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JOHNSON and SCHAUFELBERGER GENEALOGY
JOHNSON Letters

From
To
Dated
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
June 7, 1917
Letitia (Dawson) Johnson
ca. June 12, 1917
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
June 11, 1917
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
ca. mid-June 1917
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
January 31, 1918
Florence (Johnson) Hardmeyer
October 3, 1909
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
September 13/18, 1918
Letitia (Dawson) Johnson
September 20, 1918
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
November 6, 1918
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
November 22, 1918
Harry & Letitia Johnson
December 20, 1918
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
August 10, 1919
During the period after Harry Dickson Johnson, Jr. had registered for the draft and the time he was called, he worked on two farms (at least from what can be gleaned from the letters).  In June of 1917, he worked at Davis' farm in South Swansea, MA near his uncle Elmer and Aunt Laura (who were in nearby Taunton).  In January, 1918, Harry was working at Delta Farm in Yaphank, Long Island.
 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
Addressed To:
Mr. Harry D. Johnson
970 St. Marks Ave.
Brooklyn, N.Y.
From:
Elmer Embury Johnson
Return Address:
In a pre-printed envelope with return address of:     
The Sperry & Hutchinson Co.,
453 Washington Street,
BOSTON, MASS.
where the address is crossed out and the words Taunton -Mass. added in script
Date:
June 7, 1917
Postmark:
TAUNTON MASS June 7 - 17 2--PM
Stationery:
Two pages in brown ink on both sides of one sheet
On 8-1/2x11 lined letterhead of The Sperry & Hutchinson Co/The Hamilton Corporation, Home Office Two West Forty Fifth St New York
Stamp:
Prepaid 2 cents postage (G. Washington)

Dear Harry,
     Laura + I were sitting on the porch last evening and up came Harry as big as life, on his way to the Science Church.  He had no trouble finding his way in from the country and seemed well pleased to be dependant upon himself.
     He has entered into the spirit of the thing and seems to be in a fine frame of mind. The work is not just what he wants but the connection is pleasant so he is going to hold on for a month or so and then I will place him on a farm.  He can get plenty of milk + eggs + good fresh air.  He goes out on the milk wagon in the morning and helps to wash the bottles + fill them. He has to get up about 3 A.M. but he will be glad to turn in at 8 P.M. so he will be as well off.
     I told him that there were three other openings on farms but he said he is going to stick where he is
at least for awhile.  He has a dandy big room and has a companion to keep him company, a young chap about 15.
     I told Harry that I assumed that he felt rather strange the first night but he would soon get used to it.  He replied that it seemed great and he was enjoying it like he would a vacation.
     I would like to get him placed in a big peach orchard about July 10th and hope to do so.  That is a good business and well worth learning.
     How are things going with you now?  Any thing new.  We are all looking forward to better times but I feel that some sort of any opening will show itself soon and then I'll jump.
     I will keep you posted on Harry and will look after him in good shape.  He will be at our bungalow Sunday and spend the day.  I mean the portion of it that he does not work.  He has to work on Sunday's  like other days so that is another reason for a change.  He will get along O.K. and pick up some flesh.
     Tell Lettie we have plenty of room and would like to have any or all pay us a visit this Summer.
     We have some pretty fine little French dolls in Fall River so we will have to watch and see that your
son doesn't slip.  Laura says she will censor the girl end.
               Your affectionate brother,
                    Elmer

 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Letitia (Dawson) Johnson
Addressed To:
Mrs. H. D. Johnson
970 St. Marks Ave.
Brooklyn, N.Y.
From:
Harry D. Johnson, Jr.
Return Address:
Date:
ca. June 12, 1917
Postmark:
Ocean Grove Mass. June 12 - 1917 -- A.M.
Stationery:
Six pages in sloppy brown (fountain pen) ink on two sheets of folded linen note paper in a matching envelope
Stamp:
Carmine 2 cent Washington stamp

Dear Mother,
     I am very glad to be in the country and I often think of home and wonder you and Dad + Bill are. This is so different from New York city that it took me quite a while to get used to it.  Everything is on a small scale.  Small houses small farms + small dogs (Boston terrier type largly).  The houses are largely small cottages although there are a few two + three family houses called tenements.  The farms are not very extensive being not more than a few acres.  It is very hilly country and the scenery puts somewhat in mind of the view we had at Stockbridge Mountaintop. South Swansea is about three miles from Fall River and it is a ride of about ten minutes via a branch of the N.Y.,N.H.+H.R.R.-- I have been to see uncle Elmer twice,
including yesterday (Sunday)      I like uncle Elmer very much. He has had quite a few experiences and can give me advise.  He is like a father to me and says says that anytime I could come go to live with him and
Laura in time case of necessity.  (If I do not care my job until I find another) This is very kind of him
     Mother this not the kind of a place I had in mind.  It is I am with a milkman.  He gets the milk from dairy farms bottles it and delivers it to the stores + the consumer. The following is my routine:
1  arise at 3:00 a.m.
2  We load the two wagons with milk; hitch the horses + leave about four o'clock we arrive in the city (Fall River) and peddle the milk to our regular customers. (Each waggon takes a different rout.  Two men on a waggon)
3  At six o'clock we have breakfast in the "Gee Wiz" Restaurant where we supply milk.  This is deducted
from price of milk.
4  We then peddle until about noon My waggon finishes at 11 o'clock.
5. Ours arrives home first.  We then sterilize all of the bottles and cans that we bring Back. We are through
at from one to three o'clock.
6. We have dinner at 4 -
7. In the afternoon I have help where I can.
8. Supper at 6 o'clock:-Burt + I eat together at the kitchen table. The other to men Frank and Ernest eat in their own homes.  Both are married men.
9  I go to bed about 8 o'clock unless go to to Fall River.  Then it is ten or eleven.
     I am going to stay here until I find a farm.  This is great work to develop my muscles + improve my health.  Uncle Elmer thought it was a dairy farm. He knows a lot of farmers and I expect soon to locate on one maybe a Fruit farm in Swansea center.
     Burt is strapping young fellow of fifteen.  He lives near hear but boards with Mr. Davis.  I was speaking to
his mother the other day and she said that he is wild and so she has sent him to Mr. Davis so that she knows where he is at night.  He knows a lot of people here.  I met young girl at uncle Elmers last night.
     Please excuse this writing. I wrote very hurriedly before supper and have not said all would like to say but if I do not mail it tonight it will not go until tomorrow night.
     Please right a long letter and tell me all about things.
Give my love to Bill + Dad. and ask them Both to write.
                      Your loving son
                             Harry,
                       c/o Mr. J. Davis
                         So Swansea
                                   Mass.

P.S.  I hope can this writing out because I am using a stake and writing too fast
                    Harry

 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
Addressed To:
(no envelope)
From:
Elmer Embury Johnson
Return Address:
Date:
June 11, 1917
Postmark:
Stationery:
Eight pages in blue ink (with postscript in pencil) on 8 sheets of lined paper
Stamp:

Dear Harry,
     I understood Harry to say yesterday he had written you folks but possibly he said he had received a letter from you.
     Now I want to tell you something. There is only one thing the matter with Harry and you also are responsible for that. In talking with Harry I can think back to year after year when you always told Harry of his faults.  He was always too slow and too this and too that.  You never told him what a wonder his he was and how much he could accomplish in the world.  Now the kid's mind his tortured with his faults.  This will be good for him because of that fault, the other work is good because of some other fault.  I told Harry last night to forget that he ever heard of faults and to make up his mind that every one had just as many as the other.  The sooner he tells the whole world to go to hell the better.  Who said that this hustle, hustle all the time was the way to live.  Do you realize that in 3/4 of the cities that I have been in, hustle is unknown.  What is this terrible rush all about and where are you rushing to.  The first I remember of you is the
dancing school.  You broke your neck to hold down two jobs and from that day to this you have hustled and hustled.  When I look around I find that the real successful men are so slow to move it gives one the creeps.  Success is not determined by the amount of hustle but by the judgement used when one does make a move.  I have hustled so hard here that they have got the impression that I am willing to do all the work and so they let me do it but they don't pay me for it, they pay the fellow who kids me into doing then work.
   Young Harry will be O.K. if he will just stick out his chest and say look me over.  If one thinks themselves a lemon, so does the world.  It is all a matter of bluff and fight so each is as good as the next.
     Harry's work is not satisfactory to him nor to me but no harm done.  I told him or rather Laura + I did to quit anytime he wanted to and I will place him on a farm.  In the meantime he can be with us and I know I have made him believe that he is just as welcome as home.
     He has to get up at 3 A.M. and not only hustle but run until about 10, then he works along until about 1 P.M. This job is not as represented but Harry is getting the right idea.  I am trying to place him on a big fruit farm and if I succeed it will be fine.  The hours are from 7 until 5 and no Sunday work.  The work is pleasant and the business worth learning.  If I do not succeed in this I will place him with a truck farmer and you can depend on me to see that his living conditions are OK.
     When you write to Harry do not preach but for a change talk about something besides Harry Jr. and work and future.  Let the kid get to believe he is a living wonder and he will be one, if not actually at least in his own mind and that is what Science teaches, we live within our minds.  When I was a young
fellow I used to dread to meet you.  It was always straighten up, you are getting round shouldered or those cigarettes will kill you or you must show the firm how you can hustle or some such bunk.  I can imagine what your son has gone through, living right with you for 20 years.  For the love of Mike stop it nd make up your mind that others can see just as many faults in you as you see in them.  Several years ago it was hard to argue with you because you could point to your property and say behold "I am a success".  Your
son has just as a good a chance just as he is as anyone you know.  Some of the blunders that big men make would not be tolerated if made by some youngsters of 20.  Meller was a big man but the mistakes
he made in the management of the New Haven Road are hard to believe.
     Howard Coffin who is now one of Pres. Wilson advisory committee and in work day life engineer of the Hudson Motor Car Co was considered a joke a few years ago.  Shire and I knew him quite well and used to wonder how it he managed to hold his job.  Circumstances favored him and today when I he suggests a move, people accept it as a good one because he is now a big man.  In most of the suggestions he makes there is no knowing whether his advice is good or made not for there is no way to make a comparison.
     I read quite a little about Christian Science several years ago and I feel satisfied that it has a good purpose but it is not a cure all and no one can make me think that it is.  Do not forget that we cannot all be happy by following the same line of reasoning.  Our makeups are different and we need different food.
     Do not think that I have given up hopes of beating the game with my own dope for I haven't.  I have learned a lot in the past 10 years and if I can apply that knowledge successfully in the next 10 years I will be alright.  If I don't I'll have lots of friends anyhow.  The first thing I want to do is to get into a regular line of business and quit this ? game.  If the firm would fire me they would be doing me a favor for I would have to make a change and the chances are 10 to 1 it would be for the better.
     Harry came over last night for supper and we had a girl about 17 at the house.  Harry was real bashful but he managed to eat something.  Harry brought his clothes so that he could take a hot bath for I presume they do not have bath tubs in Swansea.  We had him leave his clothes here as we could take
care of them and see that he has enough clean stuff on hand. I told Harry if he needed anything or money to come to me like a regular sport and say so.  He insisted that he would and I believe he will feel free with me.
     Tell Lettie not to worry about the boy for I will look after him and take it from me if I can keep him near me for a few months I believe I can tell him how to overcome his faults.  Just kid yourself into thinking that you have no faults and the world will believe it too.
     Try to come up and see us soon.
     Love from all.
          Your affectionate brother,
          Elmer
P.S.  Do you think William could come up and see us during his vacation.  Good swimming boating etc. and dandy country -- as soon as it stops raining.  Let me know
          [over]
Harry's address is
     c/o L.M. Davis
     South Swansea, Mass
 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
Addressed To:
(no envelope)
From:
Harry D. Johnson, Jr.
Return Address:
Date:
mid-June 1917
Postmark:
Stationery:
6  pages in blue ink on two sheets of folded linen note paper and undated
Stamp:
Dear Dad,
There are some question that come up during your youth that it is good to be set right on. Uncle Elmer and I have some good conversations on various things and he having gone out into the world enjoying his fling has his idea of life.  I have my ideas of what are right and wrong but in some ways I am a little at
sea.  I know that the reason for my condition is unsatisfied passion. That is instead of keeping my mind
pure and on something worth while I have eyed the chickens and let my mind run along sensual lines.
This rises the heat of your passion and you burn up you energy and vitality.  I suppose that if I were to
satisfy this passion once my imagination would cease and with it the thoughts and harmful results; but it more likely would tend to sharpen the appetite and weaken my self control.  My ideal is to restrain ones self until marriage so that your wife will be getting a square deal--aside from the moral law.  Uncle Elmer like other fellows I have talked to that have been out in the world do not seem to believe in self control in that line and that discharges in the sleep are harmful. As I said before I have my own
ideas of the correct and best course but would like to have a little fatherly advise.  Speak to me frankly in your letter and explain to me your opinion from your life's experience and from what you know about sexual impulse In science they say Dope out your own salvation. Now Mrs. Eddy was a woman and
of course gives a woman's point of view in her book.  I want some data from somebody who is older than I.  

My idea is that a fellow should  strive not only to be as good as his father but that he should to be better
And I think I will have darned hard job to do the latter.  Without being told anything I imagine you retrained yourself with your will power just as well with drinking as before marriage as you have ag
from drinking any liqueaur all your life  But I know that nobody is perfect in every thing and if your have
had any experience that will be helpful do not hesitate to relate them.  I have never known any of the opposite sex and in my present frame of mind never will.  But if one piece is and necessary for me to recover my strength energy and vitality - Manhood.  I am ready to take a step backward in order to get
a better start forward.  Dear Dad I appologize for my frank ?? of expressing myself but lots of fellows as soon as they break the home ties plunge in to have a heluva time.  I am out here to see things as they are and think - to improve from a weak of half benaanized [?] being to a Man.

Please write a frank man to man letter.  And oblig your son.
                        Harry

PS.  I have been thinking of what you said about getting near home, and I think it would be fine if I could get in New York (Orange or Dutches county for instance) or New Jersey.
                        Harry
[over]
William Hatheway is a fellow that has been chasing the girls since he was twelve.  Uncle Elmer
and Aunt Laura think he will liven me up.  But that is just why I left New York to forget the girls and
build up.

                             Harry
 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
Addressed To:
(no envelope)
From:
Harry D. Johnson, Jr.
Return Address:
Date:
January 31,1918
Postmark:
Stationery:
Two pages (both sides) on a page of letterhead from Unique Specialty Company Inc., Patented Household and Other Devices, 116 Duane Street, New York
Stamp:
Delta Farm
Yaphank LI
January 31, 1918.

Dear Dad,

     I have received both packages of "Moniter + Sentinel" that you sent on the 20th + 26th.  I am much obliged but have not had much chance to enjoy them.  The trouble with farming is there is not much
chance to get down to study profitably. It is work, eat and sleep.  I hate to meet miss the lectures for they are very helpful.
     On Sunday afternoon, Jan 20th, Mr. Ayvad asked me how I liked it and asked me how much I expected to be paid.  I said that he should make the terms. He said that he would pay me $15 a month
and promised an advance to $20 around May, and $25 sometime later.  I accepted this w feeling that I would be able to get a pretty good idea of farming in general; that I would be doing a patriotic service; and also be making it possible for them to do seve many things (in the garden, selling milk etc) that they could not do without a third persons help.  At present I am a little discouraged partly due to the
fact that the cold weather has put things in a pretty bad condition. and partly to the fact that one may
think he would like a farmers life and then find the daily chores monotonous, such as;  cleaning the stable every morning, cutting corn husks for cows, carrying water from the house to the barn (about 200 ft) for four cows each taking about 2 pails.  Referring to the condition; they have a pipe from cellar to barn and also to chicken house but the well is not driven deep enough thereby making plumbing in the house useless.  The cesspool also is frozen at tap.  Things are pretty bad just now but I think the warm weather will put things in better condition.  We are going to drive a new well tomorrow. The water will be pumped into a tank in the cellar by a gasolene engine and then up into the house and out to barn and chicken house.  This makes things much better.
     Mr. Ayvad says that I can take the afternoon train (4 something) saturday which gets me to Nostrand Ave about 6:25.  I will come back sunday on the afternoon train.
     I received mothers letter of 29th and will answer it tomorrow.
     One thing that I am used to is being bored to death.  Mrs. Ayvad talks me deaf dumb + blind at breakfast, dinner, + supper.
                         Yours affectionately
                                    Harry

PS.  I will find out about that short rate.
 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Florence K. (Johnson) Hardmeyer
Addressed To:
(no envelope)
From:
Reuben Henry Johnson
Return Address:
Date:
Sunday October 3, 1909
Postmark:
Stationery:
2 pages handwritten in ink on two sides of one page of letterhead of "The Gladstone", Norfolk, Virginia
Stamp:

Dear Daughter
     Have so many times thought of what Raymond told me. (when he brought the  sad news of his mothers Death)  that you had asked should I be sent for  I want to say I appreciate that very much and wanted to let you know I did but hardly knew the best method to take so concluded would take this means and let me say again I thank you very much and shall ever remember your thoughtfullness Of course I had no intimation of her serious illness and not learning till 11 days afterwards of her Death you must know how I felt  Trust you and yours are all well and again thanking you       
     Sincerely yours
           R H Johnson                  
                352 Schermerhorn St
                       Brooklyn N . Y.

 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Harry Dickson Johnson, Sr.
Addressed To:
Mr. Harry D. Johnson
       The "Avondale".
          1734 P St., N.W.,
          Washington,
               D.C.
From:
William Dawson Johnson, Sr.
Return Address:
Pvt. Wm Dawson Johnson
        Co. 362, Battalion N.
          Marine Barracks
              Paris Island
               S.C.
Date:
September 13/18, 1918
Postmark:
SEP 15 11 30 AM 1918 PARIS ISLAND2 S.C.
Stationery:
Six pages in pencil on both sides of three sheets of lined memo paper of the Army and Navy Young Men's Christian Association (with the slogan "With the Colors" in the letterhead and the inscription "To the Writer:  Save by Writing on Both Sides of this Paper.  To the Folks at Home:  Save Food, Buy Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps.")
Stamp:


Other Features:

purple 3 cent Washington head stamp

YMCA envelope bears the notation in pencil "Wrote 17 Sept."

Dear Dad -      
     Received yours of Sept. 8 + it sure felt good to hear from you. It was the first letter from home since last Saturday.  Have received a letter from May Anderson a girl in the office + a letter from Jessie Klipfel of R.H. enclosing 2 pictures of herself + girl friend, but the letters that count most are those from you + mother + Harry.  Please write often if only a card, saying you have candy on the way or something like that.
      Can't seem to understand what you mean by the other box.  Do you mean the one Marjorie is sending or did mother send another?  The candy I received was a box of caramels from Washington + the candy from Lofts. N.Y.  Thats all so far + I can assure you that I can stand a whole lot more. Make it a few lbs a week with Lofts + then ask mother to make some cookies or cake + send it.  Out side of that all I need is money.  $5 or so will probably last me all right till pay day next month.  Just now my capital is 21 cents + going fast. They wont cash a check down here unless its a bank draft.  So please send something in a hurry. You didn't say whether the mandolin was on the way or not.
      Am on police duty to-day. Just have to keep the street swept + papers picked up while the others are out drilling.  Each squad has a day for police now, 5 men in the mess hall + 3 on the street. Its like a day off.  Yesterday our company went on police duty + I just happened to get on the incinerator relief, burning up the garbage after mess.  Great stuff. To-day after the second drill period the sergeant called for all men that have had experience in driving automobiles.  About 21 responded, but 4 were taken out because they did not have 2 yrs experience.  He said they would be sent to France right away most likely as truck or ambulance drivers.  Just now they are being examined as to their ability. If many are accepted it will leave quite a hole in our company.
     Yes, dad, I received your 8 page letter + noted all the contents carefully.  The Science literature that I have is the Science + Health + Quarterly, no bible or Hymnal.  But before sending them, send the money + candy, cause I can borrow Smith's bible any time, but dont want to have to borrow money or grub eats from anybody.  It sure is like a N.Y. + family reunion with Uncle Walt + Edgar + all those R.H. men coming to work with you.  I know who Mr. Dickel is, but dont know who you mean by Geo. C.  Wont say anything about it to R.H.  It sure is fine to know you are on your feet again + wont have to worry anymore.
     As to Alvah[?], there has been no news, nor have I received any answer of the letter I wrote at Quarantine, but Jessie said in her letter that he had been transfered somewhere, but from what Jane said he was at the training station up to a week ago last Sunday.
      Well, well, dad, old scout, talk about Friday, the 13th being unlucky. Not for me.  We just had mail call + I really didn't expect anything somehow or other, sort of had that feeling.  But, oh my, the joy when I got a letter from Jack Crossly with all the news from Richmond Hill. Next came one from Jane, who has been on a vacation for a week or so.  She wrote ten + a half pages that were digested with the greatest joy.  Then came the candy from Marjorie, 2 lbs. of Mirrors candy. Assorted kinds, limes, lemons, etc. to suck, on top, + fudge + others on the bottom.  The C.S. Monitor also arrived.  Then to cap the climax I opened your letter to find the 5 dollars resting peacefully twixt the foldes.  Imagine my joyous feelings.  Thats the kind of a day to have, isn't it?  Kind of puts a little variety in the army life.      Lots of love to all,                                    Bill.

 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Letitia (Dawson) Johnson
Addressed To:
(no envelope)
 From:
Harry Dickson Johnson, Jr.
Return Address:
Date:
September 20, 1918
Postmark:
Stationery:
Two pages on both sides of one sheet of lined memo paper of the Army and Navy Young Men's Christian Association
(with the slogan "With the Colors" in the letterhead and the inscription "To the Writer:  Save by Writing on Both Sides of this Paper.  To the Folks at Home:  Save Food, Buy Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps.")
Stamp:

Camp Meade, Admiral, Md.
Thur. Sept. 20, 1918  
Dear Mother,
     Well how is Washington Is it just as hot in the Apartment? Have you an Apartment yet? I took out $10,000 worth of insurance today, the premium is $6.90 per mo. (that is at $.69 a thousant). The div- rate idend is $50.57 per mo. in case of injury, maimed, or over the great divide.  That will leave me $23 a month to spend out of which will come $100 for laundry once per month.  I was examined today and passed through it.  My hight is 6 ft 7 1/2 inches, 115 lbs, normal chest 30, expand 34.  I am 1 ½ lbs lighter and 2 inches better in expansion. Please send me a picture of you and Dad and Bill.
     What do you think of the insurance Dad?  I can take out less; that would mean a smaller dividend also a larger pay roll every month.  On completeing service it can be transfered to any other kind of insurance      I gave the following addresses to them; Nearest relative:--      
     Mr. Harry D. Johnson
     War trade board            
     20th + C Street, North West           
     Washington, D.C. (Because it will be permanent)
            during the War  Beneficiary;--      
     (Mrs.) Lettie Dawson Johnson
     ?  1734 P Street N.W.           
     Washington, D.C.
     Maybe should have given 2037 Park road for one or both. But anyway I can change it anytime by seeing Top Sergeant of my Company.      I will not object to candy.      Please send me a hat or cap my straw is recked.  Also Please have a quarterly Hymn book sent Also Moniter.

 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Harry D. Johnson, Sr.
Addressed To:
Mr. Harry D. Johnson
     The New Oxford Hotel
          Penn. Ave. + 15th Street
          Washington
          D.C.
 From:
Harry Dickson Johnson, Jr.
Return Address:
Date:
September 20, 1918
Postmark:
NOV 9 6 PM 1918 BALTIMORE MEADE BRANCH
Stationery:
Four pages in pencil on both sides of two sheets of lined memo paper of the Army and Navy Young Men's Christian Association
(with the slogan "With the Colors" in the letterhead and the inscription "To the Writer:  Save by Writing on Both Sides of this Paper.  To the Folks at Home:  Save Food, Buy Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps.")
Stamp:


Other Features:
purple 3 cent Washington head stamp

Matching YMCA envelope

Base Hospital                                      Camp Meade, Md.                     Nov. 7, 1918

 Dear Dad,      

     I was able to see the true or ideal man in the Welfare worker Mr. Carl. I have read so much in Science and Health about the true real Man or the spiritual idea of God, the Christ or manefestation of Life, Truth, and Love, ?? Principal.  This image or likeness was practically revealed and gave me a better under- standing of how to live the Life.  We should      
     We should be absolute in acknowledge-     ing nothing but the real or spiritual existence and the nothingness of matter. I just stopped to talk about the war.  My ideas are covered hidden by mortal thought (distrust of Germany and belief that she will play some dirty work in the armistice).  But the Truth since it is the only true exist- ence must win out in the German consciousness. Nov. 8. - I think that peace has been concluded, because in this mornings paper the United press held to there statement of yesterday; it also mentioned that Germany, due to civil uprisings, desired that the announcement of Peace be curtalled until she had time to prepare here police and military for to keep order.  She desired that the announcement to the german people should
be through their government.
     Mr. Carl was just here and I had a good talk with him about Science It is a great help.  Spirit is the Creator therefore there is naught but Spirit, God, good.  Spirit is eternal Good; was never born will never die; no begining nor ending.  Christ is the reflection or likeness of spiritual purity in human man.
     I was glad to see mother yesterday, she is such a help here all of the fellows feel brighter after she has been here.      
     I am looking forward to seeing you soon dear old Dad.  I am very grateful for the Liberty Bond.  I have wanted one very much. It will be a souveneer     of the honorable war we have won.
     It is nice that Bill has not gone over yet, he may be kept here now. I hope so.  Thanks very much for that candy Its fine.
     Will write again soon.
     Your so called TB.
          Harry  
P.S.  Nov. 9, 1918. - Have just come been sent back to my company.  I believe it is to await my discharge from service. It is the usual routine.                           Harry

 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Harry Dickson Johnson, Sr.
Addressed To:
Mr. Harry D. Johnson
     The New Oxford Hotel
          Penn. Ave. + 15th Street
          Washington
          D.C.
 From:
William Dawson Johnson, Sr.
Return Address:
Pvt. Wm Dawson Johnson
Co. A. 10th Sep. Batt.
                     Quantico
                                       Va.
Date:
November 22, 1918
Postmark:
NOV ? 9-30AM     "Military Branch" ALEXANDRIA VA
Stationery:
Two pages in blue ink on both sides of lined memo paper of the Army and Navy Young Men's Christian Association
(with the slogan "With the Colors" in the letterhead and the inscription "To the Writer:  Save by Writing on Both Sides of this Paper.  To the Folks at Home:  Save Food, Buy Liberty Bonds and War Savings Stamps.")
Stamp:

Other Features:
(stamp removed)

YMCA envelope bears the notation in pencil:
5.12 train Got to station 7 o'clock
 Waited until ¼ of 8
 gone to the dinner place

Dear Dad: -     
     Have yours of the 17th + mothers of the 19th.  Will not get liberty this week end, but rate it Thanksgiving.  If we get it I'll call up as soon as I find out. In the meantime can you come out Sunday + bring some eats as you did last time?  Dont suppose an answer would get here soon enough, so I'll call up most likely Sunday morning.
     We're still in doubt as to whats going to happen.  In the Leatherneck it said something about keeping 60,000 Marines for another year.  I think we'll be kept in Quantico for quite a while by the appearance of things. Got a letter from Jack Crossley. but haven't heard from Jessie in a week or so.  Guess she thinks I dont write often enough  She's not far from wrong, but I don't write to anybody lately.  It seems hard to scrape up something to talk about. Had a picture taken by a photographer from Washington yesterday.  It will be ready Monday.  Charges $1.50 per doz.  Just a post card size, but thats not so steep.  Some kind Marine made love to my sharpeshooters badge while my coat was hanging on the wall over my bunk.  They cost something like $2.50 down town + you cant buy another from the government.  That's the way it goes.  The company had another picture taken.  My eyes looks funny in it but Im buying one anyway.  Money is wanting rapidly with all the junk we buy.
     Well, Dad, will expect you + Mumma Sunday morning.  Love to Mother + Harry.                          Bill.

 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Harry D. & Letitia R.D. Johnson
Addressed To:
Mr. Harry D. Johnson
     The New Oxford Hotel
          Penn. Ave. + 15th Street
          Washington
          D.C.
From:
William Dawson Johnson, Sr.
Return Address:
Pvt. Wm Dawson Johnson
Co. A. 10th Sep. Batt.
                     Quantico
                                       Va.
Date:
December 20, 1918
Postmark:
DEC 21 3-PM 1918 "Military Branch" ALEXANDRIA, VA
Stationery:
Two pages in blue ink on both sides of lined memo paper of Knights of Columbus War Activities
Stamp:

Other Features
 (stamp removed)

matching Knights of Columbus envelope

In pencil on the back of the envelope:

     tablecloth     1
     shirt          1
     collars          5
     handk'ch     10
     paj          1
     socks          2 pr.

Dear Mother + Dad:      
     Lucky 'nough.  We drew lots for furloughs as there were 75 that wanted to go and only 50 are permitted to go at one time, and I was among the lucky 50. Twenty-five men go Saturday + 25 Sunday, on account of train service, I guess.  These were picked alphabetically + I landed in the second party, so I'll be home Sunday afternoon.
     As I tried to explain to Dad over the phone, we get 10 days and traveling time.  I thought as long as I was home Thanksgiving and can get home every week end that you wouldn't mind my going up to N.Y.  It is the only chance I'll have untill for a good      while, and now I only pay 1/3 the price I would at any other time.  This is on account of the furloughs.  Our furlough papers were given us today, so now I just have to buy the ticket.
     Will be able to stay over untill Monday most likely or maybe longer, so I'll stay with Harry at the Science rooms. How is my big brod, anyhow?  Didn't take his uniform off yet, did he, because we'll want some pictures taken?  Want to write a short note to Jess, so will close with lots of love to all,
     Your loving son,           Bill.  

 
LETTER
ENVELOPE
To:
Harry Dickson Johnson, Sr.
Addressed To:
(No envelope)
From:
William Dawson Johnson, Sr.
Return Address:
Date:
August 10, 1919
Postmark:
Stationery:
Three pages in brown ink on folded ivory linen note paper
Stamp:


Dear Dad:-     
     Harry's watch came and mother's letter of the 8th arrived yesterday.  Glad to hear that you put the Woolworth deal through.  Whether it meant very much or not it is a start anyway, and one thing leads to another.  That street car strike must put everything in awful condition.  Lots of businesses must be tied up.
     Did you settle about the house yet?  Give Fanny a deposit? I am getting discharged      next Friday, the 15th of August. What do you think of my going right up to N.Y. so as to get a job and start in working?  Mother thinks it best because there are more fellows returning all the time & if I stayed here it  would be a month wasted. Could you arrange for me to  stay with you, or would it be too crowded?  If O.K. I will go up Saturday the 16th.      
     Al has landed at Norfolk and expects to be discharged either today or Monday.  Then     he will stop here on the way up.  If he can do it. I will get him to stay until Saturday, then we can go up together & he will have a chance to see some of Washington.      
     Let me know what thinkest thou.                           
          Love from all,                                  Bill.
P.S.  Mother received a letter from Grace in which she enclosed a photo of Peggy + Boby, and aske mother to visit her.                          Love                                         Bill.