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Vernon Family

JONATHAN VERNON JR born 1712, Pennsylvania d June 1805, Stokes County., NC m’d1742 at Chester, PA REBECCA WORTH, Quaker, born 23 Apr 1723 at West Bradford, Chester, PA died 1804 at Stokes County., NC her parents Thomas Worth, Jr.; Mother: Mary Faucett

Note: Rebecca WORTH : First Families of Chester Co., PA, Page 154 Footnote: Jonathan Vernon and REbeckah Worth, dau of Thomas Worth, acknowledged marrying by a priest, reported 19th of 3rd mo, 1743.

Note: Worth family

Bios: WORTH, Thomas, 1680's: Chester (now Deleware)/Allegheny Cos, PA He was born 1649 at oxten county of Nottingham, England. On February 21, 1682, in company with William Penn he left England in a ship sailing to a land of promise- Pennsylvania. A settlement of Friends or Quakers was established at Darby upon the arrivalof the ship in 1682. On october 8, 1685 he married an Isabelle Davidson, who probably also came from England in the same boat. Thomas served as an assemblyman in 1697. He owned 222 acres of land at Darby which he bequeathed to his son, Thomas. He also owned 500 acres of land at East Bradford.

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Jonathan Vernon and Rebecca Worth children

(1) Hanna Vernon ABT. 1750 in Charlotte County, Virginia d AFT. 1804 in Knox County, Tennessee m’d 4 January, 1773 in Charlotte County, Virginia, to Richard Taylor.

(2) Ebenezer Vernon married first a Miss Adams and second, on 3 March, 1810, in Charlotte County, Virginia. Mrs. Nancy Hitchcock.

(3) Jonathan Vernon, Jr., married Mary Cox and went to Jackson County, Ohio.

(4). REBECCA (some say Rebuke) VERNON b. about 1780 married Mr. CRAIN

(5). IRENE (some say Jean) VERNON, b. about 1751 at Cub Creek, Caldwell, VA married Mr. CHILDRES

(6). daughter VERNON B. ABOUT 1756 married JOHN TERRY

(7) Rachel Vernon was born 27 July, 1759 in Lunenburg County, VA and died 28 September 1844 in Stokes Co., NC. She married John Ward on 21 December, 1779, in Surry Co., NC. John Ward was born 25 April 1755, in Culpepper Co., VA and died 15 Sep 1838 in Stokes Co., NC. They were married at the home of her parents and a wedding supper was given afterwards."

1 Hannah Vernon b 1743 in Charlotte County, Virginia, m 4 January, 1773 to Richard Taylor b: ABT 1750 in VA d 1804 in Knox Co., TN

Children

1 Frances TAYLOR b: AFT 1774 in Surry Co., NC m’d Jonathan Martin between 1795-1800

2 Richard TAYLOR b: ABT 1776

3 Ezekiel TAYLOR b: ABT 1778 in Stokes Co., NC

4 Susannah TAYLOR b: ABT 1780 in Surry Co., NC m’d William Halbert

5 Rebecca Worth TAYLOR b: ABT 1782 in Stokes Co., NC

6 Hannah TAYLOR b: ABT 1784 in NC

7 Mary Polly TAYLOR b: ABT 1786 in NC

William and Susannah Taylor Halbert family page

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Jonathan Martin and his son Seth Martin m’d Francis Halbert dau of William and Susannah Taylor Halbert found on Martin II page

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Note: Vernon family

American Rev. Furnished sundries to the NC Militia

Note: Title: Heritage of Stokes County North Carolina 1981, The Author: John R. Woodard, Chairman Editor the Book Committee Publication: The Stokes County Historical Society

Page: 495

Jonathan Vernon, SR . was born in 1712 in Pennsylvania. He died June 1805 in Stokes County, North Carolina. In 1742 he married Rebecca Worth in Pennsylvania. Rebecca was born in April of 1723.

Jonathan Vernon is listed in the Revolutionary accounts in the N.C. Archives at Raleigh, N.C., as being paid for furnishing sundries to the N.C. Militia. Jonathan lived for a while in Lunenburg County, Virginia. Then he owned land and lived in Cornwell Parish in Charlotte County, Virginia before moving to Surry County, N.C. between 1773 and 1779.

On 13 October 1783, Jonathan Vernon, SR. was granted by the state of North Carolina 500 acres on Coleman's Creek in Surry County. He deeded land he still owned in Charlotte County, Virginia, to one of his sons just before he died.

The will of Jonathan Vernon, SR. is recorded in Stokes County, NC will book 2, pages 62 1/2 and 63. It is dated 18 October 1803, and probated June, 1805. It names his wife, Rebecca, and five children who are as follows:

(1) Hanna Vernon was married 4 January, 1773 in Charlotte County, Virginia, to Richard Taylor.

(2) Ebenezer Vernon married first a Miss Adams and second, on 3 March, 1810, in Charlotte County, Virginia. Mrs. Nancy Hitchcock.

(3) Jonathan Vernon, Jr., married Mary Cox and went to Jackson County, Ohio.

(4) Irene Vernon married Mr. Childres.

(5) Rachel Vernon was born 27 July, 1759 in Lunenburg County, VA and died 28 September 1844 in Stokes Co., NC. She married John Ward on 21 December, 1779, in Surry Co., NC. John Ward was born 25 April 1755, in Culpepper Co., VA and died 15 Sep 1838 in Stokes Co., NC. They were married at the home of her parents and a wedding supper was given afterwards."

1791 Stokes County, North Carolina Census

1 = FREE WHITE MALES OVER 16

2 = FREE WHITE MALES UNDER 16

3 = FREE WHITE FEMALES

4 = OTHER FREE PERSONS

5 = SLAVES

LAST NAME GIVEN NAMES 1 2 3 4

Taylor Richard, 1, 3, 6, 0, 0

Vernon Jonathan, 1, 2, 4, 0, 0

Vernon Jonathan, 2, 0, 1, 0, 0

Background of Magdalen Southern

Magdalen Southern's maiden name and parentage are not conclusively known. An affidavit signed by her son Ford in 1839, when he was 74 years old, states that Ford was a cousin to Rachel (Vernon) Ward, wife of John Ward and daughter of Jonathan Vernon and Rebecca Worth.(10) This suggests that Magdalen may have been a Vernon or Worth. The Vernons and Worths were in Pennsylvania earlier in the eighteenth century, and Jonathan Vernon and his family lived for many years in Charlotte County, Virginia, before coming to North Carolina. Jonathan Vernon (ca. 1712-1805) was a witness to William Southern's 1794 will, so it is likely that there was a close relationship between the Southerns and Vernons.(11) But no other evidence supports a blood relationship between the Southerns and the Vernons or Worths, and it is not clear what Ford meant in calling Rachel (Vernon) Ward his "cousin."

10. Ford Southern's sworn and signed affidavit, dated 16 January 1839, is included in the Revolutionary War pension papers of John Ward and Rachel Ward (#W9872), National Archives Trust Fund, Washington, D.C. Photocopies from microfilm in possession of author. The affidavit states that Rachel Ward is indeed the widow of veteran John Ward and that she has not remarried since John Ward's death on 15 September 1838, thus retaining eligibility for a survivor's pension. A similar statement on Rachel Ward's behalf made by John Terry on the same day is quite explicit about Terry's relationship to Rachel Ward: Rachel was "this deposants own Aunt being his Mothers Sister whose maiden name was Varnon;..." Ford's statement says only that Rachel Ward was "his cousin" and does not elaborate on the exact nature of the relationship.

11. Will of William Southern, Stokes County, N.C., May 13, 1794. N.C. State Archives CR 090.801.S. For Vernon family history, see article on Jonathan Vernon, Sr. by Alfred Tuttle (#992) in Stokes County Heritage. Also Vernon Vignettes (Quarterly Newsletter of the Vernon Family Association) for September and December 1973.

12. W. Mac. Jones, transcriber and editor, The Douglas Register. Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., Baltimore, 1977 (reprint). Pages 380-385 contain birth records from about 1720 to 1750 of the French Huguenots of Manakin Town, King William Parish

Life in Virginia and the Move to North Carolina

Several other Buckingham names -- including Baker, Webb, Walker, Peters, Hughes, Martin, Duncan, and others -- also start to appear in Surry/Stokes, N.C. records by the mid-1770s, and it appears that there was a general migration from Buckingham to Surry on the eve of the Revolution. Other neighbors and friends to the Southerns in Surry/Stokes included the Vernons from Charlotte County in southside Virginia, and Wards, Zimmermans, Vaughans, Vawters, Hickmans, and others from Culpeper County in northern Virginia.

Life in the Late Eighteenth Century

Two documents place the family group on a specific day -- December 21, 1779 -- at specific places -- the neighboring houses of William Hill and Jonathan Vernon -- in attendance at a wedding and dinner near Christmas. Affidavits signed in 1839 by Ford Southern and John Terry describe the marriage of Rachel Vernon and John Ward (the affidavits were made on behalf of the widow Rachel Ward's petition for a survivor's pension following the death of John, a veteran of the Revolution .Ford, who was about 14 in 1779, states that he "accompanied John Ward and his cousin Rachel Varnon from his uncle John Varnons ... to the Rev'd Wm. Hill in said County and the said Minister Hill [did] marry the said John Ward & Rachel together as man & wife a few days before Christmas in the year Seventeen hundred and Seventy nine & that he heard the said minister publish the Bans of marriage Several times previous to the Marriage, and that said Wm Hill was a Minister of the Babtist Church ..."

Lunenburg County, Virginia, Will Book No. 1, With Inventories, Accounts, Etc, 1746-1762

Page 172. Account Current of the estate of Joseph Dabbs, deceased. Debits

To: John Gannaway; Jas. Lee; Clerk of Amelia; M. Talbot Jr; John Smyth; Mich'l McDanal's judgment and costs against Collins; John David; Eliza. Young; Jas. Webb; Jas. Webb for paid Edmd Gray; paid Hoggatt; Bell and Booker; Step Collins; Step Collins his demand which Nanny Webb, one of the executors, agreed to; Step Collins for a judgment he obtained vs Webb who married the widow Dabbs. Total: £ 227.11.1. Balance: 43.15.1½

Credits

Thos Hall; Phil Halcomb; Henry Isbel; Perrin Alday; David Emanuel; Ben Dixon; Lewis Lesue; Jonathan Ashworth; Jas. Stewart; Jonathan Vernon; John Phelps; Nicholas Hayle; Mat Talbot; Jas. Eastes; Thos. Boulden by Tho. Vernon; Clement Read for John Smith; Samuel Johnson, by a Constable's fee;

Abraham Martin. By 4 Negroes, Patt, Beck, Sal, Harry. By Negro Phillis. By 1 horse to Step Saunders. By a hatchel to Chas. Lee. By 1 bed and furniture to Collins. By 2 Negroes to Edmund Gray. By Step Collins for Joseph Moreton. By ditto for William Williams. By ditto for David Emanuel. By Step Collins for Ch Talbott. Total: £ 271.2.2½.

Aug 5, 1754. We this day met and examined all the accts, and find 43 £ 15 shillings, and 1½ penny due to the estate of the said Dabbs, as by the within acct from James Webb, who married the widow of said Dabbs, and was executrix to his will. Signed - Thomas Boulden, Thos. Nash. Recd of Ann Dabbs to the value of 5 £, being the accompt of Joseph Dabbs, deceased, recd by me. Signed Oct 14, 1749 -John Gannaway Sr. Recd of Ann Dabbs, 1 £ 5 shillings on the account of Joseph Dabbs, deceased, per me. Signed Oct 26, 1749 - James Lee.

1748, Amelia, Joseph Dabbs of L. Debits mention: writ vs Robert Cammell, Read atty, writ vs James Center; Judgment vs Tar; Saml Cobbs, Cl. Credits mention: Mat'w Talbot Jr of L; writ vs Duggins; writ vs Haies; writ vs Bashaw; serving J & P vs Mount.

Stokes County, North Carolina

Book- Stokes County, North Caroline Will Abstracts Vol. I & II 1790-1816. Compiled by Mrs. W. O. Abshor & Mrs. Robert K. Hayes, North Wilkesboro, NC 1984. p. 38

Will of Johnathan Varnum (Vernon) p. 62 1/2 & 63. 18 Oct 1803 June Term 1805. Wife, Rebecka: money John Terry owes me. Dau, Hanner (Hanna) Taylor: $1.00 as she was portioned off at marriage. Son, Ebenezer: land in Virginia he lives on. Son, Jonathan: $1.00. Dau, Irene Childrers: $1.00. Dau, Racher (Rachel) Ward: $1.00 Excecr: Russel Vauter Wits: John Vauter, John Wright, John Terry. Signed Jonathan Vernon. (Note: Russell and John Vawter are brothers and the relationship of Jonathan Vernon to John's father-in-law Richard Vernon is unknown.)

notes on Jonathan Vernon, Senr.

Born 1712 PA, died June 1805 Stokes Co., NC married 1742 PA, Rebecca Worth b. 23 Apr 1723.

Jonathan Vernon is listed under V in the Rev. accounts in the NC archives at Raleigh, NC as being paid for furnishing sundries to the NC Militia in NC

Jonathan lived for a while in Lunenburg Co., VA, then owned land and lived in Cornwell Parish in Charlotte Co., VA before moving to Surry Co., NC bet. 1773-1779.

On 13 Oct 1783, Jonathan Vernon, Sr. was granted by the state of NC, 500 acres on Coleman's Creek in Surry Co. He deeded land he still owned in Charlotte Co., VA to one of his sons just before he died.

The will is recorded in Stokes Co., NC will book 2, pages 62 1/2 and 63, dated 18 Oct 1803 and probated June 1805.

Daughter Hannah m. 4 Jan 1773 Charlotte Co., VA to Richard Taylor. Son Ebenezer Vernon m. (1) Miss Adams. (2) ? 3 Mar 1818 Charlotte Co. VA.

Title: Heritage of Stokes County North Carolina 1981, The Author: John R. Woodard, Chairman Editor the Book Committee Publication: The Stokes County Historical Society

Page: 500

Text: John Ward was born April 25,1755, in Culpeper County, Virginia. He died September 15, 1838, in Stokes County, North Carolina. On December 21,1779, he married Rachel Vernon. She was born September 27, 1759 in Culpeper County, Virginia. She died after February 23, 1839 in Stokes County, N.C. She was a daughter of Jonathan Vernon, Sr. and Rebecca Worth.

John Ward was a private in the company commanded by Captain Green of the regiment commanded by Col. Patrick Henry in the Virginia line. He served 19 months and 2 days, being stationed in Williamsburg and discharged September 3, 1776. In 1777, he volunteered in Culpeper County, Virginia, under Capt. Rucker and marched to the camp of General Washington for a period of 3 months. There he served by reconnoitering the position of the enemy.

In 1778, he moved to Surry County, N.C. (later Stokes County) and enlisted in the Militia under Capt. Henry Smith and Gen. Rutherford. He marched south to Savannah River where he patrolled the river to prevent crossing by the British. He later served as a wagon driver of the provision wagon in Charleston, South Carolina. He enlisted still another term as Wagon driver to the Yadkin River. (pension File #W-9872). Besides all the family information given by the widow of John Ward in her application for pension, there was also a family record kept which listed the parents of John Ward as being Jacob Ward and Anna Hill.

History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania

Nether Providence Township.

conist), William Sankey (weaver), William Shepherd, John Stephenson, Edward Tilghman, Seth Thomas (county treasurer), Mary Vernon, John Vernon (blacksmith), Jonathan Vernon(son of Thomas Vernon (Robert Vernon's brother), Jonathan Worrell, James Wood, James Wood, Jr., Josiah Wilkinson, John Worrell, Uriah Wilson, William Waterhouse

Richard VERNON Sr, The fifth son of Thomas Vernon & Mary of PA & Stokes, Cheshire, , England. On 5 Nov 1792, Richard Vernon of Culpeper Co., Va. confirmed that he had given his dau Joanna Vernon 200 Acres of land in Surry Co., NC (now Stokes Co.) in 1781. (Stokes Deed Book 1, page 359). ABT 1725, Caldwell Settle., Cub Creek, Lunenburg, Virginia Mar 1801, Madison Co.Virginia m'd ABT 1750, Orange County, Virginia Sarah TINSLEY

Children

1 Mary VERNON

2 Elizabeth VERNON

3 Frances "Franky" VERNON

4 Amelia or Mildred VERNON

5 Susannah VERNON

6 Johanna VERNON

7 Sarah VERNON

8 Anthony VERNON

9 Tinsley VERNON

10 Richard VERNON Jr.

Deed Book 1, p. 14, To all & to whom these presents shall come. Know ye that whereas I, Richard Vernon, of the county of Madison & state of Virginia, being old & infirm cannot of course go & see to the surveying of my land in the county of Stokes and state of North Carolina. Therefore I, the said Richard Vernon, reposing great trust in my well beloved friend, John Vawter and Anthony Dearing, I do therefore by these presents make, ordain, constitute and appoint them, the said John Vawter and Anthony Dearing, my law-ful attornies, for me and on my part and behalf, & in my name to see to the surveying of the said land with the surveyors of the said county. In witness whereof I, the said Richard Vernon, have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal this 26 day of Sept. 1793. Richard Vernon seal.

At a court held for the county of Madison at the house of John Yager Junr., on Thurs. the 26 day of Sept 1793 This power of attorney from Richard Vernon to John Vawter and Anthony Dearing was acknowledged by said Vernon and ordered to be recorded.

On 10 Feb 1796, Richard Vernon of Madison Co., Va. (formed from Culpeper Co.) made a gift deed of 446 acres in Stokes Co., NC to his son-in-law John Vawter (Deed Book 2, page 389).

JONATHAN AND RICHARD VERNON PARENTS

Thomas VERNON b : 1686 in Chester Co.,PA 1777 in Cub Creek, Lunenburg Co,VA m’d Mary (Brown?)

Note: NI23626] 1710 The Chester Monthly Meeting disowned Thomas for "his vain and evil conversation as that of drinking to excess, loose company keeping, cursing, swearing, and lying." 1712 July 4, he attended the wedding of his brother Jacob to Elinor Owen. 1745 Thomas Vernon took up 501 acres Cub Creek in the Caldwell Settlement started by John Caldwell, Presbyterian Minister. He was one of the first families to take up land there.

If Thomas was disowned by Quaker Soc and became a Presbyterian. Then Robert Vernon being good Quaker would have disowned/disinherited him. Thomas move to Lunenburg Co. VA with his family and friends.

In his letter dated 23 March, 1987, VFAA founder William A. Vernon maintained that Quaker brother "...Robert's son Thomas...was dismissed from the Quaker Meeting in Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1709".

In his letter dated 28 April, he states that "...Thomas was 'disowned' by the Quaker Meeting at Chester County in 1709/10. The next record of him is found in the Cub Creek settlement as one of its original settlers...in ca. 1737. For many years I had assumed that this Thomas was of Scots-Irish origin, as were most of the original 17 Cub Creek settlers. However, some of the VFAA's older searchers had concluded that he had to be the 'missing' Thomas. I now concur. His children were named, for instance, by the names also given to his 'nephews' by the older sons of Robert and Eleanor

"THOMAS VERNON, SR. OF CALDWELL SETTLEMENT, CUB CREEK, VA" by William A. Vernon, SR

Among the first seventeen families to take up land in Caldwell Settlement was that of Thomas Vernon, Sr. Rev John, however left the Chestnut level, Pa. Presbyterian Settlement in the Spring of 1739, in compliment of several children and their families and built a home on the eastern slope of Buck Mountain in Albemarle County ( note from Janet. The County in 1739 was Goochland/Louisa, Albermarle was founded in 1744), some 75 miles north of Cub Creek and the Little Roanoke River in Old Brunswick. John Caldwell and some of his follows arrived in Dec of 1727 at Newcastle Del from Antrim No., Ireland.

This Caldwell history is given, not only as a means of explaining the religious motives for the historic settlement at Cub Creek, but also in view of the fact that at least one of the sons the Thomas Vernon, SR married a Caldwell. Isaac's second wife seems to have been Jane Caldwell.

Although Thomas Vernon, Sr. and family were members of the Presbyterian Caldwell Settlement several other families with English surnames lived in the immediate vacinity during 1740's records of deeds, Jonathan took up land from the William Kennon tract on 6 July 1753. All this would seem to substantiate the fact that the Vernons came into Caldwell Settlement prior to 1741

Major Thomas Bouldin ( a ancestor on his mother side "The Old Trunk" by Pocahontas Bouldin) son Capt. Thomas JR m'd Armine Cox of Stokes Co NC , whose sister Mary m'd Jonathan Vernon Jr of Stokes County, who moved with his family to Jackson Co, Ohio. Jonathan Jr and Mary were ancestors of Myrl Swanson, member of VFAA's Board of Compilers.

His (Isaac Vernon) sister Rachel m'd Rev War soldier John Ward.

Old Thomas Vernon was at Caldwell Settlement when Lunenburg was cut away. The "Worth Family Genealogy" which is Quaker States: "Rebecca Worth b 4/23/1723, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Fawcett0 Worth of Bradford, MM, PA (Chester County) in 1742 married Jonathan Vernon, a Godless Virginia and went to live there. Nothing further is known of her." Actually, Rebecca lived for the next 28 years at Cub Creek, since her husband, the sinner, was elder son of old Thomas. According to the Lunenburg

The Quaker Vernon Brothers of the 1681/2 Penn Colony ventured into Virginia-Carolina frontier during the early 1700's Notabe among these were John, Daniel and Abraham, sons of Edward Vernon of West Cain, Pa gr-grandson of Robert of Nether Province. Abraham goes on to Indiana in 1836. John and Daniel raised their families in Fairfax Co, VA.

Isaac and Hannah (Townshend) Vernon, Quakers lived in Old Orange Co. Va, for twelve years before go to Wrightboro MM in Georgia. This Isaac was the grandson of Immigrant Robert of Penn Colony.

Then there is the matter of the sons of immigrant ROBERT, THOMAS and JOHN, who in 1709 were 'spelled' from the Quakers for "CURSING, DRINKING AND KEEPING BAD COMPANY". No record has been found of them since they attended the wedding of their brother Jacob to Elinor Owen on 4-5-1712). Jacob received father Robert's brick massage and 330 acres later. Thomas and John Vernon are found living in the Caldwell Settlement at Cub Creek.

Thomas Vernon, Sr. took up 501 acres from the Kennon Deed on Cub in 1745. In the 1757, Thomas Vernon, Sr. and Mary went to live with son Isaac and wife Elizabeth. They deeded their homestead and 370 acres of land to Isaac (Lunenburg Deed Book No 6). Elizabeth was still the wife of Isaac in 1761 and was listed in the Richard Austin will of 1759. Presumably, Elizabeth was his daughter. The will of James Caldwell, in 1757, lists Nehemiah and Joseph as son of Isaac Vernon. The former will also mentions Thomas Vernon. Although we have continually speculated that Isaac's first wife was Elizabeth Austin (he later married Jane Caldwell), there is also a strong possibility that the wife of Thomas Vernon, S. was the "Elizabeth" of the Richard Austin will, since "Mary" is nickname of Elizabeth. Further, the Elizabeth who married could have been the daughter of James Caldwell. In other words, Lt. Isaac probably married two Caldwell girls.

The Will of David Caldwell, made at Lunenburg C H in 1770, lists Hannah Vernon. It thought that she was Thomas Vernon, Sr. daughter. Another daughter was the "beloved Rebecca, sister mentioned on the Lt. Isaac will in Rockingham Co. NC of 1787

The 1757 deed of the Ole' homestead of Isaac and Elizabeth was witnessed by David Caldwell, James Vernon, Richard Vernon and Robert Vernon. The Richard and Robert were most likely, sons of Thomas Sr. not of sons of Thomas Jr.

1757/8 Isaac was on of the grantes of a deed land from William Caldwell for a gravesite, where I (William Vernon Sr) believe Thomas Vernon, Sr. was buried soon thereafter. Thomas Jr. became Thomas Sr. by 1795, long after his brothers with their families had moved into Carolina Frontier. Richard and Robert Vernon, son of Thomas Jr., m'd Ester and Elizabeth daughters of Alexander Hambleton The last mentioned Robert and Elizabeth was born in Cub Creek in 1769 and removed to Beldsole Co., TN. where he lived to a ripe old age.

The Cub Creek Vernons had begun to make their move into the Carolina frontier by 1770, perhaps as early as 1767. The Quakers had gone before. A Joseph Vernon died in Old Rowan County in 1717.. Ephrahim Vernon was the first to receive an NC deed in New Hanover Co. NC (Wlmington) at 1667 (He was later listed as Varnum and Vernon).

Children Thomas Vernon Sr. (Mary could have been his 2nd wife?)

1 Jonathan Vernon b 1712 PA, d 1804-will in Stokes Co NC ded 1802) m'd Rebecca and settle in Old Surry Co NC., during the early 1770's. Styled "Old John Vernon." One source states he was born 1704.

2 Richard, the Wagonmaster of Culpepper Co. Va. (d abt 1795) m'd Sarah Tinsley in Carolina Co Va. in 1743

3 Thomas Jr. of Charlotte Co Va m'd either Nancy Harrison dau of Benjamin Harrison of Old Brunswick or Sarah Gains or both

4 Isaac of Rockingham Co. NC (Will 1787) m'd maybe Elizabeth Austin and 2nd Jane Caldwell, survived by 13 children. Joseph and Thomas could have proceeded him in death

5 James d 1803 of Abbeyville Co. SC m'd Eleanor; settled in first in Old Rowan Co NC in 1770 on both sides of Mayo River and on Mayo Mountain. This became Old Guilford Co in 1771 and then Rockingham Co in 1786. James and family removed to Abbeville Co SC in 1787

6 Rebecca (acc: will of bro Isaac)

7 Madaline (acc: Records of Ruby Absher. VFAA

8 John ?

9 Robert (witness to Thomas Sr. deed to Isaac in 1757

10 Hannah ?, mentioned in David Caldwell will of 1770

Thomas Vernon of Cub Creek, Virginia

Thomas Vernon of Cub Creek, Virginia

Note: From

The Andy Alexis Family Home Page

Throughout the records, we find evidence of extreme persecution of the Quakers in Cheshire, England, Thomas Vernon, Quaker, is particularly tormented during the late 1600's, having his stock driven off his estate and other property taken from him at will. Consequently, it is quite easy to understand the settlement of these Vernons in the New World. (VV June 1974 p 14)The inscription on the monument at the ruins of Caldwell Settlement states that Rev. John Caldwell, ancestor of John C. Calhoun of South Carolina and Dr. Joseph Caldwell, First President of the University of North Carolina, waited on the Presbyterian synod of Philadelphia in 1738 for permission to settle in Virginia. He was also the ancestor of Dr. David Caldwell, founder of Caldwell College of Greensborough, N.C., and educator of Governors of N.C., as well as Generals for the South in the Civil War. Dr. David died at the age of 97. I visited this site on two occasions, the last being in 1970. The Synod applied to Governor Gooch, and permission was granted in Williamsburgh on Nov. 4, 1738. Rev. John and his followers purchased 20,000acres along both sides of Cub Creek, which was then in Old Brunswick county.

Among the first seventeen families to take up land in Caldwell Settlement was that of Thomas Vernon, Sr. (Kegley's Virginia Frontier). Rev. John however, left the Chestnut Level, Pa. Presbyterian settlement in the spring of 1739, in the accompaniment of several children and their families, and built a home on the eastern slope of Buck Mountain in Albemarle County, some 75 miles north of cub Creek...and the Little Roanoke River in Old Brunswick. This same group had arrived in Dec. of 1727 at Newcastle, Del., from Antrim, No. Ireland.

Dr. Howard M. Wilson (The Tinklin spring, 1954) noted that he had located Rev. John Caldwell at his Buck Mountain home on Dec. 18, 1740. Here the Pickins, Dougherty, and Caldwell children were baptized by John Craig. Dr. Wilson also observed that Rev. Caldwell was at Buck Mt., as late as March 1, 1741, when the Francil and Anderson families and children were baptized by Craig in his home.

The wife and daughter of Rev. John are buried on Buck Mt., and he did not settle at Cub Creek until after March 1, 1741, a year when many followers of the Church of Scotland (Presbyterian) left Scotland and Ulster Plantation (No. Ireland) directly for the Southside Virginia Frontier. Rev. John, however, had made several trips to the headwaters of the James and Little Roanoke. the earliest rrip was probably in the spring of 1734, when his youngest son, James was born at Cub Creek (Caldwell Records and Curruthers, The Life of David Caldwell.) They were probably visiting the outpost frontier home of the Fuquea family.

James Caldwell (1734) became the Rebel Priest during the revolutionary War. He was the Chaplain of the army of New Jersey, in whose honor Caldwell, N.J., was named. He and his wife, with babe-in-arms, were brutally slain by British soldiers, at their Church, while he cried, "Give them Watts, Boys. Give them Watts." Patriots had given out of paper, needed for stuffing their longrifles. He was serving them the hymns by Watts.

This Caldwell history is given, not only as a means of explaining the religious motives for the historic settlement at cub Creek, but also in view of the fact that at least one of the sons of Thomas Vernon, Sr. married a Caldwell. Isaac's second wife seems to have been Jane Caldwell. (Rockingham Co., N.C., Record of Deeds: Isaac's Will of 1787.

Although Thomas Vernon, Sr. and family were members of the Presbyterian Caldwell Settlement, several other families with English surnames lived in the immediate vicinity during the 1740's. Notable were the Clement Reads and the Thomas Bouldins. They built the first and second weatherboard framed houses, respectively, in Old Lunenberg, near Bushy Fork. After Rev. John Caldwell turned down the position of first Vestryman of the Established church of England in Lunenberg, it was accepted by Major Thomas Boldin (The Old Trunk by Pocohontos Bouldin). An interesting point, in passing, is that the above Thomas Bouldin's son, Capt. Thomas , Jr., married Armine Cox of (Stokes) N.C., whose Sister Mary Cox married Jonathan Vernon, Jr. of Stokes county, who moved with his family to Jackson Co., Ohio.

Lunenburg county was cut away from Old Brunswick in 1745. the Brunswick County and Cub Creek records were destroyed by fire a few years earlier The Church built at Cub Creek was the first Presbyterian Church on the Southside Virginia frontier. Mr. Chermsides called it the "Mother Church," and added that Old Thomas Vernon was at Caldwell Settlement when Lunenberg was cut away.

In 1757 Thomas Vernon, Sr. and wife Mary went to live with son Isaac and wife Elizabeth. they deeded their homestead and 370 acres of land to Isaac (Lunenburg Deed Bood No. 6) Elizabeth was still the wife of Isaac in 1761 and was listed in the Richard Austin will of 1759. Presumed, Elizabeth was his daughter. The will of James Caldwell, in 1759, lists Nehemiah and Joseph, sons of Isaac Vernon. The former will also mentions Thomas Vernon.

Believed to have immigrated with his son, Isaac to America from Ulster Ireland or Scotland between 1738 and 1741. Both were at Caldwell Settlement, Cub Creek, Virginia by or before 1747 (VV June 1972)

Vernon (and McVernon); in Irish Mac Thirnuin; derived from "fhearnuin" meaning " the man of the ash tree." (Fhear, Irish gen.; fhir, Latin; vir, the man; nuin, the ash tree.) (VV June 1972)[alexisold. FTW]

(1) Records of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, embracing the Minutes of the General Presbytery and General Synod, 1706-1788, pg 138-139. (2) The 17 founders were David John and William Caldwell and William son of John Caldwell; Andrew and Thomas Cunningham; Thomas Daugherty; Richard Dudgeon, James Franklin, William Fuqua, William Hardwick; David and James Logan; Alexander McConnel, Israel Pickens, John Stewar, and Thomas Vernon as noted in Elizabeth Venable Gaines: "Cub Creek and Congregation, 1738-1838, p. 93

This Caldwell history is given, not only as a means of explaining the religious motives for the historic settlement at cub Creek, but also in view of the fact that at least one of the sons of Thomas Vernon, Sr. married a Caldwell. Isaac's second wife seems to have been Jane Caldwell. (Rockingham Co., N.C., Record of Deeds: Isaac's Will of 1787

Although Thomas Vernon, Sr. and family were members of the Presbyterian Caldwell Settlement, several other families with English surnames lived in the immediate vacinity during the 1740's. Notable were the Clement Reads and the Thomas Bouldins. They built the first and second weatherboard framed houses, respectively, in Old Lunenberg, near Bushy Fork. After Rev. John Caldwell turned down the position of first Vestryman of the Established church of England in Lunenberg, it was accepted by Major Thomas Boldin (The Old Trunk by Pocohontos Bouldin). An interesting point, in passing, is that the above Thomas Bouldin's son, Capt. Thomas , Jr., married Armine cox of (Stokes) N.C., whose Sister Mary Cox married Jonathan Vernon, Jr. of Stokes county, who moved with his family to Jackson Co., Ohio.

Lunenburg county was cut away from Old Brunswick in 1745. the Brunswick County and Cub Creek records were destroyed by fire a few years earlier The Church built at Cub Creek was the first Presbyterian Church on the Southside Virginia frontier. Mr. Chermsides called it the "Mother Church," and added that Old Thomas Vernon was at Caldwell Settlement when Lunenberg was cut away

In 1757 Thomas Vernon, Sr. and wife Mary went to live with son Isaac and wife Elizabeth. they deeded their homestead and 370 acres of land to Isaac (Lunenburg Deed Bood No. 6) Elizabeth was still the wife of Isaac in 1761 and was listed in the Richard austin will of 1759. Presumedly, Elizabeth was his daughter. The will of James Caldwell, in 1759, lists Nehemiah and Joseph, sons of Isaac Vernon. The former will also mentions Thomas Vernon.

More About THOMAS SR. VERNON: 1709, Disowned by Chester MM and 1698, This is Thomas Sr. of Cub Creek Vernons and 1682, believed to have immigrated to Amer. from Ireland and : Member of the Presbyterian Caldwell Settlement and Large land owner and (Lunenburg), Virginia, Cub Creek, Va .and 1709, Disowned by Quakers. (Note: Thomas Vernon born in PA move with his family and friends to Lunenburg, Virginia. Settling in the Cub Creek area. In Pennsylvania Thomas also lived in Cub Creek area)

Interesting information about Caldwell Settlement I found on the Internet at:

Caldwell Settlement

The following letter can be found in the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 19, pp 92-94 (a letter from John Roger to Elias B. Caldwell; subject-the Caldwell family).

"Our [John Roger and Elias B. Caldwell--cousins] grandfather emigrated from Scotland to Ireland soon after King William's conquest of that place [ie. Scotland--King William III of England; 1650-1702]. Our grandfather, John Caldwell, was born in Ireland and was there married to a Margaret Phillips (our grandmother). He remained there until they had five children, at which time he got three of his brothers-in-law, who had married his sisters, to come to America with him (to wit) Moor, Ritchey, and Dudgeon. Wll:[?] of whom I well remember and one brother-in-law who married his wife's sister whose name was Dougherty, grandfather of my wife and Thomas Dougherty formerly clerk to the lowest house of Congress. They set sail together and landed in Delaware the very day that King George II was proclaimed there [King George II of England; 1683-1760]. From thence they got up the country to a place in Pa., then, called Chestnut Level. Our grandfather naturally of an enterprising spirit, explored the country southwesterly from a place in Va. to Albemarle Co. to which he moved and was soon followed by all his kindred.

There he lived some years; there our grandfather died and his oldest son and my mother-his only daughter-were married.

They and their companions moved with him to Roanoke River and the fine lands there explored the country westerly until his followers fixed on a fine level waterly spot not 30 miles outside any inhabitants, to which place him and his sons and brothers-in-law moved about the year 1742-43.

They were soon after joined by other friends mostly from Ireland or Pa. until they formed a little settlement which was known and always called Caldwell Settlement. For thirty years after father was the first Justice of the Peace and his oldest son the oldest militia officer that was ever appointed under King George II within 25 miles of that place in that neighborhood. I was born and in it was married and had six children before I moved to Ky in the year 1781.

Our grandfathers children were William, Thomas, David, all are buried in the same graveyard with their father. David's widow and all the family moved to Ky. Uncle John went to So. Carolina and died there. Uncle William's widow and all that family went also to So. Carolina. Our friend John C. Calhoun is a son of the 2nd daughter of that family."

(signed by) Cousin John Roger

Page 211. Will. Aug 10, 1757. I, James Caldwell of L, being very sick - Firstly, I want my just debts and funeral charges paid.

To my wife Elizbeth - my personal estate, except what I shall further bequeath out of it. Also, to my wife, the use of this plantation, [until] my son George be of age, at which time I bequeath it to him, including 155 acres, excepting that it is to be continued in my wife's possession during life. Also, to my wife during life, Henry Caldwell, an orphan child, and then to my son James, the remainder of his servitude .

To my son James - 155 acres of land, being part of the tract I now live on, including his house and improvement.

To my son John - 155 acres on the south side of this tract I live on, on both sides of the new road.

To my son-in-law George Secot - part of the tract he now lives on, and a deed to be made to him by my executors.

To Samuel Daves - the lower part of that tract Georg Scoat lives on, and a deed to be made to him by my executors.

To James Berton - 1 English shilling.

To Joseph Irenmonger - 1 English shilling.

To Thomas Vernon - 1 English shilling.

To William Scot - 1 English shilling.

To Nehemiah and Joseph Vernons, sons of Isach Vernon - 1 £ each.

Page 237. An account of the appraisement of James Caldwell, deceased's estate, appraised by Thomas Vernon, John Logan, James Barton, & James Murphey. Includes: 8 sheep, 6 cows. Total: [about £ 48]. Witness - William Caldwell. Recorded Jun 6, 1758.

At Apr 3, 1751 Court, the will of George Harwood, deceased, was exhibited by the executors, and proved by the oaths of the witnesses, and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of the executors, certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof, they having first with David Logan and Thomas Vernon, their securities, entered into bond.

Document found on the Lunenburg Co., Virginia web site:

Lunenburg Co., Virginia

“SUNLIGHT ON THE SOUTHSIDE” Transcribed by Thomas Walter Duda

Part 3

Transcriber's Note: Apart from identifying misspelled words in Part 1, the transcriber has not altered the text. Any comments not clearly marked as being those of the transcriber re either those of the author or of a work cited by the author. The names in the tithe lists have been rendered precisely as found in the published text. It must be stressed that any suggestions as to alternative spellings or questioning that occur within the tithe lists are those of the author.

The full text is presented in this transcription with the exception of the index. Each year is contained in its own file.

Footnotes are rendered in brackets; page numbers are rendered in braces. Any parenthetical text has been rendered using the brackets or parentheses that appear in the published text. Between pp. 58 and 59 of the published text there appears a fold-out map of Lunenburg County as it existed in 1748, overlaid with the tithe subdivisions and the counties that were created from the original territory of Lunenburg county. A textual representation of the map, together with explanatory text, appears in Part 2 at the end of page 58, but prior to the start of the list of tithes.

No copyright notice was printed in the published text.

{page 86, continued}

At June Court, 1749, the appointments to take the list of tithables were made as follows:

William Caldwell, "from Falling River to Little Ronoke River." For 1749 - List Taken by William Caldwell

[page 89]

Thomas Vernon, Senr. Isaac Vernon James Vernon ............................................. 3

Thomas Vernon, Junr. ....................................... 1

Jonathan Vernon ............................................ 1

For 1750 - List taken by William Caldwell

Jonathan Vernor .............................................1

Isaac Vernor...................................................1

Thomas Vernor, Senr. James Vernor .............................................2

Thomas Vernor, Junr......................................1

For 1752 - List taken by William Caldwell

Johnathan Vernon ........................................... 1

Thomas Vernon, Senr. Isaack Vernon James Vernon ............................................. 2

Thos. Vernon ............................................... 1

LUNENBURG COUNTY VIRGINIA WILLS 1746 - 1825

74. Caldwell, James 8-10-1757; 12-6-1757; W.B. 1/211

Mentions: Wife: Elizabeth Caldwell

Sons: George Caldwell, James Caldwell, John Caldwell

Sons-in-law: George Scott

Relationship of following not stated: Samuel Davis (Davies?),

James Benton, Joseph Irionmonger [sic], Thomas Vernon,

William Scott, Nathaniel Vernon, James Vernon, Isaac Vernon

Executors: Elizabeth Caldwell (wife), James Caldwell (son)

Witnesses: John Tamplin, Samuel Davies, Robert Wood.

Will of James Caldwell, dated 10 Aug 1757, recorded 6 Dec 1757 Lunenburg County, VA

Bequests: to Thomas Vernon, one English shilling

to Nehemiah and Joseph Vernon, sons of Isaac Vernon, one pound each.

Inventory and Appraisal of the estate of James Caldwell, deceased, made by Thomas Vernon, John Logan, James Barton and James Murphy, recorded 6 Jun 1758.

Lunenburg County, Virginia, Will Book No. 1,

With Inventories, Accounts, Etc, 1746-1762

At Apr 3, 1751 Court, the will of George Harwood, deceased, was exhibited by the executors, and proved by the oaths of the witnesses, and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of the executors, certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof, they having first with David Logan and Thomas Vernon, their securities, entered into bond.

“History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania” by Henry Graham Ashmead Pub: Philadelphia, L.H.Everts & Co., 1884

page 654:

In 1715 the following persons were returned as taxable in Nether Providence: Jacob Vernon, Joseph Vernon, Thomas Vernon, John Vernon. (Jacob mention here is Thomas brother or Uncle Thomas Vernon)

COURT ORDERS - CHARLOTTE COUNTY, VA BOOK SEVEN 1786 - 1789

Page 78 Joseph Curd, Pltf vs Peter Francisco, Def Case This day came the parties by their atty's. Smith Milnor, Mumford DeJarnatte, Dudley Holt, James Johnston, John Smith, Thomas Gaines, Thomas Vernon, Williams Pride Daniel, Russell Hitchcock, Thomas Smith, Joseph Ward and Joseph Adkins, the same impanelled and sworn at the last court of Quarter Sessions, to try the issue joined between the aforesaid parties, being solemnly called but not appearing, it is ordered that the sheriff summons them to appear at the next Court of Quarter Sessions to be held the first Monday in August next, to try the issue between the parties aforesaid.

Thomas and Mary Vernon Children

1 Richard VERNON b: ABT. 1711

2 Jonathan VERNON b: 1712 in PA

3 Thomas VERNON b: BEF. 1714

4 Isaac VERNON b: ABT. 1715

5 James VERNON b: 1716 in VA, Lunenburg County

6 Hannah VERNON b: in VA, Lunenburg Co., Cub Creek

7 Madeline VERNON b: in VA, Lunenburg Co., Cub Creek

8 Rebecca VERNON b: in VA, Lunenburg Co., Cub Creek

9 Robert VERNON b: in VA, Lunenburg Co., Cub Creek

Thomas Vernon father

Robert VERNON b: 1 JAN 1641 in Acton Stoke, Middlewich, Cheshire, England d: DEC 1709 in Chester Co., Nether Providence m’d 20 MAY 1663 in England, Lancaster, Wm. Barnes Home Elinor MINSHALL b: 24 SEP 1648 in England, Stoke (Cheshire) Note Married in the Wm Barnes home. Elinor parents John MINSHALL b: 10 MAY 1617 in England, Chester and Margaret b: in England, Grappenhall, Cheshire

Occupation: Husbandman

Notes for Robert Vernon:

On August 14, 1682 The Friendship of Liverpool, Robert Crossman Master, Arrived at Upland Pennsylvania. On board were Robert, Thomas and Randall Vernon, along with Thomas and Margaret Minshall. Robert, Thomas, and Randall Vernon were First Purchasers of adjoining tracts of land in Chester Co. Pennsylvania (later Nether Province Township, Delaware).

Note: Robert born in England. Resided Stoke and Parish of Acton which is near the villiage. of Middlewich in Cheshire, England. Came to Nether Province, William Penn Colony in 1682 on the. ship Friendship. Died 1709 in Chester Co., PA. Is buried in that county.

“HISTORY of CHESTOR COUNTY,PENNSYLVANIA” by J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope. Date 1881

“Robert Vernon came from Stoke, in Chesshire, England. He was member of the Society of Friends, but did not take such an active part in meeting affairs as Thomas and Randal (his brothers), though the Monthly Meetings were sometimes held at his house. He conveyed his brick message and 330 acres of land, where he resided, to son Jacob just before his death, which occurred in Jan or Feb 1709/10. His wife Elinor, who came with him, was the daughter of John Minshall and sister to Thomas Minshall, a settler in Providence. She died 7/24/1720. Their children were Issac m’d 1710 Hannah Williams and Mary (Sellers) Marshall; Jacob m’d 4/5/1712 Eleanor Owen and settled in Philadelphia later in life; John m’d 1702 m’d Sarah Pyle who left three children: Moses, Rachel (m to Robert Green) and Aaron. Gideon Vernon, son of Moses, went to Nova Scotia at the time of the Revolution. ( note by Janet: this last son Thomas was disown by Robert as have already state above)

The following is from the History of Chester County, PA by Futhey and Cope;

History of Chester County, PA

Robert Vernon came from Stoke, Cheshire,England and was a Quaker, but did not take an active part in meeting affairs as did his brothers Thomas and Randal. He conveyed his brick mesuage and 330 acres of land, where he resided, to his son jacob, just before his death in Jan or Feb 1709-10. (there is no will) His wife was the daughter of John Minshall, and sister of Thomas Minshall, a settler in

Providence. she died 7-24-1720. Their children were (1) Isaac m. 1710 Hannah Williams and Mary Sellers Marshall; (2) Jacob m. 1712, Elanor Owen, and settled in Philadelpnia later in life; (3) John m. 1702 Sarah Pyle and left 3 children Moses, Rachel and Aaron.

Thus, the only way you could be related to Robert would be throughthe son, Isaac. Isaac Vernon was a member of th eUwchlan Meeting, and represented it at meetings of the Chester MM, so if I were you I'd do some checking in the Uwchlan records for information on him and his family

“Andrew Alexis Homepage”

Andrew Alexis

Robert Vernon, supposed to have been the youngest of the brothers, married Eleanor Minshall, supposed to have been the sister of Thomas Minshall. His home was at various times the meeting place for the local Society of Friends. he died in 1709 or 10. Children of Robert and Eleanor were Alice (baptized in Aston, England, jun 31, 1664;John (born and baptized in Aston, England) who married Sarah Pyle (born 1682; died dec. 16, 1706);he died 1731; Jacob (born 7/11/ 1680) who married 4/5/1712, Mrs. Eleanor Owens; Isaac (died 12/23/1748) who married first in 1704Thomas Garrett; second Richard Jones as his second wife; Thomas, who was disowned in 1709 by Chester MM (no reason given). (by Walter N. Vernon)

MINUTE BOOK "G" MINUTES OF PROPERTY COMMENCING YE 19TH 9TH BER., 1701. THIS IS BOOK G IN THE SEORETARIES OFFICE.

At a Session of the Commissioners at Philadelphia the 9th 9 mo., 1702. Present, Edward Shippen, Griffith Owen, Thomas Story, James Logan.

Robert Vernon having a Warr't from the Propr'y for 285 acres, be desires to Purchase 315 More to make it 600 acres for a Settlem't to two of his Sons and Chooses the N. East side of Brandywine, beyond the Barrens, for which he at last offers £10 p'r 100, complaining much of his loss in not being Suffred to take up his Land before, Granted for Several Considerations as Requested, provided the Land be realy as represented and not culled; John Hope, of Chester County, purchases 200 a's of that Land which was Ja's Stanfield's heading Peter Dix's, at £15 p'r 100 and a Bushell of wheat; to have it at one end

MINUTE BOOK "H" MINUTES OF PROPERTY BEGINNING 9TH DAY OF THE SECOND MONTH, 1712. THIS IS BOOK "H." IN THE SECRETARIES OFFICE.

At a meeting of the Commissioners at Philad'a, 13, 3 mo., 1713. Present, Samuell Carpenter, Richard Hill, Isaac Norris, James Logan. Robert Vernon having procured of the Proprietor in the Year 1700, his Warr't for taking up 285 acres, the Remaind'r of his Purchase, by an Agreement with the Commissioners, obtained their Warrant, dated 23d 9ber, 1702, for taking up 315 acres adjoining to the other to make up the whole 600 acres, but afterw'ds threw it up, and the whole Grant was by Consent made Void

MINUTE BOOK "G" MINUTES OF PROPERTY COMMENCING YE 19TH 9TH BER., 1701. THIS IS BOOK G IN THE SEORETARIES OFFICE.

At a Session of the Commissioners at Philadelphia the 30th of the First Mo'th, 1702. Present, Edward Shippen, Griffith Owen, Thomas Story, James Logan, Sec'ry John Hicks, of London, Cheesemonger, by Lease and Release, dated 10th and 11th 8br., 1681, purchased of the Prop'ry 250 a's which by a Warrant dated 7th 5 mo., 1683, were taken up in the said Township of Middletown, and the said Hicks by an Instrum't dated 3d August, 1689, Constituted Randal Vernon, Thomas Vernon and Walter Faucet, his attornies, to dispose of the Said Land, who by a Deed dated 10th 1 mo., 1691, convey'd the Said 250 acres to Caleb Pusey, Of this 250 acres Purchase, Caleb Pusey, by a Warrant dated 30th 5 mo., 1687, took up the same day 4 a's of Lib. Land so that the said tract should Contain but 246 a's [See whether John Goodson his Lib. Land in right of this].

Frances Pusey, Widdow of the said John, by a Letter of attorney dated 2d of Feb'y, 1692, Impowered Randal Vernon, Thomas Vernon and Walter Faucet to convey the said Land with all appurtenances of the said Purchase, by Vertue of which the said three attorneys by Deed dated 1st 10 mo., 1694, convey'd the said 250 acres to Caleb Pusey

Ordered that a Resurvey be Granted as Requested.

Land: 1682 LANDS Granted by PENN to Purchasers of Eng.,Ire.,Scotland,etc.:

Land: 1682

40-49 40- Thomas Rowland, Robert Taylor, William Taylor- Peter Taylor, George Glean, John Edge, Randal Maylin, Thomas Vernon, Thomas Minshall, Robert Vernon, Thomas Powell, Randall Croxton, Allen Robinet, Henry Maddock, James Kennerly, John Sharpless, John Neild.

History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania

Providence Friends' Meeting-House. -

The first mention of a Friends' Meeting in Providence occurs in the minutes of Chester Quarterly Meeting, Third month, 1696, when it was agreed to settle a meeting "at Thomas Minshall's every First and Fourth day." On Twelfth month 6, 1698/9, Friends belonging to Thomas Minshall's meeting proposed to build a meeting-house at the burying-ground of Thomas Powell, which would have located the building near the Media reservoir, on Providence road, in Upper Providence. The Quarterly Meeting deferred the consideration of the matter, but the project doubtless met with some opposition, for it is recorded, "It being the sense of this meeting that no meeting-house be hereafter built upon any new situation without ye advise & consent of the quarterly meeting." However, Caleb Pusey, Thomas Worth, John Hood, George Pierce, Nicholas Pyle, and Robert Carter were appointed "to view & consider of the most convenient place where to sett the above proposed meeting-house." On Third month 1, 1699, the committee stated "according to the order & request of ye Last quarterly meeting, The friends appointed to inspect into & consider of the most convenient place to build the meeting-house, to answer that of Tho: Minshall's, Do make return under their hands that it is their sense that at the farthest end of Thomas Minshall's Land, by ye high roade side, is the most Convenient place for that service, & accordingly this meeting approves of ye same." The land on which this meeting-house was built was given for that purpose by Thomas Minshall. The first house was a log structure. The building was completed in the summer of 1700, for on 5th day of Sixth month (August), in that year, the Quarterly Meeting "Ordered that the next Quarterly meeting be held at the new meeting-house in Nether Providence." On Ninth month 4, 1700, the First day and week day meeting was ordered to be removed from Thomas Minshall's to the "meeting-house," and on Twelfth month 12, 1701, the meeting at Randal Vernon's was also "removed to the new meeting-house."

At Providence meeting-house, Second month 5, 1703, Walter Faucitt was dealt with by the meeting, the charges being set forth in the following extract from the quaint minutes:

"This meeting having Duly taken into their Consideration the disorderly practis of Samuel Levis in keeping on his hatt whilst Walter Faucitt was in prayer, att a monthly meeting att Robert Vernon's, on the 11th month Last; therefore, the meeting doth appoint Joseph Baker and Paul Sanders to spake to him and Indaver to bring him to a sence of his disorder; and that hee do acknowledg the same to the satisfaction of this meeting, which if he doth not promise to do, then to order him to appear at the next monthly meeting." At a quarterly meeting in this house, held Twelfth month 26, 1704, the following extract from the minutes shows that Henry Hollingsworth had acted in such a manner as to cause Friends to deal with him. The old record states:

"Whereas, Henry Holingsworth has Refused from time to time to answer the sence and Judgment of the meeting held att this place the 30th of the 8th mo. Last past, and doth yett Refuse so to do, and in our meetings of Business have uttered verey unsavery expressions and unjustifiable speeches, pertiqualarly aft our Last mo. meeting, speaking of the meeting's proceedings against him for his disorder, hee said that Bonnor and Winchester would have been ashamed of such actions, and that it was like the Cuting off the Lord Stafford's head; also publickly Calling our ancient friend Randall Vernon old pimp, little pimp, & Sott, &c., with other unsavory expressions to Tedious and Rediculas heare to bee mentioned; as also telling a former monthly meeting that they acted like Jesuits, which all tended to scandalize friends; for all which, with much more, this meeting finds a Nesesaty upon them to testifie and declare, and do hereby Testifie and Declare, Henry Hollingsworth to be out of the Unity of this meeting, and do disown him to be of our peaceable society and Christian Comunion Until hee Repent and acknowledg his said abuses to the satisfaction of this meeting, which that hee may so do is our true and Heartey desire."

“Nether Providence Through the Years” Compiled by: J. Mervyn Harris, President

Nether Providence Historical Society

As with many areas, the first recorded inhabitants of Nether Providence were Indians: not the Delawares, the Minquas, or Lenni-Lenape, but the Lenape and only the Lenape. The Minquas came through the area to trade on the Delaware, but their home was above Harrisburg near the Susquehannacks. The other names existed only in the minds of the English who called anyone living around the Delaware River "Delawares". The Okehockings, a branch of the Lenape, inhabited the land between the Crum and Ridley Creeks, the creeks that form the boundaries of our Township. To the Five Nations (Iroquois) the Lenape were known as the "Grandfathers," an honorary title indicating great respect. With the coming of the Swedes in 1638, the Dutch in 1655, and finally, the English in 1664, the Lenape started to move west around 1674 to avoid the new settlers. By 1740, there were very few Lenape left in our area.

In colonial America travel was difficult and expensive, so settlements kept close to the coastline or along waterways going inland. Few people lived any farther than 100 miles from the coast. Because of the two creeks, our area became one of the first populated and organized regions of "Penn's Woods". By the time William Penn arrived (1681) in Upland (now the City of Chester), there were several small settlements in this area of the county known as Providence. Providence comprised today's Nether Providence, Rose Valley, Media, and Upper Providence. Providence Township was organized in 1684. The governmental separation came in 1687, dividing Providence into Nether Providence and Upper Providence (Media was carved out in 1850 and Rose Valley in 1923). However, having only 40 taxable properties, both were assessed as one until 1722.

In 1683, residents of Providence petitioned the Court of Chester County, (of which we were then a part), sitting in the City of Chester, to establish a road from Providence to Chester. The court approved the creation of "Providence Great Road" (now Route 252). A short time later, another "Providence" Road was approved by that court. It went from Philadelphia through Darby, through Nether Providence and into the rest of Chester County. While Nether Providence changed the road's name to Plush Mill, it is still called "Providence" in Secane and Aldan.

Over the centuries, Nether Providence went through four somewhat distinct phases of use: from farming, to manufacturing, to resort, and finally, to residential community.

When land grants were sold by William Penn starting in 1681, they were sold as farms of 100 acres or more. Some of our original farm families were Vernon, Pusey, Sharpless, Minshall and Coppock. Because of the mixture of water, steep slopes, and arable soil, farming flourished in Nether Providence. By 1729, the area was producing sufficient crops to allow exporting to New England, Canada and Europe. Of course our two creeks were indispensable in transporting farm goods to "foreign" markets. By the mid-eighteenth century, southeastern Pennsylvania was known as the "breadbasket of America."

Dairying was also important in the Township's early days and several large dairy farms existed. To dispose of and utilize the meat from older cows, Squire John Affleck started a slaughterhouse at 322 North Providence Great Road around 1820. The building is still in existence. One of the largest of the dairy farms was Dick's dairy farm, and it operated in buildings built in 1802 which are still located at 301 and 303 Copples Lane.

The same two creeks that nourished Native Americans also nourished the establishment and fostered the growth of manufacturing in the Township. The creek on our eastern border was called "Okehocking" by the Indians. It meant crooked creek. The Dutch called it "Crumkill" meaning "crooked creek" in their language, and the English shortened it to "Crum". There were eight major mill complexes in Nether Providence, four on each creek. They were founded or operated by families named Hastings, Sharpless, Vernon, Engle, Forrest, Hinkson, Leiper, Moore, Rogers, Byre, Palmer, Turner, Bancroft, Beatty, Osborne, Felds and Walker. Mills that were created to serve the immediate neighborhoods were eventually enlarged and diversified as a result of the Revolution. Two Crum Creek gunpowder mills -- Dr. Robert Harris', just north of Yale Avenue bridge, and farther downstream, Thomas Leiper's -- provided almost half of Washington's total supply of gunpowder for the campaigns of 1776 and 1777. In addition, there were saw mills, snuff mills, cotton mills, woolen mills, tool mills, grist mills, dye mills, grain mills, and rolling mills. Where there were mills, there were mill villages, built to care for the workers. Some of the most important of these were Avondale, Irvington, Waterville, Briggsville, and Sackville. Most of them consisted of tenements, houses, churches, and stores.

The last Township industry was on Ridley Creek, in what we now know as the Sackville area. The original mill was a snuff mill founded around 1791 by Jacob Benninghove. It went through several changes and owners over the years. Samuel Bancroft bought it in 1831 and added a saw mill, calling it "Lower Bank." William T. Crook took over in 1842 and converted it into a woolen mill. Bancroft was back again in 1854 and the name was changed to Todmorden Mills. By 1876, it was one of the largest woolen mills in the nation. Next, Henry T. Kent bought the property and called it Columbia Worsted Mills. Finally, it was sold to Mr. Sack and renamed Sackville Woolen Mills. Sackville continued until it was closed on January 1, 1934 because of an outbreak of anthrax that was spreading throughout the community. Two hundred residents were forced to leave in the dead of winter within a two-week period.

Pennsylvania has a distinguished record in transportation: the Conestoga wagon, the Great Wagon Road, the Pennsylvania Railroad, the Lincoln Highway, the Pennsylvania Turnpike and the Leiper Railroad. Mr. Leiper established his powder mills and snuff mills on Crum Creek in 1779. Later he added stone quarries and a blade mill. By 1825 he had added paper, stone cutting, oyster crushing (for mortar) and textile mills.

To accommodate the workers for these mills, a village was settled surrounding Mr. Leiper's home of "Strath Haven" and given the name "Avondale" for his home town in Scotland. There were over twenty-seven buildings in the village.

Getting his products to market was a challenge because transportation was so poor at that time. His first attempt to solve his transportation problem came in 1791 when he requested the Pennsylvania Legislature's permission to construct a canal along Crum Creek that would bring his goods to the tidewater terminals more expeditiously. The request was denied.

In 1809, Mr. Leiper developed a different solution - he built a railroad. The first commercial railroad in Pennsylvania! This was not a railroad in the modern sense. It was a horse-drawn tramway that went from his quarries in Avondale through the rear of today's Sproul Estates, across Bullen's Lane ending at Ridley Creek. It operated for eighteen years.

In 1824 (the year before Mr. Leiper died), the State Legislature finally gave permission for the canal.

So it was left to his son, George, in 1828, to close the tramway and replace it with a canal running from the village of Avondale to a point near present-day MacDade Boulevard. This bold move was made only three years after Governor DeWitt Clinton opened his canal in New York. The fact that the Erie Canal was still referred to as "Clinton's Ditch" did not discourage the Leipers because they believed in the merits of canal transportation. Proving them correct, soon after the Leiper Canal was completed, a wave of canal building swept across the country. The canal, in turn, was replaced in 1852 by a second railroad running the entire length of the Crum Creek valley to present day Chester Pike. Eventually, George Leiper acquired the Harris powder mill, located just above Yale Avenue on the Crum, and operated a blade mill for scythes and knives. In 1830, it was converted into a paper mill and then a cotton mill that operated until the 1880s. Avondale Mills continued production until the Depression and the quarries were open until 1944.

A word about Mr. Leiper. We tend to regard William Cameron Sproul as our most influential resident. He was, after all, Governor of Pennsylvania and owner of The Chester Times (now The Delaware County Times). Or maybe Howard H. Huston, former Mayor of Chester, director of several banks and businesses and the electric railway company that put the first trolley across Nether Providence. Nevertheless, in his time, Mr. Leiper's importance could not be surpassed. He helped form and was Treasurer of the First City Troop. He took part in the battles of Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. He was a friend and partner of Thomas Jefferson, a Presidential Elector in 1809 for Andrew Jackson, and a founder of the Bank of North America. We know he built the first permanent railway in America, but, at his home in Avondale, he also built the first private bank in America. He was President of the Philadelphia City Council (1802-1805) and President of the Philadelphia Common Council (1813). In addition to all this, he was a founder and first officer of the Franklin Institute. In retrospect, Mr. Leiper was a man for all seasons!

Further up Crum Creek, in the area surrounding Baltimore Pike, were the mills of the Lewis family. Their first mill was a cotton mill. Around 1890, it became Victoria Plush Mill and operated until the 1930s. A second mill was a paper mill. It operated from 1825 until the 1960s under various names such as Paper Manufacturing Products Company and Franklin Paper Mills. The mill buildings are on the Springfield side of Crum Creek, but the workers' tenement houses are on the Township's side. J. Howard Lewis selected a site on his 106acre estate for his home and built it around 1840. The house, located in Smedley Park, is now occupied by the Cooperative Extension Center.

Another major mill site was at the foot of Beatty Road, known as the Edge Tool Factory. It produced farm and carpentry implements starting in 1848. Around 1860, the Beatty family took it over and, in 1892, sold it to the Springfield Water Company.

The mills played an essential part in the growth of Nether Providence. In addition to hundreds of employees (men, women, and children), hundreds more were employed in occupations ancillary to the mills - as stable hands, teamsters, smiths, tailors and carpenters. Self-contained villages grew up around those mills consisting of houses, churches, stores, schools and recreational areas.

As the township stabilized and flourished, more substantial homes began to appear. Wooley Stille (802 Harvey Road) expanded its original 1685 section by adding the "Great Hall" in 1700. Other new homes included the 1704 James Sharpless house (322 North Providence Road), 1728 John Sharpless, III house (610 Creekside Lane), 1735 Vernon house (106 North Providence Road), 1735 Jonathan Vernon house (107 Wallingford Avenue), 1737 James Hinkson house (I East Brookhaven Road), 1740 Daniel Sharpless, Sr. house (723 South Providence Road), 1746 Isaac Briggs house (403 North Providence Road), 1750 John Byre dairy farm house (101 West Brookhaven Road), 1760 Beatty house (603 Beatty Road), 1763 William Edward house (410 North Providence Road), 1777 Jonathan Vernon house (41 South Providence Road), 1785 Thomas Leiper house (521 Avondale Road), 1785 Enos Sharpless house (280 Chestnut Parkway), 1790 James Vernon house (10 Meadow Lane), 1793 Franklin Iron Works foreman's house (109 Waterville Road), 1796 Thomas Hinkson house (212 Sykes Lane), 1798 Seth Thomas house (8 South Providence Road), 1798 Worrall family house (900 Penn Valley Road) and the 1799 James Hinkson Blacksmith Shop (3 West Brookhaven Road). The Blacksmith Shop was used as the Township Commissioners' meeting room from the late 1930s until 1953. There are twenty-seven houses built in the eighteenth century that are still used today. Another thirty-nine structures built in the 1800s are still in use today.

The Gratz family moved in, building or remodeling homes around Hinkson's Corners. Simon established summer residents for three daughters. One daughter married Colonel A. J. McClure, former Secretary to President Lincoln, owner of the Chester Times and founder of the Delaware County political dynasty. A home for them was built on Providence Road, next to the Caldwell home, in 1882 and called "Norland". It stood where Purdy Lane is now. Another home was built for the daughter who married Felix de Cranos, the French Consul General. It is located at 6 East Brookhaven Road. A third daughter married Alfred S. Gillette, owner of the Philadelphia Times. They expanded the old Vernon house at 41 South Providence Road. Even Simon's brother Harry, moved in. He built a large frame house just off Hinkson's Corners. It was named "Thunder Castle" and was located at the end of what is now Dale Lane.

Trolleys also helped to develop the area. The first independent trolley started in Chester in 1883. It was the Chester and Media Electric Railway and was chartered on April 18, 1892 (later to become Southern Pennsylvania Traction Company). The first trolley rolled out on March 6, 1893. The route came from Chester, went out Chestnut Parkway, turned into Garden City, crossed private fields to Rose Valley and Providence Roads, continued up Providence Road, went out Wallingford Avenue, turned onto Vernon Street in South Media (at that time the most active part of the township) continued to Manchester Avenue, Front Street, South Avenue, and ended in Media at Orange Street

Proclamation listing Chester County Inhabitants Accused of High Treason (1778): Chester County, PA

Gideon Vernon, husbandman; all now or late of the township of Providence: And Christopher Wilson, husbandman, and John Taylor, glasier, both now or late of the township of Ridley; Benjamin Miller, saddler, now or late of the township of East Caln; Joshua Proctor, labourer, now or late of the township of Newtown; Aaron Ashbridge, waterman; Joseph Gill, maltster; Elias Vernon, taylor; all now late of the township of Chester: and Daniel Register, carpenter, now or late of the township of Edgemont: and John Suplee,

Court: Proclamation listing Chester County Inhabitants Accused of High Treason (1778): Chester County, PA

Nathaniel Vernon, junior, labourer; and JOHN SWANCICK, late of the custom house, Philadelphia; all late of the county of Chester.......

More About ROBERT VERNON: Robert of Stoke and the Parish of Acton; : March 1680/81, purch. 1800 acres land in Pa.; established home at Vernon's Run, Pa.; : farmer / land owner; England / Nether Providence, Pennsylvania; 1682, 1682 Came to America on ship "Friendship" of Liverpool # 8 of 23 Wm Penn Ships; Direct Line of Vernons #9; 1702 living in Chester ELINOR MINSHALL 1651, Alternate birth date in Pennsylvania

Copied from the Chester County Genealogy web site: Chester County Ships Listing for The Friendship

Here are the passengers listed as being aboard this ship. Date of Arrival: 8/14/1682 Master: Robert Crossman

James Kennerly

Thomas and Margaret Minshall

Thomas Powell and family (son Thomas Jr died during voyage)

John and Jane Sharpless and children: Phebe, John, Thomas (died on voyage),James, Caleb, Jane and Joseph

John Simcock and sons John and Jacob

William and Margaretta Taylor and children Joseph, Elizabeth and Mary Peter Taylor

Randle Vernon

Robert Vernon

Thomas Vernon

"Colonial Families of Philadelphia," Philadelphia, PA

"Colonial Families in Philadelphia", edited by John W. Jordan, published by Lewis Publishers of New York in 1911 in 2 volumes.

These books and index are available on microfiche/microfilm from the Family History Library, Salt Lake City:

NOTE: MD = Married; CH = Child

NAME MAIDEN NAME DATE PAGES, COMMENTS

VERNON, ELINOR MINSHALL 1221 MD ROBERT VERNON

VERNON, FRANCIS 475 OF SANDWAY, CHESHIRE ENG.

VERNON, HANNAH M1736 1453 TO JOHN BRINTON

VERNON, ISAAC 497 1221 MD MARY SELLERS

VERNON, JAMES 475 OF SANDWAY. CHESHIRE ENG.

VERNON, MARY SELLERS 1687 497 1221 CH OF SAMUEL SELLERS

VERNON, RANDAL 477 OF CHESHIRE. ENGLAND

VERNON, REBECCA 177 MD THOMAS GARRETT

VERNON, ROBERT 1221 MD ELINOR MINSHALL

History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania by Henry Graham Ashmead

Pub: Philadelphia, L .H. Everts & Co., 1884

Chapter XLIX. Nether Providence Township

page 652-53:

"In describing the early settlement in Nether Providence it is propose to ignore the fact that any portion of the township was ever part of Ridley. At the southern extremity of Nether Providence, on Eight month 20, 1683, John Nixon took up seventy-five acres, which estate was knows as "Stanfield," and doubtless settled there. John Nixon, on Third month 4, 1691, sold the plantation to John Parker, and in 1700 he conveyed the estate to Samuel Carpenter and Caleb Pusey. James Irving and Williami T. Crook now own part of this tract. Above this land were two hundred acres, known as "Small gamr," which was teaken on rent by Thomas Nossiter, who settle on this tract in 1678. He was not a Friend. In 1683 he was appointed the first constable of Providence, although it appears he did not live in the township. This plantation, beginning on its northwestern limits, a short distance above the present bridge on the Providence road, ran on a straight northeasterly line across the township to a point a short distance below Strath Haven, on Crump Kill or Crum Creek. In Twelfth month, 1684, Nossiter conveyed this land to Walter Faucett, who was an eminent Friend and an early tavern-keeper in Ridley."

"Above the Faucett tract, Nossiter had also two hundred acres, which extended from Strath Haven in a southwest course directly across the township to Ridley Creek. On Sept 12, 1682, Nossiter conveyed the estate to John Sharpless. Immediately above this tract, John Sharpless took up one hundred and eight acres of land, in three parcels, under his purchase of one thousand acres from William Penn, when he had bought before leaving England. These three tracts extend from Ridley Creek to Providence great road. Above the last mentioned land of John Sharpless, Joshua Hastings took up three hundred and ninety acres, but the lower part, containing one hundred forty acres, was taken by John Sharpless. The upper part, extending from Ridley Creek to Providence road, on May 19, 19702, was purchased by Robert Vernon, who conveyed it, November 24th of the same year, to John Vernon and Sarah, his wife. Robert Vernon came from Stoke, in Cheshire England, and conveyed this estate to his son, John, at the time designated. Above this tract was a plot of two hundred and fifty acres, surveyed to Thomas Vernon, Tenth month 16, 1702. He came from Stanthorne, county palatine of Chester, England, in 1682, accompanied by his brothers, Randal and Robert. Thomas Vernon was the grandfather of Nathaniel Vernon, the noted Tory sheriff of Chester County during the Revolution. The property of Thomas Vernon extended on the Providence road a short distance above Hickson's Corners. Randal Vernon settled on a tract of two hundred and ninety eight acres lying north of Thomas Vernon's land. Todmorden is at the lower end of this plantation, and the south branch of Vernon's Run is almost entirely within its boundaries. He was from "Sandyway," Cheshire, England. In 1687 he was a member of the Provincial Assembly, and died at this plantation in 1725, in his eighty-fifth year. The homestead passed to Joseph Vernon. Above Randal Vernon's land Robert Vernon took up, Seventh month 23, 1682, three hundred and fifty acres, which extended along Ridleyu Creek to Upper Providence line, its eartern boundary being the Providence road. On the tract was the main stem of Vernon Run, and almost all that part of Media borough in Nether Providence is located on the original Robert Vernon estate. Early in 1709/10, just before his death, he conveyed the homestead tract adn the brick messuage thereon, to his son, Jacob Vernon.

At the extreme northern line of the township, east of the Providence road and extending to Crum Creek, was a tract of three hundred and eighty acres, which land Thomas Minshall purchased from Penn before he came to the province, and it was assigned to Minshall, March 21-22, 1682. He was a brother-in-law tof Randall Vernon, his sister Elinor having married the latter. His dwelling was near Providence Friends' meeting-houe, the land being given by Thomas Minshall to the society to erect the latter building on."

page 655:

At Providence meeting-house, Second month 8, 1703, Walter Faucitt was dealt with by the meeting, the charges being set forth in the following extract from the quaint minutes: "This meeting having Duly taken into their Consideration the disorderly practis of Samuel Levis in keeping on his hatt whilst Walter Faucitt was in prayer, at a monthly meeting at Robert Vernon's, on the 11th month last; therefore the meeting doth appoint Joseph Baker and Paul Sanders to spake to him and Indaver to bring him to a sence of his disorder; and that hee do acknowledg the same to the satisfaction of this meeting, which if he doth not promise to do, then to order him to appear at the next monthly meeting."

page 664:

Hinkson's Corner. - The property on which this hamlet is located was originally a part of the Vernon tract, which was confiscated after the Revolution, and in 1790 was in the possession of the Hinksons.

History of Chester County, Pennsylvania

Page 755

Robert Vernon came from Stoke, in Cheshire, England. He was a member of the Society of Friends, but did not take such an active part in meeting affairs as Thomas and Randal, though the Monthly Meetings were sometimes held at his house. He conveyed his brick messuage and 330 acres of land, where he resided, to his son Jacob just before his death, which occurred in January or February, 1709-10. His wife, Elinor, who came with him, was the daughter of John Minshall, and sister of Thomas Minshall, a settler in Providence. She died 7, 24, 1720. Their children were Isaac, m. in 1710, Hannah Williams and Mary (Sellers) Marshall; Jacob, m. 4, 5, 1712, Eleanor Owen, and settled in Philadelphia later in life; John, m. in 1702, Sarah Pyle, who left three children,--Moses, Rachel (m. to Robert Green), and Aaron. Gideon Vernon, son of Moses, went to Nova Scotia at the time of the Revolution.

lists of Taxable in 1693 and their townships;

Neither Province

Thomas Varnon

Randell Varon

Robert Varon

John Edge

Thomas Minshall

Joseph Edge, freeman

According to this book, Nether Providence was in Delaware County. List of post offices in the United States ... 1851 Publication Date: 1859 City: Washington, Publisher: Pages: 470

Nether Providence, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, Peter Worrall, Postmaster

Passengers and Ships Prior to 1864

Compiled, Edited and with a Preface by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr.

Publications of the Welcome Society of Pennsylvania, Number 1 Genealogical Publishing Society, 1970

Page 40

The next arrival was also a Liverpool ship, the Friendship, which is presumed to have arrived 14 August 1682, this being the date on which John Sharpless, who shipped goods on it, is said to have arrived at Upland.

The Friendship of Liverpool [8]

Robert Crossman, master

23 [May] Randle Vernon: 1 fardel (parcel) qty. 30 lbs. woolen cloth; 10 ells English linen; ¼ cwt. wrought iron; 2 doz. woolen stocking for men (footnote 40) (footnote 40) Randle Vernon from Sandyway, his brother Thomas Vernon from Stanthorne, and Robert Vernon from Stoke, all in Cheshire, were joint F.P. of 1500 acres. For notices of all three, see Smith, Delaware County, 509. For order or warrant of survey, dated 1 7m Sept 1682, for "Thos. Vernon & ors." see Pennsylvania Archives, 3rd Series, III, 175. Thomas Minshall, a F.P. of 621 acres, and his wife Margaret, from Stoke in Cheshire, with a daughter who died on shipboard, were probably on this ship."

Molly Baker

As Molly Baker States:

Notes for Robert Vernon:

Robert Vernon and his wife came to Pennsylvania on the "Friendship" of Liverpool in August of 1663 (this date is wrong), with his brothers Randall and Thomas. They came from Cheshire, England, each buying acreage from William Penn. In the story of these Vernon Colonists, and in the area folklore, there are frequent referrals to these "three brothers".

A history of Rose Valley, 1973, specifically places the land of the Vernons on the east side of Ridley Creek and west of Providence Great Road (laid out in 1684). Robert's house may have been on Old Mill Lane , although the structure is also known as Bishop White's house. Willam White sent his family there during the yellow fever epidemic of 1793. A small stream there was named Vernon Run.

The descendents of Robert Vernon are eligible for the Welcome Society. The Vernons came to Pennsylvania before William Penn on one of the twenty three ships which came to Philadelphia before Penn's Welcome, October 1683

The three Vernon Brothers settled in Nether Providence, their lands adjoining each other. They had purchased over 1800 contiguous acres in the William Penn grant of March 1681. Robert Vernon was a Friend, (Quaker), and Monthly Meetings were sometimes held at his house, however, he reportedly did not take such an active part in meeting affairs as did his brothers, Thomas and Randall. The time of his death is in some quetion, as it is thought that he conveyed his brick message and 330 acres of land where he resided to his son Jacob in 1710.

These three Vernon brothers helped establish a Quaker Colony in what is now Chester, Pennsylvania.

First Families of Chester County, PA, Volume 1, John Pitts Launey

Page 147

Robert Vernon of Nether Providence Twp, brother of Thomas and Randal Vernon, husbandman, arrived from Stoak (or Stoke) in Cheshire, England, with his wife Elinor and family. Robert first appeared in Chester Monthly Meeting minutes on 7th of 1st mo, 1686. Elinor first appeared in the Women's Chester Monthly Meeting records on 5th of 9th mo, 1683. Elinor Vernon, widow of Robert, d. 24th of 7th mo, 1720.

William Penn, by deed dated 6 & 7 Mar 1681 granted to Robert Vernon, husbandman, a tract of 625 acres to be laid out in the province of Pennsylvania. Robert had 330 acres (part of the 625 acres) surveyed and laid out in Lower Providence. He gave the remaining 285 acres to his son Isaac in 1709.

Pennsylvania

[REFERENCE: PA ARCHIVES: 1:1:40-46]

The PENNSYLVANIA ARCHIVES is an effort of the state to compile the records from approximately 1682 to the mid-1800's. It is represented in Series, with each series containing numerous volumes. The original volumes are difficult to find in the state of Pennsylvania.

40-Thomas Rowland, Robert Taylor, William Taylor- Peter Taylor, George Glean, John Edge, Randal Maylin, Thomas Vernon, Thomas Minshall, Robert Vernon, Thomas Powell, Randall Croxton, Allen Robinet, Henry Maddock, James Kennerly, John Sharpless, John Neild.

The Randall Vernon Family Home Page

The Randall Vernon Family Home Page

This tree covers 14 generations of VERNONS in America. My 9th great-grandparents James and Hester VERNON lived in Cheshire Co. England. I have some information about the British VERNONs, but welcome any additional knowledge you may offer. Three sons of James and Hester left their estates in England and came to America in the 1680's with the Quakers (Society of Friends).

My 8th great-grandfather, Robert, who married Eleanor MINSHALL died in 1709 or 1710. They came to America on the "Friendship". In Pennsylvania, their home was used as the meeting place for the local Society of Friends at various times.

In the 1700's there was a general migration of the Quakers to the south and west. A grandson of Robert and Eleanor, Isaac, and his wife Hannah TOWNSEND, settled in Wrightsboro, McDuffie Co., Georgia and was granted land from Governor Wright in 1762.

A grandson of Isaac and Hannah, James, married Content HUSSEY. Their names and 6 generations of descendants are in the records of the Quaker Monthly Meetings of Ohio in the 1800's. My 4th great- grandfather, James, was born to Isaac and Hannah in 1775.

Two sons of Amos and Jane WAY, my 3rd great-grandparents, were disowned by the Society of Friends for military service in the war between the states, fighting on the Union side. James and Sarah LAMBERT, another son of Amos and Jane, moved to Decatur Co. Kansas. Many of their descendants still live in Kansas and the midwest. I have James and Sarah's family Bible.

I want to thank Velma (Vernon) Osborn, Veldonna Armstrong, Marjorie (Vernon) Olson, and Loyd and Eitha (Hadix) Vernon for all the hours and loving care that has gone into the preservation of our family history.

Friendship

Friendship; Date of Arrival: 8/14/1682 Master: Robert Crossman

James Kennerly

Thomas and Margaret Minshall

Thomas Powell and family (son Thomas Jr died during voyage)

John and Jane Sharpless and children: Phebe, John, Thomas (died on voyage),James, Caleb, Jane and Joseph

John Simcock and sons John and Jacob

William and Margaretta Taylor and children Joseph, Elizabeth and Mary

Peter Taylor

Randle Vernon

Robert Vernon

Thomas Vernon

The following is from the History of Chester County, PA by Futhey and Cope;

Robert came from Stoke, Cheshire, England and was a Quaker, but did not take an active part in meeting affairs as did his brothers Thomas and Randal. He conveyed his brick mesuage and 330 acres of land, where he resided, to his son jacob, just before his death in Jan or Feb 1709-10. (there is no will) His wife was the daughter of John Minshall, and sister of Thomas Minshall, a settler in Providence. she died 7-24-1720. Their children were (1) Isaac m. 1710 Hannah Williams and Mary Sellers Marshall; (2) Jacob m. 1712, Elanor Owen, and settled in Philadelpnia later in life; (3) John m. 1702 Sarah Pyle and left 3 children Moses, Rachel and Aaron. Thus, the only way you could be related to Robert would be through the son, Isaac. Isaac Vernon was a member of th eUwchlan Meeting, and represented it at meetings of the Chester MM, so if I were you I'd do some checking in the Uwchlan records for information on him and his family.

Robert Vernon and Elinor MINSHALL Children

1 Isaac VERNON b: 1682 in England, Cheshire Pa.; d. May 12, 1757, Will Probated West Bedford (Chester) Pa.. M’d in 1710 Hannah Williams and Mary (Sellers) Marshall.

2 Jacob VERNON b: 13 AUG 1680 in England, Aston, Cheshire . June 17, 1741, Thornbury (Del.) (Chester) Pa..

Notes : JACOB VERNON: Quaker arrivals at Philadelphia Pennsylvania 1682-1750 Jacob Vernon and wife Elinor and children dated Nov. 27, 1728 from (Chester) Pennsylvania MM. Original on file. Received Dec 28, 1728. Quaker arrivals at Philadelphia Pennsylvania 1682-1750.

Note: JACOB VERNON: 1728, Rec. father's brick massage & 330 acres, : April 05, 1712, Alternate Death date. In 1728, Moved to Philadelphia Pennsylvania

3 John VERNON b: 13 APR 1679 in England, Cheshier (Aston) . 1731, Chichester, (Chester) Pennsylvania. In 1710, almost disowned by Providence Quakers. m'd 1702 Sarah Pyle. Issue: Moses, Rachel m'd Robert Green, and Aaron. Moses son was Gidson Vernon went to Nova Scotia at the time of the Revolution. Rebecca Rachel VERNON b: 1684 in PA, Chester Co., Nether Providence d. May 18, 1745, Pennsylvania. More About REBECCA RACHEL VERNON: Second Wife of Richard Jones and December 23, 1748, Alternate Death date, Facts on Richard Jones and Rebecca Vernon look below and her 1st husband was Robert Green

4 Thomas VERNON b: 1687 in PA, Chester Co., Nether Providence ; d. 1758, (Ludenburg) Virginia. For proof on this being his son read what found above, Janet

Southeastern Pennsylvania, 1680-1800 Birth Index

Location: Chester Monthly Meeting, Chester; County: Delaware; State: Pennsylvania

Jacob Vernon and Elinor Owen Children

1 Robert Vernon Birth/Baptism Date: 31 Aug 1713 Quaker Date: 31 6mo 1713

2 David Vernon Birth/Baptism Date: 9 Nov 1715 Quaker Date: 9 9mo 1715

3 Jonathan Vernon Birth/Baptism Date: 19 Jan 1717 Quaker Date: 19 11mo 1717

4 Elinor Vernon Birth/Baptism Date: 28 Aug 1720 Quaker Date: 28 6mo 1720

Chester County, PA Residents in Burial Record of Merion Meeting Graveyard

Merion Meeting Graveyard

The Incomopleted Burial Records of Merion Meeting Grave-yard 1682-1848, as compiled by Margaret B. Harvey, A.M. distinguished Genealogist and Writer, born 1855, died 1912.

"The History of Merion Friends Meetinghouse is the history of the Welsh in Pennsylvania. The history of the Welsh in Pennsylvanis is the history of Pennsylvania and of the United States."

By actual count of the Merion Meeting Graveyard 1935, there were 253 Graves stones, mostly of Marble and of a later period than Miss Harvey's records cover. There are about 25 old field stones without names or date

It is the sense of this meeting, that no monuments, either of wood or stone be affixed to graves in any of our burial grounds; and if any yet remain therein, that these be forthwith removed -- so that no cause of uneasiness on this account may exist, or partiality by justly chargeable upon us. 1706, 1733. From Rules of Disipline of the Yearly Meeting of Friends, for Penna. New Jersey, Delaware, and the Eastern parts of Maryland

1711

Jane Jones, wife of Richard, died 2d Mo. 27, 1711, at Merion. She was born Evans. Her husband was the son of Rees John William, and was called Richard Jones, Richard Rees and Richard Rees Jones. He married for his second wife Rebecca Garrett, and settled in Goshen township, Chester County, where he died 1771, aged 92. Rees Jones and his wife Hannah and their sones Rich. & Evan and one Doughter named Lowry, from Merionethshire, arrived on the "Vine", 7, 17, 1684, the same ship with Robert and Jane Owen. Richard Jones of Merion, yeoman, and Jane Evans of Gwynnedd on the Welch Tract, at Gwynnedd Meeting Place, 4, 6, 1705. Wit: Evan, John Gainor and Sarah Jones; Thomas, Anne Lowry, Robert, Hugh, Evan and Lowry Evan. The children of Richard Jones and Jane Evans, his first wife, were: Rees (b. 2 Mo. 4, 1706; m. 1 Mo. 23, 1731-2, Amy Cook, daughter of Henry and Mary Cock, of Long Island.); Ann (b. 11 Mo. 11, 1707; m. ______ Goodwin); Hannah (b. 11 Mo. 8, 1709-10). Richard Jones married (1718) Rebecca Vernon, widow of Thomas Garrett. Children: Rebecca (b. 7 Mo. 11, 1719; m. Wm. Rettew); Deborah (b. 7 Mo. 13, 1721; m. John Cheyney); Nehemiah (b. 7 Mo. 21, 1723; m. _______ and had Robert and Rebecca.) Rees John and his wife Amy Cook, had a son Benjamin Jones, who married Rebecca Eavenson and settled in Westtown. They had several children.

Search the PAGenWeb Digital Library Pennsylvania Archives

http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/pa/pasearch.htm

Chester County, Pennsylvania Wills, 1713-1825

SELLERS or SELLARS, SAMUEL. Darby, yeoman. November 1, 1732. December 14, 1732. (died April 22, 1732). A. 389. To son Samuel 5 shillings having already done well for him. To eldest daughter Sarah Ashmead 1 shilling. To daughter Mary Vernon and Ann Pritchett 1 shilling each. Remainder to wife Anna. Executors: wife Ann and son Samuel. Witnesses: Richd. Parker, James Mark, Saml. Bunting

Mary Vernon wife of Isaac Vernon son of Robert Vernon

OWENS, ELIZABETH. Widow. Willistown. Being ancient. May 5, 1741. October 1, 1741. B. 94.

To son Thomas £4. To daughter Eleanor Vernon 5 shillings. Remainder to daughter Catherine and her husband Benoni Griffith also executors. Witnesses: Thomas John, Nathan Griffith, Ricd Jones.

Eleanor Vernon wife of Jacob Vernon son of Robert Vernon

WOODWARD, EDWARD. Newtown. Yeoman. May 15, 1754. November 12, 1754. C. 515. Provides for wife Elizabeth. To son George my plantation in Newtown whereon I dwell containing about 200 acres as the same was conveyed to me by my former wife and Robert Tippin with stock, he paying legacies as follows: To daughter Jane Woodward £60. To daughter Margaret, wife of Aaron Vernon £5. To daughter Abigail, wife of Moses Vernon £5. To daughter Hannah, wife of William Hunter £5. To grandchildren of daughter Margaret Vernon 10 shillings each. To grandson Edward Woodward, son of Edward deceased, old Bible my mother gave me. To all other grandchildren 10 shillings each. To Joseph, son of Peter Taylor deceased, £5 at 21. To Margaret McLone the woman who now lives with me £5. To John Bradley the boy that now lives with me £5 if he lives with George till he is 21.

Executor: Son George.

Trustees: Son in law William Hunter and William Levis. Wit: John Williamson, William Levis, George Smedley, Jr

Aaron Vernon son of John Vernon son of Robert Veron

VERNON, AARON. Newtown. August 15, 1765. October 1, 1774. To eldest son Edward Vernon £10. To second son Aaron £10. To third son John £10. To daughter Sarah wife of Samuel Bishop £10. To daughter-in-law Rebecca wife of Jos. Tenyear £3. Provides for wife Margaret. To youngest son Abraham plantation in Newtown as the same was conveyed to me by Jacob Edge and Wm. Wall being near 100 acres of land, also all remainder of personal estate subject to legacies. Executors: Wife Margaret and son Abraham. Wit: Joshua Smedley, Geo. Smedley, Jr., Hannah Smedley

VERNON, JACOB. Thornbury. January 31, 1787. Adm. to Sarah Vernon. [Annotation states sister of Persifor Frazer, married October 18, 1750. Sarah married second Samuel Lewis.]

Jacob Vernon son of Robert Vernon

VERNON, MOSES. North Providence. July 18, 1767. September 1, 1767. Provides for wife Abigail. To son Nathan tract of land containing 120 acres. To son Elias tract of land adjoining above containing 60 acres, he paying £20 to my daughter Abigail wife of Frederick Engle. To daughter Mary Vernon tract of land containing about 11 acres, also £60. To son Moses remainder of land whereon I now dwell containing about 62 acres. To son Edward part of tract formerly Jos. Vernon's (the whole containing about 132 acres) containing about 61 acres. To son Gideon remainder of above tract about 71 acres, also £40 at 21. To daughter Abigail Engle £60. Mentions brother Aaron Vernon. Executors: Son-in- law Frederick Engle and son Nathan. Wit: John Sharpless, Job Ridgway, Wm. Swaffer

Moses Vernon son of John Vernon and Grandson of Robert Vernon

Land: Notice of Seized Estates for Public Sale (1779): Chester County, PA August 25, 1779

WHEREAS the estates of Joseph Galloway, Nathaniel Vernon, Gideon Vernon, DAVID DAWSON, RICHARD SWANWICK, William Maddock, Alexander Bartram, Curtis Lewis, Philip Marchinton, and Joseph Proctor, late of the county of Chester, having been by due course of law forfeited and seized to the use of this State, We the subscribers, Agents for the said county, do hereby give notice, That the estates of the said Joseph Galloway, Nathaniel Vernon, Gideon Vernon, DAVID DAWSON, RICHARD SWANWICK, William Maddock, Alexander Bartram, Curtis Lewis, Philip Marchinton, and Joshua Proctor, consisting of the following tracts of land, viz. Joseph Galloway's, No. 1, Two hundred and ten acres of marsh on Hog Island. No. 2, Two hundred and twelve acres of marsh on Tinicum Island, all of the best quality. Nathaniel Vernon's Two hundred and forty-four acres and buildings; a good conveniency for erecting a mill on Ridley Creek on said plantation. GideonVernon's, No. 1, Sixty-three acres and buildings. No. 2, Fifty acres and buildings, lying about one hundred perches from the other, about three and a half miles from the Borough of Chester. DAVID DAWSON'S, Four hundred and fifty acres in two plantations, and good buildings in WEST CALN, subject to a widow's thirds. RICHARD SWANWICK's, Three hundred acres, buildings and sawmill in ditto, lying near Conestogo road, about 43 miles from Philadelphia. William Maddock's, Eighty acres and buildings in Aston, four miles from Chester. Alexander Bartram's Ninety acres in Haverford, known by the name of the Fix Chase, seven miles from Philadelphia. Curtis Lewis's No. 1, One hundred and forty-four acres and buildings. No. 2, Two hundred and nine acres and ditto, No. 3, Fifty acres and ditto in East Caln, lying on Conestogo road near the Ship tavern. Philip Marchinton's Four hundred acres and buildings in West Bradford. And Joshua Procotr's, Eighty acres and buildings in New Garden. The above plantations are well wooded and watered. All which will be sold by Public Vendue, on Saturday, the fourth day of September next, at the Courthouse, in Chester. The sales to continue from day to day until the whole is disposed of, Sundays excepted. THOMAS LEVIS, August 1. JOHN HANNUM, Agents

James is father of ROBERT, RANDAL AND THOMAS VERNON

JAMES VERNON b: 13 MAR 1604/05 in England, Cheshire d : 4 APR 1675 in England, Cheshire m’d 1638 in England Hester BROWN b: 1 JAN 1608/09 in England, Chester (Cheshire)

Notes for JAMES VERNON:

The origin of the Quaker Vernons seems to be in Northwich Hundred, which was part of the original property of Sir Richard de Vernon, Baron de Shipbrook. In this hundred, for instance, we find Morton Davenham, Middlewich, Lostock, Bostock, etc. Although these estates, as well as other Vernon estates, changed hands several times over the hundreds of years that have passed, I still find many interesting references and connections.

The original Quaker in the Chester area seems to have been James Vernon. He married Hester----------------of Chester, who died on Apr. 4, 1675. Thir oldest son (as far as we know) was Thomas of Stanthorne (d. Oct. 25, 1698), who married Elizabeth (d. March 24, 1714). The second son was probably Randall, a weaver of Marston, in Great Butterworth (b. 1639, d. June 18, 1725); he married Sarah Bradshaw on Sept. 14, 1670. Sarah died in Pennsylvania, Aug. 18, 1718; she was the daughter or niece of John Bradshaw, Prime Minister of England after Charles 1 was beheaded (This is not yet verified, however). The wedding of Randall and Sarah too,k place in the home of brother Thomas at Stanthorne. (From Roll 50333, Pt. 4, of LDS Records; also Records of Greta Ramsay).

The Youngest of the three Quaker Vernon Brothers of Nether Provence (William Penn Colony of 1682) was Robert of Stoke and the Parish of Acton (d. in Pennsylvania "before 1720" He married Eleanor (d. jul 24, 1720), daughter of John Minshall of Chester, England, and wife Margaret of Grappenhall, Cheshire (Acc.: Letter to Gilbert Cope).

The best candidate for the father of our Quaker Vernon brothers that I have found thus far, assuming that his name was James was found in Memorials from St. Margaret's church, Westminister 1539-1600, James Vernon, son of Hugh, was Christened on March 13, 1605. James was not a popular name for the Vernons of Co. Cheshire during the 145h and 15th centuries, but the name Hugh is found among the Vernon records during that period, as well as in ancient times.

John Burke, esq. wrote in his Commons, Vol 1 page 292: "John Plume, Esq. of Wavertree Hall and Aughton espoused Miss Sarah Marsh, neice and Co-heiress of James Vernon, Esq. of Vernon Hall, near Liverpool (She died in 1741) According to the map found in the booklet published by the National Trust in connection with the Vernons of Hanbury, Vernon Hall is located near Haddon Hall in Bakewell, Derbyshire. This if near the counties of Lanceshire and Cheshire. (VV March 1984)

James Vernon was very closely aligned with the Vernons of Whatcroft, Middlewich, and Audley. In fact, there is some evidence that he was related to the Vernons of Hanbury (VV June 1980)

Some claim that the Quaker Vernons were descended from the family of that name of Whatcroft, Cheshire (found in Humphrey-Smith's 1984 Atlas close to Middlewich) who were descended from Sir De Vernon of Radepont, born about 1122. The conclusion seems to be that the Whatcroft origin and the descent from Sir de Vernon Radepont is correct.

Whatever the accuracy of this ancient ancestral line, the English progenitor has been accepted as Hugh Vernon through his son, James Vernon, of Cheshire, England. James being born March 13, 1605 and dying in that county apr 1, 1675. However, Reynolds says that it was his wife who died on this date in (Chester) Pennsylvania. (Poss. they both died on same date?) (Joan S. Guilford)[alexisold. FTW]

JAMES VERNON: was a Land owner / farmer in bet. Norwich & Middlewich (Davenham) England and was Direct Line of Vernons

HESTER BROWN: April 01, 1675, Alternate Death Date and bet. Norwich & Middlewich (Davenham) Eng.

History of the Vernon Family

History of the Vernon Family

"The Vernon Family History, Descendants of Robert Vernon (1682)" by John V and Laureen E Winterton available from Higginson Book Company and

"History of Vernon-sur-Seine... Giverny and Vicinity" by Michel de Decker History of Vernon-sur-Seine... Giverny and Vicinity

The "Vernon Family" story begins back around 888-906 AD when the Vikings under "Marching Rollo" invaded and conquered Normandy including the ancient town of Vernon. The Town dates back to Gallo-Roman times and is located in a beautiful valley on both sides of the Seine River, 30 some miles northwest of Paris.

Rollo's son, William Longsword, became Duke of Normandy in 925. The family became very powerful and wealthy holding many large estates in Normandy.

Richard de Reviers, the first Vernon, was a good and loyal officer serving the Duke of Normandy, William the Bastard, future William the Conqueror. He was such a good and loyal officer, that in 1050 he was given the little town of Vernon-sur-Seine as a reward. >From then on, Richard de Reviers and all his descendants to come, took the name of their town for their name. The VERNON family was born. Richard de Reviers changed has name to Richard de Vernon. Sixteen years later, William the Conqueror invaded England in 1066 at least two of his high-ranking officers were Vernons. Richard de Vernon definitely took part in the invasion. Many others of the family also accompanied him. For the service more great estates in Normandy and England were granted to the Vernon family and its members were ranked among the wealthiest and most powerful in both counties. Several members became Barons and were knighted.

Shortly following the Battle of Hastings the area round Chester County, England became a Norman stronghold. William the Conqueror awarded Chester to his nephew Hugh Lupus in 1070. Hugh immediately appointed four great Barons, one of them being Sir Richard De Vernon Baron De Shipbrook. He and his brother Sir Walter were both at the Battle of Hastings. Their Father was Sir William De Vernon of Vernon castle in Normandy.

Prior to the Norman Conquest there were no surnames used in England. Many of the families coming from Normandy eventually changed their names to a more Anglo-Saxon name. The Vernons, however, made no such change.

The Quaker Vernons descended from Sir Richard De Vernon, Baron De Shipbrook. They were not only friends of the Quaker William Penn but related to him through marriage. William Penn's father was owed a great deal of money by the King of England and to settle that debt gave the area of Pennsylvania to William Penn.

Thomas Vernon made the surveying voyage to Pennsylvania with William Penn in 1681 and returned later that year to England. He and his brothers were among the first to obtain property in the newly acquired land. Land Titles in Delaware County Records the Three Vernon Brothers purchase of 625 acres each in March 1681. Randall Vernon purchased a further 829 acres in 1711 and 1712. Robert Vernon purchased a further 330 acres in 1684.

"The Three Quaker Brothers"

The three Quaker Brothers came to America, arriving on a Liverpool ship, the "Friendship" Robert Crossman, Master, which is presumed to have arrived 14 August 1682 at Upland, Pennsylvania. It is recorded that he shipped the following goods on "The Friendship of Liverpool": 1 fardel (parcel) qty 30 lbs. woolen cloth; 10 ells English linen; 1/4 cwt. wrought iron; 2 dozen stockings for men.. The Friendship of Liverpool was one of the 24 known ships that sailed from England, arriving December, 1681 through December, 1682 with passengers to establish William Penn's "Holy Experiment" in Pennsylvania. These 24 ships made up "William Penn's Fleet", and descendants of the passengers are eligible to become members of the "Welcome Society". Descendants of both Randal and Thomas Vernon are already listed among members. Their Father was James Vernon and their Mother was Esther or Hester of Cheshire, England who probably lived in the neighborhood of Davenham, between Northwich and Middlewick. She died April 1, 1675.

Thomas Vernon of "Stanithorne", near Middlewick, County Palatine, Chester England was the eldest son. He had been persecuted for being a Quaker in 1678/9. He brought with him to America his wife, Elizabeth, and a son Thomas, aged about 12 years. He settled near Upper Providence, PA., and died Dec. 25, 1698, buried at Chester, PA. His widow died May 24, 1714. The son, Thomas, married August 13, 1702 Lydia Rolf/Ralfe. He was born about 1670 and died Nov. 4, 1754 or Apr. 11, 1754.

Randall Vernon of Sandivway, in the Parish of Weaverham, County Cheshire, England, believed to be the second son, was born in England about 1640. He married (being then the son of Maron) Sept. 14, 1670 at the home of Thomas Vernon in the parish of Middlewick, Sarah Bradshaw of Stanithorne. Sarah Bradshaw was probably related to John Bradshaw, who was appointed Premier of England after Charles I was beheaded. She died Dec. 18, 1718/9. They settled in Lower Providence Tsp., PA. Randall served as a member of the PA. assembly in 1687 and was a Justice of the Peace in 1692. He died in 1734.

Robert Vernon of Stoke in the Parish of Aston, County Cheshire, England, the third son, came with his wife, Elinor Minshall. daughter of John Minshall and their sons John and Jacob. Robert was born around 1642 and died in Jan or Feb. 1709/10. His wife Elinor died July 24, 1720.

The Brothers occupied the same house for sometime after settling in Nether Providence. Chester(now Delaware) county, PA. and a good deal of the surrounding area. They each build large homes. Thomas Vernon's home was destroyed a few years ago, however, the large two story stone house built by Randall and Robert around 1690 are still in excellent repair and presently occupied in the exclusive are of Rose Valley near Media, PA.

This was the beginning of the Vernon Family in America. During the next one hundred years the Brothers prospered and their families grew and spread throughout several states.

Immigration of the Irish Quakers into Pennsylvania

PLACES OF SETTLEMENT

page 114

The first “monthly meeting of friends belonging to marcus hooke & vpland held then at Robert Wad's house,” occurred “the 19 day of ye 11 month, 1681,” and was the first monthly meeting established in Pennsylvania. The Monthly Meeting was sometimes held at Chester, possibly at Robert Wade's house or perhaps at the old Court House, where the Particular Meeting of Chester was held; but at a Monthly Meeting held 12 Mo. 7, 1686, it was “order'd yt ye monthly meeting from hence forthe be kept at Walter fossett's2 house [in Ridley Township] untell farther order.” Thus it continued until 1693, when it began to “circulate” at the houses of John Simcock, in Ridley; Robert Vernon, Thomas and Randall Vernon, and John Edge, in Nether Providence; George Maris, Joseph Stedman and Bartholomew Coppock, Jr., in Springfield; and Caleb Pusey,1 at Chester Mills, near Chester. After 1700, meeting-houses having been erected for the particular meetings constituting Chester Monthly Meeting—especially for Chester, Springfield, Providence and Middletown—the Monthly Meeting circulated more at the meeting-houses, finally becoming settled at Providence1 (near the present Borough of Media).

Chapter XLIX

Nether Providence Township

The upper part, extending from Ridley Creek to Providence road, on May 19, 1702, was purchased by Robert Vernon, who conveyed it, November 24th of the same year, to John Vernon and Sarah, his wife. Robert Vernon came from Stoke, in Cheshire, England, and conveyed this estate to his son, John, at the time designated. Above this tract was a plot of two hundred and fifty acres, surveyed to Thomas Vernon, Tenth month 16, 1702. He came from Stanthorne, county palatine of Chester, England, in 1682, accompanied by his brothers, Randal and Robert. Thomas Vernon was the grandfather of Nathaniel Vernon, the noted Tory sheriff of Chester County during the Revolution. The property of Thomas Vernon extended on the Providence road a short distance above Hinkson's Corners. Randal Vernon settled on a tract of two hundred and ninety-eight acres lying north of Thomas Vernon's land. Todmorden is at the lower end of this plantation, and the south branch of Vernon's Run is almost entirely within its boundaries. He was from "Sandyway," Cheshire, England. In 1687 he was a member of the Provincial Assembly, and died at this plantation in 1725, in his eighty-fifth year. The homestead passed to Joseph Vernon. Above Randal Vernon's land Robert Vernon took up, Seventh month 23, 1682, three hundred and fifty acres, which extended along Ridley Creek to Upper Providence line, its eastern boundary being the Providence road. On the tract was the main stem of Vernon Run, and almost all that part of Media borough in Nether Providence is located on the original Robert Vernon estate. Early in 1709/10, just before his death, he conveyed the homestead tract and the brick messuage thereon to his son, Jacob Vernon

Children of JAMES VERNON and HESTER BROWN are:

1 THOMAS VERNON, b. Abt. 1638, Stanthorne (Cheshire) England; d. October 25, 1698, Nether Providence (Chester) Pennsylvania

VERNON, THOMAS. North Providence. Yeoman.

December 27, 1752. November 21, 1754. C. 519.

To eldest son Thomas and sons Jonathan and Mordecai 5 shillings each. to daughters Esther, wife of Abraham Ashton, and Hannah, wife of John Calvert, 5 shillings each. To Nathaniel Ring who married my eldest daughter Lydia 5 shillings and to their son Benjamin Ring 5 shillings. To granddaughter Hannah, wife of Thomas Gibson 20 shillings. To wife Lydia the remainder of my land in Marlborough, also lot in Chester to be at her own disposal, also profits of house and land in Providence during life. To son Nathaniel my plantation in Providence containing 95 acres at wife's decease. Executrix: Wife Lydia. Trustees: Caleb Cowpland and Peter Dicks. Wit: John Sharpless, William Swaffer, Joseph Vernon.

2 RANDALL VERNON, b. 1639, Great Butterworth (Cheshire) England; d. August 18, 1725, Nether Providence (Chester) Pennsylvania; m. SARAH BRADSHAW, September 14, 1670, Stanthorn, Middlewich, Cheshire, England; d. Unknown

VERNON, RANDLE. N. Providence.

June 2, 1715. May 4, 1725. A. 160.

Provides for wife Sarah. To daughter Hannah and her husband Caleb Harrison 5 shillings each. To son Jacob 5 shillings. To daughter Sarah and her husband Jacob Howell 5 shilling each. To son Joseph all estate real and personal paying above legacies also executor. Witnesses: Thomas Minshall, Jacob Vernon, Joseph Ely

Notes for RANDALL VERNON:

Randall Vernon, assumed to have been the second brother, married at the home of his brother, Thomas, of Stanthorne, England, sep. 14, 1670, Sarah Bradshaw of Cheshire. Randall also suffered religious persecution and brought his family to America with him arriving in 1682. some records say he came on the ship with William Penn. At one time he was keeper of the records of the Chester meeting House. he was a memeber of the Provincial Assembly in 1687, and a Justice of the peace in 1692. He died on his plantation at 85, in 1724 or 25. The homestead passed to his oldest son, Joseph. Randall and Sarah had four children; Joseph (Born circa 1671; died jun. 6, 1747) married Lydia Tarbuck in 1716; Hannah who married in 1713 Caleb Harrison (who died 1766); Jacob (born ca. 1688, died 1740) who married 5 mo., 1701 Ann Yearsly, dau. of John Yearsley; and Sarah (born 1680; died nov 13, 1750_ who married jun 17, 1709 Jacob Howell (jun 10, 1709-1768). (Walter N. Vernon.

William Penn's ship: "Welcome" sailed from Seale, England aug 30, 1682; and of New Castle, De. oct 27,1682, then Upland, Pa (Renamed Chester) oct 29, 1682; "Canterbury" sailed from ???, England sip 9, 1699; landed Chester, Pa Nov 30, 1699.

William Penn's father, Sir William, evidentally was closely related to the Vernons, having married the first cousin of Sarah Bradshaw, wife of brother Randall Vernon. Some sources state that Sir william's wife was the sister of Sarah Bradshaw and that Sarah was also a descendant or a close relative of John Brandsahw of Brandshaw, Prime Minister of England. In any case, these families, as well as the Vernons of Cheshire, were among the most outstanding of England. For several years prior to their immigration to Pennsylvania, the Quaker families, including the Vernons, were persecuted by their neighbors and former friends. (VV June 1980)[alexisold.FTW]

Randall Vernon, assumed to have been the second brother, married at the home of his brother, Thomas, of Stanthorne, England, sep. 14, 1670, Sarah Bradshaw of Cheshire. Randall also suffered religious persecution and brought his family to America with him arriving in 1682. some records say he came on the ship with William Penn. At one time he was keeper of the records of the Chester meeting House. he was a memeber of the Provincial Assembly in 1687, and a Justice of the peace in 1692. He died on his plantation at 85, in 1724 or 25. The homestead passed to his oldest son, Joseph. Randall and Sarah had four children; Joseph (Born circa 1671; died jun. 6, 1747) married Lydia Tarbuck in 1716; Hannah who married in 1713 Caleb Harrison (who died 1766); Jacob (born ca. 1688, died 1740) who married 5 mo., 1701 Ann Yearsly, dau. of John Yearsley; and Sarah (born 1680; died nov 13, 1750_ who married jun 17, 1709 Jacob Howell (jun 10, 1709-1768). (Walter N. Vernon.

William Penn's ship: "Welcome" sailed from Seale, England aug 30, 1682; and of New Castle, De. oct 27,1682, then Upland, Pa (Renamed Chester) oct 29, 1682; "Canterbury" sailed from ???, England sip 9, 1699; landed Chester, Pa Nov 30, 1699.

William Penn's father, Sir William, evidentally was closely related to the Vernons, having married the first cousin of Sarah Bradshaw, wife of brother Randall Vernon. Some sources state that Sir william's wife was the sister of Sarah Bradshaw and that Sarah was also a descendant or a close relative of John Brandsahw of Brandshaw, Prime Minister of England. In any case, these families, as well as the Vernons of Cheshire, were among the most outstanding of England. For several years prior to their immigration to Pennsylvania, the Quaker families, including the Vernons, were persecuted by their neighbors and former friends. (VV June 1980)

More About RANDALL VERNON: 1682, Came to America on ship "Friendship"; 1687, Member Pa. Assembly (Chester) Pa.; 1681, Acquired land from Wm. Penn by grant; 1692, Justice; 1640, Alternate Birth Date Stanthorne, England; weaver of Marston, in Great Butterworth; 1682 to Chester, Nether Prov., Pa. fr. Eng

3. ROBERT VERNON, b. January 01, 1641/42, Acton Stoke in Middlewich (Cheshire), England; d. January 1709/10, Nether Providence (Chester), Pennsylvania

4. RICHARD VERNON, b. 1643, (Cheshire), England; d. Unknown

5. WILLIAM VERNON, b. Abt. 1648, (Cheshire), England; d. Unknown.

6. LEWTON VERNON, b. Abt. 1650, (Cheshire), England; d. Unknown.

Notes come book title: “BRITISH ROOTS of MARYLAND FAMILIES” by Robert W. Barnes

HUGH VERNON was born Abt. 1579 in England, and died 1640 in England m'd Elizabeth ECCLESTON b: 1581 in Frodsam,Cheshire,England b: 1578 in CHESHIRE ENGLAND Father: JOHN ECCLESTON b: 1556 in ENGLAND Elizabeth Eccleston b: 1581 in Frodsam, Cheshire, England and Mother: CICELY DUTTON b: 1556 in FRODSHAM CHESHIRE ENGLAND Married: 28 Jan 1575 in FRODSHAM CHESHIRE ENGLAND Child of HUGH VERNON and Elizabeth Eccleston:

1 JAMES VERNON, b. March 13, 1604/05, Chester (Cheshire), England; d. April 04, 1675, Chester (Cheshire), England

Randal VERNON Sex: M Birth: 1534 in Middlewich,Cheahire,England Death: 1618 in England Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown

Note: Lancashire & Cheshire: - Original Documents relating to Lancashire and Cheshire, 1576-1701

Exchequer: Depositions by Commission (Cheshire). 2nd James 1st., 1604. Hil., No. 10. Cheshire, England

The Attorney-General versus Ralph Bostok, Randal Vernon the elder, H. Whittingham, Randle Pool, Randle Hulse, Robt. Warrell, Raffe W

Children

1 Hugh VERNON b: 1579 in England

Thomas VERNON b 1504 in England Death: 1580 in England Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown

Children

1. Randal VERNON b: 1534 in Middlewich,Cheahire,England

Richard DE VERNON b 1480 in England d 1540 in England Note: ALIA: Richard of Haslington m'd 1 Joan DE TORBOK

From Medieval Archives post by taf

"the question of the GRIFFITH/VERNON connection, which also has relevance to the continuing GRIFFITH descent. First, the common secondary sources:

Weis/Sheppard says that Richard Vernon married Joan, daughter of Richard Stackpole, but then begins a note on the relationship with a statement that Shaw proves that Joan was daughter of Rhys ap Griffith.

Bartrum, under a portion of his Marchudd descent shows:

Sir Rhys ap Griffith m.1) Joan de Somerville, m2) Isabelle Stakepole by 2) he had:

Rhys ap Griffith m.1) Margaret Zouche, m2) ? dau. Rhys LLwyd and had with others):

Thomas (who I think he shows as son of 1), and Jonet, wife of Richard Vernon, dau. of either 1) or 2).

Note that this would remove the Somerville descent, since Rhys the younger is not her son.

Now for the primary documentation.

First for the paternity of Joan, wife of Richard Vernon.

The Historical Manuscript Commission Rutland vol. shows a marriage agreement dated to 1380, in which Julianne, Madame de Vernon, and Rees ap Gruffyth, agree to the marriage of her son Richard to his daughter Joan. This proves that she was daughter of Griffith, and not of Stackpole. (the date of this agreement is after the death of Rhys the older, so the father must be the younger.

The monumental brass of Sir William Vernon, d. 1467, and widow Margaret, includes the arms (arg. a lion ramp. gu., collared and crowned or) of Stacpole, showing that at least 87 years later the family claimed a descent from Stackpole.

The inq. post mortem for Laurence Berkrolls, knt. describes his acquisition as son of a sister and coheir of Richard Turburville. One of the other representatives of this claim was Isabelle, daughter of Richard Stakepole, son of Margaret, another sister of Turburville. Later, in describing Laurence's heirs, it names one as Joan, wife of Richard Vernon Knt. heiress of Isabelle, daughter of said Richard Stakepole. This has been read to claim Joan was daughter of Richard, but if so, Isabelle would not have been sole heiress of her share when Laurence inherited the claim. Instead, it should be read as Joan is heiress of Isabelle, which Isabelle was daughter of Richard Stakepole. Thus Joan was sole heiress of Isabelle Stakepole.

Nichols' Leycestershire includes some quotes of primary data. In one, Lady Margaret, widow of Resi ap Griffith, and Thomas, son and heir of Resi and Margaret grant a deed. He also cites the heraldic glass of Wichnor chancel, which shows the arms (in order) of Zouche, Griffith quartering Somerville, and Stackpole, and an inscription of Dame Isabele Stakp... and Res ap Gryfyt Chevaler. This suggests that Rhys the heir of Griffith and Somerville married twice, to Isabelle Stackpole and to Margaret Zouche.

Finally, the ipm of Rees ap Griffitz (1 Feb., 6 Rich II, and subseq.) places his death 25 May 3 Rich. II, and names Thomas, son and heir aged 5 on 19 May last (as of 1 Aug. 7RicII). While the ipm of Joan, late wife of Rees ap Griffitz reports she died 8 Oct., 1 Rich. II, and that her son and heir was Rees ap Griffitz, aged 40 and more, inheriting numerous Somerville lands including Wichenore. This shows Rees (the younger) to have been son of Joan (Somerville).

From this data, we can conclude that:

Sir Rhys ap Griffith married Joan Somerville, and by her had son and heir:

Rhys ap Griffith, who married first Isabelle Stackpole, and second Margaret Zouche, having:

by 1) a sole daughter and heiress, Joan, wife of Richard Vernon, and by 2) son and heir Thomas.

I will save the information on the Welsh descent and the connection to the Tudors for a later post. taf"

To add more this subject.

"I am posting the following corrections/ additions/ amplifications to The 7th edition of Weis. This is not exhaustive, but only represents the lines I have worked with. The substantial corrections to line 217 render connections to other lines disproven, so I have included some supplemental lines to connect the family with others in the book, and finally, I have added a few generations to a line which, as far as I have been able to tell, is left dangling

It is not clear which parentage is preferred for Joan, wife of Richard de Vernon, as the text gives one, while the note the opposite conclusion. The document quoted by Shaw appears definitive, and is supported by a document abstracted in the Historical Manuscript Commission, Rutland iv: 28. This reports a marriage indenture (20 May, 3 Ric I) between Rees ap Griffyth and Juliane de Vernon, agreeing that Richard son of Juliane should marry Johanne, daughter of Rees

This cannot be brought into agreement with the 1411 i.p.m. of Lawrence Berkrolls, which appeared in Topographer and Genealogist, i:533-5. This indicated that Lawrence held Coityf and other properties (which once belonged to Richard Turburville), as coheir along with Isabella de Stackpole, John de la Bere, and William Gamage. Then follows "Et dicunt quod Johanna que fuit uxor Ric'i Vernon chivaler est propinquior heres predicte Isabelle vid'i't. filia predicti Ric'i Stakepole filii predicte Margarete et est etatis xl annorum et amplius." Thus, unless the author and I have both misinterpreted the Latin, (quite possible in my case) it would appear that this original source names Joan as daughter of Richard Stackpole. This must be in error, or else she and Isabelle would have been coheiresses of their Turberville share of Coityf, rather than Isabelle alone representing this branch. I would suggest that the author (or a transcriber) has dropped a generation from Joan's pedigree, and that it should have read ". . . vid'l't. filia predicte Isabelle fillia predicti Ric'i Stakepole . . . ." (Shaw and Nichols both beleived Joan daughter of Isabelle. Bartrum supplies yet another solution, making Isabelle wife of Rhys ap Griffith, Sr. and grandmother of Joan. This is incorrect, however, as proven by a plea showing Ros Griffith (Jr.) was son of Joan de Somerville, (wife of Rhys Sr), (Pedigrees from the Plea Rolls). Were this true, Joan Griffith would not have been heiress of Isabelle, her step-grandmother, to the exclusion of her (half-)brother Thomas Griffith.

63A-33,34) Richard le Fraunceys or de Vernon, father of Richard (63A-33) married Isabel de Harcla (VCH as cited and Farrer, HKF ii, 276-9). His son Richard (63A-33) married first, Eleanor de Fenes, and second, Maud de Camville (VCH,HKF). William de Vernon (63A-34) did not marry Margaret de Stokeport (that William, probably a collateral, died 1241-2, ibid.). I have found no reliable source for the wife of William (63A-34).

Another interpretation that I have seen in a couple of places is that Vernon of Haddon instead derives from the de Lisle/Vernon family. This descent makes Richard, father of the above William, the half brother of Baldwin de Lisle. The Richard, Ralph and Robert are usually given as William's sons, and not his brothers.

I hope I did not imply this. A plea roll entry (I think it is) shows a Matilda holding land (I think Pitchcott, Bucks, but I am not sure) temp. John. Her son Robert was father of Hawise de Vernon, wife of Gilbert. Another document (undated, and not proven genuine) shows a Richard de Vernon granting the hand of Hawise, daughter of Robert, son of Richard de Vernon to Gilbert le Franceys, son of Ade (Adam?) le Franceys. It has been suggested that Richard de Vernon, the founder of the Haddon family, married twice. By his first wife, (I forget her christian name) a daughter and coheiress of William Avenell, he had (as well as others) the William who married Margaret Stokeport, and whose sons went into exile. Richard then married Matilda _____, and had Robert, father of Hawise. Thus this branch was not the legal heir of Haddon, but it was granted to them on the fall of the children of William and Margaret.

This is debated. First, I don't think there is any connection between Giles de Fenes (sometimes Frenes) and the Fiennes family. More to the point, there is a question as to whether there was two or three Richards between Gilbert le Franceys and William Vernon. However, if you accept Isabella as the christian name of the de Harcla daughter, then it would appear that there was only two generations.

Richard le Franceys/de Vernon married a sister of Earl Anthony de Harcla. In 1292, he gave Pitchcott to his son Richard, and daughter in law Eleanor, and made Eleanor's father Giles de Fines guardian for the couple, who were minors. In 1312, Richard de Vernon and wife Maud make a grant. Finally, in 1323, William de Vernon is named, with doweries claimed by Maud, widow of his father Richard, and Isabel, widow of his grandfather Richard de Vernon. Thus there are two reconstructions possible:

1.Richard le Franceys/de Vernon m. dau de Harcla

2.Richard de Vernon m1. Eleanor de Fenes, m2 Isabel

3.Richard de Vernon m Maud de Camville

4.William de Vernon

or

1.Richard le F/de V m Isabel de Harcla

2.Richard de V m1. Eleanor de Fenes, m2 Maud de Camville

3.William de Vernon

Farrar presents version 1 in vol. 1, and version 2 in vol. 3., while VCH Bucks (under Pitchcott) seems to prefer (or at least present it in a way more consistant with) version 2. In my own opinion (and I just took a quick pass through my notebooks last night, and wish I could look at Farrar again) version 2 seems more likely.

I looked up this ipm. It is the inquisition for Joan, formerly wife of Rhys ap Griffith, and names as heir he son Rhys ap Griffith, aged 40. (As a side note, isn't this a little odd, Rhys Jr. going by Rhys ap Griffith, and not either Rhys ap Rhys or Rhys Griffith?) Her tie to the Vernon family is indirect, and is shown from the ipm, later in the same volume, of Edmund Vernon. His heir (or more appropriately, his wifes, as all of his land appears to be jure uxoris) was Rhys ap Griffith, son of Joan, sister of Elizabeth, whose daughter by John Stafford was Maud, Edmund's wife. Thus the Joan in question here is Joan Somerville, daughter and coheiress (along with her sister Elizabeth) of Philip de Somerville. The death of Maud, only (surviving?) daughter of Elizabeth and her husband John Stafford left Rhys ap G (Jr.) sole heir to his grandfather. Later in that volume is the ipm of Rhys ap Griffith, naming his son Thomas, aged 3 1/2 as his heir. This descent is confirmed by a plea which shows Thomas son of Rhys son of Joan daughter of Philip. In other words, the Joan, and the Vernon connection here is not the one involving Richard Vernon and Jane Griffith.

Welsh historical sources, belonging to the same lineage as the Tudors. This descent can be found in the Dict Welsh Biog (under Rhys ap Griffith and Ednyfed Vychan) and in Bartram (Marchudd family), as well as other sources. There are several royal Welsh descents, most noticably from Trahearn ap Caradoc and Lord Rhys ap Griffith

as told by Todd from Medieval Archives"

Richard and Joan Children

1. Thomas VERNON b: 1504 in England

James DE VERNON b 1450 Note: James de Vernon of Haslynton and LOSTOK m'd Margaret MINSHULL

Children

1. Richard DE VERNON b: 1480 in England

Richard DE VERNON b 1425 m'd Margaret MOLYNEUX

Children

1. James DE VERNON b: 1450

Richard DE VERNON b 1400 m'd Avice LEIGH

Children

1. Richard DE VERNON b: 1425

Thomas DE VERNON b 1370 m'd Joan LOSTOK

Children

1. Richard DE VERNON b: 1400

Ralph DE VERNON

Children

1. Thomas DE VERNON b: 1370

Ralph DE VERNON NPFX: Baron of SHIPBROOK m'd Maude GROSVENOR

Note: Sir Ralph de Vernon of SHIPBROOKE the Vernon family descended from the Barons of Shipbrook in Cheshire, England, who in turn came from the De Vernons of Vernon, Normandy, who came over with William the C, m'd 1 Mary DE DACRES

Children

1 Ralph DE VERNON

2 Richard de Vernon (c.1240-c.1330),

READ ALL THEN YOU UNDERSTAND WHY THERE IS SO Many errors have crept into various pedigrees of the family over the years, and the Shipbrook line is particulary hazardous.

This can found in Medieval Archives posted by Luke Potter

The first Ralph de Vernon was a son of Warin de Vernon and Auda Malabank and was probably born about the turn of the eleventh and twelth centuries as he was presented to Kegworth Church in 1216 and was still a minor. He was not the eldest son, but following his father's death in February 1247/8 he managed to gain a division of much of the Vernon land with his nephew Warin. Ralph died in 1251 and the wardship of his children was granted to Guy de Lezignan, and subsequently to John le Fraunceys. Hence his children were obviously under 21 and cannot have been born before 1230.

He had at least two children, another Ralph and Eustachia, and probably a third who married into the Mascy family. Ralph first begins to occur regularly in charters in the last 1260s and 1270s, indicating that he was probably born in the 1240s, and he was knighted in about 1278 or 1279. He is stated to have married Mary Dacres, but I have found no contemporary evidence for this. Judging from when his children become active, they appear to have been born around about 1280, and there were at least three sons - Ralph, Richard, and Thomas, and probably at least two daughters, Rose and Agatha. Agatha is said to have married Hugh de Venables, and Rose married Sir William Brereton and probably also Thomas Arden. Thomas de Vernon married Joan Lostock and was the ancestor of the Vernons of Haslington, Cheshire. Richard took holy orders and became rector of Stockport, Davenham, and Eccleston, Cheshire, and in 1325 was the primary beneficary of a grant of much of his fathers lands. (His father is last recorded on 27 June 1329 and died shortly after aged about 90 - not 150 as it became exagerated to in dubious sixteenth century genealogies). The other son Ralph is first mentioned in 1295, and in 1312 became keeper of Beeston Castle for which he received £10. However he had died by 1320 when his wife Margaret was suing Thomas de Vernon for part of her dower which lay in Lostock Gralam. Their eldest son was another Ralph de Vernon who is referred to as of Mottrum. He was dead by 1336 when his wife, another Margert was suing for dower. Their two children were Margaret, who married Hamo Lestrange, and Ralph, who married Agnes D'amory, and died shortly before July 1346.

The direct Vernon male line died out with this Ralph, and the inheritance of the Vernon lands passed through a Richard, son of Ralph de Vernon, a bastard. This has caused huge problems over the years, as it has been believed that this Richard was a bastard son of Ralph de Vernon the old (c.1240-c.1330), yet this is wrong. This Richard was a bastard son of Ralph his son (c.1275-c.1320). In the settlement of the Vernon lands drawn up in 1325 by old Sir Ralph, Richard seems to have been given priority of inheritance over some of his relatives of the whole blood, but this apparent favoritism is entirley possible. Richard was still alive in July 1348 when, as Richard, son of Sir Ralph de Vernon of Shipbrook, he quitclaimed all his rights in Thurstanton to Richard Doune. Ormerods editor Helsby came tantalisingly close to recognising this descent when he wrote that 'unless old Sir Ralph's son, or grandson, Ralph (which is not altogether improbable), was father of the bastards, an extrodinary error seems to run through a number of entirely distinct documents.' However, Helsby was not quite able to break free from the tradion contained in the pedigrees compiled during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Richard had two sons, Ralph and Richard. Ralph inherited through his father the lands held by his half-cousin Ralph de Vernon and his wife Agnes who eventually died in 1365. The descent of the Vernons put forward here is supported by the fact that this Ralph was referred to as 'Ralph de Vernon, knight, son and heir of Richard son of Ralph de Vernon of Shipbrook, JUNIOR.'[Ormerod, III, 248] Ralph had been born in about 1339, and died on 1 March 1396/7. He was survived by his wife Margaret who lived until November 1429, and his daughter Agnes who had been born in 1370 and married William Atherton. Ralph had also had a son Thomas, but he pre-deceased his father. Did Ralph have another daughter who married Sir John Savage?? This tradition has been passed down by Leycester, but as Ormerod pointed out, there is no surviving contemporary evidence that supports it, and therefore it should not be trusted.

After Ralph's death, the main Vernon inheritance passed to his brother Richard, who may have been up to twelve years his junior. This Richard was executed two days after the battle of Shrewsbury on 23 July 1403 and his head set above the gates of Chester 'so long as it shall last' as a deterent to potential opposition to Henry IV. Richard's actions ked to him being immortalised by William Shakespeare. Richard had married firstly Alice, the widow of Sir William Bulkylegh some time before 1383, but by 1403 he was married to a woman named Elizabeth who was struggling to support herself and her five infants following Richard's death. The eldest of these infants was another Richard de Vernon who had been born in July 1395. In 1408 he was married to Ellen Holes, but he died eleven years later leaving only a solitary daughter, Joan, who married Sir Robert Fouleshurst, and the Vernon Shipbrook inheritance, as it had been only originally granted to Richard son of Ralph de Vernon of Shipbrook in tail male, passed to the elderly James Vernon who qualified under the last section of the 1325 settlement as the right heir of Ralph de Vernon senior.

There are different versions of what her ancestry should be, all agreeing she was descended from Sir Ralph de Vernon, baron of Shipbrook, who died soon after 1325 at a great age, through his grandson, Sir Richard de Vernon, of Shipbrook, who died at the battle of Shrewsbury in July 1403. These sources are The Visitation of Cheshire in 1580, Collins' Peerage of England (6th Edition, 1814, VII: 396-399), Lyson's Magna Britannia (1810, II: 648-649) and the 2nd edition of Ormerod's History of Chester (1882, III: 248-253). Collins cites Lyson as its source, which cites "Smith's Pedigrees" a reference I have not been able to locate, but which may well be the 1580 Visitation in some form.

Cheshire Recognizance Rolls from 1415-1500. They have been published in the 37th volume of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Record and are arranged chronologically by surname, a very easy to follow arrangement.

On 25 April 1421, a writ of livery related the descent of the barony of Shipbrook from Sir Ralph de Vernon, therein referring to a fine levied at Chester in July 1325 between the elder Sir Ralph de Vernon and Master Richard de Vernon, his elder son [Rector of Stockport 1306-1334]. After failure of the the elder children of old Sir Ralph to leave any male heirs among their descendants, the barony passed to Richard, son of Sir Ralph, who, from other sources was referred to as a "bastard." This Richard left two sons, Ralph and Richard. Ralph died without male heirs [in 1396/7] and his brother Richard succeeded, assigning dower to his brother's widow, Margaret. When Richard de Vernon died [July 1403] Shipbrook passed to his son, Richard de Vernon, Kt., who then assigned dower to his mother, Elizabeth. From the IPM of the last Sir Richard, we learn he was born 7 July 1383 and died 3 Sept 1419, leaving a widow, Eleanor, daughter of Hugh de Holes, and his only child, a daughter named Joan, aged 3 [born 1416]. From a writ of livery of 21 April 1474, we learn that Eleanor, widow of the last Sir Richard, died recently leaving as her heir, her daughter Joan, wife of Robert Foulshurst, Kt.

Upon the death of Sir Richard de Vernon in 1419, the nearest male heir was James de Vernon (born 1361), great-grandson of Thomas de Vernon, of Lostock, a younger son of the elder Sir Ralph by his 1st wife, Maud Dacres. There was no younger brother of Sir Richard as stated by Collins.

The Visitation of Cheshire in 1580 correctly begins with old Sir Ralph, to son [bastard] Ralph, who was not a knight, to son Sir Richard, slain at Shrewsbury, to son Sir Richard, who died in France, but is assigned Isabel Malbank as a wife, and not Eleanor de Holes. Then on to his son, Sir Ralph, husband of Mary Butler, etc. But we already know that Sir Richard had no sons, or brothers.

Ormerod and his editor both dismiss the John Savage and Dorothy Vernon marriage completely (III: 250) basing their conclusions on Sir Peter Leycester's earlier account where he was unable to find any original reference to this marriage and consequently does not identify his wife at all.

So, if Dorothy was indeed a Vernon (and did she even exist?), and the daughter of a Ralph Vernon, then which Ralph? Could she have been a daughter of Sir Ralph (died 1396/7) who passed Shipbrook on to his younger brother Sir Richard? According to Ormerod's pedigree, he had at least one daughter, Agnes, born 1370. Dorothy does not fit well into this chronology.

If we look at the only other Sir Ralph de Vernon during this time, he being the lord of Haslington, he was a minor in 1458 and died 18 July 1497 per his IPM leaving as his heir, his son Richard, aged 24 [born 1473]. Gerald Paget in his Ancestry of the Prince of Wales (I: 174, 255) claims Dorothy was the daughter of this Ralph, but she would have been more a sister than a daughter.

The parents of Dorothy Vernon, wife of Sir John Savage (d. 1492), of Clifton, Cheshire. There are different versions of what her ancestry should be, all agreeing she was descended from Sir Ralph de Vernon, baron of Shipbrook, who died soon after 1325 at a great age, through his grandson, Sir Richard de Vernon, of Shipbrook, who died at the battle of Shrewsbury in July 1403. These sources are The Visitation of Cheshire in 1580, Collins' Peerage of England (6th Edition, 1814, VII: 396-399), Lyson's Magna Britannia (1810, II: 648-649) and the 2nd edition of Ormerod's History of Chester (1882, III: 248-253). Collins cites Lyson as its source, which cites "Smith's Pedigrees" a reference I have not been able to locate, but which may well be the 1580 Visitation in some form.

In a book on the VENABLES family ("Some Venables of England and America" by Henrietta Brady Brown, 1961), Sir Hugh de Venables (d. 1311) of Kinderton is said to have married Agatha (Agnes/Avice) VERNON in 1295. She is described as a daughter of Sir Ralph VERNON of Shipbrook. In a series of articles on the VERNON family ("The Origin of the House of Reviers, Vernon, and teh English-Norman Vernon Lines," by Wm. A. Vernon, Jr.), this Sir Ralph VERNON is identified as Sir Ralph de VERNON "the Old Liver." His wife, and the presumed mother of Agatha VERNON VENABLES, is described as Mary DACRES, a daughter of Lord DACRES. Can anyone she some light on these families? Who was the mother of Agatha VERNON, wife of Sir Hugh de VENABLES (d. 1311)? If she was Mary DACRES, how is this Mary DACRES related to the later Lord Dacres?

But read with care for the family of Vernon of Shipbrook is discussed in Ormerod's History of the County Palatinate of Chester. Unfortunately, there is a serious flaw. The Sir Ralph "the Old Liver" you name is said to have lived to the impossible age of 150 years. The question then is, how many Ralphs have been combined into one, and to which of them does this spouse belong. I have intended to take a closer look at this but haven't had the time.

Warine DE VERNON NPFX: Baron Of Shipbrook b 1198 in Shipbroke,Cheshire,England in Folkingham M'd 1 Auda MALBANK

Ralph de Vernon was a son of Warin de Vernon and Auda Malabank and was probably born about the turn of the eleventh and twelth centuries as he was presented to Kegworth Church in 1216 and was still a minor. He was not the eldest son, but following his father's death in February 1247/8 he managed to gain a division of much of the Vernon land with his nephew Warin. Ralph died in 1251 and the wardship of his children was granted to Guy de Lezignan, and subsequently to John le Fraunceys. Hence his children were obviously under 21 and cannot have been born before 1230.

He had at least two children, another Ralph and Eustachia, and probably a third who married into the Mascy family. Ralph first begins to occur regularly in charters in the last 1260s and 1270s, indicating that he was probably born in the 1240s, and he was knighted in about 1278 or 1279. He is stated to have married Mary Dacres, but I have found no contemporary evidence for this. Judging from when his children become active, they appear to have been born around about 1280, and there were at least three sons - Ralph, Richard, and Thomas, and probably at least two daughters, Rose and Agatha. Agatha is said to have married Hugh de Venables, and Rose married Sir William Brereton and probably also Thomas Arden. Thomas de Vernon married Joan Lostock and was the ancestor of the Vernons of Haslington, Cheshire. Richard took holy orders and became rector of Stockport, Davenham, and Eccleston, Cheshire, and in 1325 was the primary beneficary of a grant of much of his fathers lands. (His father is last recorded on 27 June 1329 and died shortly after aged about 90 - not 150 as it became exagerated to in dubious sixteenth century genealogies). The other son Ralph is first mentioned in 1295, and in 1312 became keeper of Beeston Castle for which he received £10. However he had died by 1320 when his wife Margaret was suing Thomas de Vernon for part of her dower which lay in Lostock Gralam. Their eldest son was another Ralph de Vernon who is referred to as of Mottrum. He was dead by 1336 when his wife, another Margert was suing for dower. Their two children were Margaret, who married Hamo Lestrange, and Ralph, who married Agnes D'amory, and died shortly before July 1346.

The direct Vernon male line died out with this Ralph, and the inheritance of the Vernon lands passed through a Richard, son of Ralph de Vernon, a bastard. This has caused huge problems over the years, as it has been believed that this Richard was a bastard son of Ralph de Vernon the old (c.1240-c.1330), yet this is wrong. This Richard was a bastard son of Ralph his son (c.1275-c.1320). In the settlement of the Vernon lands drawn up in 1325 by old Sir Ralph, Richard seems to have been given priority of inheritance over some of his relatives of the whole blood, but this apparent favoritism is entirley possible. Richard was still alive in July 1348 when, as Richard, son of Sir Ralph de Vernon of Shipbrook, he quitclaimed all his rights in Thurstanton to Richard Doune. Ormerods editor Helsby came tantalisingly close to recognising this descent when he wrote that 'unless old Sir Ralph's son, or grandson, Ralph (which is not altogether improbable), was father of the bastards, an extrodinary error seems to run through a number of entirely distinct documents.' However, Helsby was not quite able to break free from the tradion contained in the pedigrees compiled during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Richard had two sons, Ralph and Richard. Ralph inherited through his father the lands held by his half-cousin Ralph de Vernon and his wife Agnes who eventually died in 1365. The descent of the Vernons put forward here is supported by the fact that this Ralph was referred to as 'Ralph de Vernon, knight, son and heir of Richard son of Ralph de Vernon of Shipbrook, JUNIOR.'[Ormerod, III, 248] Ralph had been born in about 1339, and died on 1 March 1396/7. He was survived by his wife Margaret who lived until November 1429, and his daughter Agnes who had been born in 1370 and married William Atherton. Ralph had also had a son Thomas, but he pre-deceased his father. Did Ralph have another daughter who married Sir John Savage?? This tradition has been passed down by Leycester, but as Ormerod pointed out, there is no surviving contemporary evidence that supports it, and therefore it should not be trusted.

After Ralph's death, the main Vernon inheritance passed to his brother Richard, who may have been up to twelve years his junior. This Richard was executed two days after the battle of Shrewsbury on 23 July 1403 and his head set above the gates of Chester 'so long as it shall last' as a deterent to potential opposition to Henry IV. Richard's actions ked to him being immortalised by William Shakespeare. Richard had married firstly Alice, the widow of Sir William Bulkylegh some time before 1383, but by 1403 he was married to a woman named Elizabeth who was struggling to support herself and her five infants following Richard's death. The eldest of these infants was another Richard de Vernon who had been born in July 1395. In 1408 he was married to Ellen Holes, but he died eleven years later leaving only a solitary daughter, Joan, who married Sir Robert Fouleshurst, and the Vernon Shipbrook inheritance, as it had been only originally granted to Richard son of Ralph de Vernon of Shipbrook in tail male, passed to the elderly James Vernon who qualified under the last section of the 1325 settlement as the right heir of Ralph de Vernon senior.

Children

1 Ralph DE VERNON NPFX: Baron of SHIPBROOK Sex: M Note: Priest, Rector or Harnwell

2 Warine de VERNON Baron Shipbroke m. Margaret de ANDEVILLE

Richard DE VERNON b 1173 in Shipbroke,Cheshire,England in Folkingham m'd 1 Alice AVENELL b: 1175 in Haddon Hall,Derbyshire,England

Note: Richard de Vernon, son of Warine, died in his father lifetime, and m’d c17 Henry H. Avice, daughter (and with her sister Eilzabeth) coheir of William de Avenil o fhaddon. Co. Derby. On that date William de Avenil granted a charter in which he name his daughter Avice, wife of Richard de Vernon, and another daughter who married Simon Bassett. Yeaman places this Richard as a son of William de Vernon, Earl of Devon Fl. 1155 by his wife Lucia dau and heir of Richard de Vernon of St. Sauveur in the Colentin. This Richard had a grant of lands in Tidewell Co. Derby, from John Count of Mortain (later King John), in 4 Richard. Richard had the custom of the county of Lancaster, and at his death was buried in Linton Priory. Richard died before his father and left four sons, Warne, Baron of Shipbroke m’d had issue: Warnie succeeded his grandfather as Baron of Shipbroke m’d Auda, daughter and coheir of William Malback. He in turn had two son Warnie and Ralph) Ralph, a priest; Sir William and Robert (it may have been his son William who married Alice, daughter and heir of William Avenil of Haldon. He had a daughter Hawise who m’d 1st her cousin, Richard, son of William de Vernon and 2nd Gilbert le Francis.)

Children:

1 Sir Warin de VERNON (1198-) m. Auda de MALBANK (-1219) dau and coheir of William Malback

2 Robert de Vernon

3 Sir William de VERNON Chief Justice of Chester (-1231)

4 unknown

Warin de VERNON (1148-) m. (Miss) BAILLOL/ Margaret sister of William Patrick.

Note: Warine de Vernon, son of Hugh, was the 4th Baron of Shipbroke and was living 37 Henry III. He may be the Waren de Vernon who m’d by 1242 Margaret, sister of William Patrick, son of William Patrick and Alice who was a sister of Nigel de Lovetot. After Vernon’s death Margery (Margaret) m 2nd by 1259 m’d John de Littlebury. Warine de Vernon was the father of least one son, Richard d in this father lifetime.

Children:

1. Richard de VERNON (1173-) m. Avice de AVENELL (1175-)

2. Mathew de VERNON

Hugh DE VERNON b. ABT 1123, of Shipbrook, Cheshire, England or Folkingham, England Baron of Shipbroke Marriage Heiress DE BALLIOT

Note: Hugh de Vernon, son of William, living in 1119, was the Lord of Northwyk and the 3rd Baron of Shipboke. He m dau of heir of Reginald de Balliot, who was Lord of Herdwick and Hergrave. Hugh and his wife were the parents of Warine

Children

1 Warin de VERNON (1148-) m. (Miss) BAILLOL/ Margaret sister of William Patrick

William DE VERNON b 1092 in Vernon, Normandy, France:. D 1174 Shipbroke, Cheshire, England Marriage unknown

Note; William son of Richard, was 2nd Baron of Shipbroke. He was the father of Hugh.

Children

1. Richard DE VERNON

2. Hugh de VERNON b. ABT 1123, of Shipbrook, Cheshire, England or Folkingham, EnglandBaron of Shipbrook.

Richard de REVIERS Seigneur de Reviers, Vernon, Nehou b. of Reviers on the Seulles in the Bessin; Vernon, on the Seine, in the Vexin; Nehou, near St. Sauveur le Vicomte, in the Cotentin, Normandy, France d. 8 Sep 1107, of Mosterston, Marriage 1 Adelise PEVEREL b: 1069 in Nottinghamshire,England Father: PEVEREL, William "the Elder" b. 1062 Normandy, France d. 17 APR 1113 England William’s Father: PEVEREL, Ranulph b. ABT 1030 Normandy, France and Mother: Ingelrica Maud, b. ABT 1032 St. Martin's-LeGrand, England

Note: Richard, son of William was Lord of Vernon and was created Baron of Shipbroke, by Hugh Lupus, Earl of the County Palatine of Chester. This Richard is listed in the DOMESDAY BOOK as owning considerable property. He has as least two sons, second of whom was William.

Children:

1 Baldwin de RIVERS Earl of Devon (1090-died 4 Jun 1155 buried Quarr Abbey, Isle Of Wight, Hampshire, England) m. Adeliza Lucia de BAALUN (1099-)

2 William de VERNON 1092 in Vernon, Normandy, France, d 1174 Shipbroke, Cheshire, England

3 Hawise de RIVIERS (1100-1161)

(Devon: - Parish Registers; Burials. Volume 3.

The Parish of Bickleigh--General History. Devonshire, England

In the year 1278 , Amicia, wife of Baldwin de Redvers, seventh Earl of Devon, and daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, founded the Abbey of Buckland for monks of the Cistercian order, and endowed it with the Manor of Buckland, and with the Hamlets ("cum hamelettis") of Columpton, Walkhampton, and Bykeley. The foundation deed; printed in the Monasticon of the Diocese, p. 382, sets forth that the Countess had founded and endowed this Abbey for the health of the souls of Henry, King of England, and his wife Alianor and their children; of King Edward, son of the said King Henry, and of his wife Alianor and their children; of Gilbert de Clare, formerly Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, her father; and of the Countess Isabel, her mother; as well as for her husband, Baldwin, Earl of Devon and her daughters, Isabel, Countess of Devon and Albemarle, and Margaret, a nun of Lacock. The confirmation by her said daughter, Isabella de Fortibus, is recited by "Inspeximus." And the permission to bestow the land on the Abbey had been duly obtained from the Crown by deed dated 08 Aug 1276 , still to be held, however, "de nobis et heredibus nostris in capite." This interesting document which Dugdale calls the Charter of Edward 2nd, may be thus translated )

Devon: - Parish Registers; Burials. Volume 3.

The Parish of Buckland Monachorum.--General History and Description. Devonshire, England

Upon the death of Alice Avenell her daughter Matilda or Maud, succeeded in due course to her mother's Barony. She was first married to Robert de Aubrincis, or Avarinches, by whom she had a daughter called Hawise, and two others, afterwards nuns, which last were twins. It is further stated that after her husband's death she married Robert, son of King Henry 1st, but that she continued to be known as Matilda de Avarinches as was also her daughter Matilda, the offspring of her second marriage with the King's (natural) son, who died "pridie Kalendas Junii" 31 May 1172. His wife followed him to the grave on the 11th of the Kalends of 21 Sep 21 Oct in the following year. The King--Henry 2nd. then assumed the wardship of the two daughters, Hawise and Matilda, and gave the custody of them to Sir Reginald de Courtenay, and in the same year that their mother died their hands were bestowed upon this Reginald and upon his brother William. By this marriage, Hawise D'Avarinches (whose father with strong probability is said to have been the son of the Lady Emma De Brion Baldwin's youngest daughter) brought the Barony of Okehampton and the rest of her estates to her husband Reginald Courtenay, and was succeeded in them by her son Robert Baron of Okehampton. He married Mary, daughter of William Redvers, sixth Earl of Devon, and by this marriage the estates and title of the latter family were ultimately acquired by the Courtenays, after the death of Isabella de Fortibus as I have shown in the previous chapter.

Devon: - Parish Registers Burials. Volume 3.

The Family of Redvers, Earls of Devon. Devonshire, England

Countess Isabella had three sons, John, Thomas and William all of whom died before her, and without offspring; her daughters were Ann, who was never married, and Aveline whose first husband was Ingram de Percie, and who consoled herself in her widowhood by an alliance with Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, second son of Henry 3rd., but she also died childless. In the year 1283 , therefore, Hugh Lord Courtenay, Baron of Okehampton, in right of his descent from Hawise de Averanches, claimed to be ninth Earl of Devon by inheritance from his grandmother, Mary, daughter of William de Vernon, whose sister, Joan Briwere, had died without issue

William de VERNON Lord Vernon (-1052) Married Emma FITZOSBORN

Both sons accompanied William the Conqueror. (Robert and Walter)r. Vernon, Normandy, France d. AFT 1052 M’d Emma FITZOSBORN b. ABT 1034 Normandy, France d. ABT 1029 France. Daughter of Osbern de CREPON and Albreda de BAYEAU Married William de VERNON Lord Vernon (-1052)

Note: William de Vernon, assumed that name from the town and district of Vernon the Duchy of Normandy, of which he was proprietor in 1052. He was founder of the Collegiate and Parochial Church of St Mary in Vernon in the Duchy of Normandy. He was the father of two sons, both of whom accompanied William the Conqueror to England in 1066. The sons were Richard and Walter, holder of several Lordships in Cheshire and Burks.

Children

1 Richard de REVIERS Seigneur de Reviers, Vernon, Nehou b. of Reviers on the Seulles in the Bessin; Vernon, on the Seine, in the Vexin; Nehou, near St. Sauveur le Vicomte, in the Cotentin, Normandy, France d. 8 Sep 1107, of Mosterston, Dorsetshire, Eng. Married Adelise PEVEREL (-1156)

Devon: - Parish Registers; Burials. Volume 3.

The Parish of Buckland Monachorum.--General History and Description. Devonshire, England

Some historians aver that this Adeliza, was the wife of Richard de Redvers, 1st Earl of Devon. A comparison of dates--to say nothing of the fact that he is shown to have been her uncle--will prove the incorrectness of the statement. The generally accepted account is that Adeliza, sister of Richard de Brion, died without issue, and that she had a sister called Emma, who was twice married--1st, to William Avenel, by whom she had a son called Ralph; 2nd, to Robert de Averanches, whose issue was another son, called Robert. She nominated her elder nephew, Ralph Avenel, her successor in the Barony of Okehampton, and Reginald, Earl of Cornwall, offered him his daughter in marriage, but Ralph declined this proposal on account of his prior engagement to the daughter of the Earl of Devon. The Earl of Cornwall, out of revenge, brought over Matilda, daughter of Robert de Averanches the younger, and commenced and action of ejectment against Ralph Avenel, on the plea that Richard, the second Baron of Okehampton, had in his lifetime caused the tenants of the Barony to swear fealty to his nephew (the aforesaid Robert), and that therefore Matilda, as heir to her father, had a prior claim to that of Ralph. The action at law was successful; Ralph Avenel lost the Barony, and Matilda was afterwards twice married--first to the Lord D'Ayncourt, by whom she had a daughter called Hawise, who brought the Barony to her husband Reginald Courtenay (the first of his name in this country); and, secondly, to Robert, Fitzroy, a natural son of King Henry 1st. By this last alliance she had a daughter called after her own name, whose husband was William, brother to the said Reginald

Devon: - Parish Registers; Burials. Volume 3.

The Parish of Bickleigh--General History. Devonshire, England

"Edward, by the Grace of God, King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine, to all, &c. Know ye that we have yielded and confirmed to Amicia de Redvers, Countess of Devon, the Manor of Bocland, with the hamlets of Columpton, Walkhampton, and Bykele, together with all and singular their appurtenances everywhere existing, to be had and held to the said Amicia, according to the form and tenour of the deeds which she holds from hence, from the gift (or concurrence) of the Countess of Albemarle, her daughter; and if it should happen that the aforesaid Amicia should wish to give and assign the said manor and hamlets, &c., to certain religious men, and hence to found a new religious house, know ye that we, for ourselves and our heirs, would esteem the said gift grateful and acceptable, so that however, the said house, after the decease of the said Amicia, may be held from us and our heirs-in-chief. And we promise in good faith, when it shall have been constructed or appropriated, to confirm it in pure and perpetual alms. Of which, &c., witness ourself, at Odiham, 08 Aug , in the fourth year of our reign."

Devon: - Parish Registers; Burials. Volume 3.

The Family of Redvers, Earls of Devon. Devonshire, England

His first property here appears to have been the important lordship of Tiverton; he was afterwards created Earl of Devon, and received, in addition to the third penny of the county, the revenue of which then amounted to thirty marks, a concession of the Barony of Plympton, with all the manors and other property belonging to it; ultimately he obtained large possessions in the Isle of Wight, and his style and title was Earl of Devon and Lord of the Isle, as is shown by the MS. History of the Foundation of Ford Abbey. "Post hec. insulam Vecte a dicto rege obtinuit unde comes Devonie et dominus Insule nuncupatus erat.2 This Richard de Redvers died in the year 1107 ; and was buried in Normandy at the Abbey of Montibourg. By his wife, Adeliza, he left a son, Baldwin, who succeeded him as second Earl of Devon, and whose wife was also called Adeliza or Adeline. The second Earl was the illustrious founder "inclytum fundatorem" of the Cluniac Priory of St. James, in the suburbs of Exeter: of Christ Church, Hants, which is described as "Timmor (i.e. Bremore) canonicorum et Twina ubi est Christi Ecclesia," of the Monastery of Quarrer, in the Isle of Wight; and of Lira in Normandy. Upon the death of King Henry 1st. this powerful noble, mindful of the favours which had been heaped upon his father and upon himself by the deceased monarch, was the very first to take up arms in the cause of the King's daughter, Maud, wife of the Emperor Henry 4th of Germany. He shut himself up in the Castle of Exeter, and hastened to strengthen its fortifications during the time that elapsed between his hostile declaration and the arrival of the beleaguering army under the usurper Stephen, who during the year 1136 pressed the siege with great vigour for three months, and expended thereon the enormous sum of over 15,000 marks. We are told that the garrison ultimately capitulated for want of water, and King Stephen is said to have treated not only his adversaries, but the citizens generally, with the utmost clemency.

Devon: - Parish Registers; Burials. Volume 3.

The Parish of Walkhampton--Description and General History. Devonshire, England

This land for many generations afterwards was in the hands of the powerful family of Rivers, or Redvers. Richard de Ripariis, or Redvers, brother of Baldwin known as the Sheriff, is said to have obtained from King Henry the 1st, the whole honour of Plympton. Plympton, like Walkhampton, was at the period of the Survey, Royal demesne, and although it is absolutely certain that it was soon afterwards the property of the Earl of Devon, yet it is equally apparent that Baldwin held it previously to its coming into the hands of his brother. This is shown by an entry in the Exeter Domesday, which is not contained in the Exchequer Copy. "Rex habet I mansionem quae vocatur Plintone" ... "Haec reddit 13 libras et 10 solidos ad pensum, et quando Balduinus recepit 12 libras et 10 solidos ad pensum." The land paid geld for two hides and a half and apart from these the Canons of Plympton held two hides.

Who was William Vernon father?

"William de Vernon, his son Hugh, and his wife Emma' instead of William de Vernon son of Hugh. This charter had been seen to be vital in proving the parentage of Richard de Redvers [d.1107] as it is known that Richard had a brother named Hugh.

However, even though the Hugh of the 1067 charter has been proved to be the product of a mis-reading, there is a Hugh floating around in the 1080s. In 1089 he appears a a witness to a charter by Duke RObert to the Priory of St Vigor, and following the death of William the Conqueror a catalogue of losses and injuries sustained by the monastery of Holy Trinity, Caen, included five measures of wine and a vinyard in Vernon which had been seized by Hugh de Redvers. HUgh might be the same person as the Huard de Vernon who held land of William de Ecouis in Suffolk in 1086. The possibility that Hugh was a son of William de Vernon cannot be ruled out, and thereforer the pedigree put forward by Stapleton in 'Historical Memoirs of the House of Vernon' is still plausible.

There is further evidence for Richards ancestry, and it is something that is rarely mentioned in discussions of his origins. A charter issued by Richard de Vernon (grandson or great grandson of Richard de Redvers) and preserved by Thomas Stapleton and dated to 1186 states that 'confirmo donationem quam primus Willelmus de Vernone Antecessor meus, cujus corpus in ecclesia de Vernone jacet...' The question arises of whether Richard is referring to an actual personage named William de Vernon, or if Stapleton's view of the word 'primus' means that he is simply referring to the first of the family. Stapleton does not answer this question, but it appears that the William referred to was William son of Hugh de Vernon. In 1186 the head of the Redvers/Vernon family was earl Badwin, and therefore Richard de Vernon would surely have talked about 'primus Baldwin' if the word was used as Stapleton suggested. The word 'primus' was used to distinguish William from the other two William de Vernons.

Hence Richard de Redvers was clearly a descendant of William de Vernon, but it has been proposed that he was his grandson, and the son of the Baldwin mentioned in 1060. However, the chronology is too tight for this to work. Richard [Redvers], Baldwin's brother, died in 1060, but in a charter dated to around 1052, only eight years earlier, William de Vernon was described as a little boy ('puerolo'). In 1054 William was acting in his own interest, so it seems that he was born in the mid to late 1030s. Hence William could not have been the father of Richard [d.1060], Baldwin and William de Redvers, and must have been the father of Richard and Hugh de Redvers who would have been born in the 1050s/60s. as told by Luke Potter"

1066 LIST OF KNIGHTS

List Of Those Accompanying William The Conqueror On His Invasion Of England in 1066

This list is taken from the plaque in the church at Dives-sur- Mer, Normandy, France, where William the Conqueror and his knights said mass before setting sail to invade England in 1066. It lists all the knights who took part in the invasion.

de Vernon Gautier

de Vernon Huard

de Vernon Richard

THANKS TO ANDREW ALEXIS FOR WONDERFUL WEBPAGE

Andrew Alexis

HERE IS ANOTHER WONDERFUL SITE

Great Site Titled: “English Vernons”

English Vernons

I FOUND THIS WONDER BOOK ON THE VERNON FAMILY

“DONNA LENORA AND OTHER DAVISES, RAMSEYS, BOSLEYS,CORBINS, MEADOWS, VERNONS” by Dallie Arnold Vernon, Sr

(Copyright © 1993 by Dallie Arnold Vernon, Sr. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be changed in any form or fashion without permission in writing from the author, but may be copied for genealogical pursuits)

DONNA LENORA

“ JAMES VERNON'S PEDIGREE”

"...The Vernons of Great Budsworth, a Vernon seat in Marston, were of the Haslington line. Further, in Wills of Probate of Middlewiche, we find that Randle of Middlewiche died in 1618. This was Randle (Rondle, Randall) Vernon, styled 'gentleman of Pirle', Norwiche Hundred in the 'Visitation of Cheshire' (1600) from the Harleian Society records.

This Randle, in my search, stands the best chance, along with his brother Thomas, of being the forbearers of the Quaker Vernon brothers. According to my own calculations, one of them could very easily have been the father of James Vernon, father of the Quaker Vernon brothers. Randle (Rondle) and Thomas were the sons of Rondle Vernon, who sued his grandfather, Sir Henry Vernon in 1516, for land which he later gave to his father, Raffe (Ralph) de Vernon, and uncles. Sir Henry was the Burgess of Chester in 1487. The sons of Randle Vernon are given in the English records as Hugh and Henry. Consequently, I have presumed that brother Thomas was the father of the James Vernon who married Hester of Chester."

The "Visitations" were traveling calls made on a community of peers and nobility periodically, perhaps every generation or so, made by representatives of the official party of heraldry for England, Great Britain or the United Kingdom. The purpose was to verify the lineage, and thereby the inherited entitlement of armorial bearings -- the coats-of-arms and crest of the noble houses; i.e., peer titles -- of grants made by the king or queen.

Some of these "visitations" recorded landed gentry -- esquires, gentlemen, freemen -- as well as knights and barons, etc. The visitations have been faithfully recorded by the Harleian Society with much the same intent as does our Daughters of the American Revolution, though perhaps for different purposes. The pedigrees, which result from such visitations, are firm record of the lineage of one's history, if one can 'connect' up or document one's such lineage.

The pedigree of Shipbrook, as shown in George Ormerod's County Palatine and History of Chester, a history of Cheshire, illustrates connection with the later pedigree of Haslington by Sir Ralph de Vernon, Knight Baron of Shipbrook 16 Edward I (1288 A.D.), who allegedly lived to be 150 years old. He is the ninth Baron of Shipbrook, by my count, and the first on the lineage of Haslington.

Richard Vernon of Haslington, Esq., seventh great-grandson of Sir Ralph "the old liver," had a brother named Henry, temp. 4 Henry VII (1489 A.D.), of whom it is believed was Henry Burgess of Chester, and the grandfather sued by 'Rondle' Vernon. The line continues... The English Vernon peerage had its beginning with the Barony of Shipbrook:

"The county and palatine of Chester, England, soon became a Norman stronghold following the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

William the Conqueror awarded Chester to his nephew, Hugh Lupus, in 1070, and Hugh immediately appointed four great barons, and designated them in order of their importance (acc: Ormerod, History of the County and Palatine and City of Chester).

Of these original barons, Sir Richard de Vernon, Baron of Shipbrook, was listed as number (two)..." (Vernon Vignette, June 1974)

Through marriage and inheritance, subsequent lands and manors were acquired and relinquished. The Vernon bloodline was also diffused throughout the peerage through the marriage of Vernon daughters. Vernons begot by male and by female blood, the houses of Hulgreves, Erdswickes, Harlaston and Marple, Haddon, Hilton and Sudbury. Nicholas de Vernon was ancestor to the Vernons of Whatcroft; Eustatia, daughter of Ralph Vernon, a priest, was ancestress of the Whitmores of Thurstanston. Auda, daughter of Warin de Vernon, was mother to the Staffords and Erdeswickes of Sandon.

With the offspring of Warin fourth Baron of Shipbrook, the houses of Haslington, Haddon, Hodnet, Sudbury, Houndshill and Kinderton, among others, became desmenes of Vernon. The family peerage flowed into the shires of the kingdom, including Farnham of Bucks, Little Beligh of Essex and Nottingham, Hanbury of Worcester, Wentworth Castle of York; Shropshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire. Even Powys of Wales and Ireland's Clontarf bespoke of Vernon lineage.

Burke's Peerage, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, Burke's Landed Gentry, and Debrett's all stand as noble testimony of the British Honors of Vernon, substantiated by the Harleian Society's "Visitations". George Ormerod's History of the County and Palatine and City of Chester elaborates the rich history of the Vernon manors of Cheshire.

"William the Conqueror used a special coloring on his shield, and a banner on his standard to rally his men to victory at Hastings, thus signaling a new era in history. Among his officers that day were at least three representatives of the House of Vernon in Normandy, and at least three members of the parent family of Reveries [sic] (Reviers). No family contributed more to the official ranks of William at Hastings. For this service, they were granted vast estates in England and in Normandy. Their new Normandy estates were in addition to their traditional ownership of the district of Vernon, which had been in the possession of the rising House of Reveries (Reviers) -- Vernon since the reign of Duke William Longsword (the Viking - author) around 1000 A.D.

In honor of the Vernons at Hastings, one of the few elongated shields at Battle Abbey bears the argent (silver background), a fret (a design resembling an oversized weave), sable (heraldic for black) of Vernon...this arms was but one of the first two arms designations approved for the Vernon family following the creation of the College of Heraldry in England about the year 1185 A.D.

By this time most of the great Norman-English families had been using their chosen arms for about fifty years (1135 A.D.). Vernon was no exception. The Shipbrook Vernons of Cheshire had risen to the top of the Cheshire aristocracy, Sir Richard de Vernon having been chosen the second baron in the ranks of Earl Hugh Lupus, cousin of the Conqueror, among the Earl's original establishment in 1087 A.D. Four barons were chosen. The first in rank was Sir William de Venables. The third was Sir Hugh de Malbank. Later, these families intermarried, and the American Vernons descend from all three.

Six more barons were created by Hugh Lupus, and we [have lines of descent] from most of these. Of course, the area allotted to Earl Lupus represented only about one-fourth of England. Some of our ancestors inherited other areas of Great Britain...

The key person in the matter of our [coats of] arms in [our] family seems to have been a certain Richard de Osbroke of the Shipbrook family. He was one of the several sons of Sir Hugh de Vernon, Baron of Shipbrook and Northwyke (E. Brydges: Collins Peerage, Vol. III, page 396), who married the daughter of Reginald de Baillot, Lord Hargreves and Erdswick, etc. Some state that the Shipbrook Vernon who married into the Baillot family was Sir Warrin...an inscription on the gravestone of a grandson, Thomas de Erdswick, states that his was Hugh .

Richard de Osbroke, son of Hugh de Vernon (or Warin), Baron de Shipbrook and Northwyck, was born about 1121 A.D. A twin brother was Matthew, who received the estates of his mother and became the progenitor of the Hargreves (Hargroves, etc.) family...there were several other brothers in this family, including a Hugh. It seems there was [also] an Uncle Warin of Westley.

...The father of Richard de Osbroke [was probably] Hugh. Now, either Hugh or Warin introduced the first Vernon coat-of-arms. It has to be one of the very first in England. Or in any country. In any case, the Vernon coat-of-arms predates the College of Heraldry by about fifty years. Richard de Osbroke, son of the baron of Shipbrook, married Alicia, daughter of William de Avenel, Lord of Haddon, around 1164. This was apparently his second marriage. He died before his father. The estates of Lord Haddon went to Alicia and her sister Elizabeth, an ancestress of William Shakespeare, who married Simon Basset. During the 1170's, there was a conflict with Simon Basset over the vast estates of Harleston, etc. Richard may have been in prison for "hunting in the King's forests," which really meant that he fell out of favor with the king. Quite a few barons at this time turned against Richard the Lion-Hearted in favor of Phillip Augustus of France, in order to save their Normandy properties. Fortunately, the famous estates of Haddon and Harleston were confirmed in the Vernon family during the years to follow.

We do not know the name of the family of Richard's first wife. We do know that the Shipbrook estates passed to the oldest son, Sir Warrin de Vernon (b abt 1146). He used the arms, "Or" [Latin for gold) background, a fess (wide horizontal band across the middle of an escutcheon), azure (colored blue); or a blue cross-band on a field of antique gold. This same armorial establishment, with variation, is used as armorial bearings for the ancient town of Vernon in Normandy from which the surname of Vernon derives. Actually, the French describe the town's coat-of-arms as "three bunches of blue cress on a field of gold". The motto "Vernon semper viret" means "Vernon always green."

The related Norman-English coat-of-arms of Sir Warin de Vernon (wife Auda, daughter and heiress of Sir William de Malbank, Baron of Nampwich), Baron of Shipbrook...'or, a fess azure...' was probably first displayed by his grandfather, Sir Hugh. It is related to that of the Earls of Chester, and 'three sheaves of wheat' were added by Sir Warin's grandson, Sir Warin, a great English knight who was killed in battle in France, leaving no male heirs. One of his uncles, Sir Ralph de Vernon, Rector of Hanwell (he became a priest) won half of the Shipbrook estates and the title of Baron in court. The other half of the many great estates were assigned to the three daughters of the great knight.

The first to display the arms of the town of Vernon would seem to have been the owner of Vernon and its surrounding lands on both sides of the River Seine some seventeen miles from Paris, at the time armorial bearings became popular and important, although not necessarily official... One report states that a William de Vernon, second son of the first Baron de Shipbrook, became the owner of Vernon after the death of a Matthew de Vernon of Normandy in 1150. Another report is that William, 2nd, died in 1160, and that his son Richard succeeded him as owner of Vernon. However, the Norman-English record concerning the Vernons indicate that the William de Vernon who took over private ownership and interests of the town in 1150, representing the Revier-Vernon family of England, may have been the second son of a contemporary kin, Sir Richard Revier, who gained favor in the realm of King Henry I, and was the King's Marshall during his Normandy wars (1099-1101) with his brother, Duke Robert of Normandy. There is much speculation in this area of research.

In any event, the owner of Vernon from 1150 to 1160 was Sir William de Vernon, father of Sir Hugh, who eventually inherited the baronage from his grandfather, Sir Richard de Reviers-Vernon, the first Baron of Shipbrook...

Ralph de Vernon, Rector of Hanwell, married into the Haslington [line], [and] was located mostly in Cheshire, Bucks, and Staffordshire. He became the sixth Baron of Shipbrook. He had a bastard son, Ralph, born about 1248, and a legitimate daughter, Eustasia. Ralph became the seventh Baron and perhaps the most fantastic of all Vernons. According to all official English records, he lived until 1392, aged 150 years. If this fact bears out, he may well have been the oldest 'liver' in recorded history, until a few years ago when the Russians came up with a man 162 years old.

Sir Ralph married twice and outlived most of his many great-grandchildren. He also added the 'maiden proper' on the crest of the coat-of-arms, holding a scythe in her hand and sheaves of wheat in her arm. In 1403 his grandson by his youngest son, Sir Richard the 8th Baron, was beheaded following the Battle of Shrewsbury (he was the Sir Richard Vernon made famous by Shakespeare in one of his plays), the baronage then fell to Sir Ralph 'the Younger' of Hanwell, a great-grandson of 'The Old Liver's oldest son, Sir Ralph, Jr. He died without male issue and, in 1404, it went to Sir James of Lostock and Haslington, who became the 10th Baron.

In 1427 the Shipbrook estates passed to the Savage family. Dorothy, the great-granddaughter, and sole heiress of the 8th Baron, married Sir John Savage. The 'or, a fess azure', with the maid in crest, remained in the family of the Vernons of Haslington.

Although there have been several minor variations in the coat-of-arms of 'The Old Liver', the essentials remain. The signet ring of this old knight and extremely wealthy baron (he also held many Cracus, Hatton and Grosvenour estates) may have been handed down to the family of Daniel Vernon of Newport, Rhode Island during the 1600's.

The Pennsylvania Historical Society Journal features the arms of 'The Old Liver' for the Quaker Vernon brothers. However, ...research indicates that these brothers may have descended from the Vernons of Whatcroft near Chester in County Chester, or from an uncle of 'The Old Liver' named Nicholas. If so, the coat-of-arms would be 'or, a bend azure'. This is the same field with a blue band from top left to lower right corners of the shield. Nevertheless, the Vernons of Hanbury, also from the Whatcroft line, returned to the 'or, a fess azure', as did the family of Hon. James Vernon, famous Secretary of State to King William prior to the Revolutionary War, and Admiral Edward Vernon (Old Grog), after whom the estate of George Washington was named.

Although hundreds of English Vernon families descend from 'The Old Liver', the principal one was the Haslington line, the last represented by Sir George Vernon (1578-1639), Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in Cheshire. He died without male issue, and his daughter Muriel married Sir Henry Vernon of Sudbury, thus uniting the two most azure, three garbs of wheat, or, with a maid in the crest...and...the argent, a fretty (fret) sable'.

Now for the history of the 'argent, a fretty (fret) sable'. It is described as interwoven black bonds on a field of silver (fretty). The fret appears more like large knotted bands on a field of silver. Like the 'or, a fess azure', it is one of the most ancient of all coats-of-arms, perhaps adopted by Sir Richard de Osbroke (b 1121), fourth son of Sir Hugh.

Richard married twice, evidently was imprisoned, and probably died in 1179. His oldest son, as we have seen, became the Baron de Shipbrook. Around 1164, he married Alice, daughter of William Avenel, Lord Haddon. Lord Haddon had inherited many of the Nottingham estates of the first Duke of Nottingham, William Peveril, natural son of King William the Conqueror. He also descended from Sir Ralph Avenel and Maude, daughter of Sir Richard Revier - Vernon. Many of England's great estates were involved in the marriage of Sir Richard de Osbroke and Alice Avenel. Their oldest, if not their only, son was Sir William de Vernon, Chief Justice of Chester in 1229-36. He adopted the fretty sable, (upper left square in red) for his coat-of-arms. It was the custom in those early days for the oldest son to place a canton in that position in his father's shield. William became Lord Haddon, although his seat may not have been Haddon Hall. He commanded a company of perhaps the first archers (Welsh) to be used in the Norman wars, and was later a traveling judge with County Geoffry Plantagenet in Normandy, representing King Henry II.

Sir William, Chief Justice, protected the estates and interests of his half-brother, Robert de Vernon, whose two sons, Richard and Robert, were banished for taking the wrong sides in the English-Norman wars. He also arranged the marriage of Robert's daughter to his own son, Richard, who became Chief Justice of Chester in 1249. This Richard had been married twice before and had several sons and daughters. He also acquired all the estates of his only brother Walter, who died without male issue. When Richard died, Alice, his wife and uncle's daughter, with whom he had no children, married Gilbert Francois (d 1278).

Alice and Gilbert had a son who took the estates of his mother and the Vernon name. Some sources claim that Alice received the Haddon and Harleston estates due to the banishment of her brothers, and that the Vernons of the 'fretty (fret), sable' descended through her son Richard (Francois). It is possible that the Haddon and Harleston estates were granted by Sir William, Chief Justice, to his half-brother Robert. [There seemed] some litigation between Richard, son of Alice, and Sir Richard (wife Juliana de Vesey), grandson of Sir William, Chief Justice, during the mid-1300's. All were of the fretty (fret) sable.

Suffice it to say, these Vernons remained among the wealthiest and most powerful English families during the 14th and 15th centuries, descending from royalty and from the great barons of Norman England. Sir William, Chief Justice, married second, Margery, daughter and heiress of Sir Robert de Stockport, Baron de Stockport. Following were intermarriages with the famous families of Pembruge, Stockpole, Ludlow, and Talbot (Earl of Shrewsbury). Sir Henry Vernon of Norton, Lord Haddon, etc. (1441-1518), married Ann Tolbot, daughter of the Earl of Shrewsbury. Sir Henry was governor and treasurer for Prince Arthur, oldest son of King Henry VII. The Prince spent much time at Haddon Hall, where rooms were maintained for him.

Their sons were: 1. Sir Richard, Lord of Haddon and Harleston; 2. Thomas of Stocksay; 3. Humphrey (d 1542); and 4. Sir John. Sir Richard's granddaughter and sole heiress, Dorothy Vernon, eloped with Sir John Manners, son of Thomas, first Earl of Rutland. Haddon Hall and 30 other great Vernon manors went to the Dukes of Rutland.

Thomas of Stocksey used the 'fret, sable, a canton gules' (as his coat-of-arms). His grandson, Henry Vernon of Stoke-say Castle claimed Earl of Powys in 1584.

Humphrey (d 1542) was the progenitor of the Vernons of Hodnet. He used the fret sable, with a moline cross at the top point (chief). One of his grandsons, Sir John of Hodnet, had fourteen children. One, Sir Robert, Knight Baron, was 'Coffer-of-the-King' and later 'Controller-of-the-Household' for Queen Elizabeth I. Another, Elizabeth Vernon, was Chief Maid-in-Waiting for the Queen. She married the Earl of Southhampton, President of the Virginia Company of London that settled in Jamestown. Sir John married the heiress of Sudbury and became the progenitor of the Vernons of Sudbury, Hilton, Clontarf Castle in Ireland, etc. His coat-of-arms was the fretty sable, a quarter gules. Of course, argent (silver) is the background or field for all these bearings.

A grandson of Sir John and the heiress of Sudbury was Sir Henry of Hilton, who died in 1592. His daughter, born three months after his death, married Sir Edward of Houndhill, a great-grandson of Sir Humphrey of Hodnet. Their son was the Sir Henry of Sudbury who married Muriel, daughter of Sir George Vernon of Haslington. Their oldest grandson, in turn, Sir George of Sudbury (1635-1702) married Catherine, daughter of Thomas of London (probably of Hanbury). The last mentioned Sir George of Sudbury quartered the arms: 'argent, a fretty sable with or, a fess azure, with three garbs of wheat or'. He also used the crest of 'a boar's head, erased'... 10-12)

Sir George's brother, Sir Henry of Hilton (b 1639) married Margaret daughter of William Ladkins. He simply retained the 'argent, a fret sable, with the boar's head erased in the crest...'" (Excerpted from VFAA Vernon Vignette, Sept 1978, pages 10-12)

The odyssey of the Vernon name through English history encompasses many notable stories. The 1554 Vernon Pretention to the Barony of Powys; the story of Dorothy Vernon, the Heiress of Haddon Hall, and her remarkable father, Sir George, "King of the Peake"; Sir George's father, Sir Henry Vernon, Earl of Shrewsbury and High Steward of Henry VIII's King's Forest of the Peake; Sir Henry's father, Sir Henry, Knight of the Bath and Governor to Crown Prince Arthur, oldest son of Henry VII. And the history of the Vernon peerage flows backward through time -- and forward.

The Right Honorable James Vernon, one of the principal Secretaries of State, contemporary to William III ca 1697. His son, Edward, Admiral in the King's navy, captured Portobello in the West Indies, and commanded the attack on Carthagena, so impressed George Washington's kin with his friendship that Mount Vernon was named for him.

Francis Vernon, Esq. of Suffolk, who was created Baron Orwell of Newry, County Down of Ireland on 7 April, 1762, and then made Earl of Shipbrook by letters patented 28 January, 1777. He d.s.p. and his Earldom became extinct.

Much is written of the Barons Vernon of Shipbrook and Haslington in George Ormerod's History of the County and Palatine and City of Chester. Considerably more is written of the de Reviers de Vernon, the original surname and founding family of Vernon in The Conqueror and His Companions.

But the essence of the family name and honors is found in the Historical Memoirs of the House of Vernon, copies of which are extant at the Cleveland Public Library's history department, Cleveland, Ohio; the Western Reserve Historical & Genealogical Library, also in Cleveland, Ohio; and the family of Dallie A. Vernon, Sr., of Cleveland and Akron, Ohio.

The volume Historical Memoirs of the House of Vernon was brought into the Cleveland Public Library on 7 April, 1926. At this writing, the author does not know the exact date of writing or publication of the work. But within its pages is a comprehensive explanation of the surname, and of the genealogy of the family. From page 19 on, the book's author sets out to authenticate the Vernon family's origins. On pages 45-46:

"...We know, however, that William de Vernon was alive in 1077, and that Hugh de Redvers (the English version of the French Reviers) held sway at Vernon at the close of the Conqueror's reign; the first will there for have died in the interval, which accounts for our not finding his name among those who held lands in England at the time of the general survey. The parentage of Emma, the wife of William de Vernon, is unknown; but there is reason to suppose, from a recital in the confirmation charter of William the Conqueror, and his Queen Mathilda, to the Abbey of Caen, that he had an aunt named Billetheldis, the daughter of Roger:

'Billetheldis filia Rogerii quod pater suus

donaverat ei in Vernun pro conjugio, et ipsa

dedit praedictae ecclesiae, nepote ejuj

annuente Willelmo, de cujus Honore erat,

cui pro concessu suo, ego Regina Mathildis dedi de censu meo.'

The honor of Vernon has been shown to have belonged to a William between the years 1066 and 1080, when this gift must have been made; and thus by identifying the nephew of Billetheldis with the castellan of Vernon, we are enabled to ascend a step higher in the pedigree, and deduce the descent of the latter from Roger, father, it is presumed, of Hugh de Vernon, the monk of St. Wandrille.

The subsequent connexion [sic] of the family of Redvers with the hereditary ownership of the Chatellanie of Vernon, gives additional weight to the traditional statement of Robert du Mont; and if we admit, that when he reports a daughter of Edmund de Centumvillis, Vicompt of Vernon, to be the mother of the 'first' Baldwin de Revers, a more remote ancestor of the head of the family who then bore the surname be intended to be designated, then it may be safely presumed upon his authority that the first William de Vernon, a boy (puerulus) in 1052, was her son by Hugh de Vernon, the monk, and that through her, Richard and Hugh de Redvers and Adelis, the sons and daughter of William de Vernon and Emma, claimed kindred with the Dukes of Normandy, and the Kings of England of the Norman race."

This author makes no claim to a royal Vernon bloodline, leaving such notions to those with such interest as to further research the idea.

"Of the two sons of William de Vernon, Richard, the eldest, appears to have borne the surname of de Redvers only, but Hugh is generally distinguished by the local surname of his father, from which it may be inferred that in the distribution of the paternal inheritance, some of the fiefs which composed the Honor of Vernon had been awarded to him in parage, agreeably to the custom of Normandy, and that he had the custody of the place under his brother. Thus it is as Hugh de Vernon, that his signature is attached to a charter of Duke Robert in favor of the Priory of St. Vigor, near Bayreux, dated in 1089, on the day of the surrender of the castle of Eu..." (Historical Memoirs of the House of Vernon, page 47 [Chapter II])

Robert Vernon son:

THOMAS VERNON (SR.) and MARY

Lieutenant Isaac Vernon's parents were 1F#128 Thomas and 1F#129 Mary Vernon. At this writing, this author has no further information or knowledge of Mary's surname or family. Thomas is the last of his line to be acknowledged a Quaker, according to the information available to this author.

Thomas's parents and two uncles were Quakers who were persecuted by factions of the English civil war following Charles I's reign. They emigrated with William Penn to the American colonies to enjoy freedom of religion.

In his letter dated 23 March, 1987, VFAA founder William A. Vernon maintained that Quaker brother "...Robert's son Thomas...was dismissed from the Quaker Meeting in Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1709".

In his letter dated 28 April, he states that "...Thomas was 'disowned' by the Quaker Meeting at Chester County in 1709/10. The next record of him is found in the Cub Creek settlement as one of its original settlers...in ca. 1737. For many years I had assumed that this Thomas was of Scots-Irish origin, as were most of the original 17 Cub Creek settlers. However, some of the VFAA's older searchers had concluded that he had to be the 'missing' Thomas. I now concur. His children were named, for instance, by the names also given to his 'nephews' by the older sons of Robert and Eleanor...

association between his son Richard, the 'Wagonmaster' and the children of his brothers from Pennsylvania...dates of birth..."

Thomas's father, Robert, according to the History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, "...was a member of the Society of Friends, but did not take such an active part in Meeting affairs...though the Monthly Meetings were sometimes held at his house..." Perhaps father and son did not find the Quaker's passive and somewhat restrictive social approach much to their liking in the untamed colonies.

Thomas was born in 1686, just a few short years after the Quaker family's migration to the colonies. He married Mary, and ca. 1740 found him in Cub Creek, a wilderness settlement in the midst of Virginia, raising a family. Thomas died about 1758, probably at Cub Creek. He and Mary had at least six children, of whom most, if not all, of the males were Indian fighters, and were Revolutionary War veterans:

1 Jonathon Vernon- b 1712, d 1804 in North Carolina, m in 1742 to Rebecca Worth- b 23 April, 1723, dau of Thomas Worth and Mary Faucett;

at least seven children:

Jonathan and Rebecca Worth Vernon Children

1F#128.1.1 Hannah Vernon- b 1743 in Charlotte County, Virginia, m 4 January, 1773 to Richard Taylor;

1F#128.1.2 Ebenezer Vernon- b 1745, d 1812, m in 1810(?) to Nancy Hitchcock; at least seven children: or married first a Miss Adams and second, on 3 March, 1810, in Charlotte County, Virginia. Mrs. Nancy Hitchcock.

1F#128.1.2.1 James Vernon- m in 1797 to Nancy McMichael;

1F#128.1.2.2 Jonathon Vernon; married Mary Cox and went to Jackson County, Ohio.

1F#128.1.2.3 William Vernon- m 1813 to Anna Beadles;

1F#128.1.2.4 Molly Vernon;

1F#128.1.2.5 Rebecca Vernon;

1F#128.1.2.6 Sarah Vernon;

1F#128.1.2.7 Edith "Edy" Vernon.

(Note from Janet: I wonder who James, William Molly, Sarah and Edith are for here is the will of Jonathan Vernon, Sr. is recorded in Stokes County, NC will book 2, pages 62 1/2 and 63. It is dated 18 October 1803, and probated June, 1805. It names his wife, Rebecca, and five children who are as follows:

(1) Hanna Vernon was married 4 January, 1773 in Charlotte County, Virginia, to Richard Taylor.

(2) Ebenezer Vernon married first a Miss Adams and second, on 3 March, 1810, in Charlotte County, Virginia. Mrs. Nancy Hitchcock.

(3) Jonathan Vernon, Jr., married Mary Cox and went to Jackson County, Ohio.

(4) Irene Vernon married Mr. Childres.

(5) Rachel Vernon was born 27 July, 1759 in Lunenburg County, VA and died 28 September 1844 in Stokes Co., NC. She married John Ward on 21 December, 1779, in Surry Co., NC. John Ward was born 25 April 1755, in Culpepper Co., VA and died 15 Sep 1838 in Stokes Co., NC. They were married at the home of her parents and a wedding supper was given afterwards."

Or he may not name all children his will!!!)

1F#128.1.3 Jonathon Vernon Jr- b 1747, d o/a February 1855 in Jackson County, Ohio or Surry County, North Carolina, m in 1791 in Stokes County, North Carolina to Mary Cox, dau of Frederick Cox and Mildred Eustes; at least ten children:

1F#128.1.3.1 John Eustes Vernon- b 9 December, 1802, d 21 March, 1891, m 1.) to Elizabeth Levisay in Charlotte County, m 2.) to Sarah Rabican in Gallia County;

1F#128.1.3.2 Nancy Vernon- m to Mr. Tilley;

1F#128.1.3.3 Sarah Vernon- m to Mr. Poor;

1F#128.1.3.4 Elizabeth Vernon- m 5 May, 1817 to Solomon Brown;

1F#128.1.3.5 William C. Vernon- m 5 June, 1821 to Jane Martin;

1F#128.1.3.6 Mildred "Millie" Vernon- b 11 June, 1805, d 10 October, 1878, m to James Corn or Coon;

1F#128.1.3.7 Susanna Vernon;

1F#128.1.3.9 Mary Vernon- m to Mr. Weare; 1F#128.1.3.10 Alsay Vernon; 1F#128.1.4 Rebecca Vernon- m to Mr. Crain;

1F#128.1.5 Ileen (or Eileen) Vernon- m to Mr. Childres;

1F#128.1.6 (daughter) Vernon- m to John Terry;

1F#128.1.7 Rachel Vernon- b 27 or 29 July, 1759, m 21 December, 1779 in Surry County to John Ward- b 25 April, 1755, d 15 September, 1838, buried in Ward Cemetery, Sandy Ridge, Stokes County, North Carolina, son of Jacob Ward and Anna Hill; at least eleven children:

1F#128.1.7.1 Betsy Ward- b 17 September, 1780;

1F#128.1.7.2 Mary Ward- b 5 August, 1782;

1F#128.1.7.3 William Ward- b 5 February, 1784;

1F#128.1.7.4 Rebecca Ward- b 21 October, 1785;

1F#128.1.7.5 Jacob Ward- b 9 December, 1787;

1F#128.1.7.6 John Ward- b 6 December, 1789;

1F#128.1.7.7 Anna Ward- b 2 September, 1791;

1F#128.1.7.8 Sarah Ward- b 28 August, 1795;

1F#128.1.7.9 Mitchell Ward- b 6 September, 1797;

1F#128.1.7.10 Ebenezer Ward- b 28 September, 1798;

1F#128.1.7.11 Judith "Judy" Ward- b 16 July, 1803;

2 Richard Vernon- 1711, d 1795 in Madison, Virginia, m 1743 to Sarah Tinsley, dau of Edward Tinsley;

at least ten children:

2.1 Mary Vernon- b 1750, m 1771 to William Roebuck;

2.2 Elizabeth "Betsy" Vernon- b 1753, m 1769 to Anthony Deering;

.2.3 Frances "Frankie" Vernon- b 30 May, 1756, d 30 July, 1848, m 1771 to Benjamin Quinn; 2.4 Mildred Vernon- b 1760, m 1791(?) in Rockingham County to Joshua Lindsay, son of Richard Lindsay; six children: 1F#128.2.4.1 Taylor Lindsay of Lebanon, Tennessee; 1F#128.2.4.2 John Lindsay of Rockingham County, North Carolina; one child; 1F#128.2.4.3 Reuben Lindsay- m to Sarah Wall; six children; 1F#128.2.4.4 Joshua Lindsay, Jr.- b 1854; 1F#128.2.4.5 Mildred "Millie" Lindsay- m John A. Patrick; three children; 1F#128.2.4.6 Frances "Fannie" Lindsay- m Hugh Stubblefield; three children;

2.5 Joanna Vernon- b 1762, m 1781 to John Vauter;

2.6 Sarah Vernon- b 1764, m 19 December, 1782 in Stokes County to William Ward, son of Jacob Ward and Ann Hill; seven children: 1F#128.2.6.1 Sarah Ward- m to Thomas Vernon; 1F#128.2.6.2 Elizabeth Ward- m 1806 to Robert Vernon; 1F#128.2.6.3 Rebecca Ward- m 1.) in 1808 to Richard Vernon; m 2.) to Christopher Conner; 1F#128.2.6.4 Peter Ward; 1F#128.2.6.5 William Ward, Jr.; 1F#128.2.6.6 Nancy Ward- m to Ezekiel Calhoun; 1F#128.2.6.7 (daughter) Ward- m to Samuel Scott;

2.7 Susanna or Susan or Sucky Vernon- b 11 October, 1767, d 26 August, 1852 in Henry County, Missouri, m 20 August, 1790 in Rockingham County to Richard Wall; nine children: 1F#128.2.7.1 Sarah Tinsley Wall- b 15 October, 1791, d 1865, m 1.) in 1815 to Reuben Lindsey; m 2.) to William Fewwell; 1F#128.2.7.2 William Mason Wall- m 1.) to Elizabeth Walker; m 2.) to Sarah Fewell; 1F#128.2.7.3 Nancy Wall- b 1795, m to Abner Webster; 1F#128.2.7.4 Elizabeth Deering Wall- b 1796, m to William Fewwell; 1F#128.2.7.5 Malinda Lindsey Wall- b 1799, m 1822 to Mason C. Fewell; 1F#128.2.7.6 Frances P. Wall- b 1801, m to William J. Howerton; 1F#128.2.7.7 Benjamin Franklin Wall- b 1802, m to Susan Wall Fewell; 1F#128.2.7.8 Richard Zachary Robert Wall- b 1810, a medical doctor for Johnson County, m to Mary Covington of North Carolina; ten children; 1F#128.2.7.9 Susan Wall- b 1812, m to Absolom Potts;

2.8 Anthony Vernon- b 28 July, 1770, d 9 May, 1846, m 27 October, 1790 to Frances Quinn, dau of Thomas Quinn; twelve children: 1F#128.2.8.1 Nancy Vernon- b 31 October, 1791; 1F#128.2.8.2 Jane Vernon- b 27 September, 1792, m 5 December, 1812 in Harden, Kentucky to Abraham Enlow; 1F#128.2.8.3 Sarah Tinsley Vernon- b 2 October, 1795, d 12 June, 1876, buried in Williams Cemetery in Tonieville, Kentucky, m 7 September, 1813 to Daniel M. Williams; 1F#128.2.8.4 Richard "Dickey" Vernon- b 18 December, 1797, d 28 October, 1863, buried in City Cemetery, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, m to Frances Bledsoe; 1F#128.2.8.5 Mildred Vernon- b 16 May, 1800, d 1822 in Delaware County, Indiana, m 19 April, 1819 to Charles Ventree; one child; 1F#128.2.8.6 Elizabeth Vernon- b 16 May, 1802, d 31 January, 1860, m 17 April, 1828 to Benjamin Bledsoe; 1F#128.2.8.7 Mary J. "Polly" Vernon, late of Meade County, Kentucky- b 26 December, 1804, d 28 January, 1881, m 14 February, 1822 to John Finley Williams; 1F#128.2.8.8 Thomas Vernon- b 17 July, 1807, m 29 July, 1826 to Ellender (Eleanor?) Swank; 1F#128.2.8.9 Lucinda Vernon- b 2 September, 1809, buried in Williams Cemetery, m 21 September, 1826 to John Kennedy; 1F#128.2.8.10 Susanna Vernon- b 21 December, 1811, d August, 1849, m to Miles G. Patton; three children; 1F#128.2.8.11 Frances Vernon, late of Larue County, Kentucky- b 28 May, 1814, d 24 October, 1844, m 31 July, 1832 to Albert Galatin Goodwin; 1F#128.2.8.12 Luranz Vernon- b 18 October, 1817;

2.9 Tinsley Vernon- b 1772, m to Ann Bargrove Cox, dau of John Coats Cox and Ann Deborah Harper. Four children: 1F#128.2.9.1 John Coats Cox Vernon- b 8 March, 1803, d 6 December, 1833, m 4 February 1826 in Nolensville, Williamson County, Tennessee to Mary Peay. Three children: 1F#128.2.9.2.1 William Tinsley “Tin” Vernon b 14 December 1826 d 2 January 1912 m (1) 7 December 1851 to Martha Lawrence Floyd, (2) 6 February 1879 to Samantha Ann Batte; 1F#128.2.9.2.2 Hibernia E. I. Vernon b 12 May 1830 d 5 december 1864 m 31 January 1849 to John Edward Raney; 1F#128.2.9.2.3 Minerva Frances “Fanny” Vernon b 3 October 1832 d 12 June 1896 m 5 November 1846 to Major William Hickman Hill, Jr.; 1F#128.2.9.2 William Rousseau Cox “WRC” Vernon b 14 January 1805 d 5 March 1859 m 4 September 1836 to Rowena Crane. Six children: 1F#128.2.9.2.1 child Vernon b 1838 d bef 1840, 1F#128.2.9.2.2 child Vernon b 1839 d bef 1840, 1F#128.2.9.2.3 Virginia Vernon b 20 June 1849 d 19 September 1851, 1F#128.2.9.2.4 Sarah Vernon b 10 August 1852 d 2 April 1937 m George Alexander “Alex” Hamilton, 1F#128.2.9.2.5 Annie Vernon b 14 august 1853 d 16 January 1910 m Thomas Reber, 1F#128.2.9.2.6 William Henry Vernon b 13 August 1855 d 1940 m Mary Spurgen Cox; 1F#128.2.9.3 Henry A. M. Bargrove “Babe” Vernon b 1806 d 1866; 1F#128.2.9.4 Richard T. Vernon- b 1 January, 1813, d 11 February, 1819;

2.10 Richard Vernon, Jr.- b 1775, d 1835, m 2 March, 1800 in Madison County, Virginia to Elizabeth Davis; four children: 1F#128.2.10.1 Davis Vernon- m 20 December, 1827 to Nancy Lewis; 1F#128.2.10.2 William Vernon- m 6 March, 1828 to Laverne Mayher; 1F#128.2.10.3 John Vernon- m 9 January, 1832 to Mary Lewis; 1F#128.2.10.4 Elizabeth Vernon- m 25 January, 1832 to Simon Floyd;

3 Thomas Vernon, Jr.- b 1713, m to Sarah Gains or Nancy Harrison; three children:

1F#128.3.1 Richard Vernon- b 1746, d 1838, m 1.) 28 February, 1782 to Esther Hambleton, dau of Alexander Hambleton; four children: 1F#128.3.1.1 Hambleton Vernon; 1F#128.3.1.2 Elizabeth A. Vernon- m to Nathaniel B. Hicks; 1F#128.3.1.3 James Vernon- m to Martha Giles; 1F#128.3.1.4 Thomas Vernon, lieutenant in the War of 1812- m to Nancy Baker; 1F#128.3.2 Thomas Vernon, III- b 23 May, 1752, d 1841, m 18 November, 1784 in Surrey County to Nancy "Nannie" Hicks, dau of Capt. James Robert Hicks and Mary Frances Harrison; five children:

1F#128.3.2.1 Miles Vernon, Colonel of the militia- b 26 March, 1786, d 15 August, 1867, m 1.) in 1803 to Ann Catlett Atchley, m 2.) to Sarah Wyatt Vernon; 1F#128.3.2.2 Elizabeth Vernon- b 1789, m to Thomas Atchley; 1F#128.3.2.3 William Harrison Vernon- b 26 February, 1790, d 1836, m to Mary Vernon; 1F#128.3.2.4 Thomas Vernon, IV- b 26 July, 1793,, m 1 January, 1817 to Letticia Keziah Witten; 1F#128.3.2.5 Robert Hicks Vernon- b 31 October, 1799, d 1 August, 1871, m in Hardemann, Tennessee to Nancy Epps Chism; ten children;

1F#128.3.3 Robert Vernon- b 25 December, 1768, d 3 March, 1851, m in Prince Edward County, Virginia to Elizabeth Humbleton, dau of Alexander Humbleton; five children: 1F#128.3.3.1 Molly Vernon- b 29 January, 1793 in Bledsoe, Tennessee, m to William Harrison Vernon; 1F#128.3.3.2 Robert Vernon, Jr.- b 12 August, 1800, d in Fayetteville, Arkansas, m 8 May, 1822 to Rebecca Hutchinson; 1F#128.3.3.3 Anderson Vernon- b 10 May, 1804, d 5 February, 1837; 1F#128.3.3.4 Sarah Vernon- b 1806, m to I. A. Roberson; 1F#128.3.3.5 William Vernon- b 1809, d 20 May, 1860, m in Bledsoe, Tennessee to Elizabeth Anderson;

4 Isaac Vernon- 1715, d 1787, m 1.) to Elizabeth Austin, 2.) Jane Caldwell. Elizabeth Austin is considered to be the mother of most of Isaac's fifteen children;

5 James Vernon- b 1716, d 1803, m to Ms. Eleanor "Nellie" (?); at least nine children: 1F#128.5.1 James Vernon, Jr.- b 1754, d 1787; 1F#128.5.2 Robert Vernon, a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War- b 1756; three children: 1F#128.5.2.1 John Vernon; 1F#128.5.2.2 David Vernon; 1F#128.5.2.3 George McHugh Vernon- b 1785 in Guilford County, North Carolina, a wheelwright; 1F#128.5.3 Isaac Vernon, a member of the North Carolina militia in the Revolutionary War- b 7 January, 1757, d 1838 in Elbert County, Georgia; five children: 1F#128.5.3.1 Robert Vernon- b 1774, m 1.) Elizabeth Ward, m 2.) Sarah Self Richardson; 1F#128.5.3.2 William Vernon, late of Georgia and points west; 1F#128.5.3.3 Samuel Vernon; 1F#128.5.3.4 James Vernon; 1F#128.5.3.5 Thomas Vernon- d 1840, m to Sarah Ward, dau of William and Sarah Ward. Sarah d 1831. 1F#128.5.4 Richard Vernon, served as a captain in the North Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War- b 18 October, 1758, d 24 July, 1840, m to Catherine Barker, dau of Leonard Barker; at least thirteen children: 1F#128.5.4.1 Pleasant Vernon- b 9 December, 1790 in Pikesville, Bledsoe County, Tennessee, m in 1815 to Mary Price- b 1793; 1F#128.5.4.2 Green Vernon, served in the War of 1812- b 7 October, 1791, d 19 November, 1860; 1F#128.5.4.3 John Dagg Vernon- b 1 December, 1792, m in 1826 to Mary Prey or Paynor or Payor; 1F#128.5.4.4 Samuel Vernon- b 1794, d 1814, died single; 1F#128.5.4.5 James Adam Vernon- b 1796, d 1829, d.s.p. left a Will in Patrick County, Virginia; 1F#128.5.4.6 Thomas Vernon- b 1700, d 1865, m 1.) to Sarah M. Lewis, m 2.) Rhoda Woods; 1F#128.5.4.7 Leonard Vernon- b 1802, d 1870, m to Jenneth Robinson; 1F#128.5.4.8 Eleanor "Nellie" Vernon- b 16 September, 1804, m to James C. Robinson; 1F#128.5.4.9 Nancy Vernon- b 1805, m to Dennis Lark; 1F#128.5.4.10 Obediah Vernon- b 1806, d 1831, m to Ellen Cyrus; 1F#128.5.4.11 Robert Vernon- b 17 May, 1808, d 6 August, 1846, m 1830 to Sarah Robinson; 1F#128.5.4.12 Mary "Polly" Vernon- b 1810, d 1891, remained single; 1F#128.5.4.12 Edith "Edy" Vernon- b 1824, d 1880 in Walnut Ridge, Arkansas, m 1.) George Paynor or Payor, m 2.) to Mr. Colquette; 1F#128.5.5 Nehemiah Vernon, participated in the Battle of New Orleans, War of 1812- b 1767, d 1815 of "camp fever" on his way home at war's cessation, m to Charity Mary King. After Nehemiah's death, on 26 July, 1829, Charity m 2.) Reverend Jonathon Malkay of Moniteau County, Missouri. Nehemiah and Charity had five children: 1F#128.5.5.1 Jeremiah T. Vernon- b 1803, d 1850, m to Elizabeth "Betsy" Rebecca Stark, dau of Judge James Stark and g-dau of General John Stark of the Battle of Bunker Hill; 1F#128.5.5.2 Mary "Polly" King Vernon- b 1806, m to John Marion Nidever; 1F#128.5.5.3 Ebenezer "Nazer" Vernon- b 1808, d o/a 13 October, 1851, left his Will at Miller County, Missouri, m Nancy Suzie Cole; 1F#128.5.5.4 Leah S. Vernon- b 1810, m to Thomas Stark; 1F#128.5.5.5 George Washington Vernon- b 4 August, 1812, m 13 November, 1828 to Rebecca Greenway; 1F#128.5.6 Joseph Vernon - b 1769; 1F#128.5.7 Hannah Vernon- m to John Haslett; at least four children: 1F#128.5.7.1 David C. Haslett; 1F#128.5.7.2 James A. Haslett- m to Elizabeth Rebecca Harper Vernon; 1F#128.5.7.3 Moses Waddell Vernon; 1F#128.5.7.4 Hannah Caroline Vernon- m to James Thomas Ward Vernon; 1F#128.5.8 Sarah Vernon- m to James Tinsley, son of James Tinsley, Sr.; one son: 1F#128.5.8.1 James or John Vernon; 1F#128.5.9 Thomas (?) Vernon- m to Mary;

.6 Rebekah Vernon, of whom nothing is know

MINSHALL FAMILY

Elinor MINSHALL b : 24 SEP 1648 in England, Stoke (Cheshire) 1 Death: 24 JUL 1720 in PA, Chester Co., Nether Providence m’d 20 MAY 1663 in England, Lancaster, Wm. Barnes, Robert VERNON b: 1 JAN 1641/42 in England, Acton, Stoke, Middlewich Cheshire 1 Death: 10 JAN 1708/09 in PA, Chester Co., Nether Providence

Eleanor came with husband, Robert Vernon in Oct. 1682 with the Penn Colony. (C-680) They settled on 350 acres which they named Vernon Run adjoining Thomas Minshall's property. (C-681, 1073) They also lived in the "Minshall House" in Media, Delware Co., PA. (C-1073) Marriage Information: Elinor married Robert VERNON on 20 Apr 1678 in Sankey, Lancashire, Eng. (Robert VERNON was born about 1642 in , , , England and died about 1709 in ?, Nether Province, PA.)

John MINSHALL b: 10 MAY 1617 in England, Chester or 10 MAY 1617 in England, Cheshire, Lathford d: 26 SEP 1683 in England, Grafton, Heath m’d 1644 in England, Cheshire, Lathford Margaret b: in England, Grappenhall, Cheshire

paintergenealogy

http://ancestrees.com/pedigree/3317.htm Elizabeth MINSHALL (AFN:PQ8D-FX) b. 1635

Samuel MINSHALL (AFN:2W91-HK) b. 1645

John MINSHALL (AFN:PBSG-PF) and (AFN:2W91-JQ) b. 1647

Elinor MINSHALL (AFN:1H0F-Q89) and (AFN:2W91-KW) b. 1651

Thomas MINSHALL (AFN:2W91-76) b. 16 Jul 1653, d. 1726

Mary MINSHALL (AFN:PQ8D-DR) and (AFN:2W91-L3) b. 1653

Elizabeth MINSHALL (AFN:2W91-M8) b. 1655

Rebecca MINSHALL (AFN:PBSG-QL) and (AFN:2W91-NF) b. 1657

John MINSHALL Born: 10 May 1617 4 Married: Abt 1638 Died: 12 Sep 1685, Larchford, Cheshire, Eng Buried: 13 Sep 1685, Grafton Heath, Cheshire, Eng

General Notes:

John was listed as a prisoner for 24 hours in Lanchashier,1659, by Besse's "The Suffering of the Quakers," for which he paid 2s. He was fined 14 shillings for not taking the oath of loyalty to the King in 1664.

His will names wife Margaret, sons Samuel (to whom he gave his house), John of Great Sankei and Thomas, and daughters Elinor, (wife of Robert Vernon), Mary (wife of Thomas Barnes) and Elizabeth (wife of Randle Speakman). It was written in 1699 in Mobberley, England. (C-1073)

Marriage Information: John married Margaret UNKNOWN about 1638. (Margaret UNKNOWN was born in 1622 4, died on 11 Feb 1698/99 in Stockport, Cheshire, Eng and was buried on 13 Feb 1698/99 in Mobberley, , Eng.

Children Elinor MINSHALL b: 24 SEP 1648 in England, Stoke (Cheshire) Thomas MINSHALL b: 16 JUL 1652 in England, Great Sankey, Lancashire John MINSHALL b: in England, Great Sankey, Lancashire

Posted by: Joan Cameron

Message: Onda, I have JOHN MINSHALL born 10 May 1617 at Lathford, Cheshire, Eng. Wife's name is MARGARET. Also have names and some dates on his 7 children. Would be glad to exchange info with you.

paintergenealogy

Thomas Minshall I (165? - 1730) of Lathford, Cheshire, England, received a grant of 625 acres from William Penn on March 22, 1681. He arrived in Pennsylvania in August of 1682 with his wife, Margaret Hickock.

Jacob Minshall I (1635 - 1734) was born to Thomas I and Margaret in their first house in Nether Providence. He married Sarah Owen in 1707 and the same year was given 500 acres of his father's land in Middletown. Circa 1710, he built the first stone house on the property, known as Round Top. In this house, Thomas I and Margaret lived out the remaining years of their lives. [note by MB: Jacob could not have been born in the house in Nether Providence if he was born in 1635}

Thomas Minshall II (1708 - 1783) was the son of Jacob I and Sarah. He inherited 150 acres from his father, including 80 acres of the original land grant and 70 acres bought from John Cheyney. In 1734, Thomas II bought another 50 acres, now known as South Farm, from Peter Trego. Thomas II married Agness Salkeld in 1738, and either built the western end of Lachford Hall or added to an original house built by John Cheyney. In the 1760s, he added the eastern end of Lachford Hall, and began the construction of the Valley Cottage. Before he died, he also began construction of the South Farm

Minshall

The Minshall Lineage

[Miscellaneous Notes for Minshall: The World Wide Family Tree lists a Joan/Janet/Munshall/Minshell born in 1340 in Church Munshull, Cheshire, England. Her father was Henry De Munshulll, born in England, abt. 1320. Her mother was Tibota De Fulford. Joan married an Edward Dutton, of Dutton, Cheshire, England.]

John Minshal, b 10 May 1617, Lathford, Cheshire, England, d 26 Sep 1683, Grafton, Heath, England, married, ca 1644, Lathford, Cheshire, England, Margaret ?? They had at least two children:

1) Elinor Minshall, b 24 Sep 1648, Stoke, Cheshire, England, died 24 Jul 1720 Nether Providence, Chester County, PA, married, 20 May 1663, Herdshaw, Lancaster, England, Robert Vernon

2) John Minshall, b 1639, Great Sankey, Lancashire, England, d 12 Sep 1723, Whitley, Cheshire, England, married ca 1662, probably Appleton, Cheshire, England, Rachel ?? John and Rachel had a daughter: Rachel Minshall, b 1689, Appleton, Cheshire, England, married Samuel Littler

Sources:

1 Jon L. Wolf to Linda Coate Dudick Letter dated 3 Feb. 1996 at e-mail address: TLDK63A@prodigy.com In possession of Dudick (C-680).

2 Charlotte Burton to Linda Coate Dudick E-mail letter and phone conversation dated April 11, 1997 at 327 Elizabeth Ave., Findlay, OH 45840-3922 In L.Dudick files (C-1072).

3 Booker, Onda Minshall Minshall Ancestry In L.Dudick files (C-1073).

4 Jean Ebenhack to L.Dudick E-mail letter dated Oct. 9, 1997 at VllyHi@aol.com (C-1336).

Email me

Janet at monkey1946@centurylink.net

"