannah was b. 3/16/1758 and d. 3/05/1820 (I've added d.o.d); m. Judge Ephraim Hudson Jr. b.1757 (I added "Judge" but am keeping BBD year of birth for now); died 5/05/1805. Ephraim resided in the town of Watervliet, Albany Co. and moved to Cherry Valley, Otsego Co., NY about 1786. He had also resied in New Scotland.

(DAUGHTER) BURNSIDE, b. Aft. 1726.
Notes for (DAUGHTER) BURNSIDE: Found in opening notes.

JOHN BURNSIDE, b. Abt. 1742, Albany Co. NY; d. July 28, 1819, Otego, Otsego Co., NY.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
http://genforum.genealogy.com/burnside/messages/518.html


“The History of Otsego Co.” / Herd
"John Burnside came from New Scotland, Albany Co., in 1802 or 1803, and located on the Worden farm, now occupied and owned by Joseph Blanchard. He had three sons,--"Big" Gloud (a hunter), Samuel, and John. Gloud lived to old age, and died in the State of Pennsylvania. A daughter, wife of Edward Houghton, lives in this town; Samuel died in 1836, on the farm now occupied by his son, J.C.Burnside; John, Jr., had a large family; Samuel had a large family; James C. and Sally, wife of J.T.Thompson, of Schenevus, resides in town. Ephraim, father of DeWitt Burnsides, lived north of the village of Maryland; was a cousin of Evert. Gloud T. (son of Thomas, who settled near the Susquehanna son after 1800) settled near the Worden farm; had six sons, --Thomas, now of Otego, Otsego Co.,; Isaac, of the State of Pennsylvania; Claudius, now of the State of Wisconsin; and Wilson, of the State of Illinois; John and Washington, the last two, now live in town, north of Maryland village."

http://genforum.genealogy.com/burnside/messages/584.html

[NI0425] William b date unknown, probably in Northern Ireland.
Family records refer to him as second son.
m 11 Apr. 1772 to Mary Hudson of Albany County. Resided
in Town of Watervliet and of
Bethlehem, Albany County. Served in the French and Indian
War 1767 and in the Revolutionary
War. Moved to Canada about 1791.
FROM: ANCESTORS & DESCENDANTS of JAMES LE
ROY BURNSIDE& EMILY MARIE UNDERWOOD
Researched Compiled and Edited by Walter Clark Armstrong
Washington D.C. 1971

[NI0433] [Baptised] Aug. 12. bo. July 9. Andries of Thoms. Burnside and Arriaantje Ten Eyck.

From the Records of the Reformed Dutch Church of Albany, Part 6

[NI0435] bo. Mar. 12. Arrisantje of Thomas Burnside and Arriaantje T. Eyck.
[page 57] 1786 Records of the Reformed Dutch Church Albany, part 7.

[NI0439] Elizabeth BURNSIDE (dau. of Thomas T11), b. 29 Aug 1794 in Milford, Otsego Co., NY, bapt. either 25 or 28(?) Sep 1794 in Presbyterian Church, New Scotland, Albany Co., NY; m. to George VAN NESS

There is much more in BURNSIDE BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY compiled by Laverne Galeener-Moore. Publisher Heritage Books, Inc.

[NI0479] John Burnside who was born in Albany Co., NY
and died 7/28/1819 in Otego, Otsego Co., NY. John was m. to Mary Hall who
was b.~1749 and d. 8/15/1812. Location of Mary's death is unknown but she is
buried in the Maryland Cemetery, town of Maryland, Otsego Co., NY. This John
was son of Gloud Burnside and Margaret Stewart of Otsego Co., NY.

from http://genforum.genealogy.com/stewart/messages/3903.html

FROM: ANCESTORS & DESCENDANTS of JAMES LE
ROY BURNSIDE& EMILY MARIE UNDERWOOD
Researched Compiled and Edited by Walter Clark Armstrong
Washington D.C. 1971


John b abt 1742. d 28 July 1819 age 77 years, Town of
Maryland, Otsego County, N.Y. m (1) 26 Aug.
1770 to Mary Hall. She d 15 Aug. 1812. m (2) 22 Dec. 1815
to Mrs. Patty Johnson of Kortright,
Delaware County, N.Y. Resided in Town of Watervliet and in
the New Scotland - Bethlehem
area of Albany County. Moved to Town of Maryland, Otsego
County N.Y. about 1797.
Served in the French and Indian War 1767 and in the
Revolutionary War. Buried in Maryland,
N.Y. cemetery.

[NI0481] The Burnsides of Milford descended from the great grandfather of S. S. Burnside whose name was Gloud. He came with three brothers from Ireland and settled in this country in the year 1765. His grandfather James was the eldest of four brothers who came to America and settled at Stillwater, Saratoga County, New York. The names of the other brothers were William, John, and Thomas. The descendants of the great grandfather Glaud Burnside all settled in New York State. Of the other three one settled in Pennsylvania, one in Massachusetts, and the other in North Carolina. The original name of the Burnsides was "Wallace", which means a family by a stream of water. This was called bern in Scotland. The names were given as follows: Thomas by the bern side, Bill by the Bern side; whence the name was changed from Wallace to Burnside. The original Burnside family were of Scotch origin, but previous to their great grandfather's birth had migrated to the County of Tyrone of Ireland, from whence they had emigrated to America.

[NI0485] Margaret Burnside, born August 2, 1752.


Notes for Margaret Burnside:
Margaret b 2 Aug. 1752. m John Wands of Town of
Bethlehem, Albany County, N.Y. b about 1740.
d about 1824. He came from Scotland as a sold-
ier in the British Army and settled in New Scot-
land, Albany County in 1762. Resided in New
Scotland - Bethlehem area.

[NI0486]
His birth year may have been 1724 (BBD has a date of 1824,.. which means she married him before he was born). Anyhow, BBD states that he was a soldier in the British Army. LDS states that he was born abt.1748 and that they married in Albany abt.1772. LDS later changed his birth year to Abt. 1755, "of Normanskill, Albany Co., NY. Parents unknown.

According to the notes "Ancestors and Desc. of James LeRoy Burnside and Emily Marie Underwood" (which has the same date for Margaret's birth as was already listed here); John Wands of the town of Bethlehem, Albany Co. was born about 1740 and died about 1824. He came from Scotland as a soldier in the British Army and settled in New Scotland, Albany Co. in 1762. He resided in New Scotland (the Bethlehem Area)

[NI0487]
Notes for Hannah Burnside:
Hannah b 16 Mar. 1758. d 5 Mar. 1820. m Judge
Ephraim Hudson Jr. b 1757. d 5 May 1805. Re-
sided Town of Watervliet, Albany County. Moved
to Cherry Valley, Otsego County, N.Y. about 1786.
A daughter apparently born, married, resided and died
in Northern Ireland.

[NI0505] Lived in Richfield Spring, New York at time of "Camp Pussyfoot."

[NI0544] Newspaper clipping, c. 1918:

Earle Ely at Coe

Cedar Rapids, Ia., April 15,---G. Earle Ely of Fremont is one of the members of the freshman class at Coe college who was recently initiated into the Delta Gamma Rho fraternity. Ely was initiated at the same time that Arthur Sidner of Fremont was taken into the fraternity. Mr. Ely also is a member of the Alpha Nu literary society, the oldest literary society on the college campus, having been founded in 1882.

[NI0553] In 1915, William operated the home farm. In 1920-23, he acted as field secretary of the NY State Guernsey Breeders Association. From 1925 he was travelling salesman for Purina Mills (St. Louis), the Park and Pollard Co. (Boston), and the Dr. Hess and Clark Inc. (Ashland, Ohio).

[NI0571] Last known address (1960s): 51 Mygatt St., Binghamton, NY 13905

[NI0583] Newspaper article c. 1914 (Chenango American?):

$50,000 Asked of Davidge for Johnson Death

"Demanding $50,000 damages for the death of her son, George W. Johnson of Greene, in an automobile accident, Mrs. Cora D. Johnson, as administratrix, has sued John M. Davidge of this city.

The case has been noted for trial at the term of the Supreme Court. Justice McCann presiding, which opens Monday, April 6.

It rises from the automobile accident of August 30, 1913 last, when Mr. Johnson was riding in Mr. Davidge's car.

Mr. Johnson was seeking to buy an automobile, and he was having a demonstration of Mr. Davidge's automobile, when the car, as it was passing another car in Prospect street, near Spring Forest Cemetery, went over the bank. Mr. Johnson was killed, and the others in the car had a narrow escape from death.

Mr. Davidge was charged with being responsible for the accident and was finally indicted by the Grand Jury on another charge. His attorneys, Curtiss, Keenan & Tuthill, made a motion for a demurrer to the indictment, before Justice Kiley, the case was argued last fall, and the decision has not yet been given by Justice Kiley.

In this proceeding Hinman, Howard & Kattell are attorneys for Mrs. Johnson; Curtiss, Keenan & Tuthill represent the defendant. No details are given out for publication by either side."

[NI0616] worked at Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

In 1905 was a civil engineer of the Shawmut & Northern railroad, headquartered in Olean, N.Y.

1920 census lived on Borden Street, Woodhull, NY

[NI0617] Last known address: 30 Clinton Place, Mt. Vernon, NY

[NI0618] 4th cousin to Ulysses S. Grant

[NI0619] The following Fitch descendants of Rev. James Fitch of Norwich, CT, married
Northrups. Identifying numbers are from "Descendants of Rev. James Fitch,
1622-1702," Vol. 2.

2260. Lorena Fitch m. 1836, William Nelson Northrup and res. Chenango and
Cattaraugus Cos., NY.

6934. Eliza Sophia Fitch, m. 1863, Judge Ansel Judd Northrup and res. Onondaga
Co., NY.

John T. Fitch
4 Canal Park #712
Cambridge, MA 02141
Tel/Fax (617) 494-4882
E-mail: JTFitch@FitchFamily.com
Web Page: www.fitchfamily.com

[NI0621] http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/g/r/a/Charles-Loring-Grant/ODT7-0025.html?Welcome=984258559

[NI0622] Cause of death: Summer Complaint.

[NI0632] Oxford Times - Reel 10 (Aug 18, 1880 thru Oct 26, 1886)
WALKER
In Greene, May 14th, 1881, Mr. Simeon Walker, aged 64 yrs
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nychenan/mscdeath.htm

[NI0634] Ordained at West Branch, Mich. By Congregational
Council Jan. 29, 1896 and transferred to become a Presbyterian minister in 1903.

[NI0647] More info in History of Port Louisa Co., Iowa.

[NI0649] Lived in Burwell, Nebraska

[NI0659] Death of Mrs. Gray (obituary)
Mary Celia, wife of W. H. Gray, Esq., and daughter of James A. and Harriet E. Gray, of Grandview,
died Tuesday morning April 4, 1882, at Columbus Junction, Iowa.
Mrs. G. was born September 19, 1854, and was gifted with more than usual adornments. After receiving
what the common school could give her in the way of an education, she entered Grandview Academy and almost completed its course under the excellent tution of Major M. S. Hamill and his corps of
assistants. She afterward entered Eastern Iowa Normal School, remaining nearly one year, altogether
securing a good training for her chosen work-teaching. Entering her work with a love for it and the children under her care, she attained a reputation in Muscatine and Louisa counties, where she taught,
as being among the most successful of teachers. Her work is graven upon the heart-tablets of her
pupils, and although she is now dead, her work still lives. On her birthday, September 19, 1879, she
was married to W. H. Gray, a young and rising attorney of Columbus Junction, Iowa, and with him
looked forward to a useful and happy life. A sweet little daughter was born to them about six months
ago. Although death came unlooked for to Mrs. G.. yet she was not unprepared for it, for she was a
woman of Christian walk and conversation, as is shown by her habit as a teacher of introducing her
day’s work by reading God’s word and by appropriate prayer. And, too, this was not all-her every day
life exemplified her Christian principles-she was a good citizen, serving her neighbors acceptably as a
member of the school board, a dutiful daughter and kind sister, a loving wife and fond mother. Her
funeral took place at her husband’s residence, Rev. J. E. Eggert officiating. Mrs. Gray will be mourned
not only by kindred, but by a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

[NI0671] Martin removed from Cincinnati to Iowa about 1847 and settled on a farm near Grandview, Iowa.
Some of the data was taken from a letter in possession of Melvin Gray-(Wendell Gray-Judge George
Law Gray-John Gibson Gray Jr.-John Gibson Gray Sr.-Robert Gray.) Both Martin and his wife are
buried in the Grandview Cemetery, Grandview, Iowa. Many of the Iowa Grays and descendants are
buried in this cemetery and there are at least three unmarked graves in the family plat.

[NI0692] The Padgetts of Oxford, NY



There are two Padgett families associated with the early history of the town of Oxford in Chenango County, New York. The family of John Padget settled there in the 1790's, while several of the children of James Padget arrived in the decades after 1800. John and James were contemporaries and may well have been brothers -- but more of that later.

The most complete account we have of the life of John Padget is to be found in an unfinished sketch written by his granddaughter, Hannah Walker Barstow, and dated "Norton, Kansas, June 9, 1894." She begins:

As I have written of my father's ancestry, I will now write of my mother's what
little I have heard from my mother and others who were relations and acquaintances
of the family and knew the places where they lived.
My mother's father's name was John Padgett. His place of residence was South
Cave [Yorkshire], England. It must have been quite a place. I saw in a magazine a
picture of a castle in South Cave. As near as I know my grandfather was a shepherd.
He married Hannah Wilson. I never heard her father's name. Her mother's name I
believe was Martha. They had only two children, my grandmother and her brother
John. There was a young man of wealth who wished to marry my grandmother
when she was young, but she preferred my grandfather who was not very wealthy,
and married him.

They had three children, one little girl named Hannah after her mother. She died
and was buried in England. Then they had two sons before coming to America;
John and James. Then grandfather, hearing, as I suppose such wonderful stories of
America, made up his mind to come hither. Grandmother did not wish to leave
father and mother and brother who were wealthy. She had before marriage
everything heart could wish and did not have to labor at anything only such light
and fancy work as she chose to do. But grandfather was bent on coming and told
her he should come anyway. So rather than to have him come and leave her and
her two little boys there, she finally consented to come.

Her brother was not married at that time. He afterwards married and lived in
Hull and became very rich. He wrote to his sister that he had married as fine a
woman as eyes ever beheld, but alas, before many years she died and he wanted grandmother to name my mother after her, which she did. Her name was Jane
Furness. He sent her wedding dress (a very nice figured silk, with a guinea
sewed in the back) and a gold ring to mother, all of which were stolen or burned
when our folks had their house burned when my oldest sister was a babe.

When grandfather and grandmother came to this country, it was sometime, I do
not know how many years, before the Revolutionary War, and the power of steam
was unknown. They came in a sail vessel and were a long time crossing the ocean.
At one time they came in sight of land and the captain told her she could get her
children ready for they would soon be to land, but there came a storm and the wind
blew them far away from their course and they never saw land again for weeks.
What suffering the poor woman must have endured after being brought up in
affluence, to either bid her parents and only brother farewell forever and come to
this wilderness of wild man and wild animals, or be left worse off than widow
with the care of two little sons devolving on her. Far better would it have been for
her in that extremity to have chosen the latter. Her posterity would probably have
had much more of this world's goods, if not living in a land of freedom.

Her brother never married again and used to send chests of very rich goods to
his sister as long as he lived. He sent her sets of china so clear you could almost
see through them, and silver dishes, Brussels carpet, damask bed curtains, etc.,
high post bedsteads with curtains drawn on rings which were fashionable. He
sent a straw colored silk velvet vest I suppose for some of her boys, at least uncle
James had it, and some of his descendants must have it now. They also have a
silver tankard which they were keeping as an heirloom. My sister has an ivory
trunk all carved, or tea chest rather, for it had three cans and a place to put money
and things where they could not easily be found.

I do not know how long they had been in America when the war commenced,
but her brother sent her things at that time that she never received and all letters
were stopped so she was unable to hold any communication with her friends
over the sea.

My mother's cousin, who lived to be a little over a hundred years old, and
remembered my grandmother well, said she was a very pleasant old lady. She
also told me that John Wilson, grandmother's brother who lived in Hull (Eng.)
used to insure ships. Grandfather had relatives in England since my remembrance,
for when her husband went back there (after John Wilson died) he visited them
and once told me about it. My oldest brother's children have a bible that
grandmother's brother sent to her with his name and Hull, his place of residence,
in it, dated 1800.

According to Vesta Padgett Robinson, a great-great-daughter of John and Hannah Padget, the family came to America when John, Jr. was four years old -- that is, in 1772. We do not know where they landed, although Philadelphia and New York are the most likely locations. Wherever they may have lived for the first few years, they were apparently dislocated by the events of the Revolution. The British took New York City in a series of battles in August and September of 1776, came close enough to Philadelphia in December of 1776 to sent the Continental Congress scurrying for safety, then finally took that city in September of 1777. Like many refugees from the British, the Padgets seem to have fled northward, up the Hudson River, for Hannah Barstow's account continues:
At the time of the war they lived in Troy, this old lady said, and I have heard my
mother say that while grandfather was away to the war (for although an Englishman
he was true to the country of his adoption and served her interests and fought for
her freedom all through the war with the mother country) the Tories, as they were
called, would come and kill the sheep in the night and lay the heads and pluck on
the doorstep. They had a man of color living with them and he was anxious to
sleep out of doors in the cart. She tried to persuade him not to, for fear they would
kill him, but he insisted and she finally gave consent; so he slept in the cart, and in
the night they came to him and asked him if he did not with to be free, and in order
to find out their purpose he said he did. Then they told him when his master came
home they were going to kill him and then he could be free. As soon as they were
gone he went and told grandmother and when grandfather returned they took what
necessary things they could carry on a horse and grandmother and the children rode
and a company of Light Horse came along and they accompanied them and they
arrived safely in Albany.
They must have lived there sometime as my mother, who was the youngest child,
was born there [in 1790]. When Grandfather came home from the war he was
accompanied by a man by the name of Robinson who stopped at his daughter's to
stay over night, and as they were both tired, he urged grandfather to stop and stay
with him, but he refused saying it had been a long time since he was his family and
he must go on. The nextmorning Mr. Robinson was found with his throat cut from
ear to ear, as was supposed by the Tories. His son-in-law was also suspected of
being privy to the deed.

Grandmother was an M.D. (doctor) and after the war was ended and she went
back to the neighborhood of her old home, in her practice she saw a scarlet
broadcloth cloak of her own that had been taken and made into clothes for
children. Her practice, after she came to Chenango County, N. Y., extended a
good ways, some 30 or 40 miles from home, and as the country was new and
roads bad, she always went on horseback.

This period during the Revolution is when James Padget (1746-1830) enters the story. James was also born in England, but nothing is known of his arrival in America. However, it is on record (New York in the Revolution, p. 108) that he was appointed ensign of the Sixth Regiment of the Albany County Militia by Governor George Clinton on 28 May 1778 and served in a regiment commanded by Colonel Stephen J. Schuyler.
Not only were John and James both living in the Albany area during the Revolution, but they were extremely close neighbors afterwords. A map of land holdings in Brunswick, east of Troy, NY, shows the farms of John Padget and James Padget as separated by only two other narrow properties. The 1790 census for Rensselaerwick Town list two men named John Padget and none named James Padget -- but on the basis of the land map, it seems likely that the "John Padget" with one son and five daughters was really James, while the "John Padget" with two older sons, two younger sons, and four daughters was our John.

No records have ever turned up detailing James Padget's background or describing him and John as brothers. The closest thing we have to proof of a relationship is the remarks by Hannah Barstow, quoted above, concerning her mother's cousin. For if John and Hannah's children had cousins living nearby, a sibling of John's must have come to America, and there is no more likely candidate for this role than James.

We can even state the situation a little more strongly. We know that the cousin referred to (1) lived to be "a little over a hundred," (2) was married to a man with his own reasons for visiting Yorkshire after 1800, and (3) resided close enough to Oxford, NY for Hannah Barstow to have been on friendly terms with her. All these conditions are fulfilled perfectly by James' daughter, Barbara Padget Brooksbank. She lived to the age of one hundred years and a few months, her husband, Robert Brooksbank, was born in Yorkshire, and they were residents of Oxford.

The family of John Padgett moved from Rensselaer County to the town of Oxford, in Chenango County, during the 1790's. According to the Oxford Historical Souvenier, "James and William Padgett were among the first settlers here, probably in 1792." They were very young men at the time, James about 21 and William still in his teens. It seems that the rest of the family must have followed a couple of years later.

http://www.enter.net/~torve/trogholm/geneal/padget/padget.htm

[NI0698] Oxford Times - Reel 3 (var. Oxford papers-Chen. Reporter scattered Jan-Aug 1828, Chen. Republican 12/10/1828-11/10/1830 (1829 repeated); various papers-scattered issues 1820-1841; Oxford Times scattered 1843 & 10/6/1841-9/28/1842)
SHAPLEY
in this town, on 22nd inst (Mar 1842) Mrs. Martha Shapley, widow of the Thomas Shapley, aged 63 years

[NI0709] Oxford Times/Republican - Reel 4 (12/4/1842-12/18/1845 scattered; 8/14/1845-4/24/1850)

PADGETT
Died in this village on the 13th Jan 1847 of dropsy of the heart, Miss Ann Padgett, aged 35.

[NI0733] Probably died in Steuben County, New York.

[NI0773] This may be related to this Jasper Fleming:
Jasper Landen Fleming was born in 11-13-1879 in Tarrant Co., Texas. Parents Hiram Fleming and Celina Carolina Overlin. In the 1910 census Texas Hardeman Co., Justice Precinct No. 3, sheet No. 1B it has his mother, himshelf, wife can"t really make her name Minnie maybe middle name D. age 19 puts her to be born abt. 1891 and a daughter I think Lunvinie something like that age 9 months.

[NI0774] Graduated high school in Greene, NY in 1902.

Greene: Greene, Sept 3.

The Misses Bernice and Breta Page gave a linen and china shower Saturday afternoon at their home on Washing Street for their cousin, Miss Clara Jackson, who is to be married to-day to Mr. Paris Van Aukin. Amusing contests were held on the lawn and refreshments were served. Among those who were present were: Miss Jackson, Missees Bernice and Breta Page, Mrs. Lousie Baldwin, Miss Marguerite Morse, Charlotte Smith, Lucile Crandall, Anna Ford, Florence Bryant, Tima Graves, Ina Brown, Nellie Whitmore, Lena Bolt and Katharine Boynton, nearly all of these having been classmates of Miss Jackson in the Greene High school, from which she graduated in 1902.

[NI0777] 1920 Census--Frank is an Attorney, "Chief Counsellor"


Frank O'Neill was from Manlius, NY and was is in the National College Football College Hall of Fame for coaching at Williams College, Colgate U (where my son Robert and grandson Frank went to school), Syracuse, and Columbia U. He retired from coaching in 1923, had gotten a law degree and retired as Pres. of the Royal Indemnity Ins Co in 1944.

Frank & Grace were estranged for many years (since about 1927), but both lived in Westchester County, NY until Frank moved to Hamilton, NY until his death in 1958.

[NI0779] Blackmon came to Lake County, Ohio (Painesville) in 1888, residing for 32 years in Painesville and 50 years in Willoughby. He retired after 46 years in the hardware business, first with his father in Painesville, and then as a partner for 31 years in the Willoughby Hardware Company. Known as Lansing by nearly everyone, Blackmon lives in a stucco house (c.1970) at 37920 Euclid Ave., Willoughby, which he had designed in 1924.

[NI0783] Obituary:

Mrs. Mary Lumbard Lansing died at the home of her son, R. Schuyler Lansing in Wanakena, N. Y., Thursday, October 19. [1944]

Mrs. Lansing was born in Greene, January 1, 1864, the daughter of Lucius and Jane Wheeler Lumbard, and was married to Henry Herbert Lansing on August 21, 1894.

Mrs. Lansing is survived by one son, Robert Schuyler Lansing, of Wanakena; one step-son, Chester A. Lansing of Cranford, N. J.; a brother, John W. Lumbard of White Plains, five grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Funeral services were held in the Rogers Funeral Home in Greene, Saturday, October 21 at 2 p.m. The Rev. W. L. Wood of the Congregational Church officiated at the service and burial was made in Sylvan Lawn Cemetery. The bearers were Schuyler Lansing, Chester Lansing, George Bolt and Charles N. St. John.

Those from out of town attending the funeral were:
Mr. and Mrs. R. Schuyler Lansing and daughter; Mrs. Edward R. Gammon of Wanakena; Mr. and Mrs. Chester A. Lansing of Cranford, N. J., and son, Warner Lansing of Ithaca; Miss Annie Lansing of Syracuse; Mr. and Mrs. John W. Lumbard and their daughter, Mrs. L. P. Kurtis of White Plains, also their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mercer of Syracuse; Mrs. Howard Bishop of Syracuse; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Willis of Syracuse.

[NI0833] Last known address (1960s): 1121 Maplewood Dr. N.E., Cedar Rapids, IA 52402

[NI0839] From the Records of the Reformed Dutch Church of Albany, Part 6

[Baptised] Apr. 2. bo. Feb. 25. William of William Burnside and Mary Hudson.

[NI0850] See King Family records for more info.

[NI0867] 1880 Census, Linn County, Iowa. http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ia/county/linn/census/pg0050a.txt

St# Hou# Dw# Fm# Last Name First Name ColorSex Age Born Relationship Sgl Mar W/D Mar/YrOccupation #mo Ill? BlindDeaf IdoitiInsaneDisab School Read WriteBirthplace Father Mother Comments
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12)(13)(14) (15) (16) (17)(18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) (26) (27) (28) (29)



50a 24 Park Ave. 67 . 115 Walker Wm. w m 59 . . . x . . livery . . . . . . . . . . New York New York New York
50a 25 Park Ave. 67 . 115 Walker Eliza w f 35 . wife . x . . . . . . . . . . . . . Canada Connecticut Connecticut
50a 26 Park Ave. 67 . 115 Walker Nellie w f 14 . daughter x . . . school . . . . . . . x . . Iowa New York Canada
50a 27 Park Ave. 67 . 115 Walker Mamie w f 5 . daughter x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa New York Canada
50a 28 Park Ave. 67 . 115 Cummings Nellie w f 21 . servant x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Iowa Ireland Ireland
50a 29 Park Ave. 67 . 115 Lansing Thos. w m 28 . . x . . . saloon keeper . . . . . . . . . . New York Connecticut New York
*********************************************************************************************************

WALKER, William, 23, of Greene, was married to CASE, Carolin A, 22, of Greene, on Oct. 21, 1849 by Rev. Mr. Pitts, Colesville, Broome Co., NY

[NI0898] In 1926 Charles lived in Superior, Wisconsin.
2625 Banks Ave, Superior Wisconson.

[NI0910] Died Houghtonburg, Alma, Jackson, Wisconsin

[NI0946] From Biographical Review p.730 (currently without pg.731 to complete this):
"Adelbert T. Tallmadge, a prominent citizen of the town of Maryland, Otsego County, began life as a carpenter and joiner." He "attended the district schools in his youth, where he received his education." ,.. "Adelbert T. Tallmadge began life for himself at the age of fourteen, learning his trade, and working at it until he was twenty-one. He enlisted in the army August 12, 1861, becoming a member of Company D, 3d New York Calvalry, under Captain Peter M. Murphy and Colonel Van Allan. His company was engaged in thirty-six battles during the period of his enlistment. Among others were Ball's Bluff, Winchester, Little Washington, and Richmond, Va., and he was in additional through the Carolinas. He was honorably discharged at Bermuda Hundred, Va., August 11th, 1864. He enlisted as a private soldier, and was promoted to the rank of Sergeant during the time of his service. He returned to his native town in 1866, and followed his trade for some years." also,
"Adelbert T. Tallmadge has always lived in the town of Maryland. He followed his trade until 1872, when he began keeping hotel in the village of Maryland. About ten years later he sold this hotel and bought the Susquehanna House at Schenevus, which he ran for five years, and in 1887 was elected Sheriff of Otsego County, beginning his duties in January 1888. After serving three years he was re-elected by 172 majority, and in January, 1892, he was elected Sergeant-at-Arms in the State Senate at Albany, which position he still retains." He and his wife had 2 children, Edna "now attending Schenevus Academy." "Mr. Tallmadge owns property in Schenevus and also a sheep ranch in South Dakota. He is a strong Democrat in politics, and is a Mason of the thirty-second degree. He is also a member of Schenevus Valley Lodge No. 592, A.F.&A.M.; of the Oneonta Chapter, and of the Malta Commandery at Binghamton; also of the Binghamton Consistory. He is also a member of Brown Post No.15, G.A.R., at Schenevus, and has held all the offices of the post. He is now Chief of the Fire Department at Schenevus. Mr. Tallmadge has a most beautiful home, is well and favorably known all over the county, and enjoys the respect of his fellowmen."

[NI0957] 1960s last known address: 63 Bevier Street, Binghamton, NY 13901

[NI0970] Came to this country around 1633; took the freeman's oath at Watertown, Massachusetts. Came from Shalford, Colchester, England.

[NI1030] Ransom D., son of Solomon Page, was born in the town of Triangle, Broome county, New York, at the homestead on Page Brook, April 11, 1832, and died at Whitney Point, New York, April 20, 1886. He was a farmer and dealer in eggs, butter and other farm produce. Durin all his active life he resided in his native town, and took a keen interest in its affairs and welfare. In religion he was a Baptist, and a trustee of the church many years. In politics he was a Republican. He married, November 18, 1847 at Barker, New York, Lydia A Boynton, born in Triangle, New York, died in Greene, New York, February 16, 1902, daughter of George and Eliza (Walworth) Boynton.

[NI1033] Died July 1870, age 7 years, 10 months, 14 days; daughter of Simeon Walker.

[NI1102] Erford Lydell attended the public schools and Whitney Point Academy and Cornell University. In 1886 he engaged in business as a merchant in the town of Greene, where he has resided since then. He conducted a general store for fifteen years. In 1896 he founded the Page Seed Company, of which he is president and general manager. The business was incorporated in 1902. It has flourished from the first, and grown to large proportions. The first building of the new plant was erected in 1905 and since then several others have been built. Mr. Page is president of the Chenango Hotel Company; secretary of the Board of Trade of Greene, and was formerly president of the American Seed Trade Association. In politics he is a Republican, and he has been president of the incorporated village of Greene. He is a trustee and a prominent member of the Congregational church of Greene.

[NI1130] Census: 1870, Lewis twp. Northumberland Co. PA
************************************************************************************

Hamilton County News, March 8, 1878, p. 2, column 3:
"Mr. D. Huffman, southwest of town, who has been absent in Pennsylvania for several weeks, returned on Thursday of last week, accompanied by a party of ten persons, who will purchase land in this neighborhood and become residents of Hamilton county. Mr. Frymeyer, one of the newcomers, and Mr. Stahlnecker, son-in-law of Mr. H., called on the NEWS on Friday last."
**************************************************************************************

Settled in the Hamilton Precinct.

**************************************************************************************

Biography from "Historical Sketches of Giltner, Nebraska," by Gerald E. Sherard, 1985.:
Samuel Stahlnecker, whose life was devoted to the occupation of farming and who thus contributed to the agricultural development of Hamilton Co., was born in Pennsylvania in 1840, and passed away in 1882. His father, Samuel Stahlnecker, Sr., was of German descent and spent his last days in Pennsylvania.

In the schools of the Keystone state Samuel Stahlnecker of this review pursued his education and there was reared, early becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. Having arrived at the years of maturity he was married in 1878 to Miss Lizzie Huffman, a native of Pennsylvania, born February 13, 1848, and a daughter of Daniel C. and Mary (Frymire) Huffman, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, in which state the mother died. The father afterward came to Hamilton Co. in 1875 and purchased a section of railroad land. To him and his wife were born eight children, of whom five are living: Sarah L., the wife of Levi Hafer, a resident of Seward, NE; Mrs. Lizzie Worthington; Martin, who is a farmer of Hamilton Co.; Mrs. Hattie Frymire, living in Pennsylvania; and Mrs. Catherine McBride, of Colby, KS. The parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, loyal to its teachings and active in its support and in his political views Mr. Huffman was a democrat.

To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Stahlnecker were born seven children: Tillie, the wife of C. B. Huffman, now living in Aurora; William, who resides at Grand Island, NE; Mrs. Becky Fox, living in Frontier Co., NE; Frank, who is a resident farmer of Hamilton Co.; Dan, who also carries on farming in Hamilton Co.; Leslie, who is engaged in agricultural pursuits at Grand Island; and Samuel, who likewise follows that occupation in Hamilton Co.

Mr. Stahlnecker was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and throughout his life followed its teachings and endeavored to do unto others as he would have them do unto him. His political endorsement was given to the democratic party.

After six years of widowhood Mrs. Stahlnecker became the wife of Thomas Worthington, a native of Ohio, who came to Hamilton Co. in the early '70s and here secured a homestead claim, on which he resided to the time of his death. He became the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he converted into rich and productive fields, annually gathering therefrom golden harvests. Mrs. Worthington now owns eighty acres, her father's old homestead in Hamilton Twp. section 19, in Hamilton Co. In 1915 she removed to Giltner and in 1918 became a resident of Aurora, where she purchased a modern home at No. 1305 Eighth Street. She has been a resident of Hamilton Co. since 1875, at which time she removed to Nebraska with her first husband, who assisted his father-in-law in the cultivation and improvement of the Huffman farm. Mrs. Worthington is widely known in the county, where she has now lived for forty-six years. She has been an interested witness of all that has occurred in the way of developing and improving this section of the state and her many sterling traits of character have gained her warm friendships and kindly regard.

[NI1131] Obituary from the Aurora News-Register. Friday May 23, 1947, p.1:

Mrs. Worthington, County's Eldest, Taken by Death.

Outstanding Woman Was in 100th Year; Had a Stroke 10 Days Ago.

Hamilton county's oldest resident, Mrs. Lizzie Worthington, passed away at her home in this city at about 12:15 Thursday morning. She had been in her usual good health until ten days ago when she suffered a stroke. She had since been in a grave condition.

Celebrating her 99th birthday on February 13th, surrounded by family and friends, Mrs. Worthington stressed the fact that she was looking forward to her 100th birthday anniversary, when she wanted to really have a fig festivity. To her visitors that day in February it appeared very probable that she would reach the centenarian mark. She was active, keen minded and alert, and was in exceptional health for one so advanced in years. She had lived a good life, and the end came as she would have wanted it--with only a few days of inactivity.

Mrs. Worthington was beloved by all who knew her. She was rich in experience, through many years of the early days of Nebraska, and reared a family of seven sons and daughters. Yet she had time for neighborliness and generosity, always ready to lend a helping hand.

She had resided in Hamilton county for 72 years, 30 years of which were spent in Aurora.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Tillie Huffman, Aurora, and Mrs. Rebecca Fox, Moorefield, Nebr., and five sons, Dan and Frank Stahlnecker of Aurora, Will, Sam, and H. L. Stahlnecker, all of Grand Island.

Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Methodist church, Rev. A. J. Rich will officiate.

[NI1132] Obituary. Lodge Pole Express, February 4, 1937.
John M. Livingston was born in Sterling, Scotland, October 12, 1851, and departed this life January 24, 1937, Age 85 years, 3 months and 12 days.

He came to America at the age of 21 and located in Hamilton county, Nebraska, where he resided until he moved to Cheyenne county in 1911.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. John M. Livingston; three daughters, Mrs. George Hawthorne of Trumbull, Nebraska, Mrs. H. W. Anderson of Glendale, California, and Mrs. Sam Stahlnecker of Giltner, Nebraska; three sons, Wm. Livingston of Edison Nebraska, Earl Livingston of Ft. Worth, Texas and James Livingston of Sidney, Nebraska; also fifteen grand children and fifteen great grand children besides a host of friends and neighbors.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Vincent Beebe at the Methodist church Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock. Funeral arrangements were in charge of the Craig funeral home.

A mixed quartet sang "Nearer My God to Thee" and "Abide with Me."

Internment was made in the Pleasant View Cemetery. A large concourse of friends vollowed to pay their last respects.

Pall bearers were A. G. Carleton, B. J. Bates, W. T. Hafer, Frank Englert, Charles Hein and Alex Steward. The family have the sincere sympathy of this community.

[NI1138] Grand Island Independent Obituary:

May 23, 1939, p. 4
Death Takes Mrs. Wm. Stahlnecker
Mrs. William O. Stahlnecker, a long time resident of the city, died at three o'clock yesterday afternoon at the family residence, 822 East Pence street, following a lingering illness.

Phoebe Ann Hauk was born April 11, 1875, in Harrison county, Missouri. In her early childhood, the family moved to Hamilton county, this state, where she grew to womanhood.

On September 4, 1893, she married William O. Stahlnecker, a union to which two sons, Harvey and Dee Stahlnecker, both of this city, and a daughter, Mrs. Fae Clinite, were born.

Also surviving are six grandchildren, four sisters, Mrs. Pearl Fuller of Blackwell, Okla., Mrs. Sylvia Conway of Wichita, Kas., Mrs. Mabel Reynall of Holyoke, Colo., and Mrs. Emma Beacon of Portland, Ore.; two brothers, Miles Hauk of Indpendence, Ore., and Bill Hauk of Monmouth, Ore., and a half-brother, Doyle Hauk of Los Angeles, Calif.

Completion of funeral arrangements await word from relatives living at more distant points.

The body is at Geddes funeral home.

May 25, 1939, p. 5
Funeral services for Mrs. William O. Stahlnecker, whose death occurred at the family home Monday afternoon, will be held at two o'clock Friday afternoon at the Geddes funeral home. Rev. Earl Raitt, pastor of the Methodist church, will conduct the rites and burial will be in the Grand Island cemetery. Friends may view the body between the hours of seven and nine o'clock Thursday evening at the funeral home. Mrs. Fae Clinite, a daugher residing at Glendale, Calif., will arrive Thursday afternoon.

[NI1143] Civil War Veteran: Co. F, 36th IA Vol. Infantry. 9 August 1862 - 24 August 1865.

Homestead Claim, Union Township (Township 9, Range 7W, Section 10, NE 1/4). Certificate #2863. Patent date: March 1879. Vol. 16, page 329.

[NI1156] Came to Hamilton County with parents in 1870. In 1890 the Farrells moved to Hyannis, Nebraska where they operated a stock ranch until 1908 when they returned to Aurora.

[NI1164] http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/northumberland/bios2/f804827.txt

Floyd's Northumberland County Genealogy Pages 804 thru 827

Frederick Stamm, the grandfather of Levi F. Stamm, of Turbut
township, Northumberland county, was evidently one of the sons of
Nicholas, above, having been born in Bern township, Berks county, near
the Bern Church, Feb. 17, 1782. In 1816 he came to Northumberland
county, settling near the Paradise Church in Turbut township. Afterward
he lived for a time in Center county, Pa., but returned to
Northumberland in a few years and died on the old homestead. He was one
of the pioneers in the region, and made the trip hither from Berks
county by team. His wife, whose maiden name was Bambart, died in Center
county and is buried there, at the Loop Church at Center Hall.
Frederick Stamm died in Turbut township Sept. 11, 1859, aged seventy-
seven years, one month, twenty-four days, and is buried at the Paradise
Church. He was a Reformed member of that church and active in his
congregation, which he served many years as deacon and elder. They had
children as follows: Mrs. John Frymeyer; Jacob; Henry, who died in
Turbut township; Mrs. Samuel Stahlnecker; Mrs. Conrad Diefenbacher;
Benjamin, who died in Center county; Charles, who died in Center county;
Mrs. John Gingrith; Mrs. Christian Gingrith (John and Christian Gingrith
were brothers); Mrs. John Catterman; Daniel, who died in Montour county;
Mrs. Myers; Dr. William, who died near Pittsburg, Pa.; and one that died
in infancy.

[NI1165] Arrived in Hamilton County in 1872, and acquired a section of land for $4.50 per acre. Lived in a dugout three miles north of Giltner.


Hamilton County News, March 8, 1878, p. 2, column 3:
"Mr. D. Huffman, southwest of town, who has been absent in Pennsylvania for several weeks, returned on Thursday of last week, accompanied by a party of ten persons, who will purchase land in this neighborhood and become residents of Hamilton county. Mr. Frymeyer, one of the newcomers, and Mr. Stahlnecker, son-in-law of Mr. H., called on the NEWS on Friday last."

[NI1172] Resided at 803 M Street, Aurora, NE, after 1917.

[NI1179] Worked for the Lincoln Star in Lincoln, Nebraska

[NI1194] Homestead Claim, Union Township (Township 9, Range 7W, Section 10, W 1/2 of SE 1/4). Certificate #9222. Patent date: March 1881. Vol. 20, page 216.

[NI1196] Homestead Claim, Union Township (Township 9, Range 7W, Section 14, W 1/2 NW 1/4). Certificate #9221. Patent date: Oct. 1880, Vol. 19, page 61.

[NF041] Married by Reverend C. Darby.

[NF149] Marriage may have occurred in Montgomery County, NY. 1855 Census states Brachie was born in Montgomery County, and had only lived in Chenango Co. for 23 years.

[NF245] [Married] June 11. James Wand and Margaret Burnside.

From the Records of the Reformed Dutch Church, Part 7.

[NS16213] NSHS Library

[NS16323] NSHS Library


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