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Canadian Forestry Corps
Information supplied by Robert Briggs with contributions by Jude Mitchell

I wish to thank everyone who has made contributions of photos, stories and other info of their
family members to the Canadian Forestry Corps on this website.

Additions & corrections are very much welcomed!!

For Further information please contact Bob Briggs

No. 16 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps
District No. 2, Camp 30
Blackhall, Banchory

Canadian Mobilization Point - Quebec City, Que
Mobilization Date - 16 Aug 1940
Arrived in Scotland - 2 Jul 1941
Ceased Operations in Scotland - 1 Apr 1944
Camps Occupied in Scotland Blackhall, Banchovy

Canadian Forestry Corps Cap Badge


The war created a crisis in wood supply for the United Kingdom. Pre-war domestic production covered only a small fraction of the timber needed to support the war effort. In addition to civilian requirements, it was estimated that every soldier needed five trees: one for living quarters, messing, and recreation; one for crates to ship food, ammunition, tanks, and so on; and three for explosives, gun stocks, coffins, ships, factories, and direct or indirect support for the fighting line.
Canadians stepped up to fill this need. During 1941 and 1942, thirty companies drawn from all regions of Canada, totalling 220 officers and 6,771 regulars, were deployed to Scotland.
Also it takes a number of support soldiers for each fighting soldier.
We did load a ship with lumber, yeah. And it went to Africa and I took a chalk and I wrote my name and address on the board. I get to, it was about a month after, first thing I get this letter from the soldier in Africa. He says, "I want to tell you, he said, that you people, your job is important," he said, "We used your lumber today, we landed in Africa.
Source: Memory Project

Once again the British Government turned to Overseas Woodsman to assist in the war effort. Given their impressive record in World War One it was natural that they looked to Canada to provide forestry units once again. In May 1940 the Canadian Government decided to form a Canadian Forestry Corps. Twenty Companies were initially formed with ten more as the war progressed.
The financial agreement between the two Governments as similar to that in World War I. Canada would bear the cost of pay, allowances and pensions, all initial personal equipment, transport to and from the United Kingdom. The British Government paid for "all other services connected with equipment, work or maintenance" and certain others, including medical services. Canada covered the cost for Medical Officers and Britain paid for hospitalization.
The arrangement was unusual as it resulted in a Canadian Unit working for the British, who controlled the areas of work and disposal of the product, but Military operations of the C.F.C. was never surrendered by the Canadians and came under command of Canadian Military Headquarters in London. Even though the C.F.C. had to serve two masters, no serious problems ever resulted.
Mobilization centres for the Corp spanned all across Canada, and recruited both English and French speaking personnel. Many of the volunteers were veterans of World War One, including the Corp's Commander, Brigadier- General J.B. White. Many of the men carried out the same duties as they did in civilian life, such as loggers, black smiths, lawyers, store man, cooks and clerks. The big difference between the new Corp and their World War One counter parts were the new Corp were considered Combat Troops.

Map shows that the men came from across our country of Canada and where each of the original 20 companies was mobilized and what percentage from each province the men came from.
Source 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' book by William C Wonders

No. 16 Coy CFC was mobilized on 16 Aug 1940. They were at the Citadel in Quebec City from 1 Sept 1940 to 10 Sept 1940 when they were then housed in the Immigration Building.
Group photograph taken on the terrace of the Citadel in Quebec, on the occasion of the first Quebec Conference, with the Château Frontenac in the background. Front row: U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and the Governor-General of Canada, the Earl of Athlone. Back row: Canadian Prime Minister Mackenzie King and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.
Source: Imperial War Museum
Citadelle de Quebec
Source: Virtual Tourist
Immigration Building Quebec City

CFC soldiers at Valcartier Camp, Quebec
Photo courtesy of Bob Briggs – grandson Private Perle Bruce Tucker
Mont Joli train station
June 16, No’s 12, 14 & 16 Companies CFC paraded through the town of Mont Joli, Quebec
where they had stopped on the train on route to Halifax The parade was headed by Pipers and drums at 1400 hrs
Source: Dead Link
Harbour of Halifax, Nova Scotia WW2
Convoy of ships, material and men reading up for movement across the Atlantic
Source: Halifax Harbour

No. 12, 14 and 16 Companies CFC went to Scotland from Halifax aboard the H.C.M.T
Andres with a convoy that included the following ships Ship Convoy From Canada to UK
Information supplied by Michel Boily

War Diaries - Library And Archives Canada War Diary Index
Aug 1940 Sept 1940 Oct 1940 Part 1 & Part 2
Nov 1940 Dec 1940 Jan 1941 Part 1 & Part 2
Feb 1941 Part 1 & Part 2 Mar 1941

On October 4, 1940 the No.16 Coy with a compliment of six officers and 179 men then proceeded from the Immigration Building, Quebec City for extra infantry military training at nearby Valcartier Camp where they would have had 5 to 7 months training. After completion of training the men travelled by train to Halifax for embarkation on one of the troops ships. They would travel in convoys escorted by destroyers. They disembarked at a Clyde estuary port, whence they proceeded by train to their Scottish Camp.

View of the River Clyde
Source: Remembering Scotland at War

Firth of Clyde is where the ship with the men came in to disembark at Gourock, Scotland
Then they caught a train to Inverness and then by lorry to Duchfour, the site of Camp No. 13 District No. 5
District No. 5 Its headquarters was originally at Teanacoil Camp but moved on 15 July to Balblair House,
Lord Lovat's residence east of Beauly.

CFC Map Scotland
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Princes Pier Railway Station, Greenock
During WW2 Princes Pier was used as a terminal for troop transport.
Source: Remembering Scotland at War

PDF File Map

CFC Map Scotland
Courtesy of Paul Keenleyside

Banchory railway station
Source: Wikipedia

Blackhall Manor
Source: Mansion Houses of Paisley

The No. 16 Coy brought with them the most up-to-date logging equipment then available in Canada. They brought a standard medium type rotary mill with a capacity of 1500-2000 bd. ft. an hour or c. 8,000 cu. ft a week/3-5-4-7 cm an hour or 227 cm a week. (The British Forestry Commission also provided the company with a Scotch mill or bench, but these were not popular with the Canadians.) Power was supplied by 100-horsepowe Diesel generators. Logging equipment included TD9 caterpillar tractors, lorries, sulkies (pneumatic-tired arches), angle dozers for road making, and two and three drum winches for high-lead logging. They also were equipped with a variety of transportation vehicles, four tractors, two sulkies, one motorcycle, and originally six bicycles.
The No. 16 Coy consisted of 190 - 200 all ranks, under the command of a major. British authorities already had identified and requisitioned the major forest resources to be harvested. It laid on privately owned land, the owner had a long tradition of scientific forestry and was generally willing to assist in the wartime emergency despite the cost to their long-range forestry programmes.

WAR ESTABLISMENT, FORESTRY COMPANY
It is convenient at this point to describe the War Establishment of a Forestry Company, C.F.C. The Establishment (CDN/IV/1940/12A/1, DATED Mar 41) provides for a total of 194 all ranks, of whom six are officers: one Major as Commanding Officer, one Captain as Second in Command, one Adjutant, and three Subalterns "for Timber operations". Of these last, one is normally is in charge in the bush, one is in charge of the mill, and one is technical officer. There are 12 Sergeants, of whom two are Mill Foreman and five Bush Foreman, one a Blacksmith, one a M.T. Sergeant, one a Sergeant Cook, and two Assistant Instructors. It is not necessary or desirable to rehearse all the details here, as the Official Historian will have all War Establishments easily available to him; but it may be noted that the list of rank and file includes the following tradesmen: 2 Millwrights, 2 Sawyers, Forestry; 1 Electrician; 3 Motor Mechanics, one of whom is a Corporal, 1 Carpenter, 1 Plumber or Pipefitter; 1 Shoemaker, and 1 Tailor. Among the mass of non-tradesmen, the following groups are conspicuous: 20 Logmakers, 30 Rollers and Chainmen, 10 Road Cutters, 14 Drivers I.C. (Internal Combustion)

Lost Deeside Deeside logging's finest hour remembered
Source: Deeside Piper and Herald
Published on Wednesday 14 December 2011 11:48
As proud as I am of Scotland's many achievements, I was recently surprised to learn that during WWII, Scotland outperformed Nazi Germany in cut timber production by 20:1.
The twentieth-century style of warfare required five trees' worth of wood per fighting man, for everything from temporary buildings and packing cases to high-explosives ingredients. Yet, in 1939, 96% of Britain's wood was imported.
Most came from the USSR, the Baltic states and Finland, and so was even more severely disrupted by the Nazi conquest of the Baltic than the Great War supply had been by Imperial U-boat attacks. After Dunkirk, school pupils as young as 14 were paid 15s a week to fell trees here.
The Women's Timber Corps or 'Lumber Jills', who trained at Park House on Deeside, were better lumberjacks than the children, but their numbers were small.
Fortunately, the British government's urgent call for loggers from throughout the Empire was answered by nearly 7,000 Canadians.
The 1,400 men of Canadian Forestry Corps District 2 (Deeside and Southesk) came from Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. They were based at Ballogie, Glen Tanar, Blackhall, Abergeldie and Mar Lodge. Their colonel stayed at Guisachan House, Aboyne until August 1941, and thereafter at Struan Lodge.
Events laid on for the Canadians included a concert at Dunecht House, performances by the Feughside Dance Band, Ballater sheepdog trials, and a dance at Crathie attended by Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret. Hockey was also attempted on Aboyne Loch, but the ice was too thin.
The usual army keep-fit exercises were totally unnecessary: two men using axes could fell a tree in 70 seconds, and many local roads that are still in use were greatly improved, or first built, by the Corps. But this laudable efficiency was offset by wild behaviour.
Drunkenness, poaching, and even murder were not unknown, and there was a huge inter-company brawl in Kincardine O'Neil in 1941.
The Canadians hated Deeside's rapid alternation of snow with rain, and its winter daylight hours as short as those of the Yukon.
Disappointment cut both ways, as Scottish landlords criticised the unsightly stump-fields which typical Canadian working practices produced.
Nevertheless, relations between the Canadians and local people remained excellent, and scrap wood was often sneaked to needy local families to use as firewood.
Of the logging camps themselves, only overgrown sawdust piles are left, and today the CFC is unknown even to most Canadians.

Photos from the book 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C Wonders

The camps were usually located on estate property near a road to permit vehicle access. Buildings were mostly frame, often of lumber cut in Corps' sawmills. Some Nissen huts were usually erected, and often housed shoemakers, armourers and carpenters as well as serving other purposes. The previous map shows the plan of Blackhall Camp on the south side of the River Dee some two and a half miles west of Banchory, is representative..It was laid out 10 March 1941 by No. 2 District Headquarters, by 24 March 1941, the sawmill had been completed and on 2 July 1941, No. 16 Company took over the camp. Men were housed in huts accommodating 14 men each. A cookhouse, mess hall, ablution hut with hot and cold showers, sergeants' quarters and mess, officers' quarters and mess, orderly room, medical hut, quartermaster stores, garage and workshop were present. A recreation hall was built as well.
Blackhall Estate possessed considerable number of cherry trees and No. 16 Company personnel from Blackhall Camp were in the habit of picking the ripe fruit in the evenings after work. One member fell some twenty five feet and injured himself while engaged in this activity

Nissan Hut at some of the camps
Due to its semicircular, corrugated iron shape the Nissen Hut deflected shrapnel and bomb blast making it a perfect bomb shelter
Photo Courtesy of the Private Marvin McLennan Collection

Heavy CFC logging truck
Photo Courtesy of the Private Charles Frederick Neale Collection

Even before felling could begin most companies had to introduce an access road network in the forests to enable their mechanized equipment to be used, in contrast to the widespread use of horses in prewar local forests. Road building and maintenance continued to occupy part of the CFC personnel even after the initial period.
The heavy-laden Canadian lumber lorries from mills to shipping points placed a great deal of strain on local roads and access roads even when they were gravelled, particularly during rainy periods


Even before felling could begin most companies had to introduce an access road network in the forests to enable their mechanized equipment to be used, in contrast to the widespread use of horses in prewar local forests. Road building and maintenance continued to occupy part of the CFC personnel even after the initial period.
On 7 July 1941, No. 16 Company at Blackhall Camp noted "The main problem to contend with on this operation is building sound logging roads that will stand up under the wet operating conditions. In mid-November 1941 heavy rains washed away much of the roads and forces cessation of operations at the Deeside camps until roads could be repaired.
The military role of the CFC as distinct from its industrial role was important, particularly during the period of possible German Invasion after the fall of France. Personnel were allowed to wear civilian clothing while working, but uniforms were required for military activities and when on leave. As combatant troops they received additional military training on Saturdays after their week's work in the woods. This included practice on rifle ranges and tactical exercises with other military units. Periodically they participated in weekend military schemes in their areas.
In the earlier period a shortage of weapons and ammunition proved frustrating, e.g. one company waited a month after arrival before receiving its first arms and then these consisted of a total of 48 Lee-Enfield rifles and only 100 rounds of ammunition.
Although CFC companies were not directly involved in actual hostilities with the enemy in Scotland, they often were not far distant from bombings. Several members of No. 16 Company from Blackhall Camp on overnight passes in Aberdeen had narrow escapes from German bombs and machine gunning.
Several camps had garden patches to provide fresh vegetables for the men. Swill from the messes was sold to local farmers and the income spent on the messes, or some companies kept pigs and the swill was fed to them. On reaching maturity the pigs were sold to the RASC. Rather than have to purchase young pigs, one company at Cawdor North Camp decided to raise its own, but discovered pigs do not always obey army orders: "17 March 1942 - Delighted to notice that one of our sows is pregnant. We had come to the conclusion that her several trips to the boar had provided her with diversion only."
Not all casualties were as severe or were suffered while on duty. Blackhall Estate possessed considerable numbers of cherry trees and No. 16 Company personnel from Blackhall Camp were in the habit of picking ripe fruit in the evenings after work. One member fell some twenty five feet and injured himself while engaged in this activity.
The first Field Day of 1942 for District No. 2 at Aboyne saw all Deeside companies participating (Nos. 2,3,4,13,16,22, 24 and 25), as well as the RAMC unit stationed there. The band of the Royal Scots Fusiliers also attended. Once again, after the events and supper in the camps, the troops returned for a street dance, despite the rain.

Source: Visit Banchory The Gateway to Royal Deeside Canadian Lumberjacks

Banchory was host to the Canadian Forestry Corps No 16 Company who set up a camp at Blackhall at the foot of Scolty Hill. One local resident remembers the movies shown in the camp theatre and chocolate bars! If you have memories of the camp or know someone who has, Banchory Heritage Society would be pleased to hear from you (BanchoryHeritage@aol.com) Similar camps were established in Glen Tanar and at Ballater. The Ballater Forest Project has an interesting website with more information at Ballater Historic Forestry Project

Despite the rains that set in during the latter part of 1942, the unusually dry weather continued well into July. Men from No. 16 Company at Blackhall were out twice to extinguish bush fires in the area.
Many members became active participants in local functions and social life, particularly in smaller centres, for an example an officer of No. 16 Company became president of the Avoch Tennis Club on the Black Isle, and many men played on the courts as well as attending club dances.
The CFC was apparently well liked in the Scottish Highlands. The men became active participants in local functions, from fundraising to staging Christmas parties for the local children. Many times, scrap wood mysteriously fell from lorries beside homes in need of fuel. A notable tribute to the CFC was paid by Laura Lady Lovat when she stated, "you Canadians may be cutting the Scots firs of the Highlands, but in Highland hearts you are planting something far more lasting".

Evening Express Aberdeen No Date
Source: Paul McKay Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire

Golden days with Canadians
I have grand memories of the Canadian lumberjacks (February 25)—four of them in particular.
There was a camp at Killen, a few miles from Avoch and my uncle, who stayed with us, met some of them as the camp was near where he was head gardener.
Also the boys attended our Congregational Church and two of them sometimes took the service.
After meeting them at the church four of them were invited to our home where we “adopted” them and thoroughly enjoyed their company.
They used to come down, knock at the door, throw their caps in and shout: “Any Char, Ma?”
Mother always had the kettle boiling and scones and lovely sponge cakes at the ready.
I’ll never forget one Halloween party we had. The men were ducking for apples—which they had never done.
Treacle scones were hung from the ceiling and you can imagine the antics in putting the tail on the donkey.
My father had died in 1936 so they did some nice jobs about the house.
The lumberjacks were called Jake, Lorne, Mac and Herbie.
When the camp was closed they were sent to Holland where Herbie was killed.
Jake and Lorne are still very much alive and doing good work in Canada.
It was a pleasure to know them.
Margaret Noble
Mid Street
Fraserburgh

Evening Express Aberdeen
Source: Paul McKay Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire
FOREST PATROL: The father of letter writer Gene Williams is pictured third left during the war.
Tree soldiers
Do you remember the Canadian Forestry Corps lumberjacks who helped our war effort in Scotland
between 1941 and 1945?
We’d like to hear more about this band of men who have received so little little recognition for what they did.
Write To Memories at the bottom of this page

Evening Express Aberdeen No Date
Source: Paul McKay Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire
BALLOGIE CAMP: CFC men at work Deeside.
Snow ploughs and dances remembered
My sister in Aberdeen sent me a cutting from the Evening Express on the Canadian Forestry Corps (Memories, March 3)
We live on Deeside, near Aboyne, and I worked in the railway office and met many of the lumberjacks at No 2 Ballogie Canadian Forestry Corps also No 3 Aboyne CFC.
There was also the No 16 CFC.
As my gran lived in Banchory and I went to Banchory Academy, my girlfriends and I went to the dances in Aboyne and Banchory and met quite a lot of the Forestry Corps.
I always remember the fantastic snow ploughs they had to clear our roads near Aboyne.
Also the lovely entertainment they put on, especially the dances.
I am now over 70 but have lots of lovely memories.
The picture above is one I took from a very old album.
It was nice reading about the CFC after all these years.
Mrs FM Stuart
Pilmuir
Forres
Moray

Scotland, Banchory, Scolty Hill,
Source: Panoramio Scotland, Banchory, Scolty Hill, East view
Banchory was host to the Canadian Forestry Corps No 16 Company who set up a camp at Blackhall at the foot of Scolty Hill. One local resident remembers the movies shown in the camp theatre and chocolate bars!

One of the most memorable events for the CFC was a Royal Inspection of 600 men officers and men of the Corps by the King and Queen at Balmoral Castle on 7 September 1941.

Elizabeth, King George VI, The Queen, Margaret at Balmoral Castle
King George VI & Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Caldwell inspect the Canadian Forestry Corps at Balmoral Castle
King George VI & Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Caldwell inspect the Canadian Forestry Corps at Balmoral Castle
Capt. J MacFarlane Lieutenant-Colonel C.E.F., Jones O.B.E., Brigadier-General J.B. White, GBE, DSO, ED,
Commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Caldwell, His Majesty King George V1
The Queen inspecting the Canadian Forestry Corps at Balmoral Castle. Brigadier-General J.B. White, GBE, DSO, ED,
Commander, CFC on her left Capt. J. MacFarlane, Lt.-Col. C.E.F., Jones just back of the Queen
Princess Margaret and Elizabeth looking on
Brigadier-General J.B. White, GBE, DSO, ED, Commander, Canadian Forestry Corps just back of them
His Majesty salutes the Canadian Forestry Corps & Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Caldwell (who is out in front of the troops)

Source of photos: Estate Info

Canadian Forestry Corps Operates Under The Very ... - Google News The Maple Leaf Newspaper
Friday, November 24th 1944 Page 3
Canuck Timber Troops In Action on the Western Front
In an off- moment in the Canadian Forestry Corps in the western front, Pte Russel Dennan and Sgts Ralph Shillam and Paul Bellavance, pictured on the top right, find time for a good laugh. Lower right, Pte Herb Graham does a little dental surgery on the teeth of his big saw , while Lieut. Howard Davis and Pte. Don Young watch the operation. On the left, Cpl Joe Ludwig demonstrates the technique of Canadian rigging. NOTE PHOTOS WEREN'T AVAILABLE
Timbermen built the boom that aided in success of D-Day
Canadian Forestry Corps operates under the very noses of the Jerries

Pictures and stories by Lieut. Mickey Dean
In the last war the Forestry Corps did their work miles behind the front lines. Today the Canadian loggers and woodsmen are going about their work almost under the noses of the Jerries.
In many cases, the hands that take care of the saw or the axe are wrapped around a rifle or a Bren gun for protection or assault.
The story of the work of the Canadian woodsmen in the present war begins way back in Canada. It was there, back in the vast Canadian forests that, the huge piles of timber were cut and shipped all the way to England.
Then selected crews-men with previous booming experience- worked day and night in Southern England and built one of the most revolutionary models in booming history. This is a boom that would successfully battle the angry waves of the English Channel. When put to the supreme test, the boom did its job in great style.
"Ridiculous and Fantastic"
If anyone had suggested this idea to Major M. McLaggan commander officer of No. 16 Company of the Canadian Forestry Corps, and now in operation in the Western Front, he declares he would have termed it as 'ridiculous and fantastic." But war, like necessity, is the mother of invention, and many ideas which were considered previously unworkable are now being put into practical use in the various theatres of warfare.
As the allied forces move towards to victorious entry into Berlin the Canadian Forestry Corps also shifts around. At the present time, by a special agreement with the Belgium government, men of the CFC are busy cutting logs in the forests of Belgium.
Lumber mills erected as close to the woods as possible, are running full blast cutting millions of feet of timber for the use of Allied forces.
Men live in tents
The men of the 16th Company of the Canadian Forestry Corps is camped on top of a high hill not far from the borders of the Reich. The men live in tents, as well as small buildings, that formerly served the purpose of housing a flock of chickens.
The lumber mill at this point is under the supervision of Sgt. MacArthur of East Malarctic, Que. Many former Canadian loggers are working with him. Among them is Pte. Mike Doyle of Port Arthur, Ont., Pte John nkewicz, Hafford, Sask., Pte Armond Cairon , Montreal, Pte. Valer Michaud, Quebec City.
Across from the mill is the blacksmith shop, where all the immediate repairs are made to order. This particular job falls on the competent shoulders of Cpl Art Leydier of Kenora, Ont.
Two other mills
A short distance away there are two other mills. In one of these, Pte. Jim Young of Lachute, Quebec is the chief cutter. He handles the circular saw, while Pte. Alex Irvine of Metapedia, Quebec tails the logs. The generator is in charge of Pte. Herb Graham of Fort McMurray, Alta. One of the chief headaches of Cpl. Cam Lawlis of Port Arthur, Ont., is to keep down the size of the sawdust pile which accumulates beneath the speedy circular saw.
Timber is cut in the immediate vicinity of the mill and brought in by a sulky operated by Pte. Alex Dupont of Maniwaki, Quebec. The logs are piled handy to the tailer, and the slabs are used for making roads and filling in muddy spots, which in some places are past the knee mark. In addition, a crew consisting of Pte. Edgar Laplante of Bathurst, NB., Pte. Reg Pattenden, Melfort, Sask., and Pte. Ken Preston, London, Ont. Reinforce the roads by the constant application of gravel.
Although the trees in this area are not as large as the ones in Canada, they are a fairly good size, ranging anywhere from 50 to 80 feet in height. Undercutting is done in the Canadian manner. Falling of the timber is the work of Pte. Bruno Arseneau, Petit Roche, NB. Pte Joe Bernier, Chicoutini, Que., and Pte. Peter Daigle, Jacetquet River, NB.
Cpl. Joe Ludwig of Enderby, BC. is the rigger. The donkey engine is operated by Pte. Al Norris of Kelowna, BC.
The all important QM stores is under the care of CQMS Burns Green of Centerville, NB. The armourer, is Armourer/ Sgt. Ken Gilpin of Sillery, Que. And the shoemaker is Pte. Cliff O'Keefe.

Barry Docks, Barry, South Wales, Timber Ponds

Source: Laurentian Heritage WebMagazine

Information Sought on the Canadian Forestry Corps in the UK

Source: Laurentian Heritage Web Magazine
THE SAWDUST FUSILIERS
Author: Gordon Rainey
CFC Medal.

During World War Two, the fabric of No. 2 Company of the Canadian Forestry Corps drew heavily on the English-speaking sons of Argenteuil, leveraging their skills with the axe and the crosscut saw, honed on the family bush farms of their native county. No. 16 Company was formed around their French-speaking "bucheron" counterparts.

The war created a crisis in wood supply for the United Kingdom. Pre-war domestic production covered only a small fraction of the timber needed to support the war effort. In addition to civilian requirements, it was estimated that every soldier needed five trees: one for living quarters, messing, and recreation; one for crates to ship food, ammunition, tanks, and so on; and three for explosives, gun stocks, coffins, ships, factories, and direct or indirect support for the fighting line.

Canadians stepped up to fill this need. During 1941 and 1942, thirty companies drawn from all regions of Canada, totalling 220 officers and 6,771 regulars, were deployed to Scotland.
High rigger.

Each company worked in two sections, one cutting in the bush and bringing out the timber and the other sawing it into lumber at the company mill. Three-man felling crews chopped, sawed and trimmed. Hand saws and axes were the tools used. Three-man teams yarded the logs to the roadside landings, either by dragging them or using sulkies. From there the logs were hauled by lorry to the company saw mill and cut into whatever sizes and shapes were required.

Each CFC Company of about 230 men was set up as a self-contained community, including men capable of turning their hand to any task, from blacksmithing and mechanical repair to snow clearance on the highland roads. Unlike during the First World War, the Canadian Forestry Corps of the Second World War had to be combat-ready, so time was devoted to military training, as well.

The CFC was apparently well liked in the Scottish Highlands. The men became active participants in local functions, from fundraising to staging Christmas parties for the local children. Many times, scrap wood mysteriously fell from lorries beside homes in need of fuel. A notable tribute to the CFC was paid by Laura Lady Lovat when she stated, "you Canadians may be cutting the Scots firs of the Highlands, but in Highland hearts you are planting something far more lasting".
Bridge on the River Dee.

CFC No. 2 Company, initially located in Aboyne, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, was disbanded in late 1943, but most of the personnel were reassigned to other companies, combat engineering units or actual combat regiments, in preparation for an all-out assault on Europe.

After D-Day (June 6, 1944), the CFC delivered timber to the allied invasion forces in Europe. Due to the shortage of hold space in ships, logs were transported to the English ports of Southampton and Barry and formed into huge rafts. The Royal Engineers, originally tasked with building the rafts, relinquished the job to the more able Canadian foresters. During July and August 1944, 77 square-timber and 54 round-timber rafts were built. The huge rafts were moved with tugboats across the English Channel to the Continent in the late summer of 1944.

Following the successful allied campaign in Normandy, ten mobile CFC companies were deployed to the Continent. Ten static companies remained in Scotland to supply reinforcements when needed and to continue cutting timber. While the Canadian First Army was spearheading the liberation of Holland, the mobile CFC companies followed the allied armies from France into Belgium.

On December 16, 1944 Field Marshal von Rundstedt launched a counter-offensive with a force of twenty-four divisions and broke through the American VIII Corps along a forty mile front in the Ardennes sector of Belgium. The Battle of the Bulge, as it became known, was underway.

The six CFC companies cutting timber in the Ardennes were caught in the thick of things and had to scramble. Some units had time to pull out while some were called into sporadic combat roles to help hold the front line in the fighting.

Three allied armies tangled with three German armies for over a month and a half during the Battle of the Bulge. Over a million men participated. 600,000 Americans and 55,000 British fought 500,000 Germans during one of the coldest, snowiest winters in the Ardennes. On the allied side, 20,000 troops were killed and 90,000 were wounded. On the German side: 16,000 killed and 85,000 wounded. Ultimately the Germans were routed.

After the Battle of the Bulge, the mobile CFC Companies were assigned to other timber areas in the vicinity of Brussels, Antwerp, Charleroi, Louvain and Lierre. During the last week of January 1945, parties from the companies displaced by the Ardennes battle returned to the area to salvage equipment they had hastily abandoned.

A few of the more important tasks performed by CFC personnel, outside of normal timbering, were the lifting and transporting of pontoon bridging from the River Orne to forward areas, the design and construction of a boom to protect the Nijmegen bridge from floating mines which the Germans were putting into the River Waal, upstream, and the supervision of lumber yards for imported lumber at Brussels and Ghent. The companies working in the Antwerp and Nijmegen areas suffered a number of casualties from the incessant flying bomb and rocket attacks which continued during the winter.

In February 1945, CFC Companies 5 and 9 were sent to the Reichswald forest and, later, to the Hochwald forest, immediately following bloody battles in those areas. There they prepared lumber and timber for the Rhine crossings. CFC companies also did considerable work cutting wood for the repair of corduroy roads which had been badly cratered by enemy shelling. The companies which returned to the Ardennes forest began cutting 75-foot pilings for the bridges to be built over the Rhine. In order to cut these abnormally long lengths it was necessary to build special sawmills in the Ardennes.
Billy Rainey and Vernon Bennett.

After VE Day (May 8, 1945), the CFC carried on operations in the forests at thirty-three sites, over a distance of almost 500 miles, from Bruges, Belgium to Bad Segeberge, Germany. New timber operations were started in the forests near Osnabruck, Minden, Bassum, Hanover and Hamburg while some companies remained in the Reichswald and Rhine areas. Two lumber yards were set up along the Rhine, at Pfazdorf on the west bank and Drevenack on the east bank, to store and season lumber prior to shipping. During June 1945, it was necessary to concentrate once again on piling materials, this time for the structures being erected over the Dortmund-Ems Canal and the Weser River.

The CFC was completely disbanded by November 1945, and the "Sawdust Fusiliers" returned to Canada. However, the mixed forests of maple, beech, spruce and white pine of their native lower Laurentians could no longer hold some of these men. Their horizons had been so expanded by their wartime experiences that the only remaining forestry challenges for them were in the giant Douglas fir stands of British Columbia.

Buster and Billy Rainey, my veteran uncles, together with their younger brothers, Edward and Gilbert, were among those that headed west.


Source the book 'The Sawdust Fusiliers' by William C. Wonders

Companies No. 5, 15, 16, 28, and 30 made up the No. 1 Canadian Forestry Group, mobilized 1 May 1944, with its headquarters located briefly at Wilderness Camp and then at Beaufort Castle. They were sent to Carronbridge Camp just north of Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, for further military training.

"P.S. this is our home at The present time - we have two hotels" Written on the back
Photo from the Private Edward (Ted) James Bish Collection

For more info on No.16 Coy see CFC on the Mainland

Personnel of No.16 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps, cutting timber, La Roche-en-Ardenne, Belgium, 6 November 1944.
Source: Library and archives Canada

Source: BROKEN LINK
Society Affairs List of Members CFC
Benson, A.W., Lt. 20th Coy CFC Box 83 Meadow Lake, Sask
Burchett, E. P., Lt Col HQ CFC
Caulkins, J. G., No. 2 Coy CFC East Angus, P.Q.
Christie, H. R., Lt No. 18 Coy CFC
Corbett, J.E., Lt No. 16 Coy CFC
Dawson, F.J., Maj CO No. 5 Coy CFC
Ferguson, N.C. Major CO No.1 Coy CFC
Morley, Peter M., Lt No. 11 Coy CFC
MacNeill, W. M., No. 20 Coy CFC

Photos of the men in the
No. 16 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps
District 2, Camp 30
Blackhall, Banchory

Private Marvin McLennan collection
No. 16 Coy Canadian Forestry Corps

This next large group of photos are from the Pte Marvin McLennan Collection No.25 Coy CFC

Someplace in Belgium pretty shot up
CFC Soldiers on leave in The Spa, Belgium

CFC Soldiers on leave in The Spa, Belgium
The Spa, Belgium
CFC Truck carrying supplies
Belgium, Cordurouy Road built by lumber from CFC
Belgium, note graves of 4 dead German Soldiers
Belgium, disabled German tank
CFC Camp somewhere in Belgium

CFC soldiers hauling bridge material

Source: Faces of War

128. Personnel of an unidentified company of the Canadian Forestry Corps, La Roche-en-Ardenne, Belgium, 4 November 1944.
(L-R): Privates Phil Perkins, Tye Firlotte, Charlie Murray, Corporal Len Chase Dean, Michael M.,
Photographer Mikan Number: 3199721
ROSARIO JOSEPH LALONDE
This is one of many pictures of my father taken overseas in Great Britain, Belgium and France during WWII. He loved serving in the Canadian Army. Dad would send us pictures like this and of his whole regiment along with pretty local postcards. My Mum, sister and I would write to him twice a week. He was a wonderful father, always singing French songs and he loved to dance some old French jigs, always happy.

Source: Lalonde Monument

Scott, Andy Private
No. 16 Company Canadian Forestry Corps
Source: Forestry Commission Scotland
During the war a group of Canadian Forestry Corp were stationed at Dyce (near Aberdeen). One man in particular was especially kind to my mother who had cancer his name was Andy Scott. I live in Canada now and I have been trying to find him. Chris Beattie

Williams, Frank Joseph Private

Photograph of Joseph Williams taken during WW2 at Blackhall, Banchory, Aberdeenshire with the Canadian Forestry Corps.
Source: Paul McKay Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire & The Sawdust Fusilers by William C. Wonders

Source: Paul McKay Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire

Evening Express Aberdeen - No Date

The King’s ‘smooth’ whisky
WHEN the article about the forgotten lumberjack heroes of World War 2 appeared in the Evening Express on February 25, it was sent to my wife’s sister in British Columbia, Canada.
She instantly recognized her late husband ‘Rocky’ Irwine Rockwell, the Officer who is a central figure in the picture.
She wrote back to say it was ‘Rocky’ in his hey-day and the family now got pictures copied.
She continued in her letter: “When the King was in residence at Balmoral it was his custom to send the Officers’ Mess a case of whisky. He never tasted anything so smooth.”
Your articles do stir Memories at home and away.
Leslie B Smith
Port Elphinstone
Inverurie

Port Arthur News Chronicle Thurs Feb 26, 1942

PORT ARTHUR BROTHERS IN FORESTRY CORPS
DAVID REED, ALBERT REED, DANIEL REED
The three men above, sons of Mr. and Mrs. H.S. Reed 269 Doris Avenue, are with the Canadian Forestry Corps at Valcartier, Quebec.
They joined the army in November 1941. David is 20, Albert 23, and Daniel 18.

David Reed and Daniel Reed.
Daniel lied about his age to enlist. Not hard to see in this photo.
Photo Courtesy of Claude Kusznier & Dana Reed grandchildren

Mike Kowbuz Pte
Here's a picture of my grandpa Mike after he returned from the war.
Grandpa, grandma and dad lived with grandpa's sister Pearl for a little
while after the war. Pearl took the photo and wrote the comment on the
back. Grandma and dad sailed on the Queen Mary as it was converted
into a troop ship during the war.
Courtesy of Christine Kowbuz - grandaughter of Mike Kowbuz

War Brides of No.16 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps
Brown, William Pte married Nancy Will
Jackson, Harry Read Pte married Eileen Dingwall
Kowbuz, Michael Pte married Ina Reid
Reed, Daniel Pte married Eunice Brown

No. 16 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps
District 2, Camp 30
Blackhall, Banchory


August 1943 Photo - Courtesy of Christine Kowbuz - grandaughter of Mike Kowbuz

Soldiers of No. 16 Company
Canadian Forestry Corps
District 2, Camp 30
Blackhall, Banchory

List of Abbreviations - Library and Archives Canada
ABBREVIATIONS and ACRONYMS of WW2 and service records
Military Districts of Canada 1939

Agasse, J.J. Pte H62578
Aitken, D.C. Pte D113155 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Alain, Gerard Pte E38132
Allaire, Majella Pte E38165 Discharged
Angus, G.L. Pte H62575
Ardron, Arthur ALCpl B17210 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Arseneau, Bruno Pte
Arthur, H.W. Pte H62547
Ash, J. Pte H62605
Astles, Roy Pte E38174
Aubin, Stanley ALCpl E38244
Audit, Jean ACpl 338264
Austin, F.G. Pte H62545
Babin, Joseph Wilfrid Pte E38237 Transferred to No 5 DD
Backman, V.R. Pte H62573
Bailey, A. LCpl E29390 Transferred to No.2 Coy & HQ No 1 CFG
Baker, E.L. Pte M100625
Baldwin, Francis Ernest Cpl E38235 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Barbeau, Alfred Sgt B17245Transferred from No.14 Coy
Baronet, Edward Napoleon Major Transferred from No.3 Coy transferred to No 5 DD
Barstead, C.E. Pte H62600
Barrette, Roger Pte E38157 Discharged
Barter, Charley Pte E38177
Beaudet, Paul Emile Pte E38113 Transferred to No 5 DD & No.21 Coy
Beaudoin, J.B. Pte D113041 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Beaupre, Lucien Pte E29373 Transferred from No.3 Coy
Beauvais, Jean Guy Pte D113257Transferred from No.9 Coy
Beaven, John Edward Sgt B17237 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Bechervaise, Clifton Pte E38142 Discharged
Begin, Richard Pte E38110
Belanger, Henry Joseph Pte B17231 Discharged - transferred from No.14 Coy
Bellavance, Paul Sgt H62581
Bernier, Joe Pte
Bilodeau, G. Pte E38257 Discharged
Bilodeau, Napoleon Pte E38124
Blais, Rene Pte E38155 Transferred to No.1 Coy
Blanchette, L. Pte E38260
Blondin, Andre Joseph Pte C63088 Discharged - transferred from No.1 Coy
Boilard, Fernando Sgt E38200 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Boissonneau, Edward Joseph Pte B17099 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
Bolton, R.P. Pte C70306 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.10 Coy
Bouchard, L. Pte H62554
Bouchard, P. Pte H62577
Boucher, Albert G. Pte E38192 Transferred to No 5 DD
Boudreault, Georges Aime Pte E38231 Transferred to No 5 DD
Boulianne, Joseph Aldege Pte C63134 Discharged - transferred from No.1 Coy
Bourassa, George Henri Pte E38199 Transferred to No 5 DD
Briere, Joseph Diogana Pte C63157 Discharged - transferred from No.1 Coy
Britt, Hiram W. Pte C70266 Transferred from No.11 Coy transferred to No.9 Coy
Brochu, Alphonse Pte 28342
Brokenshire, E. Pte H62568
Brown, C.H. Pte C30605 Transferred from No 3 DD
Brown, Jasper Errold Pte E38125
Brown, R.W. Pte B23910
Brown, Russell Albert Pte B17212 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
Brown, William, Pte H62583
Brunet, R.J. Pte C70222 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Brunton, A.E.D. Pte H62553
Bujold, Joseph Pte E38109
Burke, August William John Pte C30615 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.3 Coy
Burke, Joseph W. Pte H67045
Burgess, W.M. Pte M60022 Transferred from No 13 DD
Burton, H.A. Pte C70228 Transferred from No 3 DD
Bush, Charles Leonard Pte B17230 Discharged under age - transferred from No.14 Coy
Buttle, Wilson Pte E38175 Discharged
Cairon, Armond Pte
Campbell, Donald Pte
Campbell, Ralph Edward Pte H53456 Transferred from No.5 Coy
Cardinal, Edmond Pte E38248 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Carnaghan, S.M. Capt 2IC
Caron, Maurice Pte E38171 Transferred to Royal 22nd Regiment
Carvill, T.A. Pte C70221 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.21 Coy
Castonguay, Wilfred Pte E38197
Chamillard, T. Pte C70202 Transferred from No 3 DD
Champagne, A.B. Pte C70226 Transferred from No 3 DD
Champagne, P.E. Pte C70047 Transferred from HQ No 1 Dist
Chapais, Joseph Pte H62645 See CFC Casualties
Charette, R. Pte C70309 Transferred from No 3 DD
Charlebois, Joseph Leo Pte C63135 Transferred from No.1 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy transferred back to No.16 Coy transferred to No.9 Coy
Christopher, James Byers ALCpl E38243
Clark, J.M. Pte H62549
Clarke, L.A. Pte H62561 Transferred to No.22 Coy
Clement, H. Pte D113108 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Cleveland, Morgan ALCpl E38241
Connerty, J.L. Pte H62550
Corbeil, Roger Pte E38204
Corbett, J.E. Lt Transferred to Royal Rifles of Canada
Corbett, J.N. ASgt E36055 Transferred from No.3 Coy
Cote, Leo Pte E38172 Transferred to No.8 Coy & No.9 Coy
Coull, Randolph Pte E38176 Transferred to No.2 Coy & back to No.16 Coy transferred to No.9 Coy
Craigie, Douglas James Cpl B17046 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
Croteau, Roger Pte E38120 Transferred to No 5 DD & No.20 Coy
Crowder, William Royal Pte C63139 Transferred from No.1 Coy & back to No.1 Coy
Cryderman, J.V. Sgt H62546
Curley, T. Pte D113254 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Cusson, A.F. Pte D113258 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Cryderman, Ronald Kitchener Pte B17158 Transferred from No.14 Coy
D’Allaire, J.A.A. Pte E1226
Daigle, Peter Pte
Daniels, C. Pte M60014 Transferred from No 13 DD
Davidson, R.A. Pte H62570
Davis, Howard R. Lt
Davis, Ralph C. Pte H94598 Transferred from No.29 Coy & No.27 Coy
Dean, Len Chase Cpl
Dedam, Joseph Wilfrid Pte E38107 Transferred to No 5 DD
De Lorey, J.E. Pte H62567
Delorme, Joseph Leo Pte E38154
Demean, Frederick John Pte K99087 Transferred from No.7 Coy & No.18 Coy
Demers, L. Pte C70313 Transferred from No 3 DD
Dempsey, Caswell Pte E38127 Discharged
Dempsey, Gordon Pte E38160
Dennan, Russel Pte
Denhardt, William H. Pte H62595
Derasp, Leopold Pte E38216 Transferred to No.2 Coy - See CFC Casualties
Deslauriers, J.M. Pte C70204 Transferred from No 3 DD
Dionne, Joseph Pte E38167 Transferred to No 5 DD
Dixon, John Oliver Pte B17233 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Dobson, Manford Pte E38178 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Doucet, Fernand Pte E38151 Discharged
Doyle, Jacques Pte E38156 Transferred to No 5 DD
Doyle, M.J. Pte H62559
Doyle, Michael Joseph Pte B17079 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Doyon, Jean Baptiste (John) Pte E38229
Dube, Jean Private E38265
Dubois, C. Pte C70223 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Duchaine, Jean Paul Pte E38180 Discharged
Duchaine, Rosario Pte E38206 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Ducheneaux, A. Pte C70307 Transferred to No.9 Coy transferred back to No.16 Coy transferred to No.22 Coy
Duffield, Robert James Pte H62616 Transferred to RCAMC
Duguay, Alphonse Pte E38238 Discharged
Duguay, E. Pte E38258 Discharged
Dunlop, George Bruce Pte E38230 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Dunn, A. Pte C63367 Transferred from No 3 DD
Dupont, Alex Pte Transferred from No 3 DD
Durand, Raoul Pte E38168
Durocher, J. Pte M60024 Transferred from No 12 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Dussault, Roland Pte E38123 Transferred from No 5 DD transferred to No.21 Coy
Elwell, R. Pte C70314 Transferred from No 3 DD
Fairfield, E.F. Pte C70220 Transferred from No 3 DD
Ferland, Philippe Pte E38145 Discharged
Fillingham, Charles Edward CSM E38232 Transferred to No.8 Coy
Fillion, Georges Pte E38115 Transferred to Royal 22nd Regiment
Filion, Joseph Thomas Pte E38219 Discharged
Firlotte, Tye Pte
Fitzgerald, Gerald Capt H62584 Transferred to No.24 Coy
Fontaine, Oscar Pte E38101 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Fontaine, Rosario Pte E38170 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Forest, M. Pte H62579
Fothergill, A.W. Pte H62571
Fournier, Joseph Pte E29359 Transferred from No.3 Coy transferred to No.1 Coy
Fournier, Lucien Pte E38285
Foy, George Havelock Capt Transferred to HQ CFC
Franklin, Stephen Lt Adjutant Transferred to No 4 DD
Frazer, C.A. Cpl E36018 Transferred from No.3 Coy transferred to No.21 Coy
Frazer, Robert F. Pte E38247 Transferred to Royal Rifles of Canada
Gagne, Alamanzor Pte E38133 Discharged
Gagne, Alex Joseph Pte B17238 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.2 Coy
Gagne, E. ACpl D113197 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Gagnier, A.L. Pte D113093 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Galipeau, I. Pte C70312 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Gallant, Benoit Pte E32839 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Gallant, Jean Louis Pte E38102 Transferred to No 5 DD
Gallant, Wilfred Pte E38239 Transferred to No 5 DD
Gardiner, Edward Joseph Sgt E38224 Transferred to No 4 DD
Gariepy, E.H. Lt Adjutant
Gariepy, Leo Pte E38193 Transferred to No 5 DD
Gauthier, M. Pte D113029 Transferred from No.9 Coy
George, D.E. Capt AOC
Gibbings, W. Pte M60038 Transferred from No 13 DD
Gilbert, R. Pte E38252
Gilbert, W. Pte D113209 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Gilpin, Ken Armr Sgt E20476 RCOC attached to No.16 Coy
Girard, Alfred Pte E38202 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Godin, Lionel Pte E38268
Goodall, Raymond Lloyd Pte B17017 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy & 8th Reconnaissance Regiment (14th Canadian Hussars)
Gordon, C.S. Sgt C15538 Transferred from No.1 Coy transferred to No.22 Coy & No.24 Coy
Gosselin E. Pte D113056 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Gourque, Joseph Pte E38182 Transferred to Royal 22nd Regiment
Graham, Herbert K. Pte M60021 Transferred from No 13 DD
Grano, W. Pte H62609
Gray, Fredick Pte E38249
Green, Burns Randolph CQMS Transferred from No.4 Coy
Grieve, A. Pte M60016 Transferred from No 13 DD
Guerin, Joseph E. Pte E38226 Transferred to Royal 22nd Regiment
Guidon, H. Pte C70302 Transferred from No 3 DD
Guillementte, Leo Noel Pte E38104 Discharged
Guindon, Y. Pte C70206 Transferred to No 3 DD
Guiter, Hubert Pte E38152
Guy, P. Pte C70303 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Hackey, Dean William Pte E38184 Transferred to Royal Rifles of Canada
Hadley, L.J. Pte
Halliburton, William Pte D113233 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Hamelin, J.H. Pte D113030 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Hamilton, A.A. Pte C70208 Transferred from No 3 DD
Hannon, Walter Pte E38105 Transferred to No 5 DD
Harbour, William Pte E38135 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Harder, Douglas Cameron LCpl C63075 Transferred from No.1 Coy
Harley, James Clark LCpl B17072 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.1 Coy
Hennessey, J.A. Pte D113163 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Hennigar, John William Pte E38188 Transferred to No.1 Coy
Henson, C.E. Pte M60041 Transferred from No 13 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Herlihy, P. Pte H62582
Hoopfar, O.A. Pte H62606
Hotton, Herman Pte E38137 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Howie, D. Pte M100977
Howe, Balfour Pte B17221 Discharged - transferred from No.14 Coy
Howe, E.E. Sgt E38254
Hramcsak, L. Pte H62597
Huard, J. Georges Cpl E38261
Hughes, C.A. Pte M60042 Transferred from No 13 DD
Hunting, H. ACpl D113185 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Huntingdon, Edward Cpl E0209 Transferred to No.8 Coy & HQ No 1 CFG
Hurens, Julien Pte E38116 Transferred to No 5 DD & No.21 Coy
Hurley, Melvin S. Mel Pte H62599
Hurtubise, J.A. Pte H62585
Imbeault, Maxime Pte E38190 Transferred to No.8 Coy
Inskip, Harry George Pte K99107 Transferred from No.7 Coy & No.9 Coy
Irvine, Alexander Edward Pte C36057 Transferred from No.3 Coy
Isaac, C.A. Pte M60036 Transferred from No 13 DD
Isabelle, Pierre Pte E38134 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Jackson, Harry Read Pte H62560 Transferred to Royal Canadian Dragoons
James, W.J. Pte C30624 Discharged - transferred from No 3 DD
Jamieson, R.M. Pte H62603
Jarry, D. Pte D111583 Transferred to VGH
Jean, R. Pte E38103 cook
Jean, R.J. Pte C70308 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Johnson, Arnold Pte E38141 Transferred to No 5 DD
Johnson, Charles Pte E38147 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Johnson, H.L. Pte H62611
Johnston, L. Pte C70296 Transferred from No 3 DD
Jones, E.M. Pte M60039 Transferred from No 3 DD
Jones, G.A. Pte H62564
Jossul, Nick CSM 113195 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Kaakee, George Pte B17002 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Kallio, Martin John Pte B17243 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Keays, Kenneth Pte E30659 Transferred from & back to No.3 Coy
Kempf, F.L. Pte M61402 Transferred from No 13 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Kinch, William H. (Bill) Pte H62565
Koskey, J. SSgt H62586 Transferred to HQ No 2 Dist
Kowbuz, Michael (Mike) Pte H62556
Labrecque, J.R. Pte E38251 Transferred to No.8 Coy
Lachance, Adjutor Pte E38129 Discharged
Lachance, E.M. Lt Transferred to No 5 DD
Lacroix Albert Cpl B112023
Lajeunesse, Medard Pte C63185 Transferred from No.1 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy & No. 5 Detachment Fuel Wood Cutting Unit
Lalonde, D.J.A. ALCpl E38255
Lalonde, P.D. ALCpl E38256
Lalonde, Rosario Joseph Pte
Lamontagne, Albert Pte B17248 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.1 Coy
Lamontagne, G.H. Pte E36123 Transferred from No.3 Coy & No 5 DD transferred to No.22 Coy & HQ No 1 CFG
Langlois, G. Pte E38262 Transferred to No.9 Coy
Laplante, Edgar Pte E39479
Lapointe, Beniot Pte E38159
Larocque, Joseph Aime Alfred Pte C63035 Transferred from No.1 Coy transferred to RCE
Larocque, Omer A. Pte
Larose, Jaen L. Pte E38201 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Larson, Alfred Pte E38240 Transferred to No 5 DD
Latulippe, Andre Pte E38163 Discharged
Laverone, O. Pte C70301 Transferred from No 3 DD
Laverone, S. Pte C70300 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Lavigne, G.H. Pte G48228 Transferred from No.12 Coy
Lavigne, Moise Pte B17088 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
Lavoie, Ernest ALCpl E22863
Lavoie, Paul Pte E38267
Lawlis, Cam Cpl
Lawton, W.R. Lt
Lebel, Edouard Pte E38158 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Leblanc, Joseph Pte E38181 Transferred to No 5 DD
Lee, John Pte E38173 Discharged
Legacy, George Pte E39411
Legere, Adolphe Pte E39457
Lemelin, A.C. Cpl E1018 Transferred from 57th Medium Battery R.C.A.
Leroux, A. Pte C70201 Discharged - transferred from No 3 DD
Lessard, Henri Pte E38185 Discharged
Lessard, Roger Pte E38131 Transferred to Royal 22nd Regiment
Letourneau, Armand Pte E38161 Transferred to No.8 Coy
Letourneau, Gerard Pte E38218 Transferred to No.8 Coy
Levesque, Jacques Pte E38114 Transferred to No 5 DD & No.23 Coy
Leydier, Arthur Joseph Cpl H56373 Transferred from No.17 Coy
Logan, F. Pte M60031 Transferred to No 13 DD
Longpre, W. Pte C70298 Transferred from No 13 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Lontin, John Pte E38227 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Lortie, Edward Joseph Pte C63116 transferred from No.1 Coy transferred to No 5 DD
Lucas, Ernest Arthur Sgt E38140 Transferred to No.4 Coy
Ludwig, George Joseph Joe Cpl K99068 Transferred from No.7 Coy
MacDonald, J.A. Pte C70216 Transferred from No 3 DD
MacDonald, James Edgar Pte E39423
MacGillivray, George Sgt D93754 Transferred from 9th Field Ambulance RCAMC & No.4 Coy & HQ CFC
MacLaren, David Warren Pte K99075 Transferred from No.7 Coy
MacLean, S.G. Pte C70227 Transferred from No 3 DD
McLennan, Marvin Pte Transferred from No.25 Coy
MacLeod, D. Pte M60023 Transferred from No 13 DD
MacWilliam, H.C. Pte H62589
Madigan, Adolph P. Pte H62587
Madigan, Lawrence Michael Pte B17146 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
Major, J.L. Pte H62601
Marcoux, Henri Pte E38203 Transferred to No.8 Coy
Marcoux, Paul Emile Pte E38213 Transferred to No 5 DD
Martel, Romauld Pte E38242 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Martin, Alfred Clarence Sgt B20157 Transferred from No.11 Coy
Martin, Louis Philippe Pte E38198 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Martin, Nelson J. Pte E38162 Transferred to Royal 22nd Regiment
Mathieu, Cleopas Pte B17227 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Matt, N.R.A. Pte C70218 Transferred from No 3 DD
McArthur, Lewis Arthur Sgt E36183
McBrine, George Corey Sgt G48253 Transferred from No.4 Coy
McCarthy, T.J. Pte M60015 Transferred from No 13 DD
McCooeye, E.W. Pte C70219 Transferred from No 3 DD
McCullough, W.J. Pte D113027 Transferred from No.9 Coy
McDermott, Cecil Howard LCpl B17000 Transferred from No.14 Coy
McGillivary, F.A. Pte H62590
McGlaggan, Max T. Major Transferred from No.23 Coy
McGregor, G. Pte H62593
McKay, Leonard Pte B17224 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
McKenven, Rodolphe Pte E38195 Transferred to No.8 Coy
McMullen, Gordon Frank Pte C63033 Discharged - transferred from No.1 Coy
McNeil, J.A. Pte D113232 Transferred from No.9 Coy
McQuaig, David J. Pte H62572
McWhirter, B. Pte E38266
McWhirter, Sydney Pte E38187 Transferred to No 5 DD
Mearow, M. Pte C70311 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.11 Coy
Merrion, Alrud Pte E38138 Transferred to No.8 Coy transferred back to No.16 Coy transferred to No.9 Coy
Michaud, E. Pte E38190 Transferred to No.9 Coy
Michaud, Louis Philippe Pte E38234 Transferred to No.9 Coy
Michaud, Valere Pte E36117 Transferred from No.3 Coy
Michie, Orton Alexander Pte B17187 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.9 Coy
Michon, Eugene Francis Sonny Pte H62557 Transferred to Royal Winnipeg Rifles then to Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry
Montgomery, Robert Hastwell (Pat) Capt Transferred to General Workshop Section & HQ No 1 CFG
Montroy, D. Pte D113150 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Moodie, Thomas Pte E38216 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Moran, George E. Pte H62580 Transferred to No.17 Coy
Morency, Gerard Cpl E38122 Transferred from RCAMC transferred to No.2 Coy & HQ No 1CFG
Morgan, A.J. Pte H62596
Morin, Raymond Pte E23367 Transferred to No 5 DD
Morin, Robert Pte E38128 Transferred to No 5 DD
Morley, L.S. Pte M60029 Transferred from No 13 DD
Morley, Peter Malcomson Major Transferred from No.11 Coy & No.14 & No.5 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Morris, Louis Harold Pte B17249 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy - See CFC Casualties
Morrison, W.C. Pte H62552
Muir, G.A. Pte H62592
Mulligan, G. Pte C70310 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy & back to No.16 Coy
Murray, Charlie Pte
Murray, Joseph Pte E38183 Transferred to Royal Rifles of Canada
Murray, R.R. Lt Transferred from HQ No 2 Dist
Murray, W.D. Pte D113149 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Nevers, B.L. LCpl G45597 Transferred from No.4 Coy
Norris, Al Pte
Nurminen, Lauri W. Pte H62604 Transferred to No.9 Coy
Nutt, C.I. Pte M60037 Transferred from No 13 DD
O'Keefe, Cliff K. Pte H62588
O'Leary, P. Pte C70320 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
O'Quinn, T. Pte D113223 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Otto, P. Pte M60033 Discharged - transferred from No 13 DD
Ouellet, Joseph Alcide Pte E38189 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Page, A.L. Pte D113023 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Pajinkewicz, John Pte H62613
Paquet, Luc Antoine Pte E38166 Transferred to No 5 DD
Paquet, Lucien Pte E38143
Parent, Stanley Pte E38108 Discharged
Pattenden, Reg Pte
Pattenden, Richard Maurice Henry Pte L50082 Transferred from No.20 Coy & No.3 Coy
Pedersen, H. Pte H62569
Pellerin, Roland Pte E38146 Transferred to No.1 Coy
Pepin, Raoul Pte E38233 Transferred to No.1 Coy
Perkins, Phil Pte
Perron, G.M.G. Pte E38245Transferred to No 5 DD
Perron, Paul Pte E38126 Transferred to No 5 DD - See CFC Casualties
Philp, D.R. Pte H62574
Pickering, Tom P. Capt C63496 Transferred from No.8 Coy & No.24 Coy & No.5 Coy
Pinsonneault, Wilfrid Pte E38220
Plourde, Romeo Pte E38150 Discharged
Poirier, Emile Cpl E39531 Transferred from No.23 Coy
Poogkhay, N. Pte M60027 Discharged - transferred from No 13 DD
Porter, Albert Gerald Cpl B17123 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Potts, A. Pte D113169 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Potvin, Roger Pte E38106 Transferred to Royal 22nd Regiment
Pouliot, Yves Private E38112 Transferred to Royal Rifles of Canada
Powers, Chester Pte E38210 Transferred to No.1 Coy
Prebble, John Stuart Major Transferred from No.4 Coy - See No 8 CFD
Preston, Ken Pte H44615 Transferred from No.24 Coy
Prevost, J.R. Pte E38250 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Prevost, Willie Pte E38207 Transferred to No 5 DD
Price, Dougall Pte E38139
Prieston, Ernest E. Pte H62566
Prieston, O. Pte H62551
Pronkosky, A. Pte C70205 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Racine, Arthur Sgt E38222
Radstaak, K. LCpl M60043 Transferred from No 13 DD transferred to HQ No 2 Dist
Ralph, Dennis James Pte B17219 transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
Randle, R.E. Pte H62598
Reay, I., Private M60025 Transferred from No 13 DD
Reed, Daniel Sparling Pte
Reindeau, L. Pte C70305 Transferred to No.9 Coy
Renaud, Lorenzo Pte E38111 Discharged
Renaud, Marcel Pte E38119 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Ricketts, A.E. Pte C70683 Transferred from No 3
Riendeau, L. Pte C30683 Transferred from No 3 DD
Rigobert, Jean Pte E38103
Rioux, Roumald Pte 339508 Transferred from No.23 Coy
Robbins, C.E. Pte H62555
Robillard, Joseph Armand Pte C63087 Discharged - transferred from No.1 Coy
Robins, F.O. Pte M60028 Discharged - transferred from No 13 DD
Robinson, W.N. CQMS D93803 Transferred from CMC
Rochefort, C. Pte D113158 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Rockwell, Irvin ‘Rocky’ Capt Transferred from No.30 Coy & No.24 Coy
Rodrigue, R. Pte D113222 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Ross, Gordon Pte E39424
Ross, J.A. Pte D113853 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Rouleau, Joseph Julian Fernand Pte C63023 Transferred from No.1 Coy transferred to No 5 DD
Rowland, H.G. Pte M60034 Transferred from No 13 DD
Roy, Albert Pte E38179 Transferred to Royal Rifles of Canada
Roy, Fortunat Pte E38214 Transferred to No.1 Coy
Roy, Leopold Pte E38169 Transferred to No 5 DD
Russell, Hugh McCusker Capt Transferred from No.26 Coy
Russow, J. Pte H62608 Transferred to No.9 Coy
Ryan, Joseph Malcolm Sgt B17132 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Sack, L. Pte F77271 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Savidant, E. Pte E36065 Discharged
Savoie, J.L. Pte E5053 Transferred to North Shore Regiment
Savoie, R. Pte E5054 Transferred to No.1 Coy
Sawchuk, Michael A. Pte H62558 Transferred from No 10 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Seaburn, Patrick Pte E38211 Transferred to Royal 22nd Regiment
Seed, Angus Cameron Sgt E38205
Senior, J.W. ASgt D113181 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Scott, Andy Pte
Shaw, Frederick Jason Sgt B17205 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Shea, James P. Pte C70296 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Shillam, Ralph Hilary Sgt Transferred to RCE
Shonert, A.H. Pte M60026 Transferred from No 13 DD
Sigouin, Charles Edmond Pte B17031 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
Simard, Albert Pte E38118 Discharged
Sinclair, Henry Pte E38269
Smith, Albert Pte E38186 Transferred to No.9 Coy
Smith, D.M. ASgt D113180 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Smith, Robert Pte E38217 Transferred to No 5 DD
Sprowl, C.E. Pte M60032 Transferred from No 13 DD
St. Croix, Camille Pte E38164
St. Croix, Leon Pte E38148 Transferred to No 5 DD & No.23 Coy
St. Jacques, P.E. Pte C21104 Transferred from No 3 DD
St. Jean, Hector Pte
Stanton, Mapleton Le Roy Pte K15067 Transferred from No.10 Coy transferred to No 5 DD
Steen, O.W. Pte H62562
Stephen, H. Pte M60020 Transferred from No 13 DD
Strain, R.R. Sgt RCMC attached to No.16 Coy
Stuart, A.N. Pte M60019 Transferred from No 13 DD
Stuart, J. Pte D113117 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Sutherland, J.G. Pte K73922 Transferred from No 11 DD transferred & No.18 Coy & No.10 Coy
Sylvestre, Francis Pte E38144 Discharged
Syvret, Herbert Walter Pte E38196 Transferred to No.2 Coy & North Nova Scotia Highlanders - See CFC Casualties
Sweet, M. Pte D113145 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Tapp, Gerard Cpl E38136
Taylor, Cecil Oscar Pte B17201 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No. 8 Coy
Tardif, Joseph Pte E38153 Transferred to No 5 DD & No.21 Coy
Thibault, Gerard Pte E38212 Transferred to No.2 Coy
Thomson, Stuart CSM L50184 Transferred from No.20 Coy
Thurlow, J.G. Pte M60040 Transferred from No 13 DD
Tossel, Joseph Pte E38208
Tremblay, Albege Pte E38223
Tremblay, Peter V. Cpl E38149 Transferred to RCAF
Turri, W.H. Pte H62548 Transferred from No 10 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Underhill, K.J. Pte H62576 Transferred to No. 22/24 Coy
Upton, Frank Baldwin Pte E38153 Transferred to No.9 Coy
Urquhart, Thomas Martin Pte B20562 Transferred from No.12 Coy & No.9 Coy transferred to Three Rivers Regiment
Vaillancourt, Maurice Pte E4613 Discharged
Van Nort, James Robert Cpl B17044 Transferred from No.16 Coy
Veilleux, Corulus Pte E38130 Transferred to No 5 DD
Vidal, Jean Charles Med Sgt E28577 Transferred to No.3 Coy
Vienneau, A. Pte D113211 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Vigneault, Joseph Isaie Pte E38221
Vilon, E.A. Pte C70294 Transferred from No 3 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Vizina, Joseph Olivier Albert Pte C63021 Transferred from No.1 Coy
Wagg, Wilfred Wallace Pte B17209 Transferred from No.14 Coy
Wavra, L. Pte H62602 Transferred to No.9 Coy
Webber, D.C. Lt
Wengel, F.P. Pte M60030 Transferred from No 13 DD
Westman, John Thomas Capt Transferred from No.21 Coy
Wheatley, E.C. CSM D107039 Transferred from No.9 Coy
Williams, Francois Frank Joseph Pte
Williams, Fred Henry Pte G23854 Transferred to No.15 Coy - See Collections Canada & CFC Casualties
Williams, J. Pte H62591
Willoughby, William Alfred Cpl B17006 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No. 22/24 Coy
Wills, E.L. Sgt D81826 Transferred from No.9 Coy transferred to Machine Gun Training Centre
Winskill, David Thomas Sgt & Major B17188 Foreman of Works Mills - transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to HQ CFC & HQ No 1 CFG & No.16 Coy
Wiseman, F. Pte F97409
Wolner, Erling Pte B17229 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
Worsford, Frederick J. Pte M60035 Transferred from No 13 DD transferred to No.9 Coy
Wright, Tiberius Joseph Pte B17211 Transferred from No.14 Coy transferred to No.8 Coy
Wyouche, Joseph Pte E38228 Transferred to No 5 DD
Young, Don A. Pte M60018 Transferred from No 13 DD
Young, Jim Pte
Young, Murdock Pte E38209 Discharged
Young, N.R. Pte H62594
Zahodnik, N. Pte H62612

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