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Daniel Curran


VITALS

Birth:  29 Mar 1839 -- Co. Tyrone, Ulster Province, Northern Ireland
Death: 15 Nov 1902  -- Dixon, Lee County, Illinois
Burial:  Oakwood Cemetery, Dixon, Lee County, Illinois

Immigration: 1866 (based on 1900 U.S. Federal Census Record); 1849 according to the Publication, “Portrait & Biographical Record of Lee County, Illinois” (see details) from Liverpool to New York City on S.S. Kingston.

Father:  James Curran (1811-1872)
Mother:  Bessie Cady (   -1846)



PHOTOS


MARRIAGES


1. Catherine Donaghue -- 17 May 1860, New York, New York

Son:
James Curran
(1862-1952)
Daughter:
Ansibel B. Curran
(1867-1942)
Son:
Charles Peter Curran
(1868-1933)
Son:
William Henry Curran
(1869-1917)
Son:
Thomas Francis Curran
(1871-1956)

2. Mary Lyons -- Jun 1874, Dixon, Lee County, Illinois

Son:
Edward Curran
(1875-
Daughter:
Elizabeth Curran
(1877-
Daughter: Rose Curran
(1878-
Son:
Patrick G. Curran
(1880-
Son:
Daniel Alphonse Curran
(1882-


DETAILS

1.
From the book, "Portrait and Biographical Record of Lee County, Illinois" Published in 1892 by Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, IL, 1892, (854 pgs):

"DANIEL CURRAN, senior member of the firm of Daniel Curran & Sons, mason contractors of Dixon, is one of the leading citizens of Irish birth residing in Lee County. He was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, March 29, 1839, and is a son of James and Bessie (Cady) Curran. His mother died in 1846, after which his father was again married, and in 1849 brought his family to the United States, crossing the Atlantic from Liverpool to New York City in the sailing vessel "Kingston," which dropped anchor in New York harbor after a voyage of five weeks and three days. They lived in New York City four years and then came at once to Illinois, where Mr. Curran and his wife are yet residing on a farm on the Rock River, near the city of Dixon. Although he is now more than eighty years of age, he retains much of the vigor which characterized him in earlier life, being still hale and hearty. Himself and wife are members of the Catholic Church.

We now take up the personal history of our subject, who is so widely and favorably known throughout this community. From an early age he has made his own way in the world, and well deserves to be numbered among the self-made men of the county. In Dixon he learned his trade of a mason with the firm of Robinson & Means, and after his term of apprenticeship had expired, went to New York City, where he entered the employ of John Hankinson, with whom we worked for six years. His long continuance in the service of one man attests the quality of his excellent workmanship and his fidelity to the interests of him he served.

During his residence in the East, Mr. Curran led to the marriage alter Miss Catherine Donahue, who came to this country from her native land, Ireland, during her girlhood. She died at her home in Dixon, in 1872, leaving five children: James, who wedded Miss Mary Swain, of California, and is now a brickmaker and contractor of Bakersfield, Curran County, Cal.; Charles, who wedded Alice McGraw, and is associated in business with his father; William H., who is employed as yardman in the service of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company at Sumner, Cal.; Thomas F., a member of the firm of Curran & Sons; and Anza B., wife of John McGraw, who is engaged in merchandising in Osong, Ill. Mr. Curran was again married in Dixon, his second union being with Miss Mary Lyons, a native of Vermont, who came to this State during her childhood with her parents, Edward and Bridget (Hines) Lyons, both of whom are now deceased. They were natives of the Emerald Isle and crossed the Atlantic after their marriage. Some years they spent in the New England States and then came to Lee County, Ill., where they died, the father at the age of sixty-five years and the mother in her sixty-first year. They were members of the Catholic Church.

Mr. and Mrs. Curran have two children: Patrick G. and Daniel A., and have lost five. They are members of the Catholic Church, and in political sentiment our subject is a Democrat. The firm of Curran & Sons, located at the corner of Ninth Street and Nachusa Avenue, have a liberal patronage, and rank among the leading contractors of Dixon. Daniel Curran has a high reputation as a skilled workman and has superintended many of the best buildings in this city, which now stand as monuments to his ability and enterprise. The faithfullness with which he fulfills his part of the contract has won him the confidence of all, and the custom accorded him is well merited."



2.
Biography of James Curran Jr., son of Daniel Curran and Catherine Donoghue From the book, "California and Californians: Volume 4"

"A son of James Curran, Sr., was Daniel Curran, who was reared in Illinois. He likewise took up the building material business, learned the manufacture of brick at an early age, and from 1856 to 1862 was a construction foreman in New York City. He then returned to Dixon, where he established and built up an extensive plant for the manufacture of brick. He was an honored and esteemed citizen of that community, served as a member of the Board of Aldermen, and passed away there in 1902, at the age of sixty-three. He married in New York in 1860 Catherine Donahoe. She was born in County Armagh, Ireland, and died at Dixon in January, 1873. They were the parents of four sons and one daughter. All four of the sons came to California, one of them, Charles P., going into the lumber business at Pomona; Frank is manager of the E. K. Wood Lumber Company in Los Angeles, and W. H. became an official of the coast division of the Southern Pacific Railroad.

Mr. James Curran [Jr.], of Bakersfield, was born in New York City, March 14, 1862, but spent his early youth in Dixon, Illinois. In 1881 he came to San Francisco, removing to Los Angeles in 1883, and came to Bakersfield in 1883.

It was in 1886 that Mr. Curran sent east for machines to be used in the manufacture of brick. They arrived in 1887, and were the first brick making machinery in Southern California. The hand-making process had been used exclusively up to that time. With his machinery Mr. Curran began the manufacture of common brick. From time to time his plant was enlarged, and it is now the oldest manufacturing establishment of its kind in the Lower San Joaquin Valley. Mr. Curran securred title to the tract in 1886.

In 1903 the Bakersfield Sandstone Brick Company was organized, with W. S. Tevis, president, Charles J. Lindgren, vice president, First National Bank, treasurer, and James Curran, manager and a director. The company since its organization in 1903 has furnished brick for nearly every large building in Bakersfield, and the product is shipped by the carload all over the lower valley. The company also handles all kinds of building materials.

Mr. Curran married at Rosedale Ranch in 1887 Miss Mary G. Swain, who was born at Loda, Iroquois County, Illinois. Her brother, Arthur Swain, was for a number of years receiver of the United States Land [p.172] Office at Visalia. Her parents, Thomas Howland and Sarah (Arthur) Swain, were born on Nantucket Island. The Swains were an old English family of Quaker connections, and have lived on Nantucket Island since 1620. Her father, Thomas Howland Swain, was a pioneer of Iroquois County, Illinois, taking up raw land near the village of Loda, and lived out his life as a farmer there. In 1879 Mrs. Curran's mother came to California, where she spent her last days among her children. Mr. and Mrs. Curran became the parents of nine children: Sibyl L., Charles S., Valentine, Arthur, Roland, Hugh, Mary Rosalind, Robert and Sarah Alice, who died in infancy. The five sons live at Bakersfield. One daughter, Sibyl L., married L. E. Chenoweth, county superintendent of schools; another, Valentine A., married J. R. Gore, who is resident manager of the Richfield Oil Company in Merced; and the youngest, Mary Rosalind, married Bennet R. Nofziger, of the Pasadena Lumber Company and resides in Altadena.

Mr. Curran was appointed by President Wilson as a member of Kern County Draft Board No. 1 on June 23, 1917, and was honorably relieved of war service March 31, 1919, receiving a Certificate of Service signed by Provost Marshal General E. H. Crowder and Governor W. D. Stephens of California. One son, Roland Louis Curran, volunteered and served in France in 835 Aero Squadron and is now, 1931, Postmaster of the city of Bakersfield. Another son, Hugh was mustered in upon graduating from high school at the age of eighteen. Charles S. and Arthur H. were officers in Troop A Cavalry National Guard of California, and tendered their services but were not called to duty. "


SOURCES

1.
1880 UNITED STATES FEDERAL CENSUS RECORD
Enumerated 15 Jun 1880
STATE: ILLINOIS
COUNTY: LEE
3RD WARD IN THE CITY OF DIXON


Head:
Daniel Curran (Brick Maker)
Age 42
b: Ireland
Wife:
Mary Curran
Age 30
b: Vermont
Son:
James Curran
Age 18
b: New York
Son:
Charles Curran
Age 16
b: Illinois
Daughter:
Anna Curran
Age 13
b: Illinois
Son:
William Curran
Age 11
b: Illinois
Son:
Frank Curran
Age 9
b: Illinois
Brother-in-Law:
Patrick Lyan
Age 26
b: Illinois

2.
1900 UNITED STATES FEDERAL CENSUS RECORD
Enumerated 18 Jun 1900
STATE: ILLINOIS
COUNTY: LEE
TOWNSHIP: DIXON


Head:
Daniel Curran (Dealer in Coal)
Age 60
b: Ireland
Wife:
Mary Curran
Age 50
b: Vermont
Son:
Patrick Curran
Age 19
b: Illinois
Son:
Allie Curran
Age 16
b: Illinois

3.
FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v. 5.0
IGI Individual Record: Daniel Curran


4.
DEATH CERTIFICATE of son, William H. Curran #6173 City and County of San Francisco, California

5.
"Portrait and Biographical Record of Lee County, Illinois"
Published in 1892 by Biographical Pub. Co., Chicago, IL, 1892, 854 pgs.