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Modified Register for Robert* MILLER

 

9th Great Grandfather of L. M. Bell

 

First Generation

 

    1. Robert* MILLER was born in Denniskean Parish, Co. Antrim, Ireland.

 

http://www.geocities.com/Eureka/Office/8325/gentext/miller.txt

 

 

Robert* had the following children:

 

+      2 M      i.  John Derrek* MILLER was born in 1607/1608. He died in 1669.

 

 

Second Generation

 

    2. John Derrek* MILLER (Robert*) was born in 1607/1608 in Yorkshire, England. He died in 1669.

 

http://www.geocities.com/Eureka/Office/8325/gentext/miller.txt

 

 

John had the following children:

 

+      3 M      i.  John* MILLER was born in 1633. He died on 8 Dec 1714.

 

 

Third Generation

 

    3. John* MILLER (John Derrek*, Robert*) was born in 1633 in Brechenbrough, Yorkshire, England. He died on 8 Dec 1714.

 

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~joneall/stangene/jon00001.htm#i1464

"John Miller was born in 1633 in Breckenbrough, Kerbywilk, Yorkshire, England. He

was a Friend (Quaker). He moved in 1657 to Ireland. He married Ann Clibborn,

daughter of William Clibborn.

"John Miller, born at "Breckenbrough, in ye Parish of Kerbywilk in Yorkshire, England in

1633, went over into Ireland as a planter, in 1657, and married Ann, daughter of

William Clibborn, who was born in 1630, at Cowley, in the County of Durham, England."

 

John* married Ann* CLIBBORN daughter of William* CLIBBORN and Brigetta* WARDE in 1657. Ann* was born in 1630 in Cowley, Durham, England.

 

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~joneall/stangene/jon00001.htm#i1463

 Ann Clibborn was born in 1630 in Cowley, Durham County, England. She was a

Friend (Quaker). She married John Miller, son of John Miller.

 

 

John* and Ann* had the following children:

         4 M      i.  William MILLER was born in 1659.

         5 F      ii.  Margaret MILLER was born in 1662. She died in 1668.

 

+      6 M     iii.  John MILLER was born in 1665. He died in 1714.

         7 M    iv.  Thomas MILLER was born in 1667.

 

+      8 M     v.  James MILLER was born on 24 Apr 1669. He died in 1749.

         9 M    vi.  Abraham MILLER was born in 1670.

        10 M    vii.  Isaac MILLER was born in 1672.

 

+     11 M    viii.  Gayen* MILLER was born in 1674. He died on 30 Apr 1742.

 

 

Fourth Generation

 

    6. John MILLER (John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born in 1665 in England. He died in 1714 in New Garden, Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/chester/wills/hutton-abs.txt

"Will of John Miller:  17 Aug 1714/15 - 08 Dec 1714/15. Chester County, Pennsylvania

"John MILLER of New Garden, joyner, mentions wife Mary executrix, son Joseph

executor, son in law Joseph HUTTON, daughters Martha and Sarah MILLER, sons

James and William, daughters Elizabeth, Susanna and Elinor. Land of James STARR.

Witnesses Joel BAILY, Gayen MILLER, John WILY."

 

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Acres/5127/fathersfam/smittafl.html

"John Miller b poss 1663 from Grange near Charlemont,Ireland d 11/11/1714

"Acquired large plantation in NG [New Garden]. Founded NG Meeting, it met at first in

his house, then he donated land, then he served as elder. His children and children-in-

law continued to be principal leaders of the NG meeting. Also, he borrowed from his

meeting for some time the book, New England Judged. He was apparently right up on

the central emotional issues of the Quaker movement."

 

John married Mary IGNEW in 1691. Mary was born about 1671/1672 in County Armagh, Ireland. She died on 10 Aug 1730 in New Garden , Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~joneall/stangene/jon00001.htm#i1201

 Mary Ignew was a Friend (Quaker). She married John Miller, son of John Miller and

Ann Clibborn, in County Armagh, Ireland. She and John Miller immigrated in 1709 to

Chester County, Pennsylvania. She died in 1730 in Chester County, Pennsylvania.

 

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Acres/5127/fathersfam/smittafl.html

 

 

John and Mary had the following children:

        12 M      i.  James MILLER was born in Jan 1693 in Ireland.

James married Ann CAIN on 23 Mar 1722 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co.,Pennsylvania. Ann was born in 1695 in County Armagh, Ireland.

 

+     13 F      ii.  Mary MILLER was born in 1695. She died in 1736.

 

+     14 M     iii.  William MILLER was born in Feb 1698. He died in 1768.

 

+     15 M    iv.  Joseph MILLER was born in 1700. He died on 30 Jul 1727.

        16 F     v.  Sarah MILLER was born in 1702 in Ireland.

Sarah married Nehemiah HUTTON on 25 May 1723 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Nehemiah was born in 1697/1700 in County Armagh, Ireland.

 

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~joneall/stangene/jon00001.htm#i962

 

 

Nehemiah Hutton was born in County Cavan, Ireland. He was a Friend

 

(Quaker). He immigrated on 5 January 1716 to Chester County,

Pennsylvania. He married Sarah Miller, daughter of John Miller and Mary

Ignew, on 25 July 1723 at New Garden Meeting House, Chester County,

Pennsylvania. He moved after 1723 to Berks County, Pennsylvania. He

died before or in 1749.

 

        17 F     vi.  Elizabeth MILLER was born in Jan 1704 in Ireland. She died on 8 Feb 1783 in Pennsylvania.

Elizabeth married William CHAMBERS on 22 Aug 1729 in Pennsylvania.

        18 F    vii.  Elinor MILLER was born in Jun 1710 in Ireland.

Elinor married Richard CHAMBERS on 19 Apr 1729 in Pennsylvania. Richard was born on 20 Jun 1700. He died in Nov 1774.

        19 F    viii.  Martha MILLER was born in 1711 in Ireland.

 

Martha married twice:  John JORDAN and Nathaniel HOULTON, both in

Pennsylvania.

 

 

+     20 F     ix.  Susanna MILLER was born in 1713.

 

    8. James MILLER (John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 24 Apr 1669 in County Armagh, Ireland. He died in 1749 in Leacock Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://www.geocities.com/Eureka/Office/8325/gentext/miller.txt

 

Biography: JAMES MILLER, dated 5 Mo. 20, 1729, from Dublin, Ireland, received 2 Mo.

25, 1730.

"James Miller, brother of Gayen and John Miller, married Catharine, daughter of

Thomas Lightfoot, in Ireland, and lived for some time at Timahoe Meeting, County

Kildare. They arrived at Philadelphia, in the Sizargh, of Whitehaven, 9 Mo. 10, 1729.

Here the wife, who was a minister in the Society, died, 10 Mo. 17, 1729. James Miller

then settled with his children in New Garden. He was married a second time to Ruth

Seaton, of London Grove, 2 Mo. 10, 1734, and removed to Leacock Township,

Lancaster County, where he died in the early part of 1749."

 

"Biography: page 357  Children of James and Catharine Miller:

1, Sarah, m. Thomas Milhouse, in Ireland, and came to New Garden in 1729.

2. Elizabeth, m. Thomas Hiett, in Ireland, and came to New Garden in 1733.

3. James, b. about 1708, d. 1758; m. 1st Rachel [p.357] (Fred) Miller, widow of James

(son of Gayen), 1733, and had children (Thomas, Benjamin, Katharine). He m. 2d

Rebecca, daughter of Jacob Kirk, 1 Mo. 6, 1749, and had children (Rachel, Sarah,

Hannah).

4. Mary, m. Isaac Jackson (son of Thomas), 4 Mo. 11, 1730, and had seven children;

they removed to Eno, North Carolina, in 1751.

5. Katharine, b. 1 Mo. 30, 1713, at Timahoe County, Kildare, Ireland; d. 4 Mo. 2, 1781;

m. William Jackson, 9 Mo. 9, 1733.

6. Ann, m. William Farquhar, 2 Mo. 19, 1733.

7. Hannah, m. James Jackson, 8 Mo. 31, 1745. No issue.– Potts, Our Family Ancestors,

248-9."

 

James married (1) Catherine LIGHTFOOT in 1700 in Ireland. Catherine was born on 12 Dec 1682 in County Antrim, Ireland. She died on 17 Dec 1729 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

Katherine was the daughter of Thomas Lightfoot.

 

 

James and Catherine had the following children:

 

+     21 F      i.  Sarah MILLER was born in 1705. She died on 26 Aug 1775.

        22 F      ii.  Elizabeth MILLER was born in 1707 in County Kildare, Ireland.

Elizabeth married (1) Thomas HIRT in 1727 in Ireland. Thomas was born in 1700 in Ireland. He died in 1751 in Pennsylvania.

Elizabeth married (2) Jeremiah STARR son of Jeremiah STARR and Rebecca JACKSON on 1 Jul 1756. Jeremiah was born after 1716. He died in 1791.

 

+     23 M     iii.  James MILLER was born in 1708. He died in 1758.

        24 F     iv.  Mary MILLER was born in 1711 in County Kildare, Ireland.

Mary married Isaac JACKSON in 1730.

 

+     25 F     v.  Katherine MILLER was born on 30 Jan 1712/1713. She died on 2 Apr 1781.

        26 F     vi.  Ann MILLER was born in 1715 in County Kildare, Ireland. She died in 1778.

Ann married William FARQUHAR in 1733. William was born on 29 Jul 1705 in Ireland. He died on 21 Sep 1778 in Pipe Creek, Carrol Co., Maryland .

        27 F    vii.  Hannah MILLER was born in 1717 in County Kildare, Ireland.

Hannah married James JACKSON on 31 Aug 1745. James was born on 10 Feb 1707/1708 in Ballitore, County Kildare, Ireland.

 

James married (2) Ruth SEATON on 10 Feb 1734 in Pennsylvania. Ruth was born about 1673 in Ireland.

 

  11. Gayen* MILLER (John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born in 1674 in County Armagh, Ireland. He died on 30 Apr 1742 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

 

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mickey/lancearlysettpg.html

 

Lancaster County, Early Settlers

"In the year 1707 a few Quaker pioneers settled in Kennet, Chester county. Among

others were Vincent Caldwell, Thomas Wickersham, Joel Bailey, Thomas Hope and

GUYAN MILLER.

"No actual settlements had been made prior to 1708 or 1709 in Lancaster county; but

a few whites had abodes among the Indians on the Susquehanna. These were Indians

traders and all Frenchmen. Their names-Bezalion, Chartier, Jessop and Le Tort.

Chartier had, prior to 1704, lived long among the Shawanah Indians, and upon the

Susquehanna."

"Gayen Miller, first appears in Chester Co., Pennsylvania in 1702 where he bought land

in Kennett Township."

 

http://www.kennett-square.pa.us/history/manor.htm

From The History Of Kennett Square - Manor of Steyning or Letitia's Manor

"The land described in Letitia PENN's patent included nearly all of the Township of

Kennett, excepting a few small tracts already conveyed to settlers, and although for

some years known by its manorial name, it soon came to be called Kennett. ...

"George HARLAN and Gayen MILLER were probably the first of the Irish Friends to

secure land in Kennett. In 1702, MILLER purchased 200 acres on the east branch of

Red Clay Creek, including the eastern part of the present Borough of Kennett Square.

"Of the forty-three persons taxed in Kennett, in 1715, there were nine Irish Friends, as

follows: Gayen MILLER, 8s. 6d; Michael HARLAN, 5s. 6d.; Ezekiel HARLAN, 12s. 6d.;

Aaron HARLAN 5s. 6d.; Moses HARLAN, 4s. 2d.; Valentine HOLLINGSWORTH 2s. 9d.;

James HARLAN, 2s. 6d.; Joshua HARLAN ..."

 

Albert Cook Myers, in "The Immigration of Irish Quakers"

pg 126:

"Samuel Smith, in his History Of Pennsylvania, (compiled at the direction of

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting in 1752), says that in 1707... "Guyan Miller (an Irish Friend)

and others being settled in Kennett and the east end of Marlborough had liberty to

keep a meeting of Worship, sometimes in private houses. In 1710, a piece of land was

purchased and a meeting house was built which was enlarged in 1719."

 

http://www.pa-roots.com/~chester/new_garden%20twp.htm

"In 1712, Gayen Miller bought 700 acres, and in 1713 conveyance of land was granted

to John Miller, James Lindley, John Lowden, James Starr, Michael Lightfoot, William

Halliday, Joseph Hutton, Abraham Marshall and Thomas Jackson; and in 1714 to

Thomas Garnett and Joseph Sharp. some of these, however, had been settled on the

land for 1 or 2 years before getting their titles. The whole amount purchased by the

above named persons was 5,413 acres, at the price of 20£ per hundred, or according

to modern computations, 1$ per acre."

 

pg. 129: "He (Gayen Miller) was elected to the Provincial Assembly in 1714..."

http://www.pa-roots.com/~chester/assemblymen_of_chester_county.htm

"1714 David Lloyd (speaker), Nathaniel Newlin, Nicholas Pyle, Evan Lewis, John Miller

(died before the assembly met, and Gayen Miller elected in his stead), Bej. Mendenhall,

Samuel Garrett, Richard Maris."

From SONS & DAUGHTERS OF THE PILGRIMS Page 267:_Gayen Miller in Provincial

Assembly 1714; qualifier for Colonial Dames. 

 (Colonial Dames, XVII Century, Founded 1915,  "Any American woman of good moral

character, eighteen years of age or over is eligible for membership, provided she has

been invited by the Society and is the lineal descendants of an ancestor who lived and

served prior to 1701 in one of the Original Colonies in the geographical area of the

present United States of America. — Membership is by Invitation Only.")

 

From "Joseph Dickinson and Family" pg. 100-101

 "We introduce Gayen Miller by extracts from a letter received from Mrs. Knox Taylor,

of Santa Fe, NM, dated Aug. 29, 1930: "I am ever so glad to give information

regarding our noble tribe of Miller to a relative, however many cousins removed. 'The

Millers were not Welsh, but English from Warwickshire, Guys Cliff, Warwick Castle. A

cousin, Betsey Downing, told my father, Llewellyn Miller, they were younger sons of

the house of Warwick. My father discounted this although they have the family names,

Robert, Warwick and Guion, and thought their name 'Miller' came from their

occupation at the famous Guys Cliff mill. Wales offered an asylum to the followers of

George Fox and his associates - of William Penn. They were among the English Friends

who emigrated here from Wales.' We find the name Guion spelled variously - Gayen,

Gaven, Guyen, Guion- but his own signature was Gayen Miller. He is said by the chart

made by Mr. Caleb S. Miller of Washington, D.C. to have come to America in 1688."

 

From "Englehardt/Dickinson Family History"_  "Gayen Miller first appears in Chester Co.

, PA in 1702 (where he bought land in Kennet Township). He married Margaret, said to

be the daughter of Dr. Patrick Henderson of Scotland about 1695. Two of their children

seem to have been born before their removal to Pennsylvania. Margaret, his widow,

died January 1743-4."

 

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/chester/wills/miller-g.txt

Will of Gayen Miller  (1742) Will Book B, page 114, Chester Co., PA Records;

"Guyen Miller, Kennett Township, occupation, yeoman, died in 1742, leaving a Will

dated 3 mo. 31, 1742 and proven August 31, 1742.

"To son William £5. To four sons, viz Robert, Patrick, Samuel and Benjamin £5 each.

To my two daughters, viz Sarah, wife of Joshua Johnson and Elizabeth, wife of Joseph

Dickinson £5 each. To son James four children viz Sarah, Deborah, James and Jesse

10 shillings each. To daughter Mary’s three children, viz Saml, James and Mary 10

shillings each. To son Benjamin part of the tract of land by Pequea Creek in Lancaster

Co. now in his possession. To son John the remainder of said tract, estimated to be

250 acres. To son Josephs widow Jane Miller and her two children, Samuel and

Rebecca £6. To son George 1/2 of the plantation where I dwell and the other 1/2 at

wife’s decease. To wife Margaret all remainder of estate real and personal. 

EXECUTORS; wife Margaret, son William, and cousin Jas. Miller  WITNESSES; Rachel

Miller, George Miller, David Bradford"

 

Gayen* married Margaret* HENDERSON daughter of Dr. Patrick* HENDERSON and Katherine* in 1695 in County Armagh, Ireland. Margaret* was born in 1675 in County Armagh, Northern Ireland. She died in Jan 1743/1744 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

They had the following children:

 

+     28 M      i.  James MILLER was born on 5 Nov 1696. He died on 1 Feb 1732.

 

+     29 M     ii.  William MILLER was born on 30 Aug 1698. He died in 1767.

 

+     30 M     iii.  Robert MILLER was born on 3 Mar 1702/1703. He died in 1761.

        31 F     iv.  Sarah MILLER was born on 1 Sep 1704 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died in Aug 1749 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

Sarah married Joshua JOHNSON on 23 Apr 1724 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Joshua was born on 29 Jul 1696 in Coolby, Wicklow,

 

Ireland. He died in 1783 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        32 F     v.  Mary MILLER was born on 7 May 1707.

Mary married William BEVERLY on 22 Apr 1730.

 

http://www.genealogy.com/users/e/d/w/Donna-Edwards/FILE/0014text.txt?Welcome=1066842634

 

 

        33 M    vi.  Patrick MILLER was born on 28 Dec 1708. He died in 1751.

Patrick married Patience HAINES on 5 Sep 1735 in East Nottingham Monthly Meeting, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Patience was born on 24 Jan 1715/1716 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died before 1745 in Haverford, Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania.

        34 M    vii.  Samuel MILLER was born on 14 Apr 1711. He died in Nov 1764.

Samuel married Margaret HALLIDAY daughter of William* HALLIDAY and Deborah* WOODWARD on 29 Apr 1732. Margaret was born on 13 Nov 1709 in West Meath, Ireland.

 

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/chester/wills/wills1784-5.txt

MOORE, RACHEL. Widow. Sadsbury.

Margaret (Halliday) Downing, is mentioned in the will of her sister,

Rachel (Halliday) Moore.  Will dated 1785.

 

After the death of Samuel Miller, Margaret married William Downing,

(son of Thomas Downing and Thomazine Beer, and widower of Ellen

Johns), after 1765.

 

 

+     35 F    viii.  Elizabeth* MILLER was born on 7 May 1713. She died on 11 Nov 1780.

        36 M    ix.  Joseph MILLER was born on 14 Jul 1715. He died in 1741.

 

Joseph died three or four years after his marriage to Jane.

 

 

Joseph married Jane KIRK on 18 Feb 1737/1738. Jane was born in 1717/1720 in Hillsborough, County Down, Ireland.

 

Daughter of Jacob KIRK and Rebecca ROBISON

 

        37 M     x.  Benjamin MILLER was born on 4 Jun 1717.

Benjamin married Martha MUSGROVE on 7 Oct 1738.

        38 M    xi.  John MILLER was born on 6 Nov 1720.

John married Margaret SMITH on 28 Aug 1741. Margaret was born about 1724.

        39 M    xii.  George MILLER was born on 19 May 1723.

George married Susana BIRD in 1744.

 

 

Fifth Generation

 

  13. Mary MILLER (John, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born in 1695 in Ireland. She died in 1736 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

Mary married Joseph HUTTON on 4 Sep 1714 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Joseph was born in 1689 in Ireland. He died in 1735 in Pennsylvania.

 

 

Joseph and Mary had the following children:

        40 M      i.  John HUTTON was born on 30 Jan 1715 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        41 M     ii.  Thomas HUTTON was born on 20 Dec 1716 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        42 M     iii.  Joseph HUTTON was born on 28 May 1720 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        43 F     iv.  Susanna HUTTON was born in 1722 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        44 M     v.  Samuel HUTTON .

        45 M    vi.  William HUTTON was born on 14 Dec 1725 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        46 M    vii.  Benjamin HUTTON was born on 1 Dec 1728/1729 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        47 M    viii.  Nehemiah HUTTON was born on 27 Jun 1731 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        48 M    ix.  Ephraim HUTTON was born in 1733 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

  14. William MILLER (John, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born in Feb 1698 in Ireland. He died in 1768 in Pennsylvania.

William married Ann EMLEN on 15 Apr 1732. Ann was born about 1700.

 

They had the following children:

        49 M      i.  John MILLER was born in 1733 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        50 F      ii.  Hannah MILLER was born in 1734 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        51 M     iii.  William MILLER was born in 1737 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        52 F     iv.  Mary MILLER was born in 1741 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        53 F     v.  Ann MILLER was born in 1743 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        54 M    vi.  Joshua MILLER was born in 1746 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

  15. Joseph MILLER (John, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born in 1700 in Ireland. He died on 30 Jul 1727 in Pennsylvania.

 

http://searches1.rootsweb.com/usgenweb/archives/pa/chester/wills/willbooka2.txt

 

Joseph MILLER, Chester Co., PA, 26 Jul 1721, 24 Oct 1727

"Will of Joseph MILLER of New Garden mentions wife Ann; sons John and Isaac with

reversion in case of their death to brother William MILLER, he paying wife and brother

James and sisters Mary HUTTON, Martha JORDAN, Sarah HUTTON, Elizabeth, Susanna

and Elinor MILLER. Exec: wife Ann and brother William MILLER. Wit: Michael

LIGHTFOOT, John McKILLIP, James STARR."

 

Joseph married Ann GILPIN on 31 Oct 1724 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Ann was born in 1702 in Birmingham Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

Joseph and Ann had the following children:

        55 M      i.  John MILLER was born in 1725 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        56 M     ii.  Isaac MILLER was born in 1727 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

  20. Susanna MILLER (John, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born in 1713 in Ireland.

Susanna married Joseph JACKSON on 18 Feb 1734 in Pennsylvania.

 

They had the following children:

 

+     57 F      i.  Mary JACKSON was born on 27 Mar 1738. She died on 30 Aug 1812.

 

  21. Sarah MILLER (James, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born in 1705 in County Kildare,Ireland. She died on 26 Aug 1775.

Sarah married Thomas MILHOUS on 1 Apr 1721 in Timahoe, County Killdare, Ireland. Thomas was born on 14 Mar 1699 in Carrickfergus, County Antrim, Ireland. He died in 1770 in Pikeland, Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

They had the following children:

        58 M      i.  William MILHOUS was born on 12 Jun 1738 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 24 Jan 1826 in Belmont Co., Ohio.

 

http://users.legacyfamilytree.com/USPresidents/6351.htm

Ancestor of Richard Milhous Nixon, Thirty-Seventh President (1969-

1974) of the United States.

 

 

William married Hannah BALDWIN on 22 Oct 1767. Hannah was born on 4 Nov 1748 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 30 Oct 1825 in Belmont Co., Ohio.

 

http://users.legacyfamilytree.com/USPresidents/6352.htm

Ancestor of Richard Milhous Nixon, Thirty-Seventh President (1969-

1974) of the United States.

 

 

  23. James MILLER (James, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born in 1708 in Ireland. He died in 1758 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

James married Rachel Fredd, widow of James Miller (son of Gayen) in 1733.  After

Rachel's death, he married Rebecca Kirk, daughter of Jacob Kirk on 1 mo 6, 1749.

 

James married (1) Rachel FREDD in 1733. Rachel was born on 29 Jul 1698 in Birmingham Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 23 Dec 1748 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

Rachel FREDD married twice, first to James MILLER (son of Gayen) in 1721, and after

his death in 1732,  she married James Miller (Gayen's brother's son), in 1733. The date

of her death in the "Record of the Jackson Family" is 12 mo. 23, 1748/1749.

 

 

James and Rachel had the following children:

        59 M      i.  Thomas MILLER was born on 28 Mar 1734.

        60 M     ii.  Benjamin MILLER was born on 10 Jun 1736.

        61 F     iii.  Katherine MILLER was born on 24 Jan 1737/1738.

 

 

James married (2) Rebecca KIRK on 6 Jan 1749. Rebecca was born in 1715/1721 in Ireland.

 

  25. Katherine MILLER (James, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 30 Jan 1712/1713 in County Kildare, Ireland. She died on 2 Apr 1781 in London Grove Twp., Chester Co.,Pennsylvania.

Katherine married William JACKSON on 9 Sep 1733. William was born on 24 Feb 1705 in Cloneranny, Wexford, Ireland. He died on 24 Nov 1785 in London Grove Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

They had the following children:

 

+     62 M      i.  James JACKSON was born on 3 Nov 1736. He died on 11 Apr 1817.

 

  28. James MILLER (Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 5 Nov 1696 in Ireland. He died on 1 Feb 1732.

 

"His birth date is 5d, 11m, 1696, the marriage date is 20d, 4m, 1721. James MILLER

came to America with his family about 1702, locating near the Brandywine in Chester

Co., Pennsylvania. Concord Monthly Meeting records dated 5 mo. 13, 1713, state he

produced a certificate for himself and his family from the Monthly Meeting of Carlow

dated 12 mo. 25, 1712/1713."

 

James married (1) Rachel FREDD in 1721. Rachel was born on 29 Jul 1698 in Birmingham Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 23 Dec 1748 in New Garden Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

Rachel FREDD married twice, first to James MILLER (son of Gayen) in 1721, and after

his death in 1732,  she married James Miller (Gayen's brother's son), in 1733. The date

of her death in the "Record of the Jackson Family" is 12 mo. 23, 1748/1749.

 

 

James and Rachel had the following children:

 

+     63 F      i.  Sarah MILLER was born on 30 Jan 1722/1723. She died before 1761.

        64 F      ii.  Deborah MILLER was born in 1725 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        65 M     iii.  James MILLER was born in 1728 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

James married (1) Sarah WAY . Sarah was born about 1732.

James married (2) Phebe JONES .

        66 M    iv.  Jesse MILLER was born in 1730 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

James married (2) Rebecca KIRK .

 

  29. William MILLER (Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 30 Aug 1698 in Ireland. He died in 1767.

 

http://swoodbridge.com/Genealogy/Wills/Woodward-PA-Wills.txt

"MILLER, WILLIAM. At present of Kennett, late of New Garden. August 28, 1767.

November 14, 1767. To daughter Mary wife of James Miller 1/4 of all estate real and

personal. To granddaughter Ruth Miller, daughter of Jas. and Mary, bed &c. Executors

to sell all estate and proceeds equally divided between daughter Mary aforesaid,

 

daughter Hannah wife of Wm. Whitesides, daughter Margaret wife of Jonathan Hanson

and my granddaughter Ruth. Executors: Nephews Jesse of Kennet and Saml. Miller of

New Garden. Wit: Lydia Miller, David Hayes, T. Woodward."

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=donap4w&id=I4305

 

William married Ruth ROWLAND on 30 Jul 1724 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Ruth was born about 1702.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=donap4w&id=I4305

 

 

William and Ruth had the following children:

        67 F      i.  Mary MILLER was born in 1724/1725 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

        68 F      ii.  Hannah MILLER was born in 1726 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

        69 F     iii.  Margaret MILLER was born in 1728 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

 

  30. Robert MILLER (Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 3 Mar 1702/1703 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died in 1761 in East Caln Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

Robert married Ruth HAINES on 3 Oct 1725 in New Garden Mm, Pennsylvania. Ruth was born on 28 Aug 1709 in Burlington, New Jersey. She died in 1797 in East Caln Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

They had the following children:

        70 F      i.  Rebecca MILLER was born on 13 Oct 1742 in East Caln Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

Rebecca married James ALLEN on 25 Feb 1767 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. James was born in 1743 in Cecil Co., Maryland .

 

  35. Elizabeth* MILLER (Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 7 May 1713 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 11 Nov 1780 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0284

From "Joseph Dickinson and Family" pg. 101:

 "The marriage of Joseph Dickinson and Elizabeth Miller is recorded in many places

and in a number of books - I have quoted three. It must have been an important

marriage, with two such prominent and worthy families giving the foundation for our

Dickinson line in America, we have both opportunity and obligation to be honest,

intelligent, and industrious citizens.

 "Joseph Dickinson purchased land on Pequea Creek in Salisbury Township, Lancaster

Co., PA. That the utmost good feeling existed between Joseph Dickinson and Gayen

Miller is evidenced by the numerous deeds given by Gayen Miller, father of Joseph's

wife Elizabeth, to Joseph Dickinson. The earliest of which we found recorded in

Lancaster County was dated 16 August 1738 and was followed by deeds in 1739 and

 

1742.  The last deed was for land granted to Gayen Miller by "John Penn, Thomas

Penn, and Richard Penn, Esquires, true and resolute Propreitoies and Governors - in

chief of ye Province of Pennsilvania x x x unto ye ad Gayen Miller."

 

Elizabeth* married Joseph* DICKINSON son of Daniel* DICKINSON and Elizabeth* LINCOLN on 25 Aug 1732 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Joseph* was born on 27 Dec 1706 in Cumberland Co., England. He died after Oct 1780 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0283

From "The Dickinson Family" pg 6-9:

“Joseph Dickinson sailed for America in 1725 as nearly as we can learn, when he was

18 or 19 years of age. Alexander Harris has included in his Biographical History of

Lancaster Co., PA, 1872, p. 160, a contribution of Isaac Walker, a descendant of

Joseph Dickinson: "Joseph Dickinson emigrated about the year 1725 to this country

from Cumberland, England by way of Ireland. The ship on which he came, a passenger,

having struck on a rock, causing it to leak so rapidly that it was impossible to keep the

vessel afloat, and was about given up as lost, and the passengers were preparing to

meet their fate, when Joseph Dickinson volunteered to go down under the water on

the outside of the ship and stop the leak, which hazardous undertaking he

accomplished by inserting pieces of dried beef in the crevices.

 "He was united in marriage to Elizabeth, daughter of Gayen Miller of Kennett, Chester

County, in the year 1732, when he removed and settled in Salisbury Township. He had

two sons, Joseph and Gaius, and seven daughters. His son Gaius and his grandson

Joseph continued to reside on the property, while his son Joseph purchased land and

resided in Sadsbury. He was a man well educated and was an esteemed and valuable

member of the denomination of Friends."

 "He moved from Cumberland, England to Edenderry, Ireland. Edenderry was at that

 

time in Kings County but is now in Offaly County and is located about 30 miles west of

Dublin, Ireland. A Quaker, Joseph Dickinson first joined the Mount Mellick Monthly

Meeting at Haddonfield, New Jersey. He ultimately moved to a farm at Sadsbury,

Lancaster County, Pa.

 "Joseph Dickinson went first to Haddonfield, NJ. He had brought with him a

certificate from the Mt. Mellick Monthly meeting. It is not until 1732 that we find record

of him in Chester County, PA. The Quaker records are rather elaborate. The certificate

to Pennsylvania:

 "From our monthly Meeting held at Haddon's field in the county of Gloucester and

Province of New Jersey this 10th day of the 5th month, A.D. 1732, to the Monthly

Meeting to be held at Concord or elsewhere in the County of Chester in Pennsylvania,

sendeth greetings: Dear Friends, these may acquaint you that the bearer hereof,

Joseph Dickinson, had desired a certificate of this meeting in order to joyne himself to

your meeting. Now these may certifice that due and orderly inquiry has been made

and according to the best of our inspection he hath been of an honest, sober, and

orderly conversation whilst among us and also clear of any Ingagements (sic) upon the

account of marriage with any in these parts. So we recommend him to your Care,

Desiring his further Growth in the truth and Remain your friends and brethren in the

Same. Signed in and on behalf of said Meeting. (by 22 names)". (The above Certificate

was deposited with Newark, [now Kennett] Monthly Meeting.)

 "From the Newark Monthly Meeting, 2nd day of the 7th month, 1732: "Joseph

Dickinson and Margaret [mother] and Elizabeth Miller appeared here and declared their

intention of taking each other in marriage, which is passed for the first time, and the

young man produced a Certificate of his Conversation and clearness on account of

marriage to this meeting to the satisfaction thereof."

 "From the Newark Monthly Meeting, 7th day of the 8th month, 1732: "Joseph

Dickinson and Elizabeth Miller appeared here and signified they continued their

intention of marriage with Each Other, it being the second time and the young man

produced a certificate to the satisfaction of our Last meeting and having consent of

parents and parties to accomplish their marriage according to truth and appoints Joh

Heald and Tho. Carlton to see the orderly accomplishment thereof and make report to

our next monthly meeting, and return the marriage certificate to be recorded."

 "At the next meeting, 4th day of the 9th month 1732: "The Friends appointed to see

the orderly accomplishment of the marrieage of Joseph Dickinson and Elizabeth Miller

make report it was accomplished according to good order." The marriage certificate

being recorded by Newark (now Kennett) Monthly Meeting shows that Joseph

Dickinson of Calne in ye county of Chester and Province of Pennsylvania, smith,

married on the 25th day of the 8th month 1732 at Kennett Meeting." (Signed by 47

witnesses)

From "Seven Hundred Ancestors," pgs.30/31:

 “Joseph Dickinson sailed for America in 1725. He first settled in New Jersey but on

July 8, 1732 we find a record of him at a Quaker meeting in Chester Co., Penn. On

Aug. 25, 1732 in Chester Co. he married Elizabeth the daughter of Gayen and

Margaret Miller. She was born in 1713. He purchased land on Pequea Creek in

Salisbury Township, in Lancaster Co., Penn."

 

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/de/newcastle/vitals/marriages/maraf.txt

Dickinson,Joseph & Elizabeth Miller 131

 

 

Joseph* and Elizabeth* had the following children:

        71 F      i.  Sarah DICKINSON was born on 9 Jan 1733/1734 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 7 Aug 1817 in Thornbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

Twin of Margaret

 

 

Sarah married William THATCHER on 4 May 1757 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. William was born on 7 Feb 1736/1737. He died on 6 Feb 1807 in Thornbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        72 F      ii.  Margaret DICKINSON was born on 9 Jan 1733/1734 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 22 Mar 1804.

 

Twin of Sarah

 

 

Margaret married (1) John SMITH on 31 Aug 1751.

Margaret married (2) Samuel COPE son of John COPE and Charity JEFFERIES on 21 Jun 1781. Samuel was born on 10 Aug 1726 in Bradford Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania . He died on 15 Sep 1817 in Naaman's Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania .

 

Samuel COPE married twice:  He married Deborah PARKE on 7 June

1753 in Bradford Meeting.

Samuel COPE married Margaret DICKINSON on 21 June 1781.  He

settled on the eastern half of his father's farm. He also purchased other

land in the vicinity. He was active in Bradford and West Chester

Meetings.

 

 

+     73 M     iii.  Gayen "Gaius" DICKINSON was born on 14 May 1737. He died on 2 Oct 1800.

 

+     74 F     iv.  Elizabeth DICKINSON was born on 13 Jul 1739.

 

+     75 F     v.  Mary DICKINSON was born on 10 Nov 1741. She died on 6 Nov 1805.

        76 F     vi.  Hannah DICKINSON was born on 28 Dec 1743 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

+     77 F    vii.  Deborah* DICKINSON was born on 12 Mar 1745/1746. She died on 7 Jan 1826.

 

+     78 M    viii.  Joseph DICKINSON was born on 22 May 1749.

        79 M    ix.  Daniel DICKINSON was born on 27 Sep 1751 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        80 M     x.  James DICKINSON was born on 15 Oct 1756 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

 

Sixth Generation

 

  57. Mary JACKSON (Susanna MILLER, John, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 27 Mar 1738 in London Grove Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 30 Aug 1812.

 

Daughter of Joseph and Susanna (Miller) Jackson

 

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/chester/wills/wills1812-3.txt

JACKSON, MARY. New Garden. 12 mo. 1811. July 21, 1812. To bros. Joseph and

Samuel Jackson £5 each. To sisters, viz: Hannah Jackson, Susanna Kimber, Phebe

Jackson, Alice Lewis and Rebecca Allen, £5 each. To bro. William's son Isaac Jackson

£5. To sister Catherine's 2 children, Isaac & Sarah Pugh, £5 each. To friend Mary

Bulger £5. To bro. Isaac Jackson all household goods & rem. of estate; Exr. Codicil: 1

 

mo. 1812, gives to bro. Samuel Jackson $100. Wits: Joseph Hobson, Thomas Lamborn

Jr.

 

Mary married James JACKSON son of William JACKSON and Katherine MILLER on 19 Jun 1760. James was born on 3 Nov 1736 in London Grove Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 11 Apr 1817.

 

They had the following children:

        81 M      i.  Josiah JACKSON was born on 17 Jan 1773.

Josiah married Mary SHARPLESS on 30 Jan 1799. Mary was born on 26 Aug 1777. She died on 26 Mar 1817.

 

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/chester/wills/wills1812-3.txt

"SHARPLESS, MARY. Londongrove. May 1, 1812. June 23, 1812. Money

due from David Moore, £320, and from Isaac Moore, $190, with interest,

to be div. as follows: To sister Esther Sharpless 1/2. To sister Sidney

Sharpless 1/4 and rem. 1/4 to my three nieces, Mary, Rebecca and

Sarah Webster. To niece Mary Moore £5, & rem. of est. to 2 sisters & 3

nieces above named. Executors: Brother-in-law William Webster. Wits:

Eli Hollingworth, Peter Mason, Saml. Ford."

 

 

  62. James JACKSON (Katherine MILLER, James, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 3 Nov 1736 in London Grove Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 11 Apr 1817.

James married Mary JACKSON daughter of Joseph JACKSON and Susanna MILLER on 19 Jun 1760. Mary was born on 27 Mar 1738 in London Grove Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.She died on 30 Aug 1812.

 

Daughter of Joseph and Susanna (Miller) Jackson

 

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/chester/wills/wills1812-3.txt

JACKSON, MARY. New Garden. 12 mo. 1811. July 21, 1812. To bros. Joseph and

Samuel Jackson £5 each. To sisters, viz: Hannah Jackson, Susanna Kimber, Phebe

Jackson, Alice Lewis and Rebecca Allen, £5 each. To bro. William's son Isaac Jackson

£5. To sister Catherine's 2 children, Isaac & Sarah Pugh, £5 each. To friend Mary

Bulger £5. To bro. Isaac Jackson all household goods & rem. of estate; Exr. Codicil: 1

mo. 1812, gives to bro. Samuel Jackson $100. Wits: Joseph Hobson, Thomas Lamborn

Jr.

 

 

James and Mary had the following children:

 

        82 M      i.  Josiah JACKSON is printed as #81 on page 15.

 

  63. Sarah MILLER (James, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 30 Jan 1722/1723 in Kennett Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died before 1761 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

Sarah married John JACKSON on 14 Feb 1739/1740 in New Garden Mtg, London Grove Twp.,, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. John was born on 16 Oct 1712. He died on 31 Jul 1791.

 

They had the following children:

        83 F      i.  Sarah JACKSON was born on 4 Mar 1749/1750. She died on 14 Nov 1791.

Sarah married Samuel WOODWARD on 12 May 1773. Samuel was born on 9 Aug 1750 in Thornbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 28 Feb 1814 in London Grove Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

        84 M     ii.  Isaac JACKSON .

Isaac married Phebe HALLIDAY on 24 Oct 1765.

 

  73. Gayen "Gaius" DICKINSON "Gaius" (Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 14 May 1737 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 2 Oct 1800 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0220

 

From "The Dickinson Family" pg. 9:

 "Gayen Dickinson, ususally called Gaius, was the oldest son of Joseph and Elizabeth

(Miller) Dickinson. He was born in Salisbury township and evidently was named

originally for his mother's father. He married May 26, 1757, Mary Newlin."

 

I.D. Rupp in a History of Berks and Lebanon Counties, PA, published in 1844, says on

page 241:

  "Robeson Township, Berks, Co., was settled at an early period. Among its first and

principal settlers were the Friends and Quakers. These were Gaius Dickinson, John

Scarlet, and Peter Thomas, all Friends and who settled when the country was a

wilderness." Gaius Dickinson also appears on the list of persons who were assessed as

taxables in 1756."

 

From "Seven Hundred Ancestors " Pg.31:

 "Gayen Dickinson was usually called Gaius. He was an intensely religious Quaker and

he was referred to as the "worthy and respectable minister of the gospel". He was a

strong believer in the Quaker doctrine of nonresistance and opposition to war. In 1779

he was classified as a Tory because of his opposition to the Revolutionary War. After

being very heavily taxed in the 1779 year his feelings seemed to be modified and the

next year his taxes were down to the normal rate.  He died Oct. 2, 1800 and his will is

dated Jan. 21, 1797 and recorded in Lancaster Co. His wife died Apr. 23, 1818."

 

Gayen married Mary NEWLIN daughter of Nathaniel NEWLIN III and Esther METCALFE on 26 May 1757 in Concordville, Delaware, Pennsylvania. Mary was born about 1741. She died on 23 Apr 1818 in Concordville, Delaware Co., Pennsylvania.

 

From "Joseph Dickinson and Family" pg. 113:

"Isaac Walker, a descendant of Gaius (Gayen) and Mary (Newlin) Dickinson, says: ...

'Mary Newlin was joined in marriage with Gaius Dickinson, who was a worthy and

recommended minister of the gospel at old Sadsbury Meeting of the Friends; [and]

was a daughter of Nathaniel and Esther Newlin of Concord. Nathaniel Newlin was

known to have been a grandson of Nicholas Newlin who was a member of Wm. Penn's

Supreme Executive Council in 1686.'"

 

From "The Newlin Family and Collateral Lines", edited by Alexander Du Bin:_"Mary

Newlin, the third of the ten children of Nathaniel and Esther (Metcalfe) Newlin, as

previously mentioned, born 1740, died 1818; married in 1757 Gaius Dickinson, born

1737, died 1800; son of Joseph Dickinson, who came from England to Pennsylvania

about 1725; and his wife Elizabeth Miller, the latter the daughter of Gayen Miller, who

came from England to Chester County, Pa., about 1688."

 

 

Gayen and Mary had the following children:

        85 M      i.  Joseph DICKINSON was born on 5 Apr 1758. He died on 27 Jul 1758.

 

Died as infant 27 JUL 1758

 

        86 M     ii.  Nathaniel DICKINSON was born on 22 May 1759.

Nathaniel married Rachel MOORE daughter of William* MOORE and Lydia*

 

 

MINSHALL on 5 Dec 1787 in Friends Meeting House, Sadsbury Twp., Pennsylvania. Rachel was born on 11 Dec 1759 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died in The Forest, Robeson, Berks Co., Pennsylvania.She was buried in Friends Burial Ground, Robeson, Berks Co., Pennsylvania.

 

+     87 M     iii.  Joseph DICKINSON was born on 5 Mar 1761. He died on 24 Jan 1832.

        88 M    iv.  Daniel DICKINSON was born on 20 Apr 1763.

Daniel married Rachel GRUBB on 7 Apr 1785.

        89 M     v.  Isaac DICKINSON was born on 16 Mar 1765.

Isaac married Mary WILLIAMS on 28 Mar 1787.

        90 F     vi.  Esther DICKINSON was born on 13 Dec 1766 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 6 Jul 1854 in West Marlborough Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

Esther married Thomas PASSMORE son of George PASSMORE and Margaret STRODE on 3 Oct 1787 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. Thomas was born on 7 Mar 1756 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 22 Jan 1836 in West Marlborough Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        91 M    vii.  James DICKINSON was born on 11 May 1769. He died on 29 Dec 1839.

James married Sarah TRUMAN daughter of John TRUMAN and Rachel MOORE on 29 Dec 1823.

        92 F    viii.  Elizabeth DICKINSON was born on 20 Feb 1771. She died on 9 Nov 1808.

Elizabeth married James TRUMAN son of John TRUMAN and Rachel MOORE on 7 Dec 1789.

        93 M    ix.  Cyrus DICKINSON was born on 25 May 1773. He died on 21 Jun 1773.

        94 F     x.  Rebecca DICKINSON was born on 25 Sep 1774.

Rebecca married Joshua CHAMBERS on 29 Jun 1796.

        95 F     xi.  Mary DICKINSON was born about 1776.

Mary married Caleb CHALFANT on 29 May 1796. Caleb was born about 1772 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

        96 F    xii.  Deborah DICKINSON was born in 1778.

Deborah married Isaac WALKER son of Asahel WALKER and Anna MOORE on 14 Sep 1803 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Isaac was born on 22 Jul 1779 in Warrington Twp., York Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 21 May 1847 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

  74. Elizabeth DICKINSON (Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 13 Jul 1739 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://users.legacyfamilytree.com/USPresidents/6384.htm

 

Elizabeth married James Moore, son of James Moore and Susanna Forster, on 5 Apr

1759 in Sadsbury, Chester County, Pennsylvania. (James Moore was born in

Balleymoney, County Antrim, Ireland and died in 1777 in Alglen, Chester Co.,

Pennsylvania.)

 

Elizabeth married James MOORE III son of James MOORE Jr and Susanna FORSTER on 5 Apr 1759 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. James was born in 1730 in Ballynacree, County Antrim, Ireland. He died in 1777 in Alglen, Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://users.legacyfamilytree.com/USPresidents/6383.htm

 

http://www.public.asu.edu/~moore/news/newsa27

"James Moore born about 1730 at Ballynacree, Ireland.  He died 1777 at Atglen,

Chester, PA, and was married 5 Apr, 1759 at Sadsbury, Chester, PA. There are nine

children, all born at Atglen.

The Ancestral File Nos. were:- James Moore - AFN:DZ2P-MR and for Elizabeth

Dickenson:- AFN:787V-NJ. Elizabeth was born 13 Feb, 1739 at Piques Creek, Chester,

PA, and her parents were Joseph Dickenson and Elizabeth Miller"

 

http://www.public.asu.edu/~moore/news/newsa22b

"Children of James Moore & Elizabeth Dickinson were:"

 

 

James and Elizabeth had the following children:

 

+     97 M      i.  Joseph MOORE was born on 15 Dec 1759. He died on 18 Feb 1832.

        98 F      ii.  Susanna MOORE was born on 27 Nov 1771 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. She died in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

Susanna married (1) Joshua WILLIAMS on 3 Dec 1794. Joshua was born on 27 Feb 1768 in Morgan Co., Ohio. He died on 16 Mar 1808.

Susanna married (2) Joseph MOORE son of William* MOORE and Lydia* MINSHALL on 10 Mar 1813. Joseph was born on 15 Mar 1765 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 18 Aug 1836 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He was buried in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~paslchs/smmarr3.html

"Sadsbury Monthly Meeting Marriage Record:

Pg. 208, p. 94 Joseph MOORE of Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pa., son

of William MOORE and Lydia, his wife, (both deceased) & Susanna

WILLIAMS of Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa., widow of Joshua

WILLIAMS late of the same place (deceased), 10th day 3rd mo. 1813."

(Susanna MOORE Williams was the daughter of James Moore and

Elizabeth Dickinson)

 

        99 F     iii.  Sarah MOORE was born on 9 Jul 1777 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 10 Feb 1833 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

Sarah married James MOORE son of John MOORE and Elizabeth FULTON in Apr 1804. James was born on 31 Dec 1778 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co.,Pennsylvania. He died on 28 Mar 1813 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

  75. Mary DICKINSON (Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 10 Nov 1741 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 6 Nov 1805 in Jefferson Twp., Fayette Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://www.searchforancestors.com/bios/pennsylvania/history_of_fayette_county/cope_family.html

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=annora&id=I06769

Mary married John COPE son of John COPE and Charity JEFFERIES on 10 Jan 1760. John was born in Mar 1729/1730 in Bradford Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 31 Jul 1812 in Jefferson Twp., Fayette Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://www.searchforancestors.com/bios/pennsylvania/history_of_fayette_county/cope_family.html

 

"John was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania ...  He was a farmer, and at the time

 

of his second marriage was residing in Salisbury township, Lancaster county. His exact

residence for several years is unknown, but in October, 1784, he moved to Fayette

county, Pennsylvania, where he died July 31, 1812. He settled in the Red Lion Valley in

Jefferson, where he and his sons owned farms. The greater portion of the Copes

moved from Fayette county to New Salem, Columbia county, Ohio. This branch,

however, remained and descendants are still found in Jefferson township and other

parts of the county. John Cope retained his birthright in the Society of Friends, always

belonging to and faithful to the Society._"He married (first) about 1750, Grace, who

died 1758, daughter of Jason Cloud. ... He married (second) January 10, 1760, Grace*

Dickinson, born November 10, 1741, died November 6, 1805, daughter of Joseph and

Elizabeth Dickinson, of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania...

(*Other sources list her name as "Mary Dickinson")

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=annora&id=I02922

 

 

John and Mary had the following children:

       100 F      i.  Grace COPE was born in 1760. She died in 1854.

       101 M     ii.  Samuel COPE was born in 1762.

       102 F     iii.  Elizabeth COPE was born in 1764. She died in 1820.

       103 M    iv.  Isaac COPE was born in 1766. He died in 1822.

       104 M     v.  John COPE was born in 1768. He died in 1823.

       105 M    vi.  Caleb COPE was born in 1770. He died in 1834.

       106 M    vii.  Joshua COPE was born in 1772. He died in 1839.

       107 M    viii.  Jesse COPE was born in 1774. He died in 1832.

       108 M    ix.  Joseph COPE was born in 1778. He died in 1845.

       109 M     x.  James D. COPE was born in 1780. He died in 1832.

       110 M    xi.  Israel COPE was born in 1782. He died in 1861.

 

  77. Deborah* DICKINSON (Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 12 Mar 1745/1746 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 7 Jan 1826 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0288

 

Deborah* married Joseph* GEST Sr. son of Henry* GEST and Mary* CLEMSON on 31 Jul 1765 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Joseph* was born about 1723 in Concordville, Delaware Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 23 Apr 1815 in Pennsylvania.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0288

 

 

Joseph* and Deborah* had the following children:

 

+   111 F      i.  Elizabeth* GEST was born on 14 Jul 1766. She died on 17 Oct 1819.

       112 F      ii.  Mary GEST was born on 2 Aug 1768 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 13 Aug 1771 in Pennsylvania.

 

+   113 F     iii.  Hannah GEST was born on 10 Sep 1770. She died on 9 Aug 1847.

       114 F     iv.  Ann GEST was born on 7 Dec 1772 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 30 Dec 1772 in Pennsylvania.

 

       115 M     v.  Daniel GEST was born on 5 Jan 1775 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 17 Jan 1775 in Pennsylvania.

 

+   116 M    vi.  Joseph GEST Jr was born on 4 Mar 1776. He died on 23 Feb 1863.

       117 F    vii.  Margaret GEST was born on 26 May 1778 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

       118 M    viii.  Henry GEST was born on 26 Aug 1780 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 14 Oct 1780 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

Died about two months old

 

       119 F     ix.  Deborah GEST was born on 26 Aug 1780 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

       120 M     x.  John GEST was born on 17 May 1783 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 15 Dec 1865.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=passmore4&id=I07740

 

 

John married Ann BARNARD . Ann was born on 26 Sep 1792.

 

       121 M    xi.  Benjamin GEST was born on 2 Nov 1787 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

  78. Joseph DICKINSON (Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 22 May 1749 in Pequea Creek, Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

Joseph married Elizabeth CHALFANT on 16 Apr 1777. Elizabeth was born on 2 Feb 1754.

 

They had the following children:

       122 F      i.  Hannah DICKINSON was born in 1783.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rswayne&id=I23502

 

       123 F      ii.  Margaret DICKINSON was born in 1790.

 

       124 F     iii.  Phebe DICKINSON was born in 1792.

 

Sadsbury Monthly Meeting Marriage: Pg. 212, p. 86,

Joseph POWNALL of Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa., son of Levi

POWNALL and Elizabeth, his wife of the same place, & Phebe

DICKINSON daughter of Joseph DICKINSON late of the place aforesaid

deceased, and Elizabeth, his wife, 13th day, 4th mo, 1814

 

 

 

Phebe married Joseph POWNALL on 13 Dec 1814 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

 

Seventh Generation

 

  87. Joseph DICKINSON (Gayen "Gaius" DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 5 Mar 1761 in Concord, Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 24 Jan 1832 in Zanesfield, Logan Co., Ohio. He was buried in Hicksite Cemetery, Zanesfield, Ohio.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0219

From "Englehardt/Dickinson Family History"

 "Joseph Dickinson, son of Gaius and Mary, was their third child. The first, also

bearing the name Joseph, died in early infancy, and the second, Nathaniel, having

been named for the maternal grandfather.

 "In due time, he grew to manhood and presented himself and his sweetheart before

the Robeson Monthly Meeting where they declared their intention of marriage. The rest

is told in the very quaint and dignified Marriage Certificate, the original of which is

preserved;

 Marriage Certificate of Joseph DICKINSON and Elizabeth NUZUM

 WHEREAS, - Joseph Dickinson, son of Gaius Dickinson, of the Township of Robeson,

in the County of Berks and Province of Penna., and Elizabeth Nuzum, daughter of

Richard Nuzum of Township, County and Province aforesaid, having declared their

intention of marriage with each other before several Monthly Meetings of the people

called Quakers, and having consent of parents and parties concerned, according to the

good order used among them._  NOW,- These are to Certify to whom it may concern,

that for the full accomplishment of their said intentions, this tenth day of the fifth

month, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Seven-Hundred and Eighty Two, they,

the said Joseph Dickinson and Elizabeth Nuzum, appearing at a Meeting of said people

at their Meeting House in Robeson Township and the said Joseph Dickinson taking the

said Elizabeth Nuzum by the hand, did in a solemn manner openly declare that he took

her to be his wife, promising through divine assistance to be unto her a loving and

faithful husband until death should separate them._  AND, THEN AND THERE, - in the

said assembly, she, the said Elizabeth Nuzum, did in like manner declare that she took

the said Joseph Dickinson, to be her husband, promising through divine assistance to

be unto him a loving and faithful wife until death should separate them._  AND

MOREOVER, - the said Joseph Dickinson and Elizabeth Nuzum as a further

confirmation thereof, did then and there to these presents set their hands;"

JOSEPH DICKINSON ELIZABETH NUZUM_  AND, - we being present at the

solemnization of the marriage and subscription, do as witnesses hereunto subscribe

our names, the day and year above written: Gaius DICKINSON, Richard NUZUM, Mary

DICKINSON, Hannah NUZUM,  Nathaniel Dickinson, Daniel Dickinson, Jr., Isaac

Dickinson, Daniel Dickinson, Hannah Dickinson, Esther Dickinson, John Nuzum,

Thomas Nuzum, Elizabeth Coope, Samuel Coope, Jonathan Worrall, Lydia Worrall,

Kezia Worrall, Mary Rearson, Benjamin Worrall, John Smith, Benjamin Scarlet,

_Rebekah Scarlet, O. Humphrey, Wm. Humphrey, Lydia Humphrey, Hannah Jackson,

Ann Jackson, Isaac Bonsall, Sarah Bonsall, Daird Jackson, Elizabeth Jackson, Susannah

Scarlet, Ephriam Jackson, Mary Jackson, James Thorton, Ann Thorton, John Wright,

Eleanor Plummer, Davis Philips, John Scarlet, Jr.

 On the back of the original Marriage Certificate is written: "Joseph Dickinson Marriage

Certificate, recorded in Book A, page 77." Joseph and Elizabeth lived in Berks County

until 1802 and all of their seven children were born there.

 The pioneer spirit which had actuated Joseph 1 to come to America and Gaius 1 to

settle in Berks County, Pa. while the country was still a wilderness now led Joseph II

toward the west. His first move was in 1802 to Harrison County, Virginia (now West

Virginia) of which Clarksburg is the county seat. They also joined the Redstone

 

Monthly Meeting, miles away over difficult country.

 

"Joseph Dickinson and Family; Some of His Ancestors and Descendants" compiled by

William Hedrick Maddox (Wauseon, Ohio - 1944):

Records of The Redstone (Fayette County, Pa.) Monthly Meeting

 September 3, 1802 - Joseph Dickinson produced a Certificate from Robeson Monthly

Meeting dated April 29, 1802, for self, wife Elizabeth and seven children, Gaius,

Elizabeth, Thomas, Joseph, Richard Nuzum, Hannah and Rebecca.

 Their devotion to the Church in which they were reared and trained is shown in the

fact that the Redstone Monthly Meeting is in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, which is on

the border of West Virginia and that Monongalia or Preston County, West Virginia lies

between Fayette and Harrison Counties. And, in 1802 there were no improved roads.

Yet we may surmise that such difficulties taxed their devotion to the limits as future

developments will suggest. One is tempted to think that they chose the location to be

near relatives.

 The Redstone Meeting minutes of July 29, 1814 state that "Joseph Dickinson, wife

Elizabeth and three minor children, Richard, Hannah and Rebecca, transferred their

church membership certificate to the Darby Creek Monthly Meeting, Ohio."

 In the History of Logan County, Ohio, (1880), page 401, we find: "In the year 1811

Joseph Dickinson came from (West) Virginia. He lived two years in a cabin where Oren

Outland's house now is in Zanesfield and after that, one year near Bellefountaine. He

then bought of Simon Kenton 160 acres in the southwest corner of Survey No. 3439

and commenced in improving where J. W. Easton lives. After eighteen months, he

learned that Kenton's title to the land was worthless. He fortunately recovered back his

purchase money but lost his labor in improving the land.

 He then bought of James Catlett (on February 14, 1818) 125 acres in Dandridge's

Survey No. 3220 where John H. Dickinson now resides. (Recorded in Volume A., page

26, on February 24, 1818). After the death of Joseph Dickinson on January 24, 1832,

the land was acquired by his son, Richard Nuzum Dickinson, who then passed it on to

his son, John Henry Dickinson.

 Joseph Dickinson died at the age of 70 years, 10 months and 19 days. He is buried in

the Hicksite Cemetery at Zanesfield, (Ohio) where a modest stone of Quaker

specifications marks his grave._The Will of Joseph Dickinson is on file with the Probate

Court of Logan County, Bellefountaine,Ohio, Administration Docket B, page 8, Common

Pleas Record."

 

Last Will and Testament - Joseph DICKINSON

 I, Joseph Dickinson of the county of Logan and State of Ohio in this my Last Will and

Testament (hereby revoking all former Wills) do direct that my wife if she should

outlive me shall have the sole use of my house and plantation on which I now live with

so much of my personal estate as may be necessary for her own use if she shall elect

to take the same in lieu of her right of Dower therein and I do further direct that the

balance of my estate, real or personal, shall as soon after my decease be sold or

otherwise disposed of as may appear most likely to conduce to the advantage of the

parties interested and my will is that all of my just and lawful debts be first paid out of

the proceeds thereof and that on the decease of my wife (if she should outlive me) all

the part of my estate which may have been retained for her use both real and personal

shall be sold and all of the proceeds and all other sales of any part of my estate after

my debts are paid shall be divided as follows, to wit;  FIRST, that my daughter

Elizabeth Rea should receive Five dollars thereof THEN, that my sons Gaius and Joseph

shall receive each one tenth part of what remains and that all of the remainder be

divided share about and equally amongst my sons Thomas and Richard and daughters

Hannah and Rebecca.  The part assigned to my wife being considered as in lieu of her

right of Dower. And I hereby appoint Thomas Dickinson and Samuel Starbuck

 

Executors of my Last Will and Testament. Signed and sealed on this 17th day of the

8th month in the year of our Lord 1831. Joseph DICKINSON (seal) Witnesses present

at the signing; Edmund Marmon, Aaron Brown, Joshua Scott, Horton Brown.

 

From "Story of a Place Called Goshen:  Logan County, Ohio" by Oswald K. Reames

(1961)

 "At the time of the arrival of the first Goshen Quakers, the Indian captive Isaac Zane

and his mixed blood family were living at the site of Zanesfield, (Ohio), a former Indian

town. Cabins built by the Indians yet standing were used by the Quakers until cabins

could be erected. Among the known families using these Indian huts with dirt floors

were the families of Joseph and Henry Dickinson, Quakers, and James Hill and Samuel

Todd, Methodists. Their arrival at the breaking out of the War of 1812  led to their

taking advantage of the block houses erected for the protection of the boarder settlers.

After the war closed, the Dickinson brothers established homes nearby."

 "The families of Todd and Hill continued to live at the site that became known as

Zanestown. The establishing of homes by these Quaker and Methodist families may

have been responsible for there being a town of Zanesfield. When the War of 1812

ended Quaker emigration to the upper Mad River country began again. Not all the

Quakers became members at Goshen, but its membership increased until it became

the largest religious community in the county..."

 

Joseph married Elizabeth NUZUM on 10 May 1782. Elizabeth was born on 18 Feb 1763 in Providence, Pennsylvania. She died in 1860 in Zanesfield, Logan Co., Ohio. She was buried in Hicksite Cemetery, Zanesfield, Ohio.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0220

From "Joseph Dickinson and Family" pg. 119:

"We now take up the history and descendants of Elizabeth, so far as we know the

oldest child of Richard and Hannah (Worrall) Nuzum. Elizabeth was born, Feb. 18,

1763 - the date taken from the Bible records of Joseph Dickinson.

"Elizabeth walked in the straight and narrow path prescribed by the Quakers and in

due time and with all ceremony her engagement was announced in the Robeson

Monthly Meeting for two consecutive months and on May 10, 1782 she was married to

Joseph Dickinson."

 

From "Englehardt/Dickinson Family History":

In the "History of Logan County", 1880, page 408 we find the following story:

"While Joseph Dickinson lived in Zanesfield (Ohio) in the spring of 1812, on his first

coming to the county, His Excellency Govenor Meigs visited Zanesfield with his staff for

the purpose of inspecting the blockhouses and other defenses of the post. It was

resolved to make his visit the occasion of a grand reception and Grandmother

(Elizabeth Nuzum) Dickinson, whom none knew better how to spread an excellent

repast, was charged with the duty of providing for the creature comforts of the

Governor and his attendants. The arrangements bade fair to be carried out in good

order.

"The soldiers belonging to the blockhouse with the armed Indians were drawn up in

line and received their distinguished visitor with a grand salute whose echoes rolled

down the valleys bringing a horseman in hot haste from the extreme south end of the

county supposing the post was under attack from the enemy. But what was the

mortification of our excellent hostess was to be compelled, while His Excellency was

making his round of inspection to observe, the imperturbable braves from time to time

gravely enter her cabin and unceremoniously appropriated such of the viands as suited

their fancy until when the hour arrived for her honored guests to dine there was

nothing left but such scraps as the dignified red men deemed unworthy of their

attention."

 

 

From "Joseph Dickinson and Family; Some of His Ancestors and Descendants"

compiled by William Hedrick Maddox (Wauseon, Ohio - 1944)

"Elizabeth died in 1860 as near as can be ascertained, aged about 97 years. She is

buried in Hicksite Cemetery beside her first husband, Joseph Dickinson. Mrs. Elizabeth

Ann Windham, who was 84 years old in 1933, was the granddaughter of Elizabeth

(Nuzum) Dickinson. She said that when she was nine years old, 'her grandmother was

a very handsome old lady with white hair, very white skin and blue eyes. She was very

proud.'"

 

 

Joseph and Elizabeth had the following children:

 

+   125 M      i.  Thomas DICKINSON was born on 13 Nov 1788. He died on 18 May 1879.

 

  97. Joseph MOORE (Elizabeth DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 15 Dec 1759 in Salisbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 18 Feb 1832 in Morgan Co., Ohio.

Joseph married Mary CLEMSON daughter of Thomas CLEMSON and Elizabeth STRODE in 1781. Mary was born on 3 Mar 1763 in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 7 Jan 1817 in Pittsburg, Allegheny, Pennsylvania.

 

http://users.legacyfamilytree.com/USPresidents/6347.htm

 

Lineage of Richard Milhous Nixon, Thirty-Seventh President (1969-1974), of the United

States:

Mary married Joseph MOORE (b. 1759 d. 1832);

Their son, Joseph Dickinson MOORE (b. 1794 d. 1860) m. Jane BROWN 1825;

Their dau. Mary Louise MOORE (b. 1832 d. 1918) m. Thomas W. WADSWORTH 1850;

Their dau. Sarah Ann WADSWORTH (b. 1852 d. 1886) m. Samuel B. NIXON 1873;

Their son, Francis Anthony NIXON (b. 1878 d. 1956) m. Hannah Elizabeth MILHOUS

1908;

Their son Richard Milhous NIXON who became president of the United States.

 

 

Joseph and Mary had the following children:

 

+   126 M      i.  Joseph Dickinson MOORE was born on 21 Oct 1794. He died in 1860.

 

111. Elizabeth* GEST (Deborah* DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 14 Jul 1766 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 17 Oct 1819 in Pennsylvania.

Elizabeth* married John* MOORE son of William* MOORE and Lydia* MINSHALL on 2 Apr 1788 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. John* was born on 21 Oct 1756 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died in 1810.

 

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/chester/wills/wills1812-3.txt

"MOORE, JONATHAN. Sadsbury. March 10, 1810. John Williams, administrator."

 

 

John* and Elizabeth* had the following children:

       127 F      i.  Lydia MOORE was born on 16 Oct 1795 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 19 Jun 1874. She was buried in Old Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

       128 M     ii.  Gaius MOORE was born in Feb 1797 in London Grove Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 26 Feb 1872 in Princeton, Mercer, New Jersey. He was buried in Princeton, New Jersey.

 

 

+   129 M     iii.  Joseph* MOORE was born on 20 Oct 1796. He died on 9 Feb 1856.

       130 M    iv.  Elias MOORE was born on 1 Dec 1801 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 9 Dec 1859 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He was buried in Family Burial Ground, Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

       131 M     v.  William Gest MOORE was born on 6 Dec 1805 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 22 Mar 1870 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He was buried in Family Burial Ground, Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania.

 

113. Hannah GEST (Deborah* DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 10 Sep 1770 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 9 Aug 1847 in Salisbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

Hannah married Isaac A. HAINES on 27 Oct 1790 in Salisbury Meeting House, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Isaac was born on 15 Sep 1763 in Salisbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 11 Feb 1840 in Salisbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

They had the following children:

       132 F      i.  Deborah HAINES was born on 24 Nov 1792 in Salisbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

       133 F      ii.  Elizabeth HAINES was born on 24 Oct 1794 in Salisbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

       134 M     iii.  Joshua HAINES was born on 25 Sep 1797 in Salisbury Twp., Lancaster Co.,Pennsylvania.

       135 M    iv.  Joseph HAINES was born on 24 Jan 1800 in Salisbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

116. Joseph GEST Jr (Deborah* DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*,Robert*) was born on 4 Mar 1776 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 23 Feb 1863.

 

http://www.ohiosurveyor.org/Gest.html

 - Surveyor of the Past

JOSEPH GEST (1775- 1863)

Hamilton County Submitted by: CINCINNATI CHAPTER, P. L. S. O.  Joseph Gest was

born in Sadsbury, Pennsylvania in 1775 and died in Cincinnati at age 88 in 1863. As

surveyor and engineer he early became an authority on discovering, reestablishing,

and verifying lost land lines. In 1817 he made a trip on horseback to the Wabash River.

Next year, he and his wife and infant daughter came to Cincinnati and he quickly

became a leading surveyor. In 1819 he was chosen City Surveyor and City Civil

Engineer, a position he held until 1844, when he retired because of failing sight.  Gest

was an outstanding Civic leader. He was a pioneer in the formation of volunteer fire

companies, a leader in the creation of Cincinnati's Public School System, and Ohio

Mechanics Institute, and promoter of the building of the old Miami and Erie Canal.  By

Charles T. Sampson

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~paslchs/smmarr3.html

Married to Rebekah Moore on 14 APR 1813 at Friends' Meeting House, Sadsbury,

Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

 

Joseph married Rebekah MOORE daughter of James MOORE Jr. and Jane CANBY on 14

 

Apr 1813 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Rebekah was born on 15 Jul 1791 in Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 24 Feb 1869.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~paslchs/smmarri.html

"Sadsbury Monthly Meeting Marriage Records: Pg. 209, p.92:_"Joseph GEST Junior of

Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa., son of Joseph GEST of the same place and

Deborah, his wife & Rebeckah MOORE, daughter of James MOORE of the place

aforesaid and Jane, his wife, 14th day, 4th mo. 1813.."

 

 

Joseph and Rebekah had the following children:

       136 M      i.  James GEST was born on 22 Mar 1814 in Lancaster Co, Pennsylvania. He died on 22 Mar 1814 in Lancaster Co, Pennsylvania.

       137 F      ii.  Clarissa GEST was born on 16 Aug 1815 in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

       138 M     iii.  Erasmus GEST was born on 12 Apr 1820 in Cincinnati, Ohio. He died after 1897.

       139 M    iv.  Joseph J. GEST was born on 9 Jan 1830 in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Joseph married Susannah BAILEY on 25 Jan 1855 in Sadsbury Meeting House, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Susannah was born about 1832.

 

 

Eighth Generation

 

125. Thomas DICKINSON (Joseph DICKINSON, Gayen "Gaius" DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 13 Nov 1788 in Reading, Berks Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 18 May 1879 in Bellefontaine, Logan Co., Ohio.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0355

From "Joseph Dickinson and Family" Pg. 33:_  "Thomas Dickinson was the third child

of Joseph and Elizabeth (Nuzum) Dickinson. He was born in Berks Co., PA and died in

Logan Co., OH at age 90 years, 6 months, and 5 days. He is buried in Goshen Friends

Cemetery near Zanesfield, OH where a modest stone marks his grave. He and his wife

Maria were the most prolific of the Dickinson families. He was a man of great energy

and wide influence. He purchased the farm on which he lived for many years in 1830."

 

From "Joseph Dickinson and Family", pg. 123-4:

 His obituary and the story of his life published in the Bellofontaine Examiner is as

follows:

Thomas Dickinson died at his residence about six miles east of Bellofontaine on the

19th day of May 1879, at the advanced age of 90 years and 6 months. The following

narrative was dictated by him before his death:

 "I was born in Berks County, near Reading, Pennsylvania, on the 13th day of

November, 1788. In 1802 I moved with my parents to Virginia, Harrison County, near

Clarksburg; and in 1807 came to Ohio and worked for John Garwood on the first mill

built in the northern part of Ohio, located near where East Liberty is now situated. I

worked hard for six dollars a month. Went back to Virginia in 1808 and in 1810 was

married to Maria Lowe. At this time the subject of slavery was being discussed, and my

father and I were Quakers and were opposed to slavery, and in the Spring of 1811

father and I concluded to leave the State on account of our aversion to slavery making

it unpleasant for us; and in August we arrived at John Garwood's near East Liberty,

and father located at Zanesfield. There were seven children in my father's family. I

first settled on a small piece of ground at the foot of the Mitchinor Hill on the East side

 

of Zanesfield on the East Liberty Road, and built a little log cabin near the Mad River.

In the winter of 1812 I went to Sandusky; laid out three nights; had to scrape the

snow away to get a place to sleep. While living at this cabin the Indians bothered us a

great deal, and when I was away from home my wife had to take the two children and

go down on the prairie and sleep for fear the Indians would come to the house in the

night. I moved from that place in 1813; moved to the head waters of Cherokee; put up

a small house and covered it with bark; there I had bad luck; I throwed a splinter at

my mare and killed her; the wolves killed all of my sheep. I laid off my hat while

cutting a big tree and my cow ate that up; and that night, having no door but just a

place cut for one, the cow came along and drew my pants out and ate them up (being

all I had); I felt a little discouraged; and the next day the cow ate buckeye leaves and

she died; while my wife and I were skinning the cow, the cabin got on fire and burned

everything we had. We had three children; I carried two and my wife one and we went

back to Zanesfield to report our bad luck. I then was enlisted as a Minute man under

Captain Schuyler, and was under the employ of the Government for two years acting

as guard and as a Minute man; and drove ox team after the war was over. I lived near

Zanesfield until 1830 when I moved onto the farm where I now live and have lived for

nearly fifty years. In 1820 I went back to Virginia and Mother Lowe gave me a feather

bed and I brought it from Virginia on horseback."_  "Mr. Dickinson, at the time of his

death, had living 10 children, 85 grandchildren and 120 great grandchildren and 2

great great grandchildren. Judge Bennett said the funeral was the largest he had

attended for many years - the procession being one mile in length. The funeral

services were conducted by Reverend John D. Elliott assisted by his estimable lady,

being of Quaker denomination. As Mr. Dickinson always held to their manner and form

of worship he did not make a loud profession of religion but had certain religious ruled

that he always adhered to. He pitied littleness, loved goodness, and admired

truthfulness and greatness..

 "His record as a neighbor, a citizen and a soldier, and in every capacity of life is too

well known to need any eulogy at my hands. And as the long procession moved out, it

could be observed that many distinguished persons were present, and as the long line

of the procession moved along many persons stood by the roadside with uncovered

heads, eager to catch a glimpse of the procession that was conveying to its last resting

place the remains of one of the noblest men on earth. He was buried in the burying

grounds of the Quakers near the place where he first settled on coming to the State by

the side of his venerable wife surrounded by Quaker friends."

_"Reminiscences Of My Grandparents" by Jennie Chamberlain_  "Grandfather was of a

very friendly disposition and always made us welcome. When they lived in the frame

house the Dickinson schoolhouse was not very far from their house. We would ofen

stop at Grandfather's on our way to school. Sometimes the school boys would bother

him then he would say to them 'What did you come for?' and they would say 'Nothing.'

'Well, what did you bring to get it in?' and they would say 'Nothing.' So he would say

'Then get out.' and they would._  "There was a spring down the hill and every

morning, no matter if in the winter or not, he would go down to the spring and in a big

trough he would dip his head in the water then climb the hill to the house. He had very

white hair and didn't have it out so it was long and he would come to the house with

the water dripping from his hair._   "They lived very happily in the frame house for

many years, but finally died - Grandmother when she was 72 and Grandfather was 92,

I think."

_"Descendants of Joseph Lowe" from Marilyn Roesti, 1/1999: From Jane Osborne

Jones, 3/1996:

 "The wedding of Maria and Thomas took place June 7, 1810, two years after the

death by drowning of Maria's father, Robert. The bride was 18, the groom 22. Because

Maria was not a Quaker, Thomas faced censure from his fellow Quakers. He was

 

condemned for marrying contrary to the discipline. Maria, however, soon adopted the

religion of her new husband, and in very little time was as staunch a practioner as he

of the Quaker traditions. Their first home in Ohio was on a small piece of land in

Jefferson Township. It was located on the Mad River at the foot of Mitchiner Hill near

the town of East Liberty. About this time (1811) Thomas became famous for a "100

mile run" (perhaps a bit of an exaggeration) to a nearby town of an impending Indian

raid._   "It was because of the proximity of their cabin to such unfriendly Indians that

in early 1813, the couple moved to Bellfontaine near the headwaters of Cherokee

Creek where they again built a home. After that home was destroyed by fire (see

Thomas' recollections above), they bought 160 acres from famed Indian fighter Simon

Kenton and began improving the land. About this time, the war with England (the War

of 1812) was under way and Thomas decided to try his hand at soldiering, even

though as a Quaker he was forbidden to kill. He enlisted February 21, 1813, in the

Minutemen under Captain Schooler (Schuyler?), where he served for two years as a

guide with the rank of third sergeant. He was later rewarded for his service with a

government pension. The bad luck with land the family had experienced before the

war was not yet over. They learned that Simon Kenton had not held valid title to the

land he had sold them. Fortunately, however, Thomas and Maria were able to recover

their purchase money, but lost their labor in improving the land. Thomas had been

earning a living after the war driving an ox team and as a hand for General Duncan

McArthur, a local land speculator (and later an Ohio governor). General McArthur

placed the family on a hundred acres of land near Zanesfield, which later became

theirs. In appreciation of the General's generosity, the couple named their tenth child

after him. In 1817, Thomas was elected to the post of "Fence Viewer" for Jefferson

County and he would later serve as a township trustee."

From a newspaper article by great-granddaughter Fayette Dickinson Blount:  "A

bicentennial story" as told by E.A. Dickinson, born in 1859 in Carrollton, Mo., to his

daughter, Fayette._  "Great-grandfather Thomas Dickinson lived in Zanesfield, Ohio in

1812 during the time when the Indians were fighting for their hunting grounds. He

was enlisted in the government's service as a minute man. A minute man was one who

could stay at home, but was ready to go at any time or any place if called to fight the

Indians._  "During this time the Indians became very hostile around the vicinity of

Zanesfield. The General of the army stationed there wanted to send a message to

Sandusky, Ohio which was 103 miles away. It was a timbered country and the

message had to be carried on foot at night because no one knew exactly where the

Indian camps were located._   "The Army inquired around trying to find someone to

take the message when up spoke a frontiersman saying,'Thomas Dickinson knows the

route for he moved up here two years back, but had to leave on account of the Indian

uprisings and his hard luck.'_   "Another man was chosen to accompany Thomas.

They started with the message at three o'clock in the afternoon. They knew where the

Indian camps were near Zanesfield so they skirted the edge of them until it grew dark,

then they paid no attention. The next morning they were on the hill in sight of

Sandusky. Everyone asked his grandpap, 'A man couldn't walk that far in so short a

time, could he?'_   "Grandpap replied, 'No, my son, we didn't walk, we ran. We took a

good dog-trot when we started and kept it up all night. We were afraid to be caught in

hostile country at sunrise. When thee scalp is at stake, it lightens thee foot.' He was a

Quaker and used 'thee' and 'thou'._  "The trip was too much for the other man and he

died from overexertion a short time later, but the grandfather lived to the ripe old age

of 90."

From 1850 Census, Rush Creek Twp., Logan Co., OH, pg. 231, Family 201 (Microfilm

#444697):_Thomas Dickinson, 62, m, farmer, value real estate $2000, b. PA_Maria " ,

58, f, b. MD_Louis " , 23, m, b. OH_Martin " , 11, m, b. OH

From Logan County, Ohio Will Book C (1876 - 1885). The original Will of Thomas

 

Dickinson, which was probated May 22, 1879, is now in the possession of the Logan

County Genealogy Society, Bellefontaine, Ohio"

The Last Will and Testament of Thomas DICKINSON:

 "In the name of the benevolent Father of all, I, Thomas Dickinson, of the State of

Ohio and the County of Logan do make and publish this, my Last Will and Testament.

ITEM I First, it is my will that my beloved wife be allowed to remain on my farm where

we now reside for a period of two years after my death. And then, in lieu of dower,

she is to have the use of and the interest on $1,500 from the proceeds of the sale of

my farm to be placed in the hands of my sons, M. M. Dickinson and Joshua Dickinson,

as Trustees to be used for the comfort and maintenance of my beloved wife, and at

her death the remaining proceeds to be divided among my heirs as hereinafter

provided.

ITEM II It my will and desire that at the time of my death, that within two years my

real estate shall be sold. It is my will after my death that there may be sold enough of

my chattel property to pay my just debts. It is my will and desire that my beloved wife

shall have all of the household furniture that she may want, and that at her death they

be equally divided between my heirs, also to select and keep two cows for her use as

long as she may live on said farm, also the use of one horse and one buggy.

ITEM III Whereas Joshua Dickinson and Robert Dickinson loaned to my daughter,

Hannah Stafford the sum of $400 and I became liable for said loan as surety and as

said sum has long since become due and unpaid, and in view of the fact that I am

compelled to pay such amount of money which now amounts to more than $500, it is

my will that this debt shall be her entire share in my said estate.

I nominate and appoint M. M. Dickinson and Joshua Dickinson exectuors of this, my

Last Will and Testament, hereby authorizing and empowering them to compromise the

just release and discharge in such manner as they may deem proper the debts due me

and all claims coming to my estate. I do also authorize them and empower them to sell

by private sale or in such manner upon such terms of credit or otherwise as they may

think proper all or any part of my real estate and make deeds of conveyance to said

purchases to the extent acknowledged and deliveries in fee simple. I desire that no

assessment [?] and that no sale of personal property be made further than may be

considered necessary by my executors.

It is my will and desire that at my death, M. M. Dickinson and Joshua Dickinson, my

executors, take charge of my farm, and all of the chattels not here disposed of and

execute a general supervision and rent the land as they think to the best interest of my

heirs. And if my wife does not want to occupy my farm and have so much of the rent

as my executors think fair and right, then they can sell the same as herein provided. If

some of the place is sold for any more ____ ____ into the hands of my executors, then

to divide the remainder in their hands separately between my heirs, excepting my

daughter, Hannah Stafford, who has already got her share.

In testimony whereof I have hereby set my hand and seal the 6th day of March in the

year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy Nine. (1879) THOMAS

DICKINSON {SEAL}_Signed and acknowledged by said Thomas Dickinson as his Last

Will and Testament in our presence and signed by us in his presence by his request.

PHILIP J. CORWIN H. C. DICKINSON, witnesses

 

Thomas married Maria LOWE "Mary". Maria was born on 25 Feb 1792 in Maryland. She died on 3 Oct 1867 in Zanesfield, Logan Co., Ohio. She was buried in Goshen Cemetery, Jefferson Twp., Ohio.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0356

From "Joseph Dickinson and Family", pg. 123-4:

"Reminiscences Of My Grandparents" by Jennie Chamberlain

 "Grandmother was blind, but was always very kind to meet us and talk to us. Uncle

 

Martin, who had remembered how grandmother looked before she went blind, wanted

a picture of her with her eyes open. He tried several times, but finally managed to get

a picture with her eyes open._  "Grandmother would tell about their home situated

some place between Goshen and Zanesfield up in the woods. She said it was a log

house and the fireplace was on one side of the house.

Grandfather would roll big logs and that would make a big fire, and on Saturday

evening Grandmother would put the children to bed and then she would wash their

clothes and hang them before the fire to dry, then in the morning all were clean and

ready to go to Sunday School._She also told about the trap door which was in the

middle of the floor of the log house. There were many Indians around there then and

when they heard the war whoop which the Indians gave she and the children would

open the trap door and jump down into what they called a dugout. They were afraid of

the Indians. There were no roads then, just marked trees which they called trails, and

the Indians would gallop around on these and give war whoops making the woods ring.

There were also friendly Indians around which would come near to the house but not

up to the door and then they would hide around until someone would see them and

have them come in, but would not eat with the palefaces as they called them.

Grandmother would try and make the war whoop for us like the Indians did. She

would also call us her little papooses which was the name the Indians called their

children.

 "One of Grandfather's sisters married a man whose name was Zane, one of the

Zanefield Zanes, and when the Government gave the Indians reservations in the West

they went there. Then one of the girls whose name was Sally Zane would come back

and visit the relations and I remember when she came to our house we were afraid of

her because she was an Indian._  "Grandmother and Grandfather would raise flax and

then card it and weave and make their clothes from it._  "Grandmother worried about

the church. She was Orthodox, but Hicksites bothered her. The church divided. The

Goshen Church was her church and the little church in Zanesfield cemetery was the

Hicksites. I was at that church once and the seats are very high in the back, but there

was a cushion on the seat which made it very comfortable._  "Grandmother's father

was a slave holder and each child had his own slave. I think that was in Virginia and

Grandfather's people were Whigs so you see Grandfather would not have slaves. When

Grandmother's parents were gone, they sold their slaves. Since she had had a slave,

her brother brought the money to her which came from the sale of her slave, but she

would not have the money. He then tried to give it to her son Martin, but she said No,

that it was blood money and he wasn't to take it. Then her brother laid the money on

a stump and went away._  "In this log house the door was not very tight so one

evening when Grandfather came in to retire, his pants which were made of deer skin

were wet so he hung them on the back of a chair to dry. In the night a cow came

along and pulled them out and chewed them up and as it was the only pair he had he

could not get up until Grandmother took her skirt and make him another pair of pants.

_  "Now they moved from this log house to the frame house which now belongs to

Martin Yore, a great grandson of Thomas and Maria Dickinson._  "Grandmother

always kept apples on the mantle for us. She would get up and feel along the mantle

for the apples for her papooses as she called us."

"Descendants of Joseph Lowe" from Marilyn Roesti, 1/1999:

"Maria was buried in Goshen Friends Cemetery near Zanesfield, Ohio. This story

happened to Daddy's Grandmother Dickinson (Maria Lowe, wife of Thomas Dickinson)

and is one of the traditional Dickinson family stories passed down through the

generations.  Fayette Dickinson Blount, daughter of Ewry Ansel Dickinson.

 [It is unknown if this story is true]._Kidnapped

 "A beautiful sunrise greeted a young girl named Maria Lowe one morning. Her home

was a small log cabin with a trap door leading down to a cave. Often there were

 

Indian raids, and her family would go into the cave to hide._  "Maria arose with

bubbling spirits. She helped her mother, Elizabeth, get breakfast, and after breakfast

she hurried her brother off to the field where he was plowing corn. Her parents left for

town in a spring wagon. It was a day's drive to town, and they wanted to get an early

start._As Maria was doing her work, she looked out into the woods and saw a band of

Indians coming. She ran and hid in the cave, but when she heard the Indians ride up

to the cabin, she knew she dared not stay in the cave, as they would probably burn

the cabin. So she went out and gave herself up._  "All the braves dismounted and

surrounded Maria. The old chief bound her hands and led her to the stable. He sent

two of his braves in to see if there were any horses. One led out her father's stable

horse, while the other brought out her saddle. They started to saddle the horse but

were afraid of him because he was so frisky. The old chief untied Maria's hands and

motioned for her to saddle the horse. The horse began to run and jump away. There

was a long rope on the halter, so she let him cut his capers. She knew he would quiet

down as soon as he had taken his exercise. She then led him to the barn and bridled

and saddled him. Maria was then forced to mount the stallion and submit to having her

hands and feet bound._  "As the party set off, a few of the Indians stopped and set

the cabin on fire. Maria made no protest as she knew no one could hear her. They

traveled all that day at a pretty fast rate. In the late afternoon, they came to a river.

They crossed in canoes they had previously left there, swimming the horses alongside.

_  "The opposite shore was a dense tangle of weeds, trees, and vines. The Indians

traveled only two or three miles after entering the forest, then made camp in a small

clearing. They unsaddled and unbridled their horses. Maria noticed that they put Niger,

her horse, separate from the Indian ponies as he fought them._  "The Indians fell to

drinking the whiskey they had stolen on their raid. The old chief had not let them

touch it until they got back into their own territory. Their drinking frightened Maria, as

she feared they might become mean, but they ignored her. Gradually the braves

began dropping off to sleep, but before the old chief went to sleep, he carried Maria's

saddle over to his blankets and placed it beneath his head for a pillow. Then he made

Maria lie down nearby._  "Soon all were fast asleep except for the frightened little girl.

She almost despaired of escaping when she saw the old chief put her saddle under his

head. Only the snores of the braves and the stamping of the horses disturbed the quiet.

_  "Maria decided if ever she was to escape, now was her chance. All the Indians were

in a heavy drunken slumber. For awhile she wondered if she could manage without her

saddle, but decided it would be too long a ride for her to risk bareback. They had come

almost sixty miles, she figured._Maria soon fell into a silence that was a pretense of

sleep. Then she slowly arose and went to the head of the chief and began to edge the

saddle from under his head inch by inch. At last she got it out and made her way to

Niger. She bridled him without letting him romp. Several times she stopped to peer

around to see if anyone had discovered she was missing, but all were too drunk to be

easily aroused. She was afraid her horse would snicker as she approached, but he

seemed to sense her danger and remained silent._  "Maria led Niger to the clearing on

the riverbank. There she mounted and urged him down to the water's edge. He never

hesitated, but took silently to the water, and the two were soon across the river. As he

climbed the opposite bank, he shook himself and let out a squeal, then set off in an

easy lope, taking the homeward trail._  "Maria gave him his head as she had no idea

which way was home. For awhile, she kept watching anxiously behind, but no sound

came from the camp. She heaved a big sigh of relief but was too exhausted for tears.

She folded her arms on the pommel and put her head down on it and went to sleep,

tying herself in the saddle._  "Meanwhile back at the cabin, Maria's family was frantic

at the loss of their eldest daughter. Maria's brother, when he saw the blazing cabin

from the field where he was plowing, had unhitched his horse and ridden back to his

burning home as fast as he could. There was no trace of Maria or the Indians. He sped

 

toward town after his father Robert as he realized the uselessness of trailing the Indian

band alone. By dark, Robert had gathered a bunch of his neighbors, but by then they

could not set out on the trail as it was too dark. Early the next morning they set out

following the trail left by the marauding Indians._  "Their hearts all sank as they saw

the horse far down the trail with a limp burden flung across the saddle. It looked as if

they had come too late. Nevertheless, they hurried on to meet the tired horse bearing

Maria._  "The distracted father couldn't help crying out, "Maria. Maria." As he did so,

she sat erect. Can anyone tell the joy that must have flooded that father's face as he

saw his daughter-safe at last!"

 

Children

Eliza Dickinson  b: 19 NOV 1810 in Harrison Co., VA

Robert Leroy Dickinson  b: 15 MAR 1812 in Logan Co., OH

Susan Dickinson  b: 16 JUN 1813 in Logan Co., OH

Mary Polly Dickinson  b: 6 JAN 1815 in Logan Co., OH

Joseph Nelson Dickinson  b: 27 MAR 1816 in Logan Co., OH

Margaret (Peggy) Dickinson  b: 17 SEP 1817 in Logan Co., OH

Hannah Dickinson  b: 28 DEC 1818 in Logan Co., OH

Martin Marmon Dickinson  b: 20 FEB 1820 in Logan Co., OH

Gardner L. Dickinson  b: 18 DEC 1821 in Logan Co., OH

Duncan McArthur Dickinson b: 3 DEC 1822 in Logan Co., OH

Joshua M. Dickinson  b: 18 FEB 1824 in Logan Co., OH

Martha Patsy DICKINSON  b: 25 MAR 1825 in Logan Co., OH

Anna Dickinson  b: 15 AUG 1826

Lewis Dickinson  b: 20 NOV 1827 in Logan Co., OH

Samuel S. Dickinson  b: 17 FEB 1829 in Logan Co., OH

 

 

Thomas and Maria had the following children:

 

+   140 F      i.  Martha "Patty" DICKINSON was born on 25 Mar 1825. She died on 21 Sep 1872.

 

126. Joseph Dickinson MOORE (Joseph MOORE, Elizabeth DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 21 Oct 1794 in Centre Co., Pennsylvania. He died in 1860 in Indianola, Iowa.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iawarren/cemeteries/cm-peck.htm

 

"Joseph Dickinson Moore, great-great grandfather of former President Richard M.

Nixon is buried in Peck Cemetery. Peck Cemetery is also referred to as Epps or Laverty

Cemetery."

 

http://users.legacyfamilytree.com/USPresidents/6327.htm

Lineage of Richard M. NIXON, Thirty-Seventh President of the United States - 1969-

1974

Born: January 9, 1913 in Yorba Linda, California - Died: April 22, 1994 in New York,

New York

Joseph Dickinson MOORE & Jane BROWN

Mary Louise MOORE & Thomas Wiley WADSWORTH

Sarah Ann WADSWORTH & Samuel Brady NIXON

Francis Anthony NIXON and Hannah MILHOUS

Richard M. NIXON and Thelma Catherine "Pat" RYAN

 

Joseph married Jane BROWN on 23 Jun 1825 in Perry Co., Ohio. Jane was born on 16 Mar 1807 in Perry Co., Ohio. She died on 26 Feb 1886 in Indianola, Iowa.

 

 

http://users.legacyfamilytree.com/USPresidents/6327.htm

Joseph married Jane Brown, daughter of Isaac Brown and Mary Clayton, on 23 Jun

1825 in Perry County, Ohio. (Jane Brown was born on 16 Mar 1807 in Perry County,

Ohio and died on 26 Feb 1886 in Indianola, Iowa.)

 

 

Joseph and Jane had the following children:

 

+   141 F      i.  Mary Louise MOORE was born on 24 Dec 1832. She died on 18 Nov 1918.

 

129. Joseph* MOORE (Elizabeth* GEST, Deborah* DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 20 Oct 1796 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 9 Feb 1856 in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

Bell-Cimino Family Note:  Joseph Moore (Highland Scotch)  Born 10-20-1796, Death 02-

09-1856.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~paslchs/1840drumorecensus.html

Drumore Township, Lancaster County,Pa., 1840 Federal Census index

 

Joseph* married Rebecca* WATSON daughter of John* WATSON and Alice* Dungan MORRIS before 1833. Rebecca* was born on 3 Oct 1806 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 19 Jul 1890 in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

Bell-Cimino Family Note:  Rebecca Watson Moore 10-03-1806 and 07-19-1890.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~paslchs/1840drumorecensus.html

Drumore Township, Lancaster County,Pa., 1840 Federal Census index

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~paslchs/1860drumorecensus.html

Drumore Township, Lancaster County,Pa., 1860 Federal Census every name index,

Post Office - Chestnut Level:  MOORE, Rebecca, Mary,Joseph,Marrisa

 

 

Joseph* and Rebecca* had the following children:

       142 M      i.  John G MOORE was born on 2 Feb 1833 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 18 Apr 1872.

 

+   143 F      ii.  Rebecca Ann* MOORE was born on 27 Jul 1836. She died on 21 Apr 1907.

       144 F     iii.  Alice E MOORE was born on 10 Dec 1838 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

Alice married Franklin WICKS on 1 Apr 1855. Franklin was born about 1836.

       145 F     iv.  Mary C. MOORE was born on 15 Dec 1838 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

Mary married William CUMMINGS on 6 Jun 1860. William was born about 1836.

       146 M     v.  William E MOORE was born about 1840 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

Drumore Township, Lancaster County, Pa., 1840 Federal Census index

 

       147 F     vi.  Tabitha MOORE was born about 1842 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

       148 M    vii.  Joseph D MOORE was born about 1846 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. He died in 1870.

 

 

Married Mary A. Watson

http://www.rootsweb.com/~paslchs/drumorebaphis.html

" 'A meeting was called at the residence of Mrs. Sarah Wilkinson in

Drumore township, Lancaster County, Pa., on the 29th of May AD. 1876

for the purpose of organizing a Baptist Church.' ... The following

members of good standing of the Colerain Baptist Church were entered

as constituent members:  mentions Watsons and Joseph D. Moore"

 

 

Joseph married Mary A. WATSON .

       149 F    viii.  Narcissa J MOORE was born on 8 Apr 1848 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 26 Nov 1880 in Wilmington,  Delaware.

Narcissa married James WESTCOTT . James was born about 1846.

 

 

Ninth Generation

 

140. Martha "Patty" DICKINSON (Thomas DICKINSON, Joseph DICKINSON, Gayen "Gaius" DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 25 Mar 1825 in Logan Co., Ohio. She died on 21 Sep 1872 in Westboro, Clinton Co., Ohio. She was buried in Odd Fellows Cemetery, Westboro, Ohio.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0198

"The Jackson/Dickinson Families" compiled by Helen T. Smeds 1982_From "The Life

Story of Curtis Jackson" by Curtis Jackson, brother of Thomas D. Jackson, given to

Maybell Jackson Haas on his 80th birthday,August 17, 1939:

 "The afternoon of the day Mother died I saw a man drive into our school (a Hicksite

school called Miami Valley Institute in Springboro, Ohio about 60 miles from the family

farm) grounds. I thought it looked like our horse and buggy and went to investigate. It

was Cy Moon driving our old mare 'Queen'. He told me about Mother and that they

wanted me to come home. We started out as soon as we could and drove home that

night. It was after midnight when we arrived. Cy Moon then told them that I had not

slept any on the way home. This was September 21, 1872. Mother was buried in the

Odd Fellows Cemetery in Westboro and I went back to school and finished the year

there._  "I will turn aside to tell what I know about my mother. I was only thirteen

years old when she died and a boy does not remember much that happened before he

was thirteen. I can remember very well when she used to have such awful spell of

pain caused by gall-stones, which finally caused her death. If it were now, she might

have been cured and lived many more years._  "I copy from the old leather-bound

Bible the following: 'Patty M. Dickinson born March 25, 1825, in Logan County, Ohio.'

She was one of sixteen children of Thomas and Maria Dickinson, some were older and

some were younger. Her name was Martha and all the Jacksons called her Martha, but

her brothers and sisters called her Patty. Another note from the Bible: 'Maried John W.

Jackson of Logan County, Ohio, on April 12, 1846.' Uncle Mart, who was one of

Mother's brothers, used to tell us about their wedding day. He and his wife, Aunt

Margaret, were late to the wedding because Aunt Margaret forgot the 'clout basket'

(diaper bag). They arrived in the yard just in time to see Father and Mother standing

up to be married and so watched the wedding through the front door. After the

ceremony all the guests ate dinner which Mother had prepared herself on the open

hearth. She learned to cook on a stove after she was married._  "I can remember how

she scolded me one time when I was trying to chop wood and Lena would come and

sit on the log where I was chopping. I got tired of moving around her and told her I

would hit her if she didn't stop sitting where I wanted to chop. She didn't stop so I hit

 

her on the nose with the edge of the ax. Somebody had to carry her in the house and

I thought she would surely die. Lena carried the scar yet. Another time I was in the

haymow and, as the floor was only boards laid loose on the joists, I slipped and fell

head first through the floor and caught my pant leg on a nail. I yelled and kicked and

tried to get loose till Mother came from the house and took me down. That time she

laughed after it was all over and nobody hurt."

 

Children

Lydia Jane Jackson  b: 25 MAR 1847 in Martinsville, Clinton, OH

Thomas D. JACKSON  b: 28 FEB 1850 in OH

Josephine Jackson  b: 26 JAN 1852 in Westboro, OH

Margaret Cecilia Jackson  b: 15 FEB 1853 in Westboro, OH

Curtis Jackson  b: 17 AUG 1859 in Westboro, OH

Helena Jackson  b: 6 JAN 1862 in Westboro, OH

Josiah Jackson  b: 25 JAN 1864 in Westboro, OH

 

Martha married John Walter JACKSON on 12 Apr 1846 in Ohio. John was born on 29 Dec 1821 in Clinton Co., Ohio. He died on 25 Feb 1886 in Westboro, Clinton Co., Ohio.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0208

From "Jackson-Dickinson Families" compiled by Helen Smeds, 1982

Census Information:

From 1860 Census for Clinton Co., OH, dated 6/25/1860, pg. 135, Jefferson Twp:

John Jackson, age 37, born Ohio, occupation farmer and grazer, value of real estate

$20,000, value personal assets $6,250. (This would be about $466,000 in today's

dollars -[1999])

Martha Jackson, wife, age 33, born Ohio

Lydia Jackson, daughter, age 13, born Ohio_Thomas Jackson, son, age 10, born

Ohio_Josephine Jackson, age 8, born Ohio_Margaret Jackson, age 7, born

Ohio_Curtiss Jackson, age 10 mos., born Ohio

_From 1880 census, Jefferson Twp., Clinton, OH, dated June 1880, pg. 10, family 195:

Jackson, John, w, m, age 58, head of house, m, occ. farmer, b. OH, f. b. SC, m. b.

SC_Jackson V., w, f, age 48, wife, m, occ. keeping house, b. VA, f. b. VA, m. b.

VA_Jackson, Lydia J., w, f, age 31, dau., single, b. OH, f. b. OH, m. b. OH_Jackson,

Margaret, w, f, age 27, dau., single, b. OH, f. b. OH, m. b. OH_Jackson, H.[Helena], w,

f, 18, dau., single, b. OH, f. b. OH, m. b. OH_Jackson, Curtis, w, m, 20, son, single,

occ. farmer, b. OH, f. b. OH, m. b. OH_Jackson, Josiah, w, m, 16, son, single, b. OH, f.

b. OH, m. b. OH_Also listed, Lydia Jackson (nee Sumner), John's mother, age 64,

born NC, value personal assets, $8,000

 

From "Jackson-Dickinson Families" compiled by Helen Smeds, 1982, pg. 64 and from "

History of Clinton County, Ohio - 1882"  Biographical Sketches pg. 1036:  John Walter

Jackson.

 "John W. Jackson, farmer, P.O Westboro, son of Curtis and Lydia (Sumner) Jackson,

was born near Martinsville, Ohio, December 29, 1821. He is the eldest son and fourth

child of a family of nine children, seven of whom are living. Mr. Jackson was reared to

manhood on his father's farm. In 1843, he went to Cincinnati, and was in the employ

of Samuel Perin for a time, and returned home in the fall. He then sold clocks for three

years, and, at the expiration of this time, he purchased a farm of 144 acres in

Jefferson Township, for which he paid $700. He farmed one year, and then removed

to Martinsville and subsequently engaged in selling windmills for Smith & Sawyer, of

Zanesfiled,Ohio. He was made manager of this industry and moved to Zanesfield. One

year later, he returned to Martinsville and subsequently to his farm in Jefferson

Township, where he has since resided, pursuing agriculture and stock-raising. For the

last fifteen years, he has reared and shipped fine hogs. He also bought and sold mules

 

for a number of years. Mr. Jackson owns a well-improved farm of 253 acres, besides a

good farm of 290 acres in Washington County, Iowa. Mr. Jackson started in life with a

very limited capital, but, by freely using the weapons which nature had given him and

by his good business management, he accumulated large property. He was married

the first time April 12, 1846, to Martha Dickinson, daughter of Thomas and Maria

Dickinson. She was born near Zanesfield, Ohio and died in September 1872. The

children of this union are as follows: Lydia A., a teacher; Thomas D.; Josephine, wife

of William Glasgow; Margaret C.; Curtis; Helena W.; and Josiah. Mr. Jackson married

the second time November 22, 1877. This time to Mrs. Lucinda V. Phelps, widow of

Thomas Phelps, and daughter of Thomas and Margaret Hogan, who came to

Martinsville in 1835. Mr. Jackson is a member if the Society of Friends. He is identified

with the society of I.O.O.F. and in politics he is a Republican."

 

From "Jackson-Dickinson Families" compiled by Helen Smeds, 1982, pgs.65/66:

"Some Jackson Lore" as recalled by Esther Stoughton

 "I can remember very well her (Hannah Jackson Dingee's) brother John Jackson

when he came to visit all of us. And when he got ready to leave, Mother asked him if

she shouldn't put him up a lunch to eat on the train. And he said 'No, Anna, thee need

not go to that bother. But if thee will just wrap me up several pieces of that hubbard

squash, that will be all I want.' and that is just what she done. And I remember Uncle

John had at some time had St. Vitas' Dance, but it never bothered him except when he

went to part his hair in front of a mirror; and us kids could not keep from laughing at

him, and mother said 'Shame on you.' But he did not care, but just laughed with us. I

have thought of that so often and was truly ashamed of myself, for we all loved him so

much. And I remember Eva and I ran and hid so we would not have to say goodbye to

him. And he blew kisses to us, and as he turned to go into the train, we saw him take

a handkerchief and wipe his eyes."

 

By Chas J. Hanlin

 "And this story I have heard Grandmother Dingee and Mother tell. Uncle John had

some thoroughbred horses that had been imported and were worth quite a sum.

Stallions and Jacks; One night one of the Jacks got loose and got to one of the

stallions and killed him. and forthwith Uncle John sent one of his men to Belgium to

get him another horse like the one that got killed."

 

From "The Life Story of Curtis Jackson" by Curtis Jackson, brother of Thomas D.

Jackson, given to Maybell Jackson Haas on his 80th birthday,August 17, 1939:

 "Father was a dealer in horses and cattle and his business took him away from home

a great deal. One time he was in Richmond, Indiana, talking with some acquaintances

when one of them remarked that if Lincoln were elected President he would sure have

war. Father agreed with them but he also thought that if we did not have war then

that it would only be postponed so he voted for Lincoln even thought he believed with

all Quakers that all war was wrong. After war was declared, Father with Ike and

Empson Hixon, sons of our neighbors, John Hixon, went to Camp Dennison near

Cincinnati to enlist. He was rejected because he was blind in his right eye, but the

others were accepted.

 "Father had been in ill health for a good many years, suffering with stomach

problems. His last sickness lasted five weeks, during which time Lydia, Lena, Tom, Mag,

Si and I were with him. Josephine did not come because Father had just visited her

and they had a little baby, Ralph. Father said for her not to risk coming, but that he

would like for Will to come in her place. He was there for a few days before Father

died in February, 1886. We buried him beside Mother in Westboro.

 "My father was a very wonderful man and I wish I could describe some of the things

he did and said in such a way that others could see him as I remember him. When he

 

was growing up times were different than they are now. Everyone was in very poor

circumstances. They all had to work all day six days every week for very small pay.

This caused people to figure very closely. Father had little opportunity to go to school

and when he did the teacher would be someone who thought he knew more than

there was really know then to teach. In the summer the boys worked on the farm

while in the winter they worked in the woods or got work in the city. Father usually got

his winter work in the slaughter-house in Cincinnati until he became quite a butcher of

hogs. For amusement they practiced lifting or chopping or anything which required

great strength. Father got to be a very strong man.

 "He was a great lover of livestock, especially horses. His great delight was to teach

the young horses on the farm to work and ride. This was probably the reason for his

success as a dealer in horses. When the Civil War came on he was offered the position

of inspector of horses for the cavalry and wagons. He rejected this and took a contract

to buy and deliver one thousand horses in Cincinnati. He never had a horse rejected.

When the war was over he bought what they called plugs. These were horses that

were old or not sound. He took them by boat to Tennessee and farther south where he

sold them to the planters who had sold all their horses to the Confederacy. On one of

these trips down the Mississippi he and his partner, Simeon Hodson, had a boat loaded

with horses when a flood struck them. They had put all they owned and all they could

borrow into the horses and were very scared and worried when the boat got out of the

channel and struck something so that it seemed that they would all go down twenty-

five miles from land. But all hands worked hard and they survived with the cargo.

 "Father's love of trading brought many strange animals to our home. There were two

buffaloes and then two china cattle with legs so short their bellies almost dragged the

ground. At one time he decided to make a collection of curiosities and have a tent

show for fairs, etc. He collected a monkey, a crocodile, a bear and a hand organ. He

soon tired of this and sold or traded off the stock so that he was out of the show

business.

 "Father's interest in horses led him to introduce mules into that part of Ohio where he

and Mother were living. He thought they would be good animals for farming and,

although his neighbors opposed him, he secured jackasses and raised mules. Later

when the other farmers were convinced of the usefulness of mules, he secured a jenny

and raised jacks to sell.

 "Father always prided himself as being a judge of human nature as well as a judge of

most everything else. He would do anything for any of his neighbors he thought to be

honest and deserving, but the others need not ask for any favors. In some ways he

was different from most men. In an argument he would stick to his point until he was

convinced and then he would give up completely and acknowledge he was wrong."

 

 

John and Martha had the following children:

       150 M      i.  Thomas D. JACKSON was born on 28 Feb 1850 in Ohio. He died on 17 Mar 1914 in Whittier, Los Angeles, California.

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=chaas&id=I0167

 

 

From a letter by granddaughter,Virginia Haas Gray Kashka, 2/1997:_  "

Thomas and Nannie May met and were married in Blanchester, Ohio. I

remember my mother (Maybelle) always saying that they came to

Whittier, California in the year of one (1901)."

From the 1880 Census dated 22 JUN 1880, Clark Twp.,Clinton,OH, pg.

38, ED 56, Family #393, lines 15-17 (microfilm):_Thomas Jackson, age

30, occupation: farmer, born OH, parents born OH_Isabel Jackson, age

28, occupation: house keeping, born Scotland, parents born

 

Scotland_Estelline Jackson, age 4, born OH3.

 

From "The Life Story of Curtis Jackson" by Curtis Jackson, brother of

Thomas D. Jackson, given to Maybell Jackson Haas on his 80th birthday,

August 17, 1939:

 "About forty miles east of Cincinnati and thirty miles from the Ohio

River, spread out over a small portion of the low and swampy Ohio

Valley, lies the little town of Westboro. At the time I have in mind, it

consisted of a store with a post office in one corner, a blacksmith shop,

a railroad station which was just a wooden platform, and about one

hundred and twenty-five inhabitants. Thirty years before this the whole

township of Jefferson had been covered with a heavy growth of timber;

some large, but a great deal of it small underbrush. Now there was not

even a five-acre field without stumps so thick that it was almost

impossible to plow or use a mower. The people had cleared what they

could each fall and winter and then the next spring planted it to corn or

potatoes, cultivating it with a hoe the first year. It was a common

custom among the farmers to hire a portable sawmill to move into the

woods and cut the timber that was large enough to saw into lumber.

This lumber was good for different purposes such as flooring, fences

and wagons._  "On a farm about two miles east of the town of

Westboro, about three in the afternoon of August 17, 1859, four men

were mowing hay with scythes. (There were no horse-drawn mowers

then, and anyway there were too many stumps to use one.) The farmer

was not there and these men were neighbors who had come in to help

with the harvest. They were probably John Hixon, John Holiday, and

Obe Sherwin. The farmer's ten-year-old son, Thomas, was also there. It

was his job to carry fresh water for the men. It was a very hot day and

they had all stopped under a tree to drink and cool off when they saw a

rather large man walking briskly toward them. This was my father, John

W. Jackson. The men stood up and waited till he came near, when one

said 'Well, John, any news?' He said, 'Yes.' Then addressing the boy, he

said, 'Well, Tom, you have a little brother and his name is Curtis, named

for Grandfather Jackson.'

 "Tom was very much pleased and that evening he told his boyhood

friend, Billy Bales, what great fun he would have with his little brother.

Billy had no brothers and he thought that brothers were a nuisance. He

told Tom that his brother would always want to tag along, that his

mother would insist on his going and that he would have to take care of

him on all occasions. This disturbed Tom's peace of mind very much. At

first he tried to show an aversion for his baby brother, but he just could

not help but feel differently. Very soon and always after to his last day

he thought a great deal of his brother Curt._  "There were three sisters

also to greet the new baby. They were Lydia, who was twelve years old,

having been born March 25, 1847; Josephine, aged eight, whose

birthday was January 26, 1852; and Margaret Cecelia, six years old,

whose birthday was February 15, 1853. My father's full name was John

Walter Jackson. He was named for an uncle, John Walters. His parents

were Curtis and Lydia Sumner Jackson. She was a distant relative of the

statesman, Charles Sumner. I also had a younger sister, Helena (Lena)

who was born January 6, 1862. My younger brother was Josiah (Si)

who was born July 25, 1864, named after my Grandfather Jackson's

brother._  "When I was a boy I was interested when Father would tell

 

us about the school where he went when he was a boy. His

schoolhouse had puntcheon floor and seats, and greased paper instead

of window glass. As I think of the schoolhouse where I and my brothers

and sisters and cousins attended it was just some better than the

schoolhouse where my father attended. It was located about a mile up

the creek and on the opposite side from our house. We walked along

the road or on the edges of the fields, wherever the going was best,

and crossed the creek on a log. When the weather was very bad

someone took us on horseback and we forded the creek. The

schoolhouse, a one-room frame building, was built on one corner of

about half an acre of land which had not very long before been in the

woods. The stumps of the trees with the ax prints still in them stood in

the yard. There was a place at one side where we could play ball, not

baseball, but three-cornered-cat or town-ball. There was a rail fence

around three sides of the schoolyard. The front next to the road usually

had a rick of cord wood for fuel in the big stove in winter._  "Inside the

schoolhouse was one room about 30 by 40 feet. Across one end was a

platform above which was a blackboard made of three boards each a

foot wide and painted black. Under this blackboard were three benches

of three heights to suit the different sizes of the pupils. We sat on the

benches to recite and when we wrote on the blackboard we reversed

our order and stood on the benches. The desks were arranged in rows

with the smaller ones in front and the larger ones in back. The whole

plant with equipment cost in the neighborhood of eight hundred dollars.

In summer the teacher was a woman. She was paid $18.00 or $20.00 a

month. In the winter they hired a man teacher with the wages of $20.

00 to $25.00 per month because a woman teacher would not be able to

handle the big boys who came to that session of school._  "Tom did not

go to school anywhere after I was old enough to know about it. He

wanted to be a harness-maker, but Father opposed him because he

wanted him to be a farmer. Father's argument was that when anyone

worked in a shop of any kind his salalry stopped when he stopped work,

but that a farmer's crops and live-stock grew while he slept and rested,

and made money for him even when he wasn't working. As a result of

this opposition, Tom did not put his mind on the farm work as Father

wished. It was my mother who kept harmony between the two._  "In

the early fall of 1875, brother Tom and Isabell Burnett, a neighbor

Scotch girl, were married. They rented the home place, and the balance

of John W. Jackson family prepared to move to Washington County,

Iowa, where my father had owned a farm for several years._  "Tom

and Nannie [after the death of his first wife Isabell, Tom married

Nannie Mae Pitzer], with their children Maybelle and John came west

and arrived in California in July 1908. To celebrate their arrival we had a

family reunion [Tom was the last of the Jackson children to move to

California] at Lydia's. All of the Jackson children were there with their

children. Lena and John Frazier with their three children came down

from Hemet in Riverside County where they had been living since 1908.

Si and Emma, with their two children, were living on their ranch on the

Orange County line. Mag and her two daughters, Josie and family and

Everest Glasgow and family all lived close to Lydia's on South Greenleaf.

Walter Glasgow and his wife came from their home in Los Angeles._  "

About two years later, Tom and I bought fifteen acres near Pico. We

divided it and they went down there to live. It was planted in oranges

 

and we farmed between the trees which were young. We took some

walnut trees out on our home place and planted some lemons on three

acres. We had had some fruit when in 1913, with a big crop on the

trees, there came a freeze which froze the trees to the stump. Then we

had to attent to them for another five years before we got another good

crop._  "Tom was the first of our family to go. He got sick and we

found that his heart had been bad for a long time. He grew steadily

worse and died in 1914."

 

 

141. Mary Louise MOORE (Joseph Dickinson MOORE, Joseph MOORE, Elizabeth DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 24 Dec 1832 in Morgan Co., Ohio. She died on 18 Nov 1918 in Vinton Co., Ohio.

 

Thomas married Mary Louise Moore, daughter of Joseph Dickinson Moore and Jane

Brown, on 30 May 1850 in Morgan County, Ohio. (Mary Louise Moore was born on 24

Dec 1832 in Morgan County, Ohio and died on 10 Nov 1918 in Vinton County, Ohio.)

 

Children

Sarah Ann WADSWORTH  b: 15 Oct 1852 in Hocking, Fairfield, Ohio

Elizabeth Jane WADSWORTH  b: 23 May 1851 in Morgan, Ohio

Mary Frances WADSWORTH  b: 11 Jun 1855 in Hocking, Ohio

Rebecca Melissa WADSWORTH  b: Abt 1857 in Hocking, Ohio

Robert Franklin Douglas WADSWORTH  b: 14 Mar 1862 in Hocking, Ohio

Malinda Annette WADSWORTH  b: 9 Nov 1866 in Hocking, Ohio

Mathew Wiley WADSWORTH  b: 20 Jul 1870 in Hocking, Ohio

 

Mary married Thomas Wiley WADSWORTH in 1850. Thomas was born on 10 Feb 1826 in Hartford Co., Maryland. He died on 11 Sep 1879 in Hocking Co., Ohio.

 

They had the following children:

       151 F      i.  Sarah Ann WADSWORTH was born on 15 Oct 1852 in Hocking Co., Ohio. She died on 18 Jan 1886 in Vinton Co., Ohio.

 

"Sarah married Samuel Brady Nixon, son of George Nixon III and

Margaret Ann Trimmer, on 15 Oct 1852 in Hocking Co., Ohio. (Samuel

Brady Nixon was born on 9 Oct 1847 in Smith Twp, Washington Co.,

Pennsylvania and died on 28 Apr 1914 in Vinton County, Ohio.)"

 

 

Sarah married Samuel Brady NIXON on 10 Apr 1873 in Hocking Co., Ohio.Samuel was born on 9 Oct 1847 in Smith Twp., Washington Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 28 Apr 1914 in Vinton Co., Ohio.

 

"Samuel married Sarah Ann Wadsworth, daughter of Thomas Wiley

Wadsworth and Mary Louise Moore, on 15 Oct 1852 in Hocking Co.,

Ohio. (Sarah Ann Wadsworth was born on 15 Oct 1852 in Hocking Co.,

Ohio and died on 18 Jan 1886 in Vinton County, Ohio.)"

 

 

143. Rebecca Ann* MOORE (Joseph* MOORE, Elizabeth* GEST, Deborah* DICKINSON, Elizabeth* MILLER, Gayen*, John*, John Derrek*, Robert*) was born on 27 Jul 1836 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 21 Apr 1907 in Lamoni, Decatur Co., Iowa. She was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Lamoni, Decatur Co., Iowa.

 

Rebecca is listed as “---, Rebecca, 1836, Pennsylvania” in the Crawford County, Iowa,

Boyer River P.O. records.

 

Links to Moore on Rootsweb

 

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:a28268&id=I548

 

Rebecca married John Joseph* MCKIM son of James W*. MCKIM and Elizabeth* BUCKWALTER on 3 Feb 1853 in Chesnut Level, Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. John was born on 28 Jun 1833 in Pottsville, Berks Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 15 Feb 1907 in Lamoni, Decatur Co., Iowa.

 

At least six of his children were born in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania before

he moved to Crawford Co., Iowa in about 1867 where two of his children were born

and died: Lorenzo, born 1869 and died 1878, and Harry, born 1878 and died 1878.

After 1878, John moved to Lamoni, Decatur Co., Iowa.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iadecatu/bioDocs/BIOLamoni.html

Under Biographies - Lamoni’s Passing Parade by Joseph H. Anthony, John McKim is

listed as:

"McKIM, John, Owner of McKim Hotel and the Livery, son, Martin managed the Livery,

grandson, Everett was chief handyman at both businesses. This recount of John McKim

is 3 and 1/2 pages." (Note: Grandson Everett was the son Joseph J. McKim and Emma

Mae Newcom.)

"A recount of Mr. Anthony's experiences with various people: Copied from Lamoni's

Passing Parade by Joseph H. Anthony, Page 160, By Jean Belzer, March 9, 2002

"JOHN McKIM

"One of the thriving business institutions during the 90's was the McKim Hotel, which

occupied the large frame building just north of the depot, now owned by John Foster.

In the early days of Lamoni John McKim had selected this site close to the depot as

being favorable to a business of this kind and had built his hotel here, where it proved

a convenience to the traveling public; and to further add to this convenience,

especially for the benefit of the traveling salesman who wished to make the

surrounding inland towns, he also established a livery service and built a large livery

barn across the road east of the hotel. His son Martin, as reliable and dependable a

man as ever conducted business in Lamoni, had charge of the stable, while Everett, a

grandson, was chief handyman and divided his time between both institutions,

wherever the need was most pressing. John McKim was one of the early pioneers in

this community, having been attracted to this locality through church interests, but

who as the years passed, allowed his religious fervor to become cooled to the extent

that he was openly critical of the church which had chosen Lamoni as its headquarters,

and he was not in the least hesitant in condemning many of the activities of its leaders.

He was one of those fussy, fidgety kind of men, quite excitable and impatient, and

when demands about the hotel became urgent and more than normally pressing he

would flit about the place here and there, from one task to another, giving none of

them adequate attention, and finally in desperation he would invariably step to the

door and call excitedly: "Marty, Marty, Everett, Everett," until one or the other of these

assistants came to his rescue and cared for the demands of the moment.

"On the whole, however, he was undoubtedly a clever businessman, and under his

supervision the business prospered. With his friends he was jovial and congenial, and

with adults and youngsters alike he was known quite universally as Uncle Johnnie. But

while he could be friendly and pleasant, and tolerant of the youngsters and their minor

familiarities about his place of business, he could also be, if occasion demanded, very

firm and severe. This fact I found out one day in a way that I will not soon forget.

"At the time I had a paper route and I procured my papers as they were thrown off

the train at the local depot. This particular day some traveling salesmen were there

when the papers came who were anxious to get one of them without delay, so I

stepped into the hotel office to open the bundle. I felt in my pocket for my knife to cut

the wrapping, and not finding it, I used the first thing I saw that I thought would serve

 

the purpose, and that happened to be the pen lying upon Uncle Johnnie's desk. As I

finished opening the bundle I glanced up and saw him glaring in my direction, one

hand stroking his gray beard meditatively, his eyes darting fire, and in a voice that cut

like a knife he shouted: "Young man, don't you ever let me see you do that again."

You may be sure I never did it again with his pen; and even today if I happen to use a

pen to open a letter or any similar missive I always think of Uncle Johnnie and his

warning.

"The chief reason his church associations had not turned out as he had anticipated

when he came to Lamoni was that he felt those who controlled the financial affairs of

the church were especially inefficient in that line, and if there was one thing that

irritated him it was what he considered the useless squandering of finances.

""I always paid my tithing," he would say - and I have heard him tell this story several

time - "yes, I paid my tithing when times were hard and I did not have it to spare, only

to see the bishop spend it for things which were unnecessary. And finally in

desperation I said, "Lord, no more tithing. I am giving no more money to the church to

see it squandered foolishly." And from that moment my financial affairs began to

improve and I have prospered ever since.

"When the conference of the LDS Church voted in Kirtland, Ohio, to close Graceland

College, Uncle Johnnie was jubilant. "Have you heard what the conference decided?"

he would inquire of the man on the street or in the shops. "They are going to close

Graceland College and thus put an end to a lot of this squandering of the church's

money. This act upon the part of the conference is wise and the fulfillment of prophecy.

" Then, if inquiry was made concerning the source of such a prophecy, he would

continue with an air of importance: "Yes, sir, on the day the college was dedicated I

gave that prophecy. At that time I predicted that after a short period of activity the

new college building would be deserted and finally become hidden to the world by a

rank growth of weeds, brambles and underbrush; its walls would crumble and its roof

would sway; its study rooms become roosting places for owls and bats and its halls

runways for rats and vermin."

"This was similar to the picture of desolation mentally visioned for the future Graceland

College by many people of that time. Uncle Johnnie McKim was not the only one who

predicted such a dire ending for this project, so enthusiastically and so recently

sponsored by the church and the community; and while he considered that such a

prediction could come only through inspiration in the form of a prophecy, in truth, with

many who were really acquainted with the hard facts, it was simply a matter of logical

reasoning. The only difference between his and other such predictions was that he was

probably a little more vigorous in presenting his views and a little more eloquent in

their declaration. In my opinion the miracle which did take place, however, was not in

the number or eloquence of the prophecies given, but in the fact that Graceland was

successful in keeping her doors open, that . . . but this is quite another story.

"While John McKim may have been somewhat eccentric in many of his views, on the

whole he was probably as reasonable as the majority of us, and if the following story

(one which was told quite generally and is probably authentic) can be relied upon, it

proves that though he may have been positive in his views he did keep his mind open

to conviction, and if the evidence was conclusive he could, like the proverbial female,

change his mind as often and as quickly as the occasion demanded.

"Upon this particular day Uncle Johnnie looked out of one of the east windows of his

hotel and noticed a large cloud of black smoke which completely enveloped the livery

barn across the street. He had never been a believer in fire insurance and had never

invested in it, but with this indisputable evidence that the livery barn was on fire

before him, he immediately realized the fallacy of his prejudices in this line, and in

haste he dashed from the hotel and immediately sought the advice of one of the local

insurance agents. "I want to take out an insurance policy," he exclaimed as he

 

breathlessly confronted the agent. Insurance on the hotel, the livery barn and

everything I own."

"The agent was familiar with his previous attitude regarding insurance and was not a

little amazed at the sudden change, and more or less curious at his impetuousness.

After a little questioning he soon learned what Uncle Johnnie thought was the true

state of affairs and noting his apparent despair he was really concerned over the old

gentleman's pathetic appeal for help.

"At this point in the conversation a third party entered the insurance office, a man who

had just passed the location of the supposed conflagration, and hearing enough of his

conversation to acquaint him with the details, he sensed the situation immediately and

hastened to explain:

"Your barn, is not afire, Mr. McKim," he said.  "Not afire!" shouted the old man, his

face distorted with distress. "It is all ablaze. I saw the smoke pouring from every door.

Don't tell me it is not on fire." "But it is not," assured the man, smiling in spite of the

older man's seriousness. "Some workmen are repairing the roof on one of the store

buildings and they set up their kettle for melting the tar just behind your livery stable.

It is the smoke from their fire and the boiling tar that you saw." A trip to the spot was

the only thing that could convince Uncle Johnnie of the truth of his story, and so all

three of them hurried to the location and found it just as the newcomer had said.

Uncle Johnnie admitted rather reluctantly that the joke was on him and started without

further ceremony toward his hotel.

"What about that insurance," said the agent, attempting to detain him. "Now would be

a good time to take care of it, and you may really need it sometime."

"Ho," snorted Uncle Johnnie indifferently, "my wife and I have carried the risk a long

time and I guess we can take care of it from now on."

"Yes, John McKim had his eccentricities. He was impulsive and he was critical, but to

those who knew all about him he demonstrated many good qualities. He was sincere

in his beliefs, and if he opposed a thing it was because that in his heart he felt it was

not worthy of his support. With some individuals it seems only natural to differ with the

majority, and many of his inclinations seemed to follow this tendency. In group

development, however, this tendency in moderation is an asset rather that a liability,

as it acts as an ingredient which tends to leaven the loaf. In memory we think of Uncle

Johnnie and the many constructive things he did contribute, and we know his works

entitle him to a place among those other pioneers to whom Lamoni owes her very

existence, and a place in Lamoni's passing parade."

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iadecatu/databaseDocs/dbMc.htm

 John’s death record  is listed in Death Bk D 1906-1913 . 9 . Decatur Co. Courthouse

and he is buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Lamoni, Iowa along with his wife, Rebecca,

and infant daughter (Mabel). All in Plot 330, graves 1,2, and 4.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iadecat2/rosehill.htm

 

 

John and Rebecca had the following children:

       152 M      i.  Joseph J. MCKIM was born on 20 Oct 1853 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. He died on 11 Jun 1937 in Harrison, Missouri. He was buried on 12 Jun 1937 in Lamoni, Decatur Co., Iowa.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iacrawfo/boyer1870.html

 Crawford County Boyer River PO, 1870 Residents, McKim, Joseph 1853

Pennsylvania

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iacrawfo/deloitnews.html

Denison Review 5-29-1885 - Local Matters

"We regret to learn that Mrs. Joseph McKim of Milford township, is very

 

sick with dropsy and consumption."

 

       153 F      ii.  Emma Louise MCKIM was born on 15 Feb 1856 in Drumore, Lancaster Co.,Pennsylvania. She died on 29 Nov 1947 in Crawford Co., Iowa.

 

Married Eli Taylor DOBSON

Children of Emma and Eli:

Blain Lloyd DOBSON was born on 5 Jan 1881 in Otter Creek, Crawford,

Iowa. He died on 16 Apr 1954. _Austin Marvin DOBSON was born on

13 Aug 1886 in Missouri. He died on 21 Mar 1939.

Alma Adelia DOBSON was born on 28 May 1892 in Utah. She died in

Independence, Missouri.

 

       154 F     iii.  Annie E. MCKIM was born on 10 Jun 1858 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. She died .

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iacrawfo/boyer1870.html

According to Crawford County, Boyer River P.O.  records, Anna was a

resident of Crawford County, Iowa in 1870 and was born in 

Pennsylvania in 1858.

 

       155 F     iv.  Mary Everetta MCKIM was born on 6 Jun 1860 in Drumore, Lancaster Co.,Pennsylvania. She died on 5 Apr 1914 in Deloit, Crawford Co., Iowa.

 

Mary Everetta McKim married William Riley Johnson 25 Dec 1877.

Their children were:

Cassie Amy b: 14 Dec 1878, Deloit, IA;

Mabel Louise b: 17 May 1883, Deloit, Crawford, IA; d: 21 Apr 1919

Brown Co., NE; Mabel Louise married Joseph Almon Jordan at

Hartington, Cedar, NE.

Jennie  b: 26 Oct 1884, Deloit, IA; d: 03 Jan 1909 Brown Co., NE; m:

Joshua Robson 26 Feb 1902, possibly in Laurel, NE;

Tracy W.  b: Aug 1885 in Iowa.

 

       156 F     v.  Alice C. MCKIM was born on 12 Nov 1863 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iacrawfo/boyer1870.html

 According to Crawford County, Boyer River P.O.  records, Alice was a

resident of Crawford County, Iowa in 1870 and was born in

Pennsylvania in 1863.

 

The Saint's Herald, pg 807, unknown volume:

Married:  McCormack-McKim:  At Lamoni, Iowa, October 23d, 1883, by

Elder Henry A. Stebbins, Mr. Elmer E. McCormack to Sr. Alice E. McKim,

daughter of Bro. John and Sr. Rebecca McKim, formerly of Crawford Co.,

Iowa.

 

       157 F     vi.  Rebecca Jane "Jennie"* MCKIM "Jennie" was born on 6 Aug 1864 in Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. She died on 20 Jul 1941 in Denver, Colorado.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iacrawfo/boyer1870.html

According to Crawford County, Boyer River P.O  records, Rebecca was a

resident of Crawford County, Iowa in 1870 and was born in

Pennsylvania in 1861. She is listed twice, once as "Rebecca" and once

as "Jennie" with Pennsylvania birth place and 1861 birth year (Family

records show date of birth as 6 Aug 1864)

 

Her name is given as Jennie Rebecca McKim on her marriage certificate.

 

 

When Rebecca's father died in 1907, she and William were living in

Hoxie, Sheridan County, Kansas

 

Bell-Cimino family note:  Rebecca Jane McKim Bell

(born) 8-06-1864; Lancaster Co., Penn;

(died) 07-20-41, St. Anthony's Hosp. Denver, Colo.

 

 

Rebecca married William Henry* BELL son of James* BELL and Fannie (Mary Frances)* MCCUTCHEON on 28 Mar 1882 in Lamoni, Decatur Co., Iowa. William was born on 16 Nov 1855 in New Providence, Clark Co., Indiana. He died on 17 Apr 1940 in Denver, Colorado. He was buried on 20 Apr 1940 in Denver, Colorado.

 

Census Records: 1860 Clark County, Wood Township June 2,1860

#48  BELL, James 30 - Frances 29 (female) - Thomas 9 - Elias 6 -

William H. 4 - James N. 2

 

William Henry and his brother, Thomas Jefferson, both moved from

Clark County, Indiana to Decatur Co, Iowa in about 1876.  William was

married to Rebecca Jane “Jennie” McKim in Lamoni, Iowa in 1882 and

three of their children were born there - Elmer Lorenzo (1883),  LuAda

(1885), and Milton Lilburn (1887).

 

In about 1888, William and Rebecca  moved to Nebraska for a few

years as sons Clyde Lloyd (b.1889) and William Lester (b.1892) were

both born in Nebraska, but their next son, Cleveland, (b.1894) was born

back in Lamoni, Iowa.

 

Gothenburg, Nebraska history:

<http://www.ci.gothenburg.ne.us/>

"Gothenburg reached a population of 300 and was incorporated as a

town on July 8, 1885. The first church was completed in 1886. A boom

occurred in the early 1890s when a canal, lake and powerhouse were

built to generate electric power. A barbed wire factory, pickling works,

galvanized iron works, lead pipe works, sheet copper rolling mill, brass

foundry, boiler iron works, and bathtub factory were some of the firms

that located in Gothenburg in the 1890s. The Financial Panic of 1893 (a

year after William Lester was born) put most of the companies in the

hands of receivers, and the boom turned into a bust. Resulting,

however, was irrigation for about 16,800 acres east from the lake, and

the community settled down to an agricultural future which has

continued to progress through the years.”

 

Migration:  Indiana; Lamoni, Iowa; Gothenburg, Nebraska; St. Joseph,

Missouri; Hoxie, Kansas; Denver, Colorado

 

William Henry and his wife Rebecca both died in Denver, Colorado in

1940 and 1941.

 

       158 F    vii.  Martha D MCKIM was born on 3 Dec 1866 in Drumore, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania.

       159 M    viii.  Martin MCKIM was born about 1867 in Iowa. He was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Lamoni, Decatur Co., Iowa.

 

http://www.rootsweb.com/~iacrawfo/boyer1870.html

Crawford County Boyer River PO, 1870 Residents:  McKim, Martin 1867

Iowa

 

 

       160 M    ix.  Lorenzo J. MCKIM was born on 3 Apr 1869 in Iowa. He died on 9 Jul 1878 in Iowa. He was buried in Deloit Cemetery, Crawford Co., Iowa.

 

Died of Diptheria

 

       161 M     x.  Harry Esau MCKIM was born on 4 Jan 1878. He died on 26 Jun 1878 in Iowa. He was buried in Deloit Cemetery, Crawford Co., Iowa.

 

Died at about 5 months old of diptheria.

 

       162 F     xi.  Mabel V. MCKIM was born on 4 Mar 1881. She died on 3 Aug 1881.

 

The Saint's Herald:

"McKim - At Lamoni, Iowa, August 3d, 1881, Mabel Vola, child of Bro.

John and Sr. Rebecca McKim, aged 5 months.  Funeral sermon by Elder

H.A. Stebbins"

 

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