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Jean McDowell

F, #I2704

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

 

 

Andrew McDowell

 

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Ann Calhoun

 

 

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Jean McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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(Unknown) (Unknown)

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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John McDowell

M, #I2705, b. 1714, d. 25 December 1742

Family

Marriage 1 : Madeline Wood

  1. James McDowell, d. 1771
  2. Samuel McDowell, b. 1735, d. 1817
  3.    Sarah McDowell

Notes:



There was a John MacDowel born in 1743 whose wife was Madeline Wood. John's father was
Ephraim MacDowel born 1673 - died 1742. His wife was Margaret Irvine. They came over frm
Scotland in 1729 at the age of 56 years on the 'George and Anne'. They set sail on May 9th and
reached land on Sept. 4th on the coast of Pennsylvania. Several children were buried at sea, as also were several older MacDowels. Their son Benjamin may have been born on the voyage. The
MacDowels settled in Pennsylvania and James the second son of Ephraim had planted corn and made a settlement on the south river in the Beverley Manor. In the fall of the year Ephraim and John MacDowel and James and Mary Greenlee left Pennsylvania and traversed the lower valley of the Shenandoah. Ephraim and John MacDowel and James Greenlee were the first three settlers in that district not far from the present town of Lexington. Ephraim built his house like the one he had left in Connor and died in 1742 aged 69.

The MacDowels were connected by blood and inter marriage with the Campbells and being
Presbyterians of the strictest sect found their natural leaders in the House of Argyle.

The MacDowels were really a branch of the McDougal family who settled in "Grey Galloway" a
famous resort of gentlemen graziers who raided cattle from across the English border hiding them in gloomy valleys protected by treacherous moss bogs.

The name McDowell has taken on may spellings.

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

 

 

Ephraim McDowell

 

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Ann Calhoun

 

 

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John McDowell

 

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Robert Irvine

 

 

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Margaret Irvine

 

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Margaret Wylie

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John McDowell

M, #I2706, b. 1700, d. 1775

Family

Marriage 1 : Rachel (Unknown)

  1.    James McDowell
  2. John McDowell, b. 1720, d. 1807
  3.    Thomas McDowell
  4.    William McDowell

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

 

 

Joseph McDowell

 

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Ann Calhoun

 

 

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John McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Ann (Vans) Vance

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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John McDowell

M, #I2707, b. aft. 1665

Family

Marriage 1 : Catherine (Unknown)

Notes:

Fought with two of his brothers, Charles and Ephraim, in the Battle of Boyne, the siege of Londonderry, in 1690. He or his brother Charles was killed at that time.

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph "The Calvinist" MacDowal

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

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(Unknown) Calhoun

 

 

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John McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Ann Calhoun

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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John McDowell

M, #I2708

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

 

 

Andrew McDowell

 

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Ann Calhoun

 

 

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John McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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(Unknown) (Unknown)

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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John McDowell

M, #I2709, b. 1714, d. 1779

Family

Marriage 1 : Hannah DePui

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

 

 

Robert McDowell

 

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Ann Calhoun

 

 

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John McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Jane O'Neal

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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John McDowell

M, #I2710, b. 1720, d. 1807

Family

Marriage 1 : Mary (Unknown)

  1.    James McDowell, b. 23 October 1770, d. 22 August 1850
  2.    John McDowell, b. 13 November 1778, d. 29 June 1829
  3. Margaret McDowell, b. 10 November 1764, d. 15 August 1810
  4.    Mary McDowell, b. 20 March 1773
  5. Nancy McDowell, b. 13 August 1776
  6. Rachel McDowell, b. 07 December 1762, d. July 1803

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph McDowell

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

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Ann (Vans) Vance

 

 

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John McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Rachel (Unknown)

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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John McDowell

M, #I2711, b. 13 November 1778, d. 29 June 1829

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

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Rachel (Unknown)

 

 

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John McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Mary (Unknown)

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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John McDowell

M, #I2712

Family

Marriage 1 : Sarah McDowell , b. 1772, d. 1802

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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John McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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John McDowell

M, #I2713, b. 1757, d. 1835

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

 

 

Samuel McDowell

 

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Madeline Wood

 

 

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John McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Mary McClug

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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John "Hunting" McDowell

F, #I2714

Family

Marriage 1 : Rachel Moffett

  1.    Joseph Moffett

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph McDowell

 

 

 

Joseph McDowell

 

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Ann (Vans) Vance

 

 

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John "Hunting" McDowell

 

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Samuel O'Neill

 

 

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Margaret O'Neill

 

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{UNKNOWN}

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Joseph McDowell

M, #I2715, b. 1668, d. bet. 1727 and 1737

Family

Marriage 1 : Ann (Vans) Vance

  1. Ann McDowell, b. 1700
  2. Charles McDowell, b. 1697, d. 1754
  3. Elizabeth McDowell, b. 1710
  4. Isaac McDowell, b. 1710
  5. James McDowell, b. 1707, d. 1747
  6. John McDowell, b. 1700, d. 1775
  7. Joseph McDowell, b. 1715, d. 1771
  8. Robert McDowell, b. 1709, d. 1771
  9. Thomas McDowell, b. 1708, d. June 1738
  10. William McDowell, b. 1705, d. 1778

Notes:

McDowells on way to the Colonies of Great Britain in America...
Records exist describing one particular voyage of the McDowells to America, that of the 'George and Anne'. However, the best of trips lasted 2 to 3 weeks. The voyage of the McDowells on the ship George and Anne took nearly 4 1/2 months. At least 86 souls, of a total of 168 passengers, lost their lives on
that voyage, including 12 members of the McDowell family. The ship was overloaded with people, the rations were short or just barely enough, the food was vermin ridden, and the water was stagnant and scummy. The following describes a rather severe ocean voyage of the period and is not atypical:

"The ship 'Sully' set sail for Philadelphia on the 31st of May and at first was blown off course northward. The weather turned very cold and icebergs were sighted. By the 10th of August, the weather had turned very warm and rations were down to a little more than one pound of bread per passenger per week. Two weeks later, the ration was cut further. In the next 12 days, they were reduced to 2 biscuits per week. Hunger and thirst reduced the passengers to shadows. Many killed themselves by drinking salt water or their own urine. They were saved only by a providential rain. On September 2nd, they finally sighted land. This journey had lasted 14 weeks or or more than 3 months."

The voyage of the 'George and Anne' was even worse. This is the story of their terrible voyage. The passengers of the 'George and Anne' were mostly friends and neighbors from County Longford in Northern Ireland, supplemented by a few last minute additions in Dublin. The organizer of the expedition was Mr. Charles Clinton. The passengers were nearly all free people who paid their own way to go to the land, which they perceived as offering a better opportunity. They intended to land in Pennsylvania but actually landed on Cape Cod - after a horrendous 4 + month voyage in which most of them perished.

Mr. Clinton kept a journal (or diary) of the voyage, stating the his journey began from the County of Longford on Friday the 9th day of May. He and his family arrived next at Dublin on the 12th and embarked on the George and Anne on the 18th, with the ship getting underway from Dublin on the 20th of May. On the River Liffey in Dublin, just above the O'Connell Street Bridge and about one mile from the ingress of the Irish Sea is where the George and Anne set sail for America. The ship next arrived at anchor at Glenarm on the 24th, departing the next day. On the 26th, the ship came to anchor at Green Castle in the Lough of Foyle where it remained until the 29th of May, then set sail in the company
of the John of Dublin, bound for Newcastle, Ireland. The ship caught sight of Loughsuly (Lough Swilly) on the 30th, and sailed past Tory Island and Hornhead, bound for America. The night of the 30th of May, a strong wind arose and continued through the evening of the 1st of June. The crew loosened the Bowsprit
with Hazard of the Masts. On the 2nd of June, the ship caught a fair breeze and set a westerly course. Clinton's daughter Catherine and son James fell sick with the measles on the 3rd of June and this marks the beginning of that epidemic, according to Clinton's diary, which would claim the lives of many of the children on board.

The winds continued westerly through the 5th of June, when the first child died. On the 7th the George and Anne, presumably still in company with the John of Dublin, met the ship Mary from Pennsylvania from which she had sailed in 5 weeks and 5 days. On the 8th of May, 1729, a child of James McDowell died and its body was committed to the deep. Two days later, the winds had come to East and were now Southerly, and turning more Easterly on the 11th. On the 12th of June, the winds blew North and East as a fresh gale by which the sailed 40 leagues in 20 hours and found that the ship was at position 49 degrees 20 minutes North Latitude by observation. During this point, addition passengers and their servants began dying a rate of at least one a day, with addition children becoming ill and succumbing to the measles epidemic. Conditions were beginning to deteriorate rapidly, with one instance of a servant throwing himself over the side and drowning. On the 17th of June, the winds came to the south and continued with a violent gale to the 18th, driving the ship off its westerly course and further south.

According to the ship's journal, on the 12th of June the George and Anne was on a direct northern course from Ireland to Pennsylvania, but by the 21st the reading puts them far south of the Azores in the region of the Canary Islands, off the northwest coast of Africa. This indicates that Captain Rhymer, the ship's master, was either incompetent of determining his position, or incompetent of maintaining his course. The stated position is well south in the Horse Latitudes, the area of the Atlantic where sailing ships risked laying motionless adrift, without benefit of wind for long periods. The ship was reported in the journal entry for the 21st in a perfect calm (no wind) at position 27 degrees 30 minutes North latitude. On the 28th of July, the winds turn favorable with a West by Northwest heading. The Journal continues recording the deaths of the passengers on board through 7 July including the death of another child of James McDowell on that date. Just two days prior they had sighted the Azores at 40 degrees 09 minutes North latitude, 32 degrees 33 minutes West longitude. On the 7th of July, Clinton's journal is no longer being kept and falls silent. By this time multiple deaths were occurring every day.

Apparently there was a long hiatus in Clinton's journal (diary) from 7 July to 4 October. Prior to this point, Mr. Clinton lists 16 deaths. In the list that followed, he listed 78 deaths (some apparently duplicated from the first list). Perhaps Mr. Clinton was sick, or perhaps there was so much dissension and thoughts of mutiny on board that he was too busy to continue the diary during this hiatus period. In the later "Recapitulations", it appears that a total of 80 or 85 died during the voyage. There was a measles epidemic on board, and probably some of the children succumbed to this. Also, in a 4 + month voyage, it was routine in those days for many to die of scurvy (lack of vitamin C). However, most of the deaths on this long voyage of the George and Anne were probably due to the incredible overcrowding and inevitable spoilage of food in 4 months, with intractable, epidemic, fatal diarrhea, and vomiting.

For example, Christopher Columbus' Santa Maria (1492) was about the same size (100 tons gross weight, compared to 90 tons for the George and Anne) but carried only 50 people on its voyage of little more than two months (compared to an apparent load of 168 passengers plus an unknown number of crew on the George and Anne). As the George and Anne was a chartered ship, it was stuffed with as
many passengers as possible to collect as many fares as possible. The ship finally reached land fall off the Continent of America on the 4th day of October, 1729 on Cape Cod. Some accounts indicate that the actual anchorage of the George and Anne in America was off Momoloy Island, of the county of Barnstable, Massachusetts. After wintering over there, many of the surviving passengers migrated to the Little Britain (Orange County) part of New York. This settlement was located on the western shore of the Hudson River about 60 miles north of New York City.

Another document about the voyage relates the following:

"On the 20th of May, 1729, the ship left Ireland. After being at sea for some time it was discovered that the Captain (Rhymer) had formed a design of starving his passengers to death, either with the view to obtain their property or to deter emigration. Several of the passengers actually died, among whom were a son and daughter of Mr. Clinton. In this awful situation it was proposed by the passengers to seize the captain and commit the navigation of the vessel to Mr. Clinton, who was an excellent mathematician; but the officers of the ship refusing to co-operate with them, they were deterred from this proceeding from the apprehension of incurring the charge of piracy. They were finally compelled to commute with the captain for their lives by paying a large sum of money; who, accordingly, landed them at Cape Cod on the 4th of October. Mr. Clinton and his friends continued in that part of the country until the spring of 1730, when they removed to the county of Ulster, in the province of New York, and formed a
flourishing settlement called Little Britain."

Yet another document relates:

"At last it was discovered by Col. Clinton that it was intentionally caused by the Captain, to starve out the passengers and lessen their number by death or otherwise, and thus possess himself of their money, of which there was considerable on board. The captain was seized, put in irons by the passengers, and the command given to the mate, who brought the ship in, in a few days."

The accompanying ship "John of Dublin" presumably continued its voyage and arrived at the port of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1729. Possibly on board the John of Dublin were additional members of the McDowell family, as well as, related Campbells, Irvines, Mitchells, McElroys family members.

Members of the McDowell Family (18 total) on board the George and Anne:

Group 1: The James McDowell Family
James McDowell (survivor)
Margery McDowell (wife of James) (died at sea)
Matthew McDowell (survivor)
Patrick McDowell (died at sea)
Margaret McDowell (died at sea)
Margery McDowell (daughter of James) (died at sea)
George McDowell (died at sea)
Sarah McDowell (died at sea)

Group 2: The Andrew McDowell Family
Andrew McDowell, (Jr.) (survivor) (he later married Martha Giverans of Westchester Co., NY)
Elinor McDowell (survivor) (wife of Andrew who died a few years later)
James McDowell (survivor)
Mary McDowell (died at sea)
William McDowell (died at sea)
Jean McDowell (died at sea)
Sarah McDowell (died at sea)
Margaret McDowell (died at sea)
(Boy) McDowell (brother of Andrew) (died at sea)

Group 3: John McDowell (died at sea, along with traveling companion Thomas Cowin)

The twelve McDowells who died on the voyage of the George and Anne:

James McDowell's wife (Margery) and five of his children died (Patrick, Margaret, Margery, George, and Sarah). (Group 1)
Andrew McDowell's two brothers (William and an unnamed Brother) and three sisters died (Mary, Jean, Sarah, and/or Margaret). (Group 2)
John McDowell died. (Group 3)

God Rest Their Souls

The Palatine Germans who emigrated to America during the same period on board the same British ships, tell of the disembarkation process at their destination:

"First the ones who could pay full price were allowed to pay and get off the boat. Next the healthy ones were sold (for indentured service) to their new masters for the full fee. Then the unhealthy ones were sold at auction. This process often took several weeks. If one of the family died (during the voyage), the rest of the family members were held accountable for passage fees of the deceased."

Despite all this, the Scots/Irish, like the Germans, thought they had found the promised land. But by the end of the first half of the 18th century, the peaceful coexistence of Palatine German and Scots/Irish immigrants had worn thin. Both held firm to their respective European cultural traditions and social and religious mores. In fact, by 1743 coexistence was no longer possible in cohabited parts of Pennsylvania as reflected by this account: "...the proprietaries, in consequence of the frequent disturbances between the governor and Irish (Scots/Irish) settlers, after the organization of York and Cumberland counties, gave orders to their agents to sell no lands in either York and Lancaster counties to the Irish; and also to make advantageous offers of removal to the Irish settlers on Paxton and Swatara, and Donegal townships, to remove to Cumberland county, which offers being liberal, were accepted by many (including some McDowells).

Settling the Frontier...
Upon arrival in America, several (if not most) of the early Scots/Irish McDowell families started moving out into the frontier. Joseph McDowell (born 1668, an older brother of Ephraim of the Battle of the Boyne and later Virginia, b. 1672), the probable father of Charles McDowell's (b. 1697) was believed to have not made the voyage to America. It was thought that perhaps he remained behind in Ireland, had died prior to their departure, or died during the voyage. However, there is some evidence that he may, in fact, have also left Ireland and may have died in Pennsylvania. A Joseph McDowell and family imported themselves to Pennsylvania around 1725-1729, where Joseph died in either 1727 or 1737. Joseph's son John McDowell was the administrator of his father Joseph's estate in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Nearby in present day Cecil County, Maryland, records indicate the presence of Joseph's possible son William McDowell of Martin's Delight (died 1738), a probable brother of Charles McDowell who had removed from Cecil Co., Maryland to Virginia in 1738, and later of Anson Co., in the North/South Carolina borderlands. This is Joseph McDowell of New London, Chester Co., Pennsylvania and the one who had been appointed guardian of his nephew John McDowell, Jr. also of New London, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Joseph's wife was Ann Vans (Vance) of the prominent Scots/lrish Vans (Vance) family, some of whose descendants were later also of Virginia and North Carolina. A John McDowell (d. 1733) and Ruth Roberts McDowell (d. 1738) - wife of William McDowell of Martin's Delight, Conowingo settlement in Cecil Co., Maryland, are buried at the Christ Church burying ground in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The McDowells, like other Scots/Irish families, originally occupied the hills around the settlements in Pennsylvania, and later they did the same in Maryland. In Pennsylvania, McDowells made their homes in settlements like Carlisle, Donegal, and Stranbane, in Lancaster County (named after the township and parish back in County Antrim, Ulster). When Lancaster County was established on 10 May 1729, it became the prototype for the sixty-three counties to follow. The original three counties, Philadelphia, Bucks and Chester, were created as copies of typical English shires.

The frontier conditions of Chester County's backwoods, from which Lancaster was formed, presented knotty problems to the civilized Englishmen. Lancaster County, therefore, was an experiment in pragmatism erected on the periphery of William Penn's "Holy Experiment". Pennsylvania's "first western county" would test the genius of English government and political common sense. Political control of Pennsylvania at this time, however, firmly rested in the hands of the Quakers. The pacifistic Quakers did not look with favor upon the arrival of the bellicose Scots/lrish, who generally moved toward the frontier and whose contempt for the English was only slightly milder than their hatred of the "red savages." A new county might cause competition, for surely the Scots/Irish would demand representation in the Provincial Assembly. Then, there was also opposition from the Germans in the hinterlands. More local government would mean more regulations and higher taxes. Fortunately, on the banks of the Susquehanna River at Wright's Ferry there existed a settlement of remarkably competent Quaker politicians who adjusted intelligently to the challenges of the frontier, including the Indians and Scots/Irish.

Eight magistrates, all of British ancestry and mostly Quakers, were appointed to subdivide the Lancaster County into townships. By 5 August 1729, the settled portions of the county had been organized into seventeen townships with names chosen by the usual jockeying for honors. Two honored the Welsh (Caernarvon and Lampeter); two had Indian names; Conestoga and Paxtank (or Peshtank, Paxton); six were English (Warwick, Lancaster, Martic, Sadsbury, Salisbury and Hempfield); four kept the Scots/Irish happy, Donegal, Drumore, Derry, and Leacock); one was German (Manheim); one came from the Bible (Lebanon); and one was the Anglicization of the family name Graf or Groff (Earl). Late in 1729, an eighteenth township was created: Cocalico, an Indian name.

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph "The Calvinist" MacDowal

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

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(Unknown) Calhoun

 

 

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Joseph McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Ann Calhoun

 

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{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Joseph McDowell

M, #I2716, b. 1715, d. 1771

Family

Marriage 1 : Margaret O'Neill

  1. John "Hunting" McDowell

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

 

 

Joseph McDowell

 

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Ann Calhoun

 

 

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Joseph McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Ann (Vans) Vance

 

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{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Joseph McDowell

M, #I2717, b. 25 February 1758, d. 11 April 1796

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles McDowell

 

 

 

"Hunting" John McDowell

 

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Rachel McDowell

 

 

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Joseph McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Ann Evans Edminston

 

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{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Joseph McDowell

M, #I2718, b. 1763

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

 

 

Samuel McDowell

 

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Madeline Wood

 

 

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Joseph McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Mary McClug

 

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{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Julie McDowell

F, #I2719

Family

Marriage 1 : Richard D. Sutton , b. 10 August 1965, d. 18 September 1995

  1. Joseph Richard Sutton, b. [private]
  2.    Lindsay Ann Sutton, b. [private]

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Julie McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

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{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Lillie McDowell

F, #I2720

Family

Marriage 1 : George Wesley Clayton , b. 08 June 1841, d. 22 February 1898

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Lillie McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

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{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Magdalin McDowell

F, #I2721, b. 1755

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

 

 

Samuel McDowell

 

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Madeline Wood

 

 

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Magdalin McDowell

 

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{UNKNOWN}

 

 

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Mary McClug

 

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{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Margaret McDowell

F, #I2722, b. abt. 1716

Family

Marriage 1 : James William Mitchell

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

 

 

Ephraim McDowell

 

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Ann Calhoun

 

 

|

 

 

 

 

Margaret McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

 

 

 

Robert Irvine

 

 

|

Margaret Irvine

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

Margaret Wylie

[TOP]


Margaret McDowell

F, #I2723

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

 

 

Andrew McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

|

 

 

|

Ann Calhoun

 

 

|

 

 

 

 

Margaret McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

 

|

(Unknown) (Unknown)

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Margaret McDowell

F, #I2724, b. 10 November 1764, d. 15 August 1810

Family

Marriage 1 : (Unknown) Mitchell

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

|

 

 

|

Rachel (Unknown)

 

 

|

 

 

 

 

Margaret McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

 

|

Mary (Unknown)

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Martha McDowell

F, #I2725, b. 1766

Family

Marriage 1 : Abram Burford

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

 

 

Samuel McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

|

 

 

|

Madeline Wood

 

 

|

 

 

 

 

Martha McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

 

|

Mary McClug

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Mary McDowell

F, #I2726

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abraham McDowell

 

 

 

Andrew McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

|

 

 

|

Ann Calhoun

 

 

|

 

 

 

 

Mary McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

 

|

(Unknown) (Unknown)

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Mary McDowell

F, #I2727, b. 20 March 1773

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

|

 

 

|

Rachel (Unknown)

 

 

|

 

 

 

 

Mary McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

 

|

Mary (Unknown)

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]


Mary McDowell

F, #I2728, b. 1774

Family

Marriage 1 : Alexander K. Marshall

Pedigree:

 

 

 

 

 

 

John McDowell

 

 

 

Samuel McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

|

 

 

|

Madeline Wood

 

 

|

 

 

 

 

Mary McDowell

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

 

 

 

{UNKNOWN}

 

 

|

Mary McClug

 

|

 

 

 

 

 

 

|

{UNKNOWN}

[TOP]