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Individual Notes

Note for:   Matthew Benjamin Cowden,    -          Index

Event:   
     Type:   Fact1
     Place:   Louise Lilley descends from his line


Individual Notes

Note for:   Maggie Vivian Barnett,   5 JUL 1896 - 2 AUG 1985         Index

Burial:   
     Date:   1985
     Place:   Berry Cemetery

Individual Note:
     [Combined.ftw]

The Times News, Kingsport, VA. Aug. 4, 1985
Maggie V. Berry
Maggie V. Barnette Berry, 89, Rt. 3, Clinchport, VA., died Friday evening, Aug. 2, at Holston Valley hospital and Medical Center after a short illness.
She was predeceased by her husband, Ora E. Berry, Sr. Surviving are six daughters, Mrs. Eunice (Bessie) Robinette and Mrs. Orbin (Rosalee) Bledsoe, both of Blackwater, VA., Vivian Justice, Church Hill, Mrs. Bill (Mable) Thurman, Rogersville, Mrs. Paul (Jean) Noody and Mrs. Sheryl (Faye) Barker, both of Kingsport; two son, James H. Berry and Ora E. Berry, Jr., both of Clinchport, VA.; 12 grandchildren; four step grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; and three nieces.
Services were conducted at the chapel of Warren Funeral Home with the Rev. Lester P. Smith and the Rev. Alex Willis officiating. Grandsons served as pallbearers. Burial was in the Berry Family cemetery
in Clinchport, VA.


Individual Notes

Note for:   Parelle Bledsoe,   1878 - 25 AUG 1945         Index

Burial:   
     Date:   1945
     Place:   Barnett Cemetery; Big Ridge, Scott Co., VA


Individual Notes

Note for:   John Barnett,   13 MAR 1704/05 - 20 JAN 1785         Index

Alias:   John /Barnett/ II

Individual Note:
     [Combined.ftw]



Citation to kindred and creditors, on Estate of JOHN BARNETT, (dcsd.) as recorded at Court House, Camden, S.C.

South Carolina, Camden District
By: Heny Hampton, Esq.

Ordinary.

WHEREAS: Margaret Barnett, applied to me to me for Letters of Administration of all and hath singular the Goods and Credits of John Barnett late of the District, aforesaid, deceased.

These are therefore, to Cite and Admonish all and singular the kindred and creditors of the said deceased, to be and appear before me in the Court of Ordinary for the said District, to be held at my house, near Winnsboro, the first Monday in September next to show cause (if any they have) why the said -Administration should not be granted.

Given under my hand and Seal, this twenty-eighth day of August, Anno Domini, One thousand seven
hundred and eight-four, and in the Ninth year of American Independence.

To any protestant minister of the Gospel of said District:

Read this Citation in your congregation, and certify on the back hereof when you did so.

October 24, 1784 read as ordered at the Waxhaw Church.
(Signed) James Edmonds, V.D.M.

August 28, 1786. John Barnett's Estate,
Margaret Barnett,
Administratrix, read from Waxhaw Church. [Combined.ftw]

Came to America with his father. On record for paying a stipend toward pastor's salary, Rev. John Roan's Congregation, Paxtang, 1745-1773

Assessed (taxes?) in Paxtang - 1756.

Side Note:
The eldest son, James Russell Sharon, born in 1775, was a Presbyterian minister of prominence, and, for a period of almost thirty-six years, ending with his life in 1843, was the pastor of the old Paxtang church, one of the
landmarks of Scotch Irish settlement in Pennsylvania. He was a man of eminent piety, was greatly beloved by his congregation, and was universally respected for the purity of his faith and the integrity of his moral character.

        The historian of this church quotes the recollections of a friend of the devoted minister, who says: 'The tall lank figure of Mr.. Sharon was one of the fixtures and features of Paxtang. His soft, white delicate skin, blue eyes,
dark hair, narrow chest - his soft, weak but clear voice, hacking cough, etc. marked him as one short for this world.
Yet he was punctual in his duties, preached good, sensible sermons, attended all the christenings, marriages, and funerals. With all odds against him, he lived his threescore and ten, and at last was gathered to his fathers, ripe
for the harvest, with eternal sunshine on his head.'"

James grew up in Fayette Township and studied to enter the Ministry, and was ordained on April 12, 1806 by the Carlisle Presbytery. In 1807 he became the Pastor of the United Congregations of Derry and Paxton at he old Paxtang Church a few mile east of Harrisburg in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. He was to serve as minister of this church for over 36 years from 1807 until 1842 just before his death. [Seiber~1.FTW]

[willbarn.ged]

Came to America with his father. On record for paying a stipend toward pastor's salary, Rev. John Roan's Congregation, Paxtang, 1745-1773

Assessed (taxes?) in Paxtang - 1756.

Side Note:
The eldest son, James Russell Sharon, born in 1775, was a Presbyterian minister of prominence, and, for a period of almost thirty-six years, ending with his life in 1843, was the pastor of the old Paxtang church, one of the
landmarks of Scotch Irish settlement in Pennsylvania. He was a man of eminent piety, was greatly beloved by his congregation, and was universally respected for the purity of his faith and the integrity of his moral character.

        The historian of this church quotes the recollections of a friend of the devoted minister, who says: 'The tall lank figure of Mr.. Sharon was one of the fixtures and features of Paxtang. His soft, white delicate skin, blue eyes,
dark hair, narrow chest - his soft, weak but clear voice, hacking cough, etc. marked him as one short for this world.
Yet he was punctual in his duties, preached good, sensible sermons, attended all the christenings, marriages, and funerals. With all odds against him, he lived his threescore and ten, and at last was gathered to his fathers, ripe
for the harvest, with eternal sunshine on his head.'"

James grew up in Fayette Township and studied to enter the Ministry, and was ordained on April 12, 1806 by the Carlisle Presbytery. In 1807 he became the Pastor of the United Congregations of Derry and Paxton at he old Paxtang Church a few mile east of Harrisburg in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. He was to serve as minister of this church for over 36 years from 1807 until 1842 just before his death.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Margaret Roan,   1710 - JAN 1790         Index

Event:   
     Type:   Fact2
     Place:   John Barnett b.1765 named a daughter Margaret Roan Barnett

Individual Note:
     [Combined.ftw]

Possibly sister to the Rev. John Roan - by Jesse L Barnett

From: Historical Sketches of the Campbell, Pilcher, and Kindred Families

        Author: Margaret C. Pilcher
        Call Number: CS71.C191x
        THE ROAN FAMILY.

Rev. 1John Roan was born in 1717, in Greenshaw, Ireland, and he, with his brother, 1Andrew, came to the English Colonies in America in 1736. They settled in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, then called Donegal and Derry. 1Andrew Roan married Margaret Walker. He died in 1768, leaving his wife with four children: 2Archibald, 2Margaret, 2William and 2Sarah Roan. The wife did not long survive her husband, and the brother, the Rev. 1John Roan, became the guardian of the four young children.

The following is copied from the historical archives of Dauphin County, Pennsylvania:
"Archibald Roan, the son of Andrew Roan and Margaret Walker, was a native of Derry Township, Lancaster County (now Dauphin County), Pennsylvania, where he was born about 1760. His father dying about 1768, he was placed in care of his uncle, the Rev. John Roan. In the will of the latter, this mention is made: 'I allow to my nephew, Archibald Roan (in case the above persons, the Rev. George Duffield, and my executors apprehend him religiously disposed), twenty pounds towards his college expenses.' He studied law and removed to Tennessee, where he obtained a license to practice that profession; he was shortly afterwards appointed District Attorney General; and in 1796 was honored with the position of Judge of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. From 1801 to 1804 he was Governor of that State, and afterwards held a number of prominent offices. He was a gentleman of education, a leading jurist, and an honored citizen of the State of his adoption. Tennessee gave his name to one of her counties."

The writer has a letter written by Governor Roan, April 1, 1797, from Jonesboro,
Tennessee, to his cousin, Flavel Roan, of Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.

The Rev. 1John Roan, of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, had charge of Neshaminy Academy after Mr. Tennant left it. 2Archibald Roan, his nephew, left Pennsylvania and settled first at Liberty Hall, Rockbridge County, Virginia. Later he removed to Tennessee.
***********************************************************************

O' Ruadhain

(O) ROWAN; (O) RUAN; Rouine; (O) ROGAN

The name Ruane presents little difficulty; it is that of a sept of the Ui Maine1 (O’Ruadhain in Irish) whose modern representatives are numerous in the Ui Maine, or Hy Many, country in east Galway. In north connacht O’ Ruadhain, formerly O’ Ruaidhin according to O’ Donovan, was the name of a distinct Ui Fiachrach2 sept, located around the parish of Roben, County Mayo, and still there as Ruane, when he visited the place in 1840. William Hennessy, editor of The Annals of Loch Ce, says that O’ Ruadhain was then (1871) anglicized both as Rowan and Roughan, not mentioning Ruane. Birth registration statistics of a much later date show nearly 80 percent of Ruanes to be in County Mayo and the remainder in County Galway, whereas the Rowans were scattered throughout the four provinces. Even in the sixteenth century this was the case, for the name under the variants of Rowan, O” Rowane, O’ Rowhan, O’ Rowghan, O’ Roan, O’ Roen and O’ Rwan occurs frequently in the Fiants relating to counties Clare, Galway, Cork, Kilkenny, Wexford, Wicklow, Kildare, and Leix. In south-ast Leinster some Rowans were a branch of the O’ Morchoe sept, as witness the pardon dated 10 June 1584 to “Mortiertagh O’ Morchoe alis O’ Rowane of Ballinvalle in the Moroes, County Wexford, gent.: The Annals, Inquisition and Books of Survey and Distribution all agree in placing the O’ Rowans as people of property and importance in the barony of Gallen, County Mayo, and other contiguous territory, but eighteenth and nineteenth century sources of information make it clear that Ruane is the form finally adopted in English by most of these families.

Rowan, now rather less numerous than Ruane, is historically a name of importance and the fact that it can be of several different origins is confusing. In addition to the two septs of O’ Ruadhain already mentioned O’ Robhachain of Thomond [County Clare] has become Rowan. This small sept was never very prominent, but they are recorded as accompanying the O’ Gradys in the unsuccessful attack on Ballyalla Castle in 1642, when all but one of their number were killed: they were the heredtary stewards to the O’ Gradys. They survive in east Clare as Rohan as well as Rowan. In west Clare and south Connacht the variant O’ Ruaidhin (Rowine, Rouine and Ruine) is not uncommon.

In addition to the mant variants in the Fiants given above, O’ Roghan also appears in Clare and Tipperary; in the “census” of 1659 O’ Roughane is given as a principal name in the barony of Bunratty (east Clare) and Roughane in the barony of East Carbery (County Cork). William Roghan was conformist Chancellor of the diocese of Cashel in 1564. Woulfe states that the Rowans or Roughans of Clare were an ecclesiastical family connected with monasteries as far afield as Swords and Lismore, and the Four Masters record the death in 988 of O’ Robhachain, the successor of St. Colmcille on Iona Island, though this man lived at a time when surnames were very rarely fixed. There have certainly been a number of distinguished crchmen of the names now under consideration, such as Felix O’ Ruadhain, Archbishop of Tuam, was one of the Irish prelates at the Latern Council in Rome in 1215; judging by the positions they occupied they were presumably of the Ui Fiachrach or Ui Maine (Connacht) septs, though occupancy of the see of Kilmacduagh could possibly point to Thomond as well as Ui Maine. In all, seven different members of the sept were bishops of the Connacht dioceses. Woulfe derives O’ Ruadhain from ruadh red; the surname is probably not connected with St. Ruadhan of Lorrha.

The most famous Rowans were Archibald Hamilton Rowan (1751-1834), the Ubited Irishman, and his relative Sir William Rowan Hamilton (1805-1855), the astronomer and mathematician. A notable member of Tralee, County Kerry, family was Ven. Arthur Blennerhassett Rowan (1800-1861), antiquary and genealogist; while from Antrim came two officers of the British army called Rowan who distinguished themselves in the Napoleonic wars.

Finally, it should be observed that Rowan is found indigenous in England being an abbreviated form of the better known Rowantree or Rowntree. There was also the Norman Rohan and de Rohan, but it is improbable that the few medieval families in Ireland so named have any surviving descendants called either Rohan or Rowan. It has been suggested that William Rohane, of Moclerstown, County Tipperary, whose will was made in 1762, was one of these. Dr. John Roan, the protestant Bishop of Killaloe from 1675 to 1693, who was relentless in his persecution of the Catholic bishop (Dr. Molony), also spelled his name Rohan.

O‘ Rogan, sometimes confused with O’ Roghan, has no connection with Rowan or Ruane; it is the name (O’ Ruadhagain in Irish) of an Oriel sept of considerable importance in the baronies of Armagh and Iveagh (County Down) up to the end of the twelfth century when it sank into relative obscurity. They did not die out, however. In 1550 the O’ Rogans of Kenelerte (mod. Kinelarty, County Down) are mentioned in a Chancery Roll. They were in County Westmeath in 1402, for the annals relate that Ruaidhri O’ Ruadhagain was attacked by the Galls (i.e. the English) there in that year. One appears in a list of the principal followers of O’ Donnell in 1601; and several appear in northern Hearth Money Rolls later in that century. It is found today in all provinces in small numbers, t majority being in Ulster.

Footnotes

1-Ui Maine (Clan), descendants of Maine Mor, the fourth in descent from Collda-chrioch, one of the ancestors of the Oirghialla (Oreil Clan); the name of a great Connacht clan, whose territory comprised part of the present counties of Galway, Roscommon, Clare and Offaly, and of which O’Kelly was chief.

2-Ui Fiachrach (Clan), descendants of Fiachra, son of Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin, King of Ireland in the 4th century. Fiachra was a brother of Niall of the Nine Hostages and the father of celebrated King Dahy, the last pagan monarch of Ireland. The Ui Fiachrach were divided into two great branches, viz: Ui Fiachrach Muaidhe (seated in the counties of Mayo and Sligo) and Ui Fiachrach Aidhne (seated in the district of Aidhne Co. Galway) , grandson of the celebrated King Dahy.

Excerpted Ver Batim from:

MacLysaght, Edward (1982). More irish families, pp. 183-184. Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland: Irish Academic Press Limited.

O’ Ruadain

Early Irish Origin: O’Ruane, O’Rowane, O’ Roan, Ruane, Rouane, Roane, Ruan, Roan, Roon, Rowan, Rewan, Royan, (Ryan); descendant of Ruadan (diminutive of Ruad: red) also O’ Ruaidin; the name (I) of an old Mayo family of the Ui Fiachrach^, who possessed a district lying between Newbrook and Kileen, to the north of Ballinrobe; and (2) of an old Galway family of the Ui Maine^ race. No fewer than seven of the name were bishops of various sees in Connacht, in the 12th and 13th centuries. The name is still ver common in that province, generally anglicized Ruane, but sometimes disguised as Ryan.

O’ Ruadacain

Early Irish Origin: Roughan, Roohan, Rohan, Rowan, (Rogan) &c.; Descendant of Ruadcan’ (diminutive of ruad: red) a variation of O’ Ruadajain; common in West Ulster and Connacht. Its anglicized forms cannot always be distinguished from those of O’ Rodacain.

O’ Rodacain

Early Irish origins: O’ Rachaine, O’ Rawghan, O’ Rowghane, O’ Roaghan, Roughan, Roohan, Ruhan, Rohan, Rowan; descendant of Rodacan’ (crafty); also written O’ Readacan; the name of an eccelesiastical family, anciently attached to the monasteries of Swords, County Dublin, and Lismore, County Waterford. In the 16th and 17th centuries, it was not uncommon in County Clare, where members of the family appear to have been stewards to the O’ Gradys. In 1641, Donogh oge O’ Roughan and Charles O Roughan were proprietors of the townland of Sunnagh, in the parish of Inichroman. The name is now rare and scattered, and its anglicized forms cannot always be distinguished from those of O’ Ruadacain.

Excerpted Ver Batim from:

Woulfe, Rev. Patrick (1993). Irish names and surnames, pp. 632-625. Baltimore, Md.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.


Individual Notes

Note for:   Mary smith,   1 MAR 1873 - 21 DEC 1963         Index

Individual Note:
     [mary elender connor.ged]

This individual was found on GenCircles at: http://www.gencircles.com/users/jsmith9842/1/data/1387

Individual Notes

Note for:   Alice Leslie Barnett,   19 FEB 1886 - 22 NOV 1959         Index

Name Note: Source:    Don Rose DAROSE@@YOSEMITE.NET



Individual Notes

Note for:   David Davis Barnett,   6 AUG 1798 -          Index

Alias:   David /Barnett/, Jr.

Name Note: Source:    Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #5321, Date of Import: Dec 13, 1996

Birth Note: Source:    Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #5321, Date of Import: Dec 13, 1996

Death Note: Source:    Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #5321, Date of Import: Dec 13, 1996

Individual Note:
     [Combined.ftw]

Date: Sat, 6 Dec 1997 21:00:07 -0800
From: "Richard A. Johnson"
To: "Jesse L Barnett"

Jesse, I wanted to give you the rest of my family in Warrick Co. IN. David BARNETT married Agnes HODGES 6-9-1820 in Daviess Co. KY. They both died In Warrick Co. Indiana. Their daughter Susan BARNETT married Colmore B. MORRIS.Jan 2,1845, in Ohio, Co. Kentucky. Susan died 4-21-1860 in Warrick Co. IN. Colmore died 4-24-1867, Warrick Co. IN. Their son John Thomas MORRIS married Sarah CHAMBERS March 4, 1875. They died in Stoddard Co. Missouri in 1899. Their son Alta Beeler MORRIS was born in Warrick Co. IN. in 1881. He died in Tacoma Washington in 1946. His daughter, Nevada May
MORRIS, my mother, was born in Sikeston Missouri, in 1912. She married Oscar Salander JOHNSON, in Gig Harbor Washington, in 1934. She died in 1989. Rich Johnson.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Martin Barnett,    -          Index

Individual Note:
     1830 census of Ohio Co., KY between the ages of 20 and 30, his wife the same. One daughter under 5.
Living near his brothers William and David whom were older than Martin.
Also living in the general vicinity of Giles Chambers, Sr.

Individual Notes

Note for:   William G. Sinnett,   ABT 1838 -          Index

Alias:   William /Stinnett/, Jr.


Individual Notes

Note for:   Elizabeth Douthitt,   4 NOV 1804 - 11 MAR 1890         Index

Individual Note:
     acesfan@@evansville.net
Thanks for posting the line of Alvin Barnett. He and his wife were friends of my parents for many years. I do not have a Barnett line, however my ancestor (Aunt), Elizabeth Douthitt of Daviess County, KY and Warrick County, IN was married to Reason Barnett son of Solomon Barnett and Mary Booth and later Byram Barnett son of David Barnett and Sarah Phillips. I was wondering if you had ever seen this line in your research. Would like to know more about this branch of the family. We had often wondered if Alvin's family was related to either Reason or Byram. Thanks again. Brenda

Individual Notes

Note for:   John C. E. Barnett,   9 NOV 1827 - 12 MAR 1917         Index

Alias:   John Clinton /Barnett/

Burial:   
     Place:   Barren Fork Cemetery, Warrick Co., IN

Individual Note:
     http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec?htx=message&r=rw&p=localities.northam.usa.states.indiana.counties.warrick&m=9.62.233.261.267

Subject: John Clinton Barnett
Author: Tonya Powell
Date: 01 Feb 1999 12:00 PM GMT
Email:

John Clinton Barnett b. Nov.19 1827 Ohio co.,Ky.d. nov.12 1917warrick co.,ky. barrenfork cem.,warrick co.,in.
Susan Jane Camp b. Feb.21 1825 warrick co.,in. d. June 15 1858 warrick co.,in barrenfork cem.,warrick co.,in
1. John David b. June 18 1851 warrick co.,in d.aug.9 1915 warrick co.,in Shiloh cem.,warrick co.,in. m.{1} Jan.6 1870
warrick co.,in.Sarah E. Gentry b. 1854 d.Mar.29 1881 warrick
co.,in m.{2}Cordelia Gentry m. Jan.22 1882 b.Feb.14 1860
d.Feb.19 1939warrick co.,in.
2.Agnes Jane b.Apr19 1854 warrick co.,in. d.Dec.13 1917
warrick co.,in.
3.Louis M. b.Jan.12 1860warrick co.,in. d.Apr4 1918 m.Jan1
1882 to Malssia Alzena Gentry
4.James
5.Narcussua Emeline b.Apr.2 1862 warrick co.,in. d.Nov.6 1929 Boonville,warrick co.,in. Maple Grove cem.,warrick co.,in m.Apr.19
1879 to Charles Henderson Carnahan
6.Sarah

I have this Barnett line all the line back to the mid 1600s. John Clinton had five wives. If i can help you please let me know.

Tonya