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johnsonfolksA society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.


Third Generation Grandparents

James Henry Johnson and Georgia Elizabeth Wells had the following children: i Eston Franklin Johnson b.19 Jun 1901 in Edwardsville, AL. d. Jan 1992 in Cleburne County, AL. ii Orvel Sylvestor Johnson was born on 5 Dec 1904 he died on 25 Jul 25 1989 in Jefferson County, Alabama. iii Lester Eber Johnson was born on 16 Sep 1908 he died on 15 May 1962 iv Vesta Oleta Johnson was born on 3 Sep 1915 she died on Aug 1986
young_james_henry_johnson_s james_henry_johnson_edwardsville_al_cleburne_co_al
Click Images to Enlarge, Left image James Henry when he was young.
The picture with hat on is as I remember granddaddy, James Henry Johnson.
The tree he planted was mostly in my mind. I leave this record for all his descendants. 
Granddaddy told me how we were connected to president Lyndon B. Johnson 
but I can not remember now how it was connected. He did not have a television set but he
would listen to the radio uncle John had as he played it. When he listened he would her
about Kennedy and Johnson ticket. That is the reason it is still in my mind.
His garden was just behind his right shoulder, see the old fence.
Behind the left shoulder, see the old smokehouse. The picture, taken by Hobson Anderson,
kinfolks down the line, a photographer and TV radio repairman out of Atlanta.
He grew his own tobacco and most times smoked a crooked stem pipe. He would also 
make twist for chewing tobacco. He and grandmother had very little in the line of income.
I remember one of grandmothers check was about $18.00 per month.
He had set up a grist mill about 100 yards east of the smokehouse to add to income.
He sold some of his property near what is now Pine Grove church to one of the pulp wood companies.
A road to the property was near the old beacon light. I helped granddaddy take down the old fencing.
He did not sell the property adjoining the pine grove church property.
He still had a renter in the house that was near the church for income.
As I recall the mans name was Taylor. Seem he had a bad leg and could barely walk or maybe not walk at all.
Later on he deeded four 40 acre tracts to each of his children .

Statement from his granddaughter:
He loved to grow watermelons and we would all watch the largest one until it got ripe.  
He would cut in and tell each one of us to save the seeds to replant next year.
He was often seen sitting under a shade tree whittling and made whistles for us from a branch of a hickory tree.  
Many times his pocket knife was cleaned and used to peel fruit for us kids.
He loved all his grandchildren, would allow them to sit in his lap and play in the pockets of his overalls.
Most of all I remember just what a kind man he was.  I never remember an angry or unkind word. 
I would say he had a positive outlook on everything.
inside_mill_james_henry_johnson_s
Click Image for more information about the mill.
mill_near_claude_kiker_store
Click Images to Enlarge,
Front of old millhouse. Located north of Claude Kiker's store about 50 yards.
The store property previous owner was Lester & Orvel Johnson.
The Claude Kiker store previously ran by Eston & Orvel Johnson as a car repair place.
The lumber for it came from the old house shown below.
home_1948_s
Click Images to Enlarge, 
We moved to this old house in about 1948.
Old lumber was used to construct the millhouse.
A new house was built at the same location.
Lumber from the sawmill near Eston Johnsons place was used.
Later on the mill machinery was sold to kinfolks.
Those big rocks were heavy, we moved them with old steel pipe and crowbar.
marion_richardson_james_johnson_s
Click Images to Enlarge, 
The new house was about the same location as the old house.
Both Grandfathers standing in front of new house.
Left to Right:
Marion Andrew Richardson James Henry Johnson
The mill machinery show above was actually ran by both grandfathers.
Granddady Rich would come by our house to eat lunch.
Mother would make jello sometimes.
Grandaddy called it shakey.