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To our children -
I have included two ways of looking at your ancestry; a six generation circular tree   Circular Family Tree link  and this ten generation narrative ancestry. The first is more of a visual picture while the second has detailed information. This ancestry is as I know it here at the end of the year 2000.

This ten generation narrative is as generated for John (the middle child and thus the choice) but it is the same for each one of you. If you would like your own version, I would be happy to generate it and print it out for you. Be aware that if you want to print this yourself, it is some 40 plus pages long. I have omitted details on the living folks but they are available if you want a hard copy. This is to help prevent someone from looking at the webpage information and stealing your identity.

Dad

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Ancestry of the Cahill Children

[Ancestors of John Francis Cahill]

Generation One - Our Children

1 . John Francis 1 Cahill J.D. ( Gerald , #2) married Victoria Lynn Chesky and is still living.
Generation Two - Parents
2 . Gerald Francis 2 Cahill ( Charles , #4) married Elizabeth Sughrue Marie Fahey (see #3), daughter of Michael Laurence Fahey and Dorothy Quinn Sughrue.
Children of Gerald Francis 2 Cahill and Elizabeth Sughrue Marie Fahey (see #3) are as follows:
3 . Elizabeth Sughrue Marie 2 Fahey ( Michael , #6) is still living.
Born at 3 Essex Rd. the family home in Belmont, her mother and father left her and her siblings with a nurse and housekeeper and took the boat to Ireland for six weeks about two weeks after she was born. This was her mother's only trip to Ireland although her father made many "crossings."
She married Gerald Francis Cahill (see #2), son of Charles Valentine Cahill and Edith Louise Campbell, on 28 Aug 1956 at Our Lady of Mercy Church, Belmont, Middlesex County, Mass.. Lil's brother Laurie gave her away and Father Edmund Griffin performed the wedding. The wedding reception was held at Longwood Towers, Brookline, MA.
Generation Three - Grandparents
4 . Charles Valentine 3 Cahill ( John , #8) was born on 14 Feb 1904 at Mildred, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. He was born on 14 Feb 1904 at Murraytown, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. He was baptized on 28 Feb 1904 at St. Francis of Assisi, Mildred, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. He married Edith Louise Campbell (see #5), daughter of Ford Walker Campbell and Bertha Maude Baxter, on 9 Aug 1930 at St. Joseph's Church, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He died on 14 Nov 1978 at Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 74. The cause of death was a Coronary Seizure lasting only an estimated "minutes." He was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
He Took apart and rebuilt his first car, an Essex, in the garage on Chestnut Street. They previously lived on Ferry and Willow streets in Athens before moving to Chestnut Street in 1938. Grandpa Ford Campbell bought the house and "rented" it to Mom and Dad. Grandpa Cahill had a Plymouth and Charlie and Edo drove that after his death.
Children of Charles Valentine 3 Cahill and Edith Louise Campbell (see #5) both b. at Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, are as follows:
5 . Edith Louise 3 Campbell ( Ford , #10) was born on 17 May 1910 at Litchfield Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
The following newspaper article is from THE EVENING TIMES, Friday, Dec. 13, 1985. It was found in Edith Cahill's files with a hand written notation "This is when I was born."
Halley"s in 1910: The Changing Times
By Peter D. Usher
Penn State Department of Astronomy
Nothing happened when the tail of Halley"s Comet swept the world in 1910, to the joy of astronomers who had inclined to that view and of a Dallas entrepreneur who had sold comet insurance for two bits a week. The latter reckoned that as the comet struck the Earth he would be killed anyway and would not have to pay up.
The general anticlimax provoked an editorial comment that the comet had done a "tadpole stunt" by dropping its tail.
In the merry month of May, 1910 meteors, auroras, sunspots and the comet crowded the skies and the news. The earth's shadow covered the moon as well, but terrestrial events were by no means eclipsed.
Admiral Perry was hailed on a visit to Europe, having reached the North Pole less than a year earlier.
An International Anarchist Conference in Germany abjured "violent terrorism." Edward VII of England was laid to rest at Windsor at a time of growing tensions with Kaiser Wilhelm.
President Taft was urged to use his office to prevent massacres in Russia. The Turks were torching Albania and slaughtering its people. Immigration to America exceeded a million persons, who were defended as refugees from European oppression.
The European starling had been introduced into New York and was branded an "obnoxious bird," worthy of a "Horrible death at the hands of custom collectors." Its westward flight had reached Pennsylvania.
The Pittsburgh Press (as it was spelled then) reported that Model T fords were rolling off the assembly line at a rate of 188 cars a day. the paper cost one penny and the four cylinder, 20 horsepower, all-vanadium car cost $950.
Only extreme radicals were said to favor the rule abolishing the flying tackle in football. In baseball, the triple play was becoming more frequent. At Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, President Taft and the world champion Pirates attracted a record crowd. When the season ended the championship had moved across state to Philadelphia.
Co-education in universities was being abandoned. "A menace to any college," explained one president, citing the difficulty of presenting subjects to the comprehension of both sexes. Females, it seemed, had a tendency to enter into argument during recitation classes. They avoided classes of interest to males, who were demoralized by lower academic standing.
An editorial concluded that womens minds are "to be trained in great part to womens occupations." A bachelor don felt that women were "no better than the savages of old" because of a penchant for ornaments and hair-dos of "fantastic shapes and colors." He believed womens suffrage to be a form of insanity "which will soon end."
Labor unrest was widespread. In Pennsylvania, a striker was mortally wounded by a mine foreman. A special policeman, employed to protect strikebreakers at a New York bakery, was attacked and reserves were called out.
The mayor of Toledo clarified his role in a moral crusade against crime, whose economic basis he claimed to be involuntary poverty.
Police pursued slavers in Brooklyn. In Massachusetts, a bar and bottle bill was passed without enthusiasm and was hailed as a victory of Prohibition.
Halley"s comet measures the generations. Times change and permanence is illusion. Heraclitus said as much 2,500 years ago.
She married Charles Valentine Cahill (see #4), son of John Patrick Cahill and Mary McEvoy, on 9 Aug 1930 at St. Joseph's Church, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
6 . Michael Laurence 3 Fahey ( Patrick , #12). Michael Laurence Fahey was born on 18 Jan 1880 at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Mass. He was baptized on 22 Jan 1880 at St. Mary's Church, Charlestown, Suffolk County, Mass, At his baptism, his godparents were Theodore _______ and Hanna Kelleher. He married Dorothy Quinn Sughrue (see #7), daughter of Michael Joseph Sughrue and Elizabeth Frances Quinn, on 7 Oct 1922 at St. Aidan's Church, Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass. [ see Photo 7 "Fahey Wedding" ]
He died on 24 Aug 1955 at Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Mass, at age 75. Michael called his son Laurence and asked him to take him home from the office, as he wasn't feeling well. As the taxi passed by Mount Auburn Hospital he suffered a massive heart attack and although he was immediately in the Emergency Room the doctors were unable to save his life. Following a funeral mass at Our Lady of Mercy church, Belmont his was buried on 27 Aug 1955 at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.
A letter from Michael to his brother John:
LETTERHEAD OF THE HOTEL METROPOLE
Cork, July 12, 1899
Dear Brother John
It is hard to realize that I am so far away from home. Here am I in Ireland in the city of Cork, stopping at the above named hotel with no friend near me but myself. I wish that you were with me. It is quite a nice place all that I have seen of it but it cannot come up to Boston in cleanness. I think it is rather dirty. I can tell you better when I see you. We arrived in Queenstown this morning at about 11 and I at once proceeded to Cork with Mrs. O'Connell and saw that she was all right and then I left her. She is the mother of George O'Connell who works with you. Tell him that I saw that she was well fixed before leaving her.
We had a fine passage on the boat and I was not seasick once, but I was homesick I must admit. I had to work quite hard, from 5:30 in the morning until 8:30 one night and ten thirty (10:30) the next. I was awaken by the steward every morning and then I had to scrub decks. After that was done I had to help set the table and serve breakfast. After that came the "strap up" washing the dishes. I was not in that I am glad to say. We had two sittings at each meal and you must know how hard the work must have been. We had an hour or so during the day to ourselves but that was all. I will soon be ready for another week's work but I do not believe it will not be so hard. It will not be. Many was the times that I wished that I was in my own bed with you for companion, watching you sleep with your mouth open. I am now waiting for dinner. Queenstown is a very pretty place. I was up at 4:30 this morning looking at the Irish coast. The ocean all the way over was as smooth as Boston Harbor. All the soldiers in the fort to the entrance to Queenstown came out to greet us, wearing their red coats. I road up from the station in a jaunting cart.
This was probably the first of many trips to Ireland for Michael Fahey. At the time in 1899 he would have been 19 while brother John would have been 25 in 1899.
In about 1915 on another trip to Ireland, a day or two before leaving for America he was a special guest of Lower Ormand Regiment, Borrisokane No. 1 Battalion who gave a special parade and drill in his honor. At the banquet Mr. Fahey was introduced by President McKenna where he made the following address.
"Volunteers, I am very grateful to you for your kind reception. It was something which I did not look forward to when I returned again to Borrisokane. Let me tell you, Volunteers of Borrisokane, that I appreciate it from the bottom of my heart, and I will take back with me to America the memory of this night, and the scenes before me and which I have witnessed I whilst you were drilling. It certainly is an inspiration to a man to see such a fine corps as you coming here upon these grounds under the canopy of heaven and on your own Green Isle, and to prove true to the faith for which your forefathers fought for centuries. (cheers)
"I cannot help thinking while you stand before me that the galaxy of heroes who have shed their blood and made every sacrifice for their country are watching over you and guiding you to the destiny which our members of Parliament have fought with such remarkable perseverance and surprising success - Home Rule. It is only a short way off and it is what Ireland has to receive. That is what our forefathers fought for and I can claim them as mine, because my father was born only a stone throw from here. (applause).
"Volunteers, what a future is in store for Ireland within the next few years. It is fifteen years ago since I made my first visit to Borrisokane, but in that short time I have seen many changes which have delighted me, and I am always glad to inform my fellow countrymen across the water (hear, here), and your fellow-countrymen also for many were born and bred in Ireland. They are always delighted when I tell them of the great change for the better that has come over your country.
"Ireland is now going to receive the blessing which so beautiful a land deserves, the blessing, which only a free land can obtain. (cheers). The scene here tonight reminds me of the lessons which we were taught in our schools at home. I was born within the shade of a monument that was erected to commemorate the battle which freed our country from the shackles England had bound about her. (applause). For eight long years men such as you fought. Men who tilled the land and followed the plough. They went forth and fought the trained soldiers of England. Thank God you will not be called upon to make the sacrifice which they were compelled to make in order to win the liberty which the people of that country are now enjoy. (applause).
"Peace has its victories, and members of the Parliament whom you have been sending to the British House of Commons for the past twenty-five years have theirs, not through fighting the soldiers of England, but through ability, intelligence and unity they have won Home Rule. (applause). No matter what the House of Lords did with the Bill, we in America have been taught to know and believe that Home Rule is coming for Ireland.
"When I made up my mind last .February to visit your beautiful town I thought it would be my privilege to see your Parliament in Dublin opened, but I was intensely disappointed that it was not my privilege. But in a short time I am to hear and read of the opening of your Parliament which was closed in 1800. (applause). The magnificent scenes of the reopening will go down forever, and the Irish people will again emerge into prosperity which was theirs in centuries past. (cheers.)
"It is a beautiful thing, Volunteers, to return to one 's country and to tell of the prosperity that is now Ireland's, and which you men will enjoy. Your men are much too young to remember the famine which our people went through in the forties, but some of you may have heard from your mother's lips the suffering they went through. That now is all past, and with Home Rule your blessings will increase, and we in America will closely follow your actions. We in America are reading word by word what you are doing, and let me tell you that when we read in Boston that Mr. Redmond was raising an army, if necessary, to meet Carson's men we appreciated it. (applause.) But it will not be necessary for you to meet them, for King Carson's men, in my opinion, were taunts set up and can be easily blown down. We follow your actions and know we can depend upon you if the necessity arises to foil any action King Carson may attempt. (cheers).
"But as I have said it will not be necessary to make any sacrifices, but it is a beautiful thing to see you enter into your drill when the day's work is done, and I will take away memories of this night. I cannot adequately express my appreciation of what I have seen here tonight and the reception given me, and I will always remember it with pleasure and I will be delighted to inform my fellow citizens what I have seen in Ireland. (cheers).
"On my first night in Ireland I saw the volunteers marching through the city of Cork and I felt I would like to be one of them myself, but of course I cannot. Within a week I will be on my way home to America but I will be with you in spirit (cheers), and I hope that when I return in two years I will see the prosperity which I have already witnessed increased a hundred fold under Home Rule which I hope will be for all Ireland. (loud applause)."
At the conclusion of Mr. Fahey's address he was given a rising vote of thanks and made an honorary member of the Borrisokane Volunteers Corps, and it was voted that on his return in two years, he would be met on his arrival by the Borrisokane Volunteers headed by the Borrisokane Band and escorted to the Fahey homestead.
He was very active in community affairs and Irish freedom efforts in the 1910-20 period. It was during this time period that he made eight "crossings" to Ireland in fifteen years prior to this article. During this visit he was made an honorary member of the Lower Ormand Regiment of the Borrisokane Volunteers.
Many years later (circa 1990) Dave Powers who was a Charlestown native and assistant to President Kennedy, did recall Michael Fahey to his daughter Elizabeth with the words "the gun runner"! It is suspected that Michael collected funds for the Irish Freedom efforts and carried them to Ireland with him.
Michael served on the building committee for the Winn Brook school in Belmont and as a Director and Trustee of the Hibernia Savings Bank in Boston.
Children of Michael Laurence 3 Fahey and Dorothy Quinn Sughrue (see #7) were as follows:
She Barbara and Dick resided in Somerville, MA after their marriage and then moved to 160 Payson Road, Belmont in 1985.
Laurie ran as the Democratic candidate for Representative in the 23rd Middlesex District in the fall of 1964 on a conservative program of fiscal integrity and home rule.
He Worked for A.D. Little for many years. A Senior VP of Sea-Land in 1986.
Co-authored with Dr. Philip Donham in 1966 the book "Congress Needs Help" published by Random House of New York.
7 . Dorothy Quinn 3 Sughrue ( Michael , #14) was born on 2 Mar 1895 at Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. She married Michael Laurence Fahey (see #6), son of Patrick Fahey and Catharine Mahoney, on 7 Oct 1922 at St. Aidan's Church, Brookline, Norfolk County, Mass. She died on 15 Mar 1976 at Watertown, Middlesex County, Mass, at age 81. She was buried on 17 Mar 1976 at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.
Generation Four - Great Grandparents
8 . John Patrick 4 Cahill ( John , #16) was born in Jul 1869 at Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. He was born in 1870 at Williamsport, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. He married Mary McEvoy (see #9), daughter of Thomas McEvoy and Mary Brily, on 9 Apr 1891 at St. Adrian's Roman Catholic Church, Anita, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. The Rev. C. Wienker performed the ceremony and entered the bride's name as "McAvoy."
He died on 12 Jan 1940 at 106 Chestnut St., Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 70. He was buried on 15 Jan 1940 at St. Francis Cemetery, Mildred, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, after a funeral mass at St. Joseph's Church, Athens celebrated by Rev. Thomas P. Durkin, the pastor.
Children of John Patrick 4 Cahill and Mary McEvoy (see #9) were as follows:
It appears that all of their children were baptized at St. Francis Church in Mildred, PA.
At 16 when her mother died in childbirth, Kate stayed home and raised all her siblings. Her brother Francis said she was the only mother he knew and he always sent her Mother's Day cards.
Edith Cahill said John never worked in the mines and came to Sayre where he lived with the Fitzharrises. He was not a large man but dressed well, was very good looking; everyone liked him (a charmer) who lived by his wits.
Came to our house on Chestnut St. for his father's funeral with his wife Bessie.
Olene quotes Francis as saying John was away for years and no one knew where.
Daughter Anne lists her middle name as Elizabeth.
Notes in family bible on her marriage give a middle initial of "E." The Coveney girls were all baptized at St. Joseph's Church, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
He loved sports and went to all the Notre Dame, Army and Navy football games and followed the N.Y. Yankees. Also a "Sparky" he was a member of the Athens Volunteer Fire Department and the Dauntless Volunteer Fire Co. of Ebensburg.
Information on the death certificate was given by her father, John, within a month of her death; buried 29 Aug 1910 at St. Francis, Mildred, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania; d. 30 Oct 1910 at age 1.
9 . Mary 4 McEvoy ( Thomas , #18) was born on 3 Dec 1868 at Patterson, Passaic County, New Jersey. On his daughter Mary's death certificate, John listed his wife's maiden name and place of birth as Patterson (sic), New Jersey. She was born in Dec 1869 at New Jersey. She was born in 1870 at Patterson, Passaic County, New Jersey. She married John Patrick Cahill (see #8), son of John Cahill and Catherine McDonald, on 9 Apr 1891 at St. Adrian's Roman Catholic Church, Anita, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. The Rev. C. Wienker performed the ceremony and entered the bride's name as "McAvoy."
She died in childbirth on 18 Mar 1909 at Bernice, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, at age 40. She was buried at St. Francis Cemetery, Mildred, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania.
According to Edith Cahill, Charlie's mother, Mary McEvoy, died when youngest (number 10) child was born in 1909. The girl died too. She was about 37, I think. Her parents, Tom & Mary McEvoy lived in half of a double house and helped Pa's older sisters as there were seven who grew up in Pa's family - Thomas, Kate (Palmer in Elmira), John, Josephine Murphy, Regina Coveney, Charles and Francis. All are now dead; Pa was the last one.
10 . Ford Walker 4 Campbell ( Frank , #20) was born on 19 Oct 1880 at Litchfield Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He married Bertha Maude Baxter (see #11), daughter of Charles Melvin Baxter and Hester E. Thomas, on 20 Apr 1904 at Nichols, Tioga County, New York. He died on 17 Apr 1962 at Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 81. He was working on the roof of the Catholic Church in Athens when he suffered a massive stroke or heart attack and was dead before he hit the ground. He was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
He Played coronet in band that traveled to various cities for parades, including Boston as a young man. (ca. 1900-1920).
Children of Ford Walker 4 Campbell and Bertha Maude Baxter (see #11) are as follows:
11 . Bertha Maude 4 Baxter ( Charles , #22) was born on 17 Jan 1882 at Orwell Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. She married Ford Walker Campbell (see #10), son of Frank Campbell and Huldah Jane Carmer, on 20 Apr 1904 at Nichols, Tioga County, New York. She died on 15 Jan 1982 at Troy, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 99. She was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
12 . Patrick 4 Fahey ( Patrick , #24) was born in Mar 1843 at Borrisokane, County Tipperary, Ireland. The "Index to the Register of Baptism, Parish of Borrisokane, 1821-1911 AD" at the Catholic church in Borrisokane, Ireland contains the record of baptism for Pat Fahy (sic) on July 1, 1843 and giving the parents as Pat Fahy (sic) and Winny Hogan. Sponsors were Thomas Costeloe (Costello ?) and Una Kelly. He married Catharine Mahoney (see #13), daughter of Michael Mahoney and Julia Sullivan, on 11 Dec 1873 at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Mass.. On their marriage certificate Patrick is listed as 26 with an occupation of blacksmith. His parents' names are Patrick and Winifred Fahey. Catharine was 24 and her parents were Michael and Julia Mahoney. It was the first marriage for both and they were married by Rev. Daniel Healy in St. Mary's Church in Charlestown. Witnesses were Patrick Murphy and Hannah O'Brien. After the death of his first wife, Patrick married Ellen Carroll, daughter of Michael Carroll and Mary Murphy, According to family tradition, after Patrick's first wife Catharine died, he went down to the docks and married a young Irish girl just off the boat, Ellen Carroll. Michael L. Fahey was very devoted to his stepmother who raised the children. John the oldest was 10 when Catharine died while Winnifred the youngest was 3. Having a woman to run the house and raise the children was essential to Patrick.
A search of Archdiocesan records at Chancery up to 1905, did not turn up a wedding for Patrick and Ellen at either St. Mary's or St. Francis de Sales parishes in Charlestown.
He died on 22 Feb 1922 at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Mass, at age 78. He was buried on 25 Feb 1922 at Holy Cross Cemetery, Malden, Middlesex County, Mass.
He emigrated between 1866 and 1870 from Ireland. Mr. Fahey was a sterling Nationalist and a consistent advocate of Home Rule for his native land, Ireland circa 1915.
Children of Patrick 4 Fahey and Catharine Mahoney (see #13) all b. at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Mass, were as follows:
13 . Catharine 4 Mahoney ( Michael , #26) was born in Apr 1850 at Ireland. She married Patrick Fahey (see #12), son of Patrick Fahey and Winnifred Hogan, on 11 Dec 1873 at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Mass.. On their marriage certificate Patrick is listed as 26 with an occupation of blacksmith. His parents' names are Patrick and Winifred Fahey. Catharine was 24 and her parents were Michael and Julia Mahoney. It was the first marriage for both and they were married by Rev. Daniel Healy in St. Mary's Church in Charlestown. Witnesses were Patrick Murphy and Hannah O'Brien. She died on 17 Jan 1884 at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Mass, at age 33. She was buried on 18 Jan 1884 at Holy Cross Cemetery, Malden, Middlesex County, Mass.
14 . Michael Joseph 4 Sughrue ( John , #28) was born on 27 Aug 1857 at Nashua, Hillsboro County, New Hampshire. He married Elizabeth Frances Quinn (see #15), daughter of Charles William Quinn and Bridget Keenan, on 22 Jun 1892 at St. Patrick's Church. He died on 15 Apr 1926 in the late afternoon at his home, 328 Bay State Road at Boston, Suffolk County, Mass, at age 68. He was buried on 19 Apr 1926 at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. [see Photo 5 "M. J. Sughrue" ]
The Boston Daily Globe newspaper carried the following account of their marriage.
SUGHRUE - QUINN
Suffolk's Able Second Assistant District Attorney Married This Morning
Mr. Michael Joseph Sughrue, the much respected second assistant district attorney of Suffolk County, and Miss Elizabeth Francis Quinn were united in marriage this morning in St. Patrick's Church by the pastor, Rev. Joseph H. Gallagher.
The attendance was very large.
The bride was attired in a costume of rich white crepe de chine, embellished with knots of fine lace. The gown was made high coverage and long sleeves, the train being also of full length and circular.
Above the bridal veil she wore a chaplet of orange blossoms, and a tracery of the same was used as garniture for the bodice, and likewise to adorn the front of her gown.
Instead of a bridal bouquet she carried a diamond rosary.
There were no bridesmaids, the bride's sister, Miss Emma Quinn, attending upon her as maid of honor.
Miss Emma's costume was of fawn-colored crepen, with overdress of lace of a color to correspond with her gown and trimmings of pale blue velvet ribbon. She wore a hat made of tulle to match her gown, and carried a large bunch of jacquimenot roses.
The bridal procession to the altar was in this order: In advance were the ushers, Messers. Joseph and George Quinn, brothers of the bride; Daniel Sughrue, brother of the groom; James McCarthy, J. Porter Crosby and John Campbell.
The maid of honor came next, and behind her walked the bride leaning upon the arm of her father, Mr. Charles W. Quinn.
At the altar rail, attended by his best man, his brother, Mr. D. F. Sughrue, the bridegroom, awaited his bride. Together, attended by the maid of honor and the best man, they entered the sanctuary, and the marriage service was at once performed by the robed and vested celebrant of the nuptial mass which was to follow, and during which they continued to occupy places in the sanctuary.
The score of the mass, which was Weber's, in G, was rendered under the direction of Organist McGoldrick by a quartet consisting of Miss Louise Martins, soprano; Miss Jennie E. McCann, contralto; Mr. J. A. Marmaud, tenor; Mr. J. A. Mullen, basso, and other members of the regular church choir.
While those bidden to the marriage were assembling the organist played a wedding march by Wely. The bridal party entered to the strains of Mendelssohn's march and retired to those of Widor.
At the offertory Miss McCann sang Dana's "Salve Regina."
Of the costumes noticeable for their elegance and richness of material were the following:
Mrs. C. W. Quinn, the bride's mother, a rich gown of myrtle green silk.
Miss Nellie Quinn, mile green crepe de chine.
Miss Margaret Sughrue, lilac silk with lace garniture and velvet ribbon trimming, cut décolleté.
Miss Maime Sughrue, yellow satin, striped challie with lace and yellow ribbon.
Miss Alice Sughrue, white mull.
Mrs. D. Thurston, black grenadine, lavender lace trimmings.
Mrs. A. J. Norton, black foulard silk, jet trimmings.
Miss Millie Carrier, black lace over changeable silk.
Miss Minnie Bolton, cream colored challie, lavender ribbon and lace.
Miss Mamie Lally, ecru figured India silk, point lace trimmings.
Miss Cluin of Lowell, red silk
Miss Delia Carey of Nashua, black lace.
Miss Minnie Sullivan of Nashua, light blue silk.
Miss Margaret Sullivan of Nashua, black silk.
Miss Nellie Sullivan of Nashua, black silk.
Among those who attended the services at the church, and afterwards offered their congratulations to the happy couple at the home of the bride's father, 94 Blue Hill Ave., where the reception was held, were:
Mr & Mrs John P Santry, Capt and Mrs Hurley
Mr & Mrs P T Hennigan, Mr & Mrs G E Quinn and
Maj & Miss P E Murphy daughter
Mr & Mrs John Murphy, Mr Thomas Norton
Mr and Mrs W Peter, Mr and Mrs A V Norton and son Mr Harry Norton
Mr Joseph A Ryan, Alderman John F Dever
Miss Mamie Sughrue, Mrs Thurston
Miss Alice Sughrue, Mr Daniel Sughrue
Miss Margaret Sughrue, Miss Adelaide Ryan
Miss Nellie Lally, Miss M. Josephine Ryan
Mr and Mrs J Mullaly, Rev N J Murphy
Misses (illegible), Rev John I Lane
Mr and Mrs F J Crosby, Mr George Dougherty
Miss Minnie Bolton, Mrs E Sullivan
Miss Nellie Cassico, Mrs Jennie Sullivan
Miss Minnie Whitton, Miss Margaret Sullivan
Dr John Sullivan, Mr Frank Slagon
Rev Father A Sullivan, Lawyer John B Meran
Mr and Mrs Keegan, Mr Charles A Smith
Mr and Mrs John Field, Mr E F Donnelly
Miss Mamie Field, Miss Riddle
Mrs Thomas Clarkson, James J McCarthy
Mrs Julia Sullivan, J Peter Crosby
Lawyer P Sullivan, John Campbell
Among the many and valuable wedding gifts received by Mr. and Mrs. Sughrue were the following: Oil painting, executed by Miss Mamie Sughrue; banquet lamp, onyx table, candelabra, fancy chair, hall clock, ladies dressing case, easy chairs, library chairs, statue "Diana", silver spoons, statuary and bisque figure, The (illegible) works, dinner, breakfast and supper sets, dining set, etchings, engravings, silver services and silver in great variety.
At 5 o'clock this afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Sughrue leave Boston on their wedding journey.
Upon their return they will reside on Howard Ave., corner of Julian Ave., Dorchester and will be at home Wednesdays in October.


Explanatory notes by G. Cahill:
1. "Mamie" Sughrue is Mary, sister to the bride.
2. Her oil painting as of 1998 was in the possession of Richard S. Fahey in Belmont.
3. The Sullivans of Nashua, NH were in all likelihood relatives of the mother of the Groom, Julia Sullivan.
As a prosecuting District Attorney, he was famous for his ferocity during a trial. In another newspaper article appeared the following:
"The argument of Assistant District Attorney Sughrue in the Lang-Hagar-Reardon case Wednesday was so fierce and galling that the principal defendant fainted dead away in the dock. All who heard Mr. Sughrue's excoriation of the three prisoners averred they never heard such cutting, crushing, scathing things said in a court before. From the beginning to the end of his argument the accused were targets for the most merciless tongue lashing conceivable and no one was at all surprised when Dr Lank fainted. Anybody with a conscience would have down the same thing in a similar position."
Children of Michael Joseph 4 Sughrue and Elizabeth Frances Quinn (see #15) were as follows:
Eulogy by Robert J. Fahey on the occasion of Mildred M. Sughrue's funeral.
MILDRED MARY SUGHRUE
For those of us to whom she was "Aunt Mil" there is no one who better personifies in our ordinary world the life lived for others, or the gentleness, and the fruitfulness of the good Christian woman. In Mil we shared a truly divine gift, a gift so great that it is really hard to imagine our own lives without her. In the Jimmy Stewart movie that is rebroadcast every Christmas a man is given a chance to see what the lives of those around him would have been if he had not been born. For Mil not to have been given us by God would have been an unimaginable deprivation.
Try for a moment to think of Mil, just Mil, as I did yesterday after Elizabeth asked me to say something today about her. To try to isolate her, even merely in one's mind's eye, in order to think about her is almost impossible. Too many others, all part of her, crowd in.
Today it is popular to think that what is important about a person is their "self-realization", their "bliss", their individual accomplishments, their career, their special interests, even their possessions, any of the things that go to make up worldly distinction, renown, or celebrity.
There's little enough of those things to speak of in Mil's case. She was a teacher in Boston's elementary schools, not a beauty, never married. What we call "the world" takes little notice of such as Mil.
And Mil took, I must say, little notice of herself. It was as difficult to hold a conversation with Mil about herself alone as it would be to climb upright atop a beach ball in the ocean; you would simply slip off into talk of others' lives.
What did she amount to then, why are we here? Is it just because she was one of the family? Is it family duty?
I daresay that none of us could miss the meaning of Mil's life, so central to our own, so beautiful for all of us to see. But what was it? Can we say?
Her hospitality perhaps, the graceful, joyful, lifelong providing to others? Her humility, that did not call attention to itself, not even in a whisper? Her fidelity? There was that. To God, simply and strongly in worship and obedience. To her father and mother, and five generations of her family, to her pupils, her friends, her church, her country. Was it her endless joyful devotion to others? I can tell you, for having spent a day as a visiting student in one of her classes, kindergarten, I suppose, that that day of school for me as one of her pupils was little different from what she made of all our family gatherings, it was fun. She was fun.
The fun was there when she had us do The Wizard Oz and when her mother had us say the Rosary together. There is no way, really, to think about Mil even a minute without remembering happiness, always shared happiness, deep family happiness, in gatherings at 142 Beacon Street, at Pine Point, Goose Rocks, and in all our homes.
Nor can one have known Mil's life without seeing Christ as its foundation, His her charity and joy. We here because of what we learned from her and remember.
It would be very hard to believe otherwise than that in the basic reordering that must happen in Heaven, where we each will be given the place that we deserve, Mil will be among the most blessed.
And those of us whom she loved and served so well will know at last who she really was, in God's own heart, all along, our handmaiden, and surely, surely, His.
15 . Elizabeth Frances 4 Quinn ( Charles , #30) was born on 12 Nov 1867 at Preble St., South Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. She was born on 12 Nov 1868. She married Michael Joseph Sughrue (see #14), son of John Sughrue and Julia Sullivan, on 22 Jun 1892 at St. Patrick's Church. The Boston Daily Globe newspaper carried an account of their marriage that can be found under her husbands record above.
She died on 31 Mar 1958 at Chestnut Hill, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass, at age 90. She was buried on 2 Apr 1958 at Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.
She had one year of high school, then went to work as a clerk, mostly copying wills in the courthouse in back of the statehouse until her marriage.
Generation Five - Great Great Grandparents
16 . John 5 Cahill ( (--?--) , #32) was born between 1833 and 1835 at County Sligo, Ireland. The year 1833 is calculated from his age at death on his burial record given as 69. His death certificate states he was born in Ireland and died at 67 and thus he would have been born in 1835. He married Catherine McDonald (see #17), daughter of John McDonald and Mary Gainer, in 1868 at St. Basil's Church, Dushore, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. He died on 27 Jun 1902 at Murray Mines, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. Consumption was listed as cause of death. He was buried at St. Basil's Cemetery, Dushore, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania.
Supposedly three Cahill brothers came from Sligo, Ireland to New York City. They were brought over by coal barons to work the mines in the Scranton area. After the mines opened in Sullivan Co. (Murraytown, near Dushore, PA) they came there and lived in Bernice.
I have assigned Mary Ann and Willie to John and Catherine as their children for the following reasons:
(1). They are listed on the tombstone that reads "Children of John and Catharine Cahill".
(2). Although Mary May (Patrick's wife) was also on this tombstone, I do not think they are her children because she was married ca. 1871 and had children in 1872, 74, and 77 before she died in 1877. Thus there does not appear to be any missing children.
(3). There is a large gap between John and Catharine's children James b. 1875 and Catherine b. 1885.
(4). Since neither Mary Ann nor Willie is listed in the 1880 census they were probably born after the census was taken during the summer.
Thus, I conclude that these two are most likely the children of John and Catharine Cahill and indeed may have been twins. Because the gravestone is unreadable as to the age of death of these two children, it is only speculation that they might have been twins and as to their birth date. (GFC comment).
Children of John 5 Cahill and Catherine McDonald (see #17) were as follows:
She was a very beautiful woman who was always well dressed and kept a spotless home. According to Kate Cahill Palmer via her daughter Christina, she tried to adopt either one of the Palmer children or one of Tom & Molly Cahill's. She wanted a child with Cahill bloodline.
17 . Catherine 5 McDonald ( John , #34) was born on 13 Jul 1846 at Ireland. She was born in 1848 at Ireland birth date calculated from death in 1894 at age 46; i.e. born in 1848. She married John Cahill (see #16), son of (--?--) Cahill, in 1868 at St. Basil's Church, Dushore, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. She died on 1 Feb 1894 at Bernice, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, at age 47 cause of death listed as an accident. She was buried at St. Basil's Cemetery, Dushore, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania.
Catherine McDonald was one of four sisters who came and settled near Dushore. She married John in St. Basil's Church, Dushore and they are buried in that cemetery. Catherine was kicked by a cow and died in her early 40's. Had John, Michael, Kate Fitzharris, Nell Fell, and James. All finally lived in Sayre. She used to smoke a corncob pipe and would walk from Bernice to Williamsport through the woods to visit her sisters. [In today's driving distance this is 47 miles!]
Her sisters married men named Sick, Donoughy, and Kelly from Dushore area. (These surnames still exist today in the Dushore area.).
18 . Thomas 5 McEvoy was born on 12 Jun 1838 at Ireland. He was born in 1842 at Ireland. He was born in Mar 1848 at Ireland. He married Mary Brily (see #19) circa 1861. They were probably married in England, possibly the Liverpool area where many from Ireland lingered for a short while waiting for transportation to America.[GFC comment]. He married Mary Brily in 1866. He died on 14 Dec 1926 at Sayre, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 88. He was buried at St. Francis Cemetery, Mildred, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania.
He and Mary Brily emigrated in 1871.
Children of Thomas 5 McEvoy and Mary Brily (see #19) were:
19 . Mary 5 Brily was born in 1844 at England. She was born in 1848. She was born in Jan 1849 at England. She married Thomas McEvoy (see #18) circa 1861. They were probably married in England, possibly the Liverpool area where many from Ireland lingered for a short while waiting for transportation to America.[GFC comment]. She married Thomas McEvoy in 1866. She died on 18 Mar 1912 at Murraytown, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. She died in 1922. She was buried at St. Francis Cemetery, Mildred, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania.
She and Thomas McEvoy emigrated in 1871.
20 . Frank 5 Campbell ( Daniel , #40) was born on 4 Mar 1855 at Litchfield Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He married Huldah Jane Carmer (see #21), daughter of Silas Brink Carmer and Ann Eliza Keyzer. He died in Jan 1930 at Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 74. He was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Children of Frank 5 Campbell and Huldah Jane Carmer (see #21) were:
21 . Huldah Jane 5 Carmer ( Silas , #42) was born on 22 Oct 1855 at Litchfield, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. She married Frank Campbell (see #20), son of Daniel Campbell and Leah Frederick. She died in Jan 1931 at Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 75. She was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
22 . Charles Melvin 5 Baxter ( Clark , #44) was born on 20 Jul 1855 at Rome, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He was born in Aug 1855 at Pennsylvania. He was born in Nov 1855 at Ghent, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He was born on 20 Nov 1855. He was born in 1860. He married Hester E. Thomas (see #23), daughter of Morgan Thomas and Jane Evans, on 5 Feb 1879. He married Hester E. Thomas, daughter of Morgan Thomas and Jane Evans, on 2 May 1879 at Rome, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He died on 17 Nov 1922 at Nichols, Tioga County, New York.
Children of Charles Melvin 5 Baxter and Hester E. Thomas (see #23) were as follows: [ see Photo 8 "The Tree Baxter Sisters" ]
23 . Hester E. 5 Thomas ( Morgan , #46) was born on 3 Oct 1859 at Neath, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. She was born in 1860. She was born in 1861. She married Charles Melvin Baxter (see #22), son of Clark Lindly Baxter and Terressa Brown Taylor, on 5 Feb 1879. She married Charles Melvin Baxter, son of Clark Lindly Baxter and Terressa Brown Taylor, on 2 May 1879 at Rome, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. She died on 30 Jan 1941 at Nichols, Tioga County, New York, at age 81. She died in 1942.
When she was a babe, her father, Morgan Thomas, anxious to make money, had the gold fever and went to a gold field. He was gone several years and there are no indications of any success. While he was gone, Hester had either scarlet fever or diphtheria and was near death for several days. Thomas and Mary her siblings died as did many others in the community. Since Morgan was gone west, Jane's brother Evan Evans stayed with her many nights to help her and John take care of the sick ones.
Source: Copy of a letter sent by LaVeta Denman to Maude Campbell of a letter to Mary Charlton in Seattle from SOW, presumably Sarah O. Whipple.
When her mother died with the birth of her sister Mary in 1867, Hester who was about eight or nine went with her father (and presumably her new stepmother) to Scranton where she went to school. When he was killed in a mine accident in 1871 (Hester was 12) she returned to Bradford county where she lived with her half-sister Ann Phillips and her husband Arthur Hines.
24 . Patrick 5 Fahey was born in Ireland. He married Winnifred Hogan (see #25). He died in Ireland.
Children of Patrick 5 Fahey and Winnifred Hogan (see #25) were:
25 . Winnifred 5 Hogan was born in Ireland. She married Patrick Fahey (see #24). She died in Ireland.
26 . Michael 5 Mahoney was born in Ireland. He married Julia Sullivan (see #27).
Children of Michael 5 Mahoney and Julia Sullivan (see #27) were as follows:
He emigrated in 1870 from Ireland.
27 . Julia 5 Sullivan was born in Ireland. She married Michael Mahoney (see #26).
28 . John 5 Sughrue ( Dennis , #56) was born in 1833 in County Kerry, Ireland. He married Julia Sullivan (see #29), daughter of Daniel Sullivan and Bridget (--?--), on 31 May 1856 in Nashua, Hillsboro County, New Hampshire. He died on 6 Jun 1889 in 102 George Street, Roxbury (Boston), Suffolk County, Mass,. His daughter Anna found him dead in bed when she went to call him for breakfast. He may have died of heart disease according to his death certificate. He was buried in Hudson, Hillsboro County, New Hampshire.
They resided at various times as follows:
1855 to 1863 in Nashua, NH
1863 to 1880 at 98 1/2 George Street, Roxbury, MA
1825 supposedly moved back to NH.
In 1889 they were living at 102 George Street, Boston, MA at the time of his death.
Children of John 5 Sughrue and Julia Sullivan (see #29) were as follows: [ see Photo 4 "Summer Outing" ]
He graduated from Harvard Medical School as an M.D. in 1898.
He was a Spanish American and WW I veteran. He was a Lieutenant Commander in construction.
She was a kindergarden teacher in Boston.
29 . Julia 5 Sullivan ( Daniel , #58) was born in 1835 in County Cork or Kerry, Ireland. She married John Sughrue (see #28), son of Dennis Sughrue and Mary (--?--), on 31 May 1856 in Nashua, Hillsboro County, New Hampshire. She died on 27 Apr 1928 in 36 Hartford Street, Dorchester, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. She was buried on 30 Apr 1928 in Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.
Julia was living at 36 Hartford St. Dorchester, MA in 1928 when she died.
30 . Charles William 5 Quinn ( Cormack , #60) was born in 1840 in Easton, Bristol County, Mass. He was born in Feb 1841 in Mass. He married Bridget Keenan (see #31), daughter of Peter Keenan and Ann McArdle, on 26 Nov 1862 in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.. He is listed as William C. Quinn but the rest of the data clearly indicates he is Charles William Quinn.
They were married on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving by a Peter Mendetti. Priest or J.P. ?
The 1900 U.S. Census states she had 10 children of whom eight were living. (Who are the missing children? (GFC comment)). He died in 1910 in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. He was buried on 30 Dec 1910 in Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass. He died in 1915 in North Easton, Bristol County, Mass.
Children of Charles William 5 Quinn and Bridget Keenan (see #31) were as follows: [ see Photo 2 "Quinn Family" ]
Aunt Helen lived in Portland where her husband was a floorwalker. Later lived in Fall River.
A teetotaler, Joseph was a bartender for his father. He was also an epileptic. Family was fairly poor.
31 . Bridget 5 Keenan ( Peter , #62) was born in May 1839 in County Donegal, Ireland. She married Charles William Quinn (see #30), son of Cormack Quinn and Ann Doherty, on 26 Nov 1862 in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.. He is listed as William C. Quinn but the rest of the data clearly indicates he is Charles William Quinn.
They were married on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving by a Peter Mendetti. Priest or J.P. ?
The 1900 U.S. Census states she had 10 children of whom eight were living. (Who are the missing children? (GFC comment)). She died on 5 Aug 1906 in Boston, Suffolk County, Mass, at age 67. She was buried on 6 Aug 1906 in Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Boston, Suffolk County, Mass.
Generation Six - GGGreat Grandparents
. 32 . (--?--) 6 Cahill. There were three sons who emigrated to the United States, John, Patrick, and Michael.
Children of (--?--) 6 Cahill and an unknown spouse all b. in County Sligo, Ireland, were as follows:
34 . John 6 McDonald was born in 1833 in Ireland. He married Mary Gainer (see #35). He died at Dushore area, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania.
He emigrated in 1846.
Children of John 6 McDonald and Mary Gainer (see #35) were as follows:
Pauline Holcombe wrote, I remember Mrs. Wendell Sick. She was a small woman with tight little dark curls - never long enough that she had to "put her hair up" in days when nobody had "bobbed" hair. My father owned some land across the street from Uncle Wendell (he was my grandmother's brother) and Mrs. Sick was always "nice to us kids" when we went down to the "Mutchler lot" to play.
My grandmother said that Uncle Wendell and the little McDonald girl were in love and wanted to get married, but her parents objected to the young shoemaker. She was under age (I don't know what age) I guess and they thought they could prevent her marriage. But the Overton priest said he'd marry them. Her mother heard about it and came into the church and up the aisle and tried to take her out by the hair, but the priest said no she was already married. Mrs. McDonald went home and had nothing to do with Sarah until the first child was born, then she walked from their home on the Laporte road this side of Ringdale, carrying a high chair as a gift, to Overton where the Sick's lived at the time. They "made up" I guess.
The distance from Ringdale to Overton is over ten miles.
35 . Mary 6 Gainer was born in 1822 in Ireland. She married John McDonald (see #34). She died in Dushore area, Sullivan County, Pennsylvania.
She emigrated in 1850. She would walk from Dushore to Williamsport to visit her daughter Ellen with a roll of butter and other goodies. There was no road and only a path through the woods. Jane Dunfee quotes her father telling the story many times.
40 . Daniel 6 Campbell ( Jacob , #80) was born on 14 Aug 1830 in District #2 at the junction of roads #224 and #337, Litchfield Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, This farm was known as the T. W. Brink farm in later years. He married Leah Frederick (see #41), daughter of Philip Frederick. He died on 14 Jun 1914 at age 83. He was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Children of Daniel 6 Campbell and Leah Frederick (see #41) were:
41 . Leah 6 Frederick ( Philip , #82) was born on 13 Aug 1839. She married Daniel Campbell (see #40), son of Jacob Campbell and Elizabeth Struble. She died on 7 Dec 1903 at age 64. She was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
42 . Silas Brink 6 Carmer was born on 16 Apr 1826 in New Jersey. He married Ann Eliza Keyzer (see #43), daughter of Henry Keyser and Huldah (--?--), on 3 Sep 1846 in Sussex County, New Jersey. He died in Apr 1904 in Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. He was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Children of Silas Brink 6 Carmer and Ann Eliza Keyzer (see #43) were as follows:
43 . Ann Eliza 6 Keyzer ( Henry Keyser , #86) was born on 24 Aug 1828 in Wantage, Sussex County, New Jersey. She married Silas Brink Carmer (see #42) on 3 Sep 1846 at Sussex County, New Jersey. She died in Jan 1893 at Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 64. She was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
There are two special antique items from Ann Eliza Keyzer that survive; her sampler made in Sussex County, NJ in 1839 and the "Shaker" rocking chair that according to Edith Campbell Cahill was brought from New Jersey to Bradford County about 1847.
The top five lines of the sampler contain the letters of the alphabet and numbers. These were practice lines. In line six, about half way across, starts the following message.
"Ann Eliza Kyser, Her work aged
11 years | July the 20. Sussex, County, New Jersey +
Forget + not + your + instructress + SS + 1839 + AEK +"
[In 1995 this sampler was in the possession of G. Cahill in Belmont.]
The name has also been spelled KEYSER but since the sampler and her tombstone and that of her father read KEYSER that is the spelling I have used.
44 . Clark Lindly 6 Baxter ( Moses , #88) was born in 1823 in New York. He was born in 1827. He was born on 20 Jul 1827 in Masonville, Delaware County, New York. He married Terressa Brown Taylor (see #45), daughter of William Taylor and Sally Vasbinder, on 20 Aug 1847 at Sheshequin, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. They set up housekeeping in the wilds of Ghent Township per Mrs. Sweeney. He died in 1898. He died on 29 Jan 1898 at North Orwell, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 70. He was buried at North Orwell Cemetery, North Orwell, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Supposedly he liked to slide on the ice with his bare feet in the winter. In an 1888 letter from Jay Baxter to Rev. Charles Weeks, Clark Lindley was living in Ghent, PA but reported to be very feeble.
Children of Clark Lindly 6 Baxter and Terressa Brown Taylor (see #45) were as follows:
Mrs. Sweeney called them Uncle Bert and Aunt Nett.
He lost three fingers on his right hand in an accident at Athens Novelty Works. Jesse was from North Orwell on 1 Mar 1893.
45 . Terressa Brown 6 Taylor ( William , #90) was born in 1828. She was born on 27 Jan 1828 at Pennsylvania. She married Clark Lindly Baxter (see #44), son of Moses Tyler Baxter and Phaelie Rose, on 20 Aug 1847 at Sheshequin, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. They set up housekeeping in the wilds of Ghent Township per Mrs. Sweeney. She died in 1907. She died on 30 Apr 1907 at Ghent, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 79. She was buried in May 1907 at North Orwell Cemetery, North Orwell, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
46 . Morgan 6 Thomas ( David , #92) was born in South Wales. He married Jane Evans (see #47), daughter of Israel Evans and Nancy Jones, circa Jan 1859. He married Margaret Rose circa 1868. He died in 1871 at Scranton area, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania. Morgan Thomas died in the coalfields near Scranton where he was working as a carpenter.
Have been unable to locate any information as to when, where, or how he died or is buried. (GFC)..
Morgan Thomas and the Gold Rush
Morgan Thomas reportedly left his wife and new daughter Hester to go west searching for gold in about 1860. To try and confirm this I did some research on whether a gold rush did take place at that time. After all, how does a farmer in rural backwoods Susquehanna county become aware of the gold rush? It would have to be big news.
At the end of the 1850s, the U.S. was expanding westward; railroads had advanced to the Mississippi River and talk was underway of a transcontinental railroad to the West Coast. People had already migrated from the east to the West coast but much of the middle of the country was still relatively unsettled. The famous California Gold discovery took place in 1848 and the Gold Rush followed. In the last years of 1850 gold was also discovered in the Pikes Peak region of Colorado. Thus it is highly likely that Morgan Thomas would have heard of the gold to found in the West and would have joined the Gold Rush.
The following is taken from Grolier's Encyclopedia, Copyright 1995 by Grolier Electronic Publishing, Inc.
Although gold had been mined in western Georgia in the late 1830s, the greatest gold rush in the history of the United States began with the discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill on the American River in northern California on Jan. 24, 1848. When word reached San Francisco, thousands from that city and other parts of California flocked to the region. The great rush, however, began in 1849. California's population grew from about 14,000 in 1848 to 100,000 in 1850. That number increased to 250,000 by late 1852 and to 380,000 by 1860. While the majority of immigrants were from the United States, forty-niners also came from China, Australia, many Latin American nations, and all parts of Europe to prospector's camps like Yreka, Spanish Bar, and Grass Valley.
Over the next decade, three mining regions developed in California. The first was in the mother-lode region of the Sierra Nevada from Sutter's Mill south to Mariposa. The second was to the north in Nevada County. The third area, in the northern coastal ranges west of Shasta, was never exploited fully because of its isolation and rough terrain.
The earliest placer miners sought the eroded gold in the form of dust, flakes, and nuggets. Found in streambeds and in gravels laid down by ancient rivers, this supply of gold was exhausted quickly, and miners were forced to turn to other techniques requiring greater cooperation, sophistication, and expenditure. Eventually deep mines were dug to tap the original deposits of gold. Rock was hauled to the surface, crushed, and treated to extract the precious dust. Such work, however, required huge amounts of capital, and the individual placer miner either went to work as a wage laborer, returned home, or wandered on to gold strikes in Colorado, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, and Arizona between 1859 and 1890. Subsequent gold strikes in Australia (1851), the TRANSVAAL (1886) in South Africa, the KLONDIKE (1896), and ALASKA (1898) produced similar sequences of events.
The gold rush drew not only fortune hunters but also merchants, artisans, and farmers to the American West. This boom in turn encouraged construction of wagon roads and railroads and attracted essential outside capital. Gold production provided wealth for an expanding American economy and stimulated technological advances later used elsewhere in the United States and the world.
A note in Edith Cahill's handwriting:
"Oct. 1976 - Maude Campbell told me this:
Morgan Thomas returned to Wales for a visit and brought back as presents to daughter, Hester, velvet and green silk. Marion Simonds has the velvet - never made up. The green silk made into a dress for Grandma, Hester Thomas Baxter, pieces of material are in "Crazy Quilt" Maude made in 1904 which I have. Aunt Anna Bowen had the dress. As he was killed in mining accident (he was a carpenter) in Scranton when Hester was 12 - it was before then. Hester then lived with her half-sister, Anne Phillips Hine until she married Charles Melvin Baxter at 18. Maude was born when she was 21."
Children of Morgan 6 Thomas and Jane Evans (see #47) both b. at Neath, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, were as follows:
Mary's mother died about two weeks after Mary's birth, possibly as a result of childbirth. After her mother died, Mary was raised by relatives in Susquehanna county. Her sister Hester who was 9 years old went with her father to Scranton where she went to school until he was killed 1871. She then came back to Bradford County where she lived with her half-sister Ann Phillips who had married a widower, Edwin Hines.
I suspect it may have been her Uncle, Jane's brother, Evan Evans and his wife that took Mary in as she appears to have been very close to her cousin, Sarah O. Evans Whipple. Her father, Morgan Thomas, went to work in the coalmines in Scranton as a carpenter. I suspect as a way of bringing in additional money to help support his family. (GFC).
47 . Jane 6 Evans ( Israel , #94) was born on 1 May 1822 at Cardiganshire, South Wales. She married John Phillips circa 1842. She married Morgan Thomas (see #46), son of David Thomas and Ann Jones, circa Jan 1859. She died on 1 Oct 1867 at age 45. She died on 16 Oct 1867 at near Clifford, Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, at age 45. She was buried at Welsh Congregational Church graveyard, Neath, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Born and married in Wales, Jane emigrated to America as a young woman (ca. 20) with her mother, grandmother, and brothers Evan and Thomas and sister Elizabeth. She emigrated on 4 Jul 1841 from Wales. About 1863, an epidemic of scarlet fever or diphtheria killed her daughter May, her son Thomas, and many others in the community and nearly so her daughter Hester. Since Morgan had gone west to seek his fortune in the gold fields, Jane's brother Evan Evans stayed with her many nights to help her and John take care of the sick ones.
56 . Dennis 6 Sughrue was born at Ireland. He married Mary (--?--) (see #57). He died at Ireland.
Children of Dennis 6 Sughrue and Mary (--?--) (see #57) were:
57 . Mary 6 (--?--) married Dennis Sughrue (see #56).
58 . Daniel 6 Sullivan was born at Ireland. He married Bridget (--?--) (see #59). He died at New Hampshire.
Children of Daniel 6 Sullivan and Bridget (--?--) (see #59) were:
59 . Bridget 6 (--?--) was born at Ireland. She married Daniel Sullivan (see #58). She died at New Hampshire.
60 . Cormack 6 Quinn ( (--?--) , #120) was born circa 1814 at County Donegal, Ireland. He married Ann Doherty (see #61). He died on 29 Dec 1887 at North Easton, Bristol County, Mass. He was buried at Immaculate Conception Church Cemetery, North Easton, Bristol County, Mass.
Children of Cormack 6 Quinn and Ann Doherty (see #61) were as follows:
61 . Ann 6 Doherty was born at Ireland. She married Cormack Quinn (see #60), son of (--?--) Quinn. She died in 1878 at North Easton, Bristol County, Mass. She was buried in 1878 at Immaculate Conception Church Cemetery, North Easton, Bristol County, Mass.
62 . Peter 6 Keenan was born at Ireland. He married Ann McArdle (see #63).
Children of Peter 6 Keenan and Ann McArdle (see #63) were:
63 . Ann 6 McArdle was born at Ireland. She married Peter Keenan (see #62).
Generation Seven - GGGGreat Grandparents
80 . Jacob 7 Campbell ( Roelof , #160) was born on 11 Feb 1800 and was baptized on 4 May 1800 at Dutch Reformed Church, New York, New York County, New York. He married Elizabeth Struble (see #81), daughter of Jacob Struble and Sarah Rutan, circa 1821. He died on 15 Mar 1881 at Litchfield, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 81. He was buried at Sheshequin, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Children of Jacob 7 Campbell and Elizabeth Struble (see #81) were as follows:
The Campbell brothers Jacob, Daniel, and Charles married the Frederick sisters Ann, Leah, and Isabell respectively.
81 . Elizabeth 7 Struble ( Jacob , #162) was born on 27 Sep 1802 at New Jersey. She married Jacob Campbell (see #80), son of Roelof Campbell and Elizabeth Stewart, circa 1821. She died on 9 Feb 1885 at Litchfield, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 82. She was buried at Sheshequin, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
82 . Philip 7 Frederick was born on 22 Feb 1801. He died on 12 Sep 1883 at age 82.
Children of Philip 7 Frederick and an unknown spouse were as follows:
The Campbell brothers Jacob, Daniel, and Charles married the Frederick sisters Ann, Leah, and Isabell respectively.
86 . Henry 7 Keyser was born in Aug 1804 at New Jersey. He married Huldah (--?--) (see #87) circa 1827 at Wantage, Sussex County, New Jersey. This is an estimate from the data in the 1850 and 1830 censuses. (GFC comment). He died on 22 Dec 1866 at Litchfield Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 62. He was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Children of Henry 7 Keyser and Huldah (--?--) (see #87) were as follows:
87 . Huldah 7 (--?--) was born in Mar 1805 at New Jersey. She married Henry Keyser (see #86) circa 1827 at Wantage, Sussex County, New Jersey. This is an estimate from the data in the 1850 and 1830 censuses. (GFC comment). She died on 21 Sep 1868 at Litchfield Township, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 63. She was buried at Tioga Point Cemetery, Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
88 . Moses Tyler 7 Baxter ( Nathan , #176) was born in 1795. He was born on 30 Jul 1795 at Delaware County, New York. He was born circa 1796. He married Phaelie Rose (see #89), daughter of John Rose and Rhoda Crippen, circa 1820. He married Phaelie Rose, daughter of John Rose and Rhoda Crippen, between 1834 and 1837. He married Phaelie Rose, daughter of John Rose and Rhoda Crippen, on 30 Jul 1838. He died on 30 Jul 1838 at Sheshequin, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 43. Mrs. Glueck's letter indicates the name is listed as M. (Moses) Taylor Baxter. The letter implies her source was possibly a cemetery listing.
Edith Cahill's DAR application gives the place of death as Ghent, Bradford County, PA. He was buried at Sheshequin Cemetery, Sheshequin, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Children of Moses Tyler 7 Baxter and Phaelie Rose (see #89) were as follows:
Wilt settled in Michigan. He was in the Civil War Union Army in 1861.
In 1850 census listed with his mother at Sheshequin, PA and age of 14. This would be a birth year of 1836. States he was born in NY.
89 . Phaelie 7 Rose ( John , #178) was born on 21 Mar 1805 at Sullivan County, New York. She was born in 1806. She married Moses Tyler Baxter (see #88), son of Nathan Baxter Jr. and Anna Dodge, circa 1820. She married Moses Tyler Baxter, son of Nathan Baxter Jr. and Anna Dodge, between 1834 and 1837. She married Moses Tyler Baxter, son of Nathan Baxter Jr. and Anna Dodge, on 30 Jul 1838. She died on 26 Jan 1885 at Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 79. She was buried at Rome Cemetery, Rome, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
90 . William 7 Taylor was born in 1803. He married Sally Vasbinder (see #91). He died in 1864.
Children of William 7 Taylor and Sally Vasbinder (see #91) were:
91 . Sally 7 Vasbinder was born in 1808. She married William Taylor (see #90). She died in 1877.
92 . David 7 Thomas was born in 1807. He married Ann Jones (see #93). He died in 1882.
Children of David 7 Thomas and Ann Jones (see #93) were:
93 . Ann 7 Jones was born in 1813. She married David Thomas (see #92). She died in 1897.
94 . Israel 7 Evans was born in 1777. He was born on 2 Jun 1779 at Cardiganshire, South Wales. He married Nancy Jones (see #95), daughter of (--?--) Jones and (--?--) (--?--), circa 1800 at Cardiganshire, South Wales. He died on 5 Nov 1872 at Neath, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 93 years 5 months. He was buried at Neath, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
He emigrated in Jul 1841 from Cardiganshire, Wales.
Children of Israel 7 Evans and Nancy Jones (see #95) were as follows:
He came to America when 3 years old with his mother and grandmother, Evan Evans, Aunt Jane, and others.
Lived in Little Meadows, PA with his wife. He emigrated in 1831.
95 . Nancy 7 Jones ( (--?--) , #190) was born in 1780. She was born in 1785 at Cardiganshire, South Wales. She married Israel Evans (see #94) circa 1800 at Cardiganshire, South Wales. She died on 25 Sep 1849 at Neath, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 63 years.
She emigrated circa 1842 from South Wales.
.
120 . (--?--) 7 Quinn. Two brothers, Cormack and Patrick Quinn migrated from Ireland to Boston before 1840 based on the birth of Cormack's son, Charles William Quinn, in Boston in 1841.
Children of (--?--) 7 Quinn and an unknown spouse both b. at County Donegal, Ireland, were as follows:
Generation Eight - GGGGGreat Grandparents
160 . Roelof 8 Campbell ( Jacob , #320) was born on 3 Jan 1780 at Schraalenburgh, Bergen County, New Jersey. He was baptized on 27 Feb 1780 at Schraalenburgh, Bergen County, New Jersey. He married Elizabeth Stewart (see #161) circa 1798. He died on 6 Oct 1869 at Litchfield, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 89. He was buried at Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Children of Roelof 8 Campbell and Elizabeth Stewart (see #161) were as follows:
161 . Elizabeth 8 Stewart was born on 31 Aug 1780 at New Jersey. She married Roelof Campbell (see #160), son of Jacob Campbell and Aeltje Westervelt, circa 1798. She died on 1 Aug 1870 at Litchfield, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, at age 89. She was buried at Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
162 . Jacob 8 Struble married Sarah Rutan (see #163).
Children of Jacob 8 Struble and Sarah Rutan (see #163) were:
163 . Sarah 8 Rutan married Jacob Struble (see #162).
176 . Nathan 8 Baxter Jr. ( Nathan , #352) was born on 17 May 1764 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. He married first Anna didge (see #177) probably at Hebron. He married the second time Mrs. (--?--) Willson circa 1816. He married Mrs. (--?--) Wilton circa 1830. According to Mrs. Shive, Nathan Jr. married a widow, probably named Wilton, some time in the early 1830's after the death of his first wife, Anna in February 1815. The new wife had a son named Henry Wilton. The story supposedly handed down in the family is that Nathan's children were very much opposed to this marriage, considering the widow merely a gold digger with both eyes on Nathan's recently awarded pension. It was only eight dollars a month, but in those days that amount in hard cash coming in regularly each month was worth fighting over. Soon after the wedding, the couple left for the mid-west, settling in or near Carlyle, Illinois. The stepson, young Wilton managed to get Nathan to sign papers allowing the young man to act as agent to collect the pension. Either family friction or Nathan's disgust with the climate made him decide to return East. He started back but never reached Delaware County having been taken ill and died somewhere on the way. No one now seems to know any details or the place where he died, or the date, but it was about 1836 as the last pension payment was that year.
Unfortunately Mrs. Shive did not cite any sources for her information and being three generations removed from one of Nathan's children, her family traditions may be suspect.[GFC comment].
They migrated to Horton in the town of Colchester, Delaware County, NY in 1796, coming up the river from Cochecton.
Children of Nathan 8 Baxter Jr. and Anna Dodge (see #177) were as follows:
In 1833, Julia and Aaron migrated to Delaware County.
According to Mrs. Everett's genealogy, he settled in Colchester before the Rev. War. Driven out by Tories and Indians, he hid his ironware in the ground and dug it out on return seven years later in 1783.
This doesn't fit with his birth date and age at death on tombstone. According to the census information, Joel came to Delaware County in 1805 and Polly, his wife, came ten years later. He may have gone first as a single man to clear the land and build a cabin to live in. He then could have returned east to the Hudson River and married Polly and brought her to live in the wilderness.[GFC comment].
Solomon and his wife lived their lifetime on the place now known as the Chester Cairns farm, 2 miles west of Roscoe, NY.
Mindwell married in Sullivan or Delaware Co., Sylvester Stewart, and several or all of their children were born there. About 1836 the family moved to Nelson, PA and had a sawmill on a small creek a mile or so west of the village. John Weeks was a partner with his brother-in-law in a mill for a year or two after the Weeks family came in 1838 or 1839. Soon after the Stewarts moved over into Woodhull Township, NY and cleared a farm on which their descendants were living after 1900.
"Wm. Baxter went from Delaware Co. N.Y. down into Chemung Co. where he was in the furniture business." Aunt Theresa Baxter's letter 3/6/1931.
The family later moved to Nelson, PA circa 1840.
177 . Anna 8 Dodge was born on 14 Sep 1761. She married Nathan Baxter Jr. (see #176), son of Nathan Baxter and Mindwell Holdridge, on 14 Oct 1782 at Colchester, New London County, Connecticut. She died after 1814. She died on 4 Mar 1815 at Masonville, Delaware County, New York, at age 53.
They migrated to Horton in the town of Colchester, Delaware County, NY in 1796, coming up the river from Cochecton.
178 . John 8 Rose was born circa 1771 probably in Schoharie County, New York. He married Rhoda Crippen (see #179). Betty Gregory's file lists 11 children of this marriage, of whom Phebe is number four. (GFC comment). He died on 11 Mar 1833 at Sullivan County, New York.
Children of John 8 Rose and Rhoda Crippen (see #179) were:
179 . Rhoda 8 Crippen was born circa 1782 probably in Connecticut. She married John Rose (see #178). Betty Gregory's file lists 11 children of this marriage, of whom Phebe is number four. (GFC comment). She died circa 1843 probably in Otsego County, New York.
190 . (--?--) 8 Jones married (--?--) (--?--) (see #191).
Children of (--?--) 8 Jones and (--?--) (--?--) (see #191) were as follows:
191 . (--?--) 8 (--?--) married (--?--) Jones (see #190).
Generation Nine - GGGGGGreat Grandparents
320 . Jacob 9 Campbell ( William , #640) was born in 1750 at Bergenfield, Bergen County, New Jersey. He was baptized on 18 Mar 1750 at Schraalenburgh, Bergen County, New Jersey. He married Aeltje Westervelt (see #321), daughter of Roelof Westervelt and Arriantje Romein, on 24 Apr 1774 at New Jersey. He died on 19 Jan 1816.
Children of Jacob 9 Campbell and Aeltje Westervelt (see #321) were as follows:
321 . Aeltje 9 Westervelt ( Roelof , #642) was born on 10 Aug 1756 at Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York. She was baptized on 26 Sep 1756 at Dutch Church, Kingston, Ulster County, New York. She married Jacob Campbell (see #320), son of William Campbell and Elizabeth Demarest, on 24 Apr 1774 at New Jersey. She died on 31 Jan 1815 at age 58.
352 . Nathan 9 Baxter ( Simon , #704) was born on 10 Jun 1742 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. He married Mindwell Holdridge (see #353), daughter of Gershom Holdridge and Susannah (--?--), on 15 Jan 1761 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. He died on 24 Dec 1833 at Norfolk, St. Lawrence County, New York, at age 91. He died on 24 Dec 1833 at Lawrence City (sic), New York, at age 91. He died on 24 Dec 1833 at Raymondville, St. Lawrence County, New York, at age 91. It is believed he is buried in at Baxter Cemetery, Norfolk, St. Lawrence County, New York. Darlene Baxter Kruppa believes that Nathan Baxter was buried at Kent's Mills Cemetery, Norfolk, St. Lawrence County, New York.
On 30 Apr 1765 Nathan Baxter petitioned the court and represented that his brother Simon was his bondsman, that he was bound out to his brother for two years, that he had no property and a wife and two small children living in Hebron who suffered with hunger and cold as the petitioner was obliged to serve with his brother in Hartland, "and being subject to fitts begs etc." He took the freeman's oath on 19 September 1775. J. P. Baxter cites "Hebron Town Rec. p. 216" on 19 Sep 1775 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. He on 19 Dec 1775 was chosen a school committee at a Society meeting. He must have been considered fully reformed and not incapacitated by fits. On 12 Dec. 1776 he was again chosen to the same office. The First Society of Hebron provided for the public school for many years as well as religious instruction for the town.
Children of Nathan 9 Baxter and Mindwell Holdridge (see #353) were as follows:
Euriah and Keturah migrated from CT to VT sometime before 1790 and then around 1804 to Schoharie County, NY and thence to Granville, PA around 1810. They settled in Granville Township near Bailey Corners on a ridge called Baxter Hill.
Mrs. Everett lists Asa as a son of Simon who possibly went to islands in St. Lawrence River. This is in error as proven by his application for a Revolutionary War pension. Asa was the second owner of Baxter's Island. The War of 1812 was about to begin and at that time the island was actually on the British side of the border. Asa considered himself an American and when drafted into the Canadian militia he refused to enter the army. The island was confiscated and he was branded a deserter.
He hid until the war was over and in April of 1814 attempted to return to the island but was arrested. He was jailed in Cornwall but when he was being transferred to Kingston for trial he escaped and hid in the Thousand Islands. Eventually he was able to return to his family. The Treaty of Gent made Baxter's Island American territory and Asa returned to the island with his family in 1812.
Mrs. Hoffman suspects Jesse's parents may have been Nathan Baxter, Sr. and Mindwell Holdridge. She thinks Jesse and Mindwell Baxter were brother and sister but has no proof or other information.
Mrs. Hoffman thinks this Mindwell Baxter may have been a daughter of Nathan Baxter Sr. and Mindwell Holdridge. She may have been born in either Hartland, CT or somewhere in VT. Nathan and Mindwell did have a daughter named Mindwell who was born Feb. 1769 and died in 1774. Thus the could have had another daughter in 1776 and named her Mindwell. She thinks Jesse and Mindwell Baxter were brother and sister but has no proof or other information.
Quotes a family bible owned by Hannah Rosenstraus in N.Y.
He Sept. 1795 sold land in Wardsborough, VT to Uriah Baxter of Westminister, Windham, VT.
May 1803 - Purchased farm in Wardsborough, VT from Nathan Baxter except for the house which Nathan held for himself and Mindwell, his wife.
Dates and places of birth of children indicate John & Hannah lived on Baxter Island in early 1800's, moved to Dover, VT during the War of 1812 when the British took over the Island, and then moved back after the war. By 1839 they had moved on to Ionia Michigan in 1795.
353 . Mindwell 9 Holdridge ( Gershom , #706) was born in 1742. She married Nathan Baxter (see #352), son of Simon Baxter and Rebecca Tarbox, on 15 Jan 1761 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. She died before 1833 at Granville Center, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.
Generation Ten - GGGGGGGreat Grandparents
640 . William 10 Campbell ( (--?--) , #1280) was a Scotsman and born on 23 Jan 1718 at Ulster, Ireland. He married Elizabeth Demarest (see #641), daughter of David Demarest and Matie DeBaun, on 19 Aug 1736 at Schraalenburgh (now the Bergenfield and Dumont area), Bergen County, New Jersey. He died on 9 Oct 1793 at age 75. He was buried at South Church, Bergenfield, Bergen County, New Jersey.
He emigrated circa 1735 from Ulster, Ireland. He The fact that he married at the age of 18 years, signifies that he emigrated probably when in his early teens and could not have been in this country very long when he married. He may have come to Old Bridge (now New Milford) in Bergen Co., to work for David Demarest whose daughter, Elizabeth, he married He had an education before or after he came to America, since he wrote a good hand as evidenced by his signature to his Will. His sons also received an education, since they too always signed their names in full and were actively engaged in their trades. The Old Bridge was an active business place long before the Revolutionary War, from which a large amount of shipping was made via the Hackensack River. The Campbells lived near the east bank of the river, close to the traffic and trade of this busy center.
The Campbell name, without saying, is a common one and although William lived and died in Bergen County, N.J. it was not too long before some of his descendants had gone to New York City and elsewhere. There were other contemporary Campbell families in Bergen Co., and adjacent Rockland Co., N.Y., not to mention any number in New York City. The problem of similar names in different families appears early and for this reason some of the descendants cannot be identified and traced further. A number of children in the early families probably died in infancy or childhood as was common in those days. This will account for some but not all.
Children of William 10 Campbell and Elizabeth Demarest (see #641) were as follows:
In 1780 he lost 5 shoats and an ax, taken by the American Army for which he filed claim in 1782.
It is not known when they died or where they are buried. He left no recorded estate.
He died 15 Mar. 1826 and his wife died 25 June 1841. They are buried at Park Ridge.
They resided at Poughkeepsie through the Rev. War period; then the Schraalenburgh area until 1792; and finally at Bull's Ferry in Bergen Township. They conveyed lands to their sons David, James and Benjamin between 1813 and 1823. In 1809 they became members of the Dutch Ref. Church at English Neighborhood (Ridgefield) N.J. He died Aug. 1825 intestate, at Bull's Ferry, leaving household goods, cattle and a pleasure wagon, etc., valued at 160 Pounds.
641 . Elizabeth 10 Demarest ( David , #1282) was born on 3 Apr 1715 at Hackensack, Bergen County, New Jersey. She was baptized on 3 Apr 1715 at Hackensack, Bergen County, New Jersey. She married William Campbell (see #640), son of (--?--) Campbell, on 19 Aug 1736 at Schraalenburgh (now the Bergenfield and Dumont area), Bergen County, New Jersey. She died on 9 Jul 1797 at age 82. She was buried at South Church, Bergenfield, Bergen County, New Jersey.
642 . Roelof 10 Westervelt married Arriantje Romein (see #643). He died in 1767 at Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York.
Children of Roelof 10 Westervelt and Arriantje Romein (see #643) were as follows:
643 . Arriantje 10 Romein married Roelof Westervelt (see #642). She died before 1767.
704 . Simon 10 Baxter ( Francis , #1408) was born either 1697 or 1698 at Martha's Vineyard Island, Dukes County, Mass. He was born in 1698 at Scotland. He married Abigail Mann, daughter of Richard Mann and Elizabeth Sutton, on 6 Apr 1721 at Lebanon, New London County, Connecticut. Simon Baxter appeared in Lebanon, CT when a young man. His marriage to Abigail Mann and the birth of their first child, Abigail, appear on the Lebanon town records according to this source.
J. P. Baxter says when Simon of Hebron married Abigail Mann he made a wise choice. She was the daughter of a highly respected Puritan family, regarded in those days as "forehanded." He married Rebecca Tarbox (see #705), daughter of Jonathan Tarbox and Eleanor (--?--), on 25 Oct 1741 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. He died on 26 Dec 1778 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. He was buried at Hebron Cemetery, Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut.
There is an interruption in children born to Simon from 1732-1740 which is unusual. Mrs. Everett lists a son named Uriah with no information as to birth etc. Would he have been born in this time period? However, she mentions he was possibly in southern Vermont and thus may be confusing Nathan's son Euriah. (GFC comment).
Simon and Abigail Mann were married and having children in Hebron while Daniel Birge and Rebecca Tarbox lived on the farm next to them. Daniel and Simon were such good friends that when Daniel died in 1737 he appointed Simon to be the administrator of his estate.
There is a question as to who is the mother of Simon's son Aaron born 9 Oct 1740. Although still married to Abigail, if you look at her will and disposition of her belongings she only leaves Aaron out! For this reason, most folks list Aaron as the son of Rebecca. At any rate, Abigail filed for and was granted a divorce from Simon for "fornication with Rebecca Birge a widow living next door." This quote is from the court records of their divorce of 3 Mar 1741. Rebecca then married Simon on 25 Oct 1741. Abigail died in 1748, Simon in 1778 and finally Rebecca died in 1796. All three are buried together at Hebron with some children who died in infancy.
Children of Simon 10 Baxter and Rebecca Tarbox (see #705) all b. at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut, were as follows:
705 . Rebecca 10 Tarbox ( Jonathan , #1410) was born in 1706 at Lebanon, New London County, Connecticut. She was born in 1706 at England. She married Daniel Birge, son of Daniel Birge and Deborah Holcomb, on 28 Mar 1721/22 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. She died circa 1738. She married Simon Baxter (see #704), son of Francis C. Baxter, on 25 Oct 1741 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. She died in 1793 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. She died in 1796. She died in 1798 at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut. She was buried at Hebron, Tolland County, Connecticut.
706 . Gershom 10 Holdridge married Susannah (--?--) (see #707).
Children of Gershom 10 Holdridge and Susannah (--?--) (see #707) were:
707 . Susannah 10 (--?--) married Gershom Holdridge (see #706).
Generation Eleven - 7GGreat Grandparents
1280 . (--?--) 11 Campbell.
Children of (--?--) 11 Campbell and an unknown spouse were as follows:
He James Campbell who was living in Queens County, N.Y., and married Sarah Demarest on 26 Dec. 1745 at Schraalenburgh. She was a sister of Elizabeth Demarest who married William Campbell. Sarah joined the Dutch Church at N.Y., on 23 May l748 and that is where this family probably remained, unless they went to Long Island. A Sarah Campbell died l0 May 1793 and was buried at or from the Schraalenburgh Church. William Campbell had a son named James.
She Nensje (Nancy) Campbell married prior to July 1752 Ulderick Brouwer, baptized 30 May 1728 at Schraalenburgh, son of Abraham Brouwer and Elizabeth Ackerman. On 5 July 1752 at Schraalenburgh they were sponsors for Nentie, daughter of William Campbell and Elizabeth Campbell, and in subsequent years for Brouwer children.
1282 . David 11 Demarest was baptized on 3 Oct 1681 at Bergen, Bergen County, New Jersey. He married Matie DeBaun (see #1283) on 10 Nov 1705 at Hackensack, Bergen County, New Jersey. He died in 1761.
Children of David 11 Demarest and Matie DeBaun (see #1283) both b. at Hackensack, Bergen County, New Jersey, were as follows:
1283 . Matie 11 DeBaun was born at New Utrecht, Kings County, New York. She was baptized on 4 May 1690 at Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. She married David Demarest (see #1282) on 10 Nov 1705 at Hackensack, Bergen County, New Jersey. She died on 26 Oct 1752 at New York, New York County, New York.
1408 . Francis C. 11 Baxter was born in 1681. He married (--?--) (--?--) in 1697. He died on 10 Oct 1723 at Brimfield, Hampden County, Mass, Was killed by a gun in the hands of a person named Johnson.
He is possibly brother of the famous Rev. Richard Baxter of England. He is said to have come from England in the latter part of the 17th century and purchased a farm at Enfield, CT. He emigrated in 1698. He emigrated in 1715 from Scotland. He moved from Boston to Worcester ca. 1718 and settled in Brimfield about 1720-23.
Children of Francis C. 11 Baxter and an unknown spouse were as follows:
He lived on the homestead for ninety years; used to speak of "Uncle Richard" (probably Rev. Richard Baxter of England). Francis Baxter was in Capt. Samuel Chandler's Company from 3/26 to 12/1/1756 (III.2636) and in Capt. David Parson's 9th Company 3/25 to 11/25/1760 (III.2641) in the Rev. War.
1410 . Jonathan 11 Tarbox was born on 3 Jul 1668. He married Eleanor (--?--) (see #1411). He died in 1715.
He and Eleanor (--?--) were married at Lynn, Essex County, Mass.
Children of Jonathan 11 Tarbox and Eleanor (--?--) (see #1411) were as follows:
1411 . Eleanor 11 (--?--) married Jonathan Tarbox (see #1410), son of Samuel Tarbox and Rebecca Amitage. She was born in 1693. Eleanor (--?--) married John Gott at Wenham, Essex County, Mass, on in 1718. She died in 1770.
She and Jonathan Tarbox were married at Lynn, Essex County, Mass.

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