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John/Jones Family

William Awbrey born Abt 1583 in Llanelieu, Breconshire, Wales died 1631. Sir William wife was Elizabeth Johnes/Jones "Sir William had three sons: Henry, John, and Thomas that came to America. They settled in Westmoreland and Rappahannock Counties, Virginia. Richard was Sir Henry Awbrey grandson.

Elizabeth Johnes/Jones who married Sir William Awbrey was descended on both sides from the Berkeley family. This family descends many different ways from Charlemagne, as well as the majority of the early Norman kings of England. This line would apply to you as you are a descendant of John Awbrey Sr., a son of Sir William Awbrey and Elizabeth Johnes/Jones. This line would not apply to the other Awbrey branches, such as the group that immigrated to Pennsylvania, or the branch that continued to reside in England as Baronets of Llantrithydd. The Virginia Awbreys are the only ones descended from Elizabeth Johnes/Jones.

Many Aubrey/Awbrey family reseacher thank that Sir William Awbrey born Abt 1583 in Llanelieu, Breconshire, Wales died 1631. Sir William wife was Elizabeth Johns. Some researcher thing that Elizabeth Johnes' father as David Johnes and Mother: Agnes Morton But this been proven wrong.

I know this Elizabeth Johnes/Jones Awbrey father.

Sir Thomas Jones of Abermarlais, Kt. Sheriff of Carmarthenshire married Jane Puleston.

Children

Henry Jones b: Abt 1582 in Wales

Thomas Jones

Rowland Jones b: Abt 1570 in Abermarlais, Carmathen, Wales

Herbert Jones b: in Of Llanover, Rector Of Llangatwg, Crughywel

Elizabeth Jones b: Abt 1589 in Abermarlis, Wales

Mary Jones b: twin to Elizabeth

Agnes Jones b: 1581 in Llansadwrn, Caerfyrddin, Cymru, Wales, Note:Follow this line to this time from you see that this line goes to Princes Diana and her sons Prince William and Prince Harry

Here is the prove that Elizabeth Awbrey is the daughter of Thomas Jones/Johnes of Abermarlais.

See Griffith's *Pedigrees of Anglesey and Caernarvonshire Families*, p. 275, for a list of their seven other children

Fact Thomas Johnes mention that he had daughter Ann, Son Harberte and his To uncle Sir John Harberte a horse.

Could the reason for Harbert be Herbert name for his mother Elizabeth Herbert family?

The Will of Sir Thomas Johnes, Knight of Carmarthenshire, Wales UK

Sir Thomas Johnes, Kt., of Aberrnarlais, Carmarthen-shire, Wales, an abstract of whose will is given, appears to have belonged to a very ancient Welsh family, one branch of which was seated at Dolau Cothy, Wales, an extended pedigree of which appears in Thomas Nicholas’ Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales.

P.C.C., 54 Harte.7th March, 1603/4.

Sir Thomas Johnes of Abermarles. Carmarthen, Kt.

To second son Thomas Johnes certain messuages, lands, etc.

To son Rowland Johnes an annuity of £20.

To son Richard Johnes an annuity of £20.

To son Harberte Johnes an annuity of £20.

To daughter Anna Johnes £500.

To servant Thos. Gwin a tenement.

To John Johnes a base son of my father Sir Hy. (Henry) Johnes, Kt., an annuity of £6 13s. 4d.

To servant David Morgan Rees certain messuages, he paying rent therefor.

To servant Lewes John ap Owen certain messuages, he paying rent, etc.

To servant James Willyams a house. etc., he paying rent, etc.

Residue to son and heir Sir Hy. Johnes, Kt., except join-ture to wife, Dame Jane. Said Sir Hy. to be executor. Uncle Sir John Harberte, Kt., and cousin Rowland Gwyn, and Charles Vaughan, Esquires, to be overseers.

Witnesses: Reddz Walter, vicar of Llansadorne, Richd. Johnen, clerk, Howell Thomas, Lewes John Bowen, Rhes Thomas Dd. Poll (Dd Poll, David Powell), and John Thomas, writer.

Wife Jane to have three horses, household stuff and cat-tle, etc.

To uncle Sir John Harberte a horse.

To servant Thomas Gwine an annuity of £3 for a certain No. of years.

To Rees Thomas Dd Powell £3.

To servant John ap Ievan 40/-.

To servant Owen Gwin Dd ap Rees 40/-.

To servant Owen Gwin John 40/-.

Witness, Richard Johnes.

Schedule of debts. Proved 18th May. 1604. by said executor.

This will can found on Johns Family Research Group. One the family send Sir Thomas Johnes, Knight of Carmarthenshire, Wales UK"s will from their site. To find more click. This wonderful site.

Johns Family Research Group

Sir Thomas Johnes of "Abermarles" will matches up pretty well with Dwyn's data except that it omits the oldest son Henry, and also the two daughters Elizabeth and Mary. The other five children are correct.

ANNALS AND ANTIQUITIES of THE COUNTIES and COUNTY FAMILES OF WALES” by Thomas Nicholas

Under Gwynn family

“Rowland Gwynn or Gwyne Esq. Of Glanbran, who m Gwellian, dau of Howel ap Sion ap Howel of Cwrn-dan-ddwr, widow of Thomas Lewis Esq of Harpton. Their son, Rhydderch Gwynne, Esq., of Glanbran m Mary, dau of Sir Thomas Johns, Kt of Alemarlesm Carm d 1613. Their eldest so Rowland. The next owner

Howel, the second son , whose wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Herbert Johns or Jones clerk B.D. second son of Thomas Johns or Jones Kt of Abermarles. Their eldest son Rowland remained at Glanbran and their third son, Rhynioyre or Roderick of Llanfair Cilgydin, Mon m Mary, dau and heiress of Samuel Prichard of Brynioyre.”

Rev. J. Jones-Davies, R.D. in Abercunrig p. 13 says that Sir William Awbrey married Elizabeth, daughter to Sir Thomas Johnes of Abermarlais. There is only one Thomas Johnes (or Johns/Jones) of Abermarlais at this time that I am aware of. Hugh Thomas' Essay Towards the History of Brecknockshire on page 51 recites essentially the same data but he spells the name Jones instead of Johnes. George Clark in the Genealogies of Glamorgan includes the same data on page 341 but spells the name Johnes, It is the same family. Abermarlais did not have by coincidence a Thomas Jones and another Thomas Johnes and another Thomas Johns each with a daughter named Elizabeth who married William Awbrey. Obviously this is a spelling variation.

That by others and the soundex that when the people from Wales spoke their surname to English speaking person, the name Jones can and does sound like Johnes. There for I and others have into Elizabeth Johnes father as being Thomas Jones.

Colby Morgan, Jr. found this family in:

"See Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales, Vol. I, p. 269 by Thomas Nicholas, F.G.S. (showing the marriage to Jane Puleston, dau.. of Rowland Puleston); George T. Clark, F.A.S., Limbus Patrum Morganiae et Glamorganiae (Familes of Glamorgan) p. 341 (showing Elizabeth was their daughter who married William Awbrey; Lewis Dwnn, Deputy Herald, Heraldic Visitations of Wales and Part of the Marches Between the Years 1586 and 1613, Vol. I pp. 189, 333, Vol II pp. 58, 151 (showing Thos. marriage to Jane Puleston and their parentage of Elizabeth Johnes)." "Rev. J. Jones-Davies work Abercynrig which also cites Thomas Johnes of Abermarlais as the father of Elizabeth who married William Awbrey.

" Sir William Awbrey's will, According to George Clark's Families of Glamorgan p. 341 the will was proved at Brecon in 1631. Anthony Gwyn of Llansannor is one of his allies-men and Refering again to Clark, he shows that Sir William indeed married Elizabeth /o Thomas Johnes by Jane Puleston and even describes her father Thomas Johnes' coat of arms. The following children are listed (I am not sure whether they are all named in the will): 1. Edward 2. Reginald, slain at Edgehill 3. John 4. Thomas 5. Harry 6. John 7. Catherine 8. Jane 9. Elinor. another ref. that shows Edward and the first John died young. I see no reference to a Richard. The surviving sons appear to be Henry (Harry), John and Thomas, all of whom show up later in Virginia. Jeffries bought Abercynrig, and as you can see from my previous email, John Awbrey had some connection to the Jeffries family (Va. Mag. Hist).

Clark shows Sir Thomas Johnes' wife as Jane Puleston (sometimes her family name has different spellings too.) That leads us to Thomas Nicholas' pedigrees in The Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales which shows the spelling for this family as Johnes of Abermarlais. On pp. 268-269 he shows Sir Thomas Johnes married Mary Berkeley (sometimes spelled Barkley or Berkley). They had Sir Henry who married Elizabeth Herbert (sometimes spelled Harbert), and they had Sir Thomas Johnes, Kt., of Abermarlais, who married Jane daughter and heiress to Rowland Puleston. The name is spelled Johnes in the lineage on p. 291 and again in the Puleston lineage on p. 455. The Annals do not recite all of the children Sir Thomas Johnes and Jane Puleston, but it does refer to son Henry (269, 291) and daughter Mary (455). That becomes more important as we look to Lewys Dwnn's Heraldic Visitations of Wales as editied by Samuel Meyrick. Remember this is the work of a Deputy Herald and was supposed to be reliable, almost like a census."

"The Museum of Brecknock. In Extracts from Hugh Thomas Essay Towards the History of Brecknockshire 1698, he says on page Fifty-one:"

"Sir William Awbrey Knt. of Aberkunrig and Tredomen married Elizabeth the Daughter of Sir Thomas Jones, of Abermarlais Knight he was the last owner of Aberkunrig of this family for he sold it Jno. Jeffreys a mercer of Brecon about the latter End of the Reign of King James the first. He had one son called Edward as extravagant and dissolute as himself, who sold Tredomen and died without male issue."

The Visitations of Wales, Vol I, p. 189 shows in Welsh the pedigree of "Syr Thomas Johns" (notice the third spelling variation):

Syr Tomas Johns = Mari Barkley

Syr Harry Johns = Elsbeth v Mathe ap Syr Giorg Harbert

Syr Tomas Johns, Kt. = Jan v Rolant Pilston

Even the old Welsh spelling sounds like the same family noted in the references above. But most importantly Dwnn then shows the eight children of Sir Thomas Johns and Jane Puleston (again using Welsh spelling):

1.Syr Hari Johns, Kt [oldest son] = Elsbeth v Richart Harbert;

2. Tomas Johns = Jan v David Morgan Rys;

3. Rolant = Dorati v John Powel;

4. Richart; 6. Elsbeth = Syr Wiliam Awbre; 8. Ann = Giorg Mortmer.

According to your email, Griffith's Pedigrees of Anglesey etc counts eight children. I have not seen that book, but you can see that Dwyn accounts for all eight! However, I should add that the Puleston pedigree in the Visitations, Vol II, p, 151 includes the first seven children of "Jane Pilsdon and Sr Thos. Jones" (Jones spelling again) but omits Ann. It also shows that Elsbeth (Elizabeth) married "Sr Wm Awdry" (yet another spelling variation).

The Puleston family has many other families of Wales link to them to find all the documents on Puleston and their many families go to Jane Puleston.

Type in Puleston and Jane is the first Janes listed

Janet Ariciu Family Bush

“Sir William Awbrey. Her name was Elizabeth Johnes and she lived c. 1590-1640. Need to know whether she was a Johnes of Abermarlais, Wales.

The following appears in the Llyfr Baglan (pp.131-132)written by John Williams in 1607:

Jestin ap Gwrgan, King of Glamorgan

Gwenllian md. Drymbenog, Lord of Cantreselif

Mareiddig Warwyn md. Elinor, daughter of "the Lord Rhys"

Llewellyn md. Joan verch Kynevillyn ap Rhys Gouch

Sicilt, Lord of Cantreselif md. Llyky verch Madock

Howell md. Gwenllian verch Meredith ap Cradock

Evan md. daughter of Evan ap Rhys Greig

Roger Vaughan md. daughter of Sir Ralph Baskerville

Walter Says md. daughter of Sir Walter Bedwarden

Roger Hen md. Anne daughter of Sir Walter Devereaux

Sir Roger Vaughan md. Gladys verch Sir David Gam

Sir Roger Vaughan of Tretower md. Eva Vaughan of Tyleglace

Sir Thomas Vaughan of Tretower

Henry Vaughan md. Agnes da. of Sir Christopher Throckmorton

Christopher Vaughan of Tretower md. daughter of John Morgan

from Abercynrig by J.Jones Davies, p. 12:

Christopher Vaughan of Tretower had issue a daughter who married William Havard of Tredomen. They had issue:

Joan Havard md. Sir Edward Awbrey

Sir William Awbrey of Tredomen md. Elizabeth Johns.

Children

Sons:

Edward, John who died young, Reginald, Henry, John and Thomas

daughters:

Elinor who married Gregory Parry, Catherine, and Jane

They had issue John and Henry Awbrey who settled in Essex and Westmoreland counties Virginia, c. 1664. John Awbrey/Aubrey this my mother"s side of Aubrey family. Henry Aubrey/Awbrey is my dad's side of the Aubrey family

Note: I, Janet, have prove both Aubrey sons and have add them DAMES of the 17th Century. I have got some of Coat of Arms for them.

I thought that some of you might find this interesting. Since it is almost impossible to verify any of the Awbrey / Aubrey's great early lines, I offer a documented later line.

Edward I King of England m. Margaret, Princess of France

Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk m. Alice Halys

Lady Margaret Plantagenet m. John, Lord Segrave

Elizabeth Segrave m. John, Lord Mowbray

Thomas de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk m. Elizabeth Fitz-Alan

Isabel de Mowbray m. James, Lord Berkeley

Maurice de Berkeley, (3rd Lord by right)m. Isabel Mead

Hon. Sir James Berkeley m. Susan (var.) Vdall

Mary Berkeley m. Sir Thomas Johns of Abermarlais

Sir Henry Johns of Abermarlais m. Elizabeth Herbert

Sir Thomas Johns of Abermarlais.

Elizabeth Johns m. Sir William Awbrey of Abercynrig

They had issue John Awbrey, Henry Awbrey, with Sir William Awbrey grandson Richard Awbrey, who settled in Old Rappahanock,Westmoreland, and Essex counties, Virginia circa 1664. Their other son Thomas Awbery came too.

All information relevant to the Brotherton/Plantagenet line comes from Burke's Extinct Peerages, p. 433.; Mowbray- ibid. p. 387; Berkeley- ibid. pp. 44-45 Johns- Burke's Landed Gentry, vol. I, pp. 417-418; Awbrey/Johns- J. Jones-Davies, Abercynrig p.13;

Henry Johnes was the son of Thomas Johnes and Mary Berkeley

Not only does Burke indicate this, but the Llyfr Baglan states that Henry Johnes was the son of Mary Berkeley. Since the Llyfr Baglan was completed in 1607, and Henry Johnes was a relative contemporary of this work, it is rather certain that John Williams, the author of the Llyfr Baglan, would have had firsthand knowledge of that family, and therefore would not have made such a mistake.

According to the Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales by Thomas Nicholas, F.G.S., page 291, the first Sir Thomas Johnes of Abermarlais was married to 1) Elizabeth, dau. and co-h. of Sir Edward Dwnn before he married 2) Mary Berkeley. Thomas' eldest son is shown as Sir Henry Johnes. However, it is not clear from this lineage whether Henry's mother was Elizabeth or Mary. Can we safely rely on your reference to Burke that Mary was the mother of Henry? Do you know whether Elizabeth died w/o issue or at least w/o sons?

Jones-Davies, in which he explicitly names Elizabeth's father as Sir Thomas Johnes of Abermarlais Henry Awbrey is specifically mentioned as the son of Sir William Awbrey and Elizabeth Jones Awbrey of Tredomen”

Quote Richard B. Anderson, Jr., Danville, Virginia USA

I would like to thank Peter Western for let link to wonder webpage and use some of information on my webpage.

Here is link to his site called MAXIMILIAN GENEALOGY

MAXIMILIAN GENEALOGY

Now for family that links to Aubrey , Jones family

Elizabeth Johnes/Jones family

Thomas Johnes/JONES Sir Knt married Jane PULESTON. Her father was Rowland PULESTON Her mother was Annes ferch Rowland Griffith. See Bartrum's *Welsh Genealogies AD 1400-1500*, table "Marchudd 6 (B2)" for her ancestry Sir Thomas Johnes of Abermarlais, Kt. Sheriff of Carmarthenshire married Jane Puleston They have a daughter name Ann. See Griffith's *Pedigrees of Anglesey and Caernarvonshire Families*, p. 275, for a list of their seven other children.

Thomas father was

Harry Johnes/JONES Sir Knt married Elizabeth HERBERT.

Sir Henry Johnes of Abermarlais, Kt., Sheriff of Carmarthenshire married Elizabeth Herbert . Elizabeth father was Matthew HERBERT.Elizabeth's mother was Mary Gamage. See Bartrum, op. cit., table "Godwin 8

(A2)" for Elizabeth's ancestry Matthew HERBERT father was George HERBERT Sir Knt, who married Elizabeth BERKELEY.

Henry father was

Thomas Johnes/JONES Sir Knt married Mary BERKELEY. Sir Thomas Johnes of Abermarlais, Kt., Sheriff of Carmarthenshire and Cardigan married 1st Elizabeth Dwnn (s.p.) and 2nd, as her second husband Mary Berkeley. Sir Thomas Jones was Mary Berkeley's second husband. Her first husband was Thomas Perrot, by whom she was mother of Sir John Perrot, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Mary Berekley father: Sir James Berkeley and mother: Susan Fitz Alan .

Go the Berkley family here

Berkeley Family

Sir Thomas Jones Knt father unknown as far as MAXIMILIAN GENEALOGY knows but I have now a book on this family. but this book

“BURKE’S Genealogical and Heraldic History of the LANDED GENTRY founded 1836 by John Burke and Dir Bernard Burke, C. B. LL.D (Ulster King Arms 1853-1892)” Edited by Peter Towend. 18th Edition Published by Burke’s Peerage Limited in London in MCMLXV

Page 417

LLOYD-JOHNES OF DOLAUCOTHY

Sir Thomas Johnes, Kt of Abermarlais, Carmarthanshire and Haroldston, Pembrokeshire, 1st Knight of the Shire for Pembrokeshire and Sheriff of Carmartenshire (1541) and Cardiganshire (1544) m’d Mary, widow of Sir Thomas Perrott, Kt, Haroldston and dau and heir of Hon Sir James Berkeley, 2nd son of 3rd Lord Berkeley. ( Maurice De Berkeley)

Children

1*** Henry m’d Elizabeth, dau of Matthew Herbert of Swansea, Giam and Mary Gamage b: in Coity, Pen-y-Bont Ar Ogwr, Morgannwg, Cymru ancestor of the Johnes of Abermarlais , now extinct.

2 Richard of Cwmgwill, Carmarthanshire

3 Samuel

4 James Johns, of Llanbadarnfawr, Radnorshire, Sheriff of Cardiganshire, 1586 m’d Anne, Widow of James Lewis, of Llanbadarnfawr and dau and Her of John Thomas of Cryngae and Dolaucothy, Carmarthenshire

Sir Thomas Johnes father was John ap Thomas, of Abermarlais , Carmarthenshire m’d Elizabeth, dau of Thomas Vaughan, Bredwardine. Sir Thomas's father was John ap Thomas, and his mother was Elsbeth ferch Thomas ap Vaughan. See Bartrum, op. cit., table "Einion ap Llywarch 7 (A5)" for the ancestry of Sir Thomas Jones of Abermarlais.

Elsbeth ferch Thomas ap Vaughan Father: Thomas (Vychan) Vaughan b: Abt 1440 in Of Brodorddyn (Brodwarding)and Mother: Elinor Whitney b: Abt 1442 in Whitney, Herefordshire, England

John ap Thomas Father: Thomas Ap Gruffudd b: Abt 1425 in Maenordeilo, Cantref Mawr, Carmarthenshire, Wales and Mother: Elizabeth ferch Sir John Gruffudd b: Abt 1430 in Burgundy, France, dau Sir John Griffith, of Llansadwrn and Abermarlais, Carmarthenshire, and was k. in a duel (bur. On Bardsey Island, Carmarthenshire.(below) Elizabeth daughter of John Griffith b: in of Llansadwin and Abermartais, John wife Catherine Tyrwhit b: 1400 in Kettleby, Lincolnshire, England. Elizabeth is granddaughter of Thomas Griffith b: Abt 1365 in Winchnor, Staffordshire, England Thomas wife Ann Blount b: Abt 1365 in Elvaston, Devonshire, England

Children

1 Morgan ap Thomas,a Yorkiat supported, d.s.p 3 Jenkins ap Thomas

4 Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K.G. (1506) Kt. Banneret (1497) ,fought at Bosworth 1485 b 1451 m 1stly Eva, dau and heir of Henry ap Gwlliam and 2ndly, Joan (d 5 Feb 1535) widow of Thomas Stradling of St Donat’s Glam and dau of Thomas Mathew of Rhadyr, Glam.

5 John of whom presently (This is John ap Thomas)

Thomas ap Gruffudd Father: Gruffudd Ap Nicholas b: Abt 1393 in Llandeilo Fawr, Maernordeilo, Carmarthenshire, Wales and Mother: Mabel ferch Maredudd Dwnn

Note:

GRUFFUDD ap NICOLAS (fl. 1425-1456), an esquire and a leading figure in the local administration of the principality of South Wales in the middle of the 15th cent. Nothing is known of his early years, but it is said that he was the posthumous son of Nicolas ap Phylip ap Syr Elidir Ddu (one of the knights of the Sepulchre) by his wife Jennet, daughter of Gruffydd ap Llewelyn Foethus.

Gruffudd Ap Nicolas (fl 1425-56), an esquire and a leading figure in the local administration of the principality of South Wales in the middle of the 15th cent. Nothing is known of his early years, but it is said that he was the posthumous son of Nicolas Ap Phylip Ap Syr Elidir Ddu (one of the knights of the Sepulchre) by his wife Jennett, daughter of Gruffydd Ap Llewelyn Foethus. The first authentic record of him is as holder of the office of king's approver for the lordship and new town of Dynevor in 1425. He was sheriff of Carmarthenshire in 1436. With Edmund Beaufort, parts of the lands of Phillip Clement were demised to him in 1437.

He was a power to be feared in West Wales in 1438, according to the evidence of Margaret Malefant in a petition to Parliament. He was farmer of the lordship of Dynevor in 1439, and his son John shared the office with him.

In that same year we find his son Thomas escheator for Cardiganshire. In 1442-3, he again came to the notice of the authorities in London, when he and the abbot of Whitland were summoned to the metorpolis and the Privy Council ordered the arrest of his son Owen. Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, was his patron, and he received, 24 July 1443, the custody of the lordship of Caron and the commote of Pennarth during the minority of Maud, heiress of William Clement. He held session on behalf of duke Humphrey in the counties of Carmarthen and Cardigan. When the English inhabitants of North Wales towns petitioned Parliament in 1444, against the denization of more Welshmen, he and William Bulkeley were excepted by name. He was placed on a commission to enquire into the felonies committed by David Ap Meredith in Aberystwyth 2 July 1445. The fall of his patron in 1447 brought him into trouble, and he was imprisoned with other members of duke Humphrey's retinue. He was soon released and managed to retain the confidence of the court, continuing to act for the Justice of South Wales and, occasionally, for the chamberlain. John Delabere, bishop of S Davids, 1447-c. 1460, committed his bishopric to his care, and the duke of York obtained licence, 13 May 1449, to grant him and the bishop the castle, manor, and town of Narberth. He and his son Thomas were placed on a commission for the defence of the ports of south-west Wales, to muster forces, and erect beacons, 7 Oct 1450. About this time, when he was at the zenith of his power, the Carmarthen eisteddfod was held. The date and details are uncertain - reports vary between 1451 and 1453. Some maintain that it lasted three months at his cost at Dynevor and others state that it lasted a fortnight and that it was held at Carmarthen.

It is agreed that Gruffudd Ap Nicolas was judge over the poets, and that the chair was awarded to Dafydd ab Edmwnd. It is pretty certain also that the eisteddfod revised the bardic metres and regulated the bardic fraternity. In 1454-5, the castle of Carregcennen was repaired and garrisoned upon his command. On the verge of the Wars of the Roses, he was on good terms with the court of Henry VI, and after the Yorkist victory at S Albans, 1455, he lost some of his offices. Yet, he appears to have taken offence at the coming of Edmund, earl of Richmond, to Pembroke, in 1456 if he was the 'Gruffith Suoh' who, with the earl of Richmond, was reported, 7 June 1456, by John Bocking, in a letter to John Paston, to be at war greatly in Wales. However, he and his sons, Thomas and Owen, were granted general pardons on 26 Oct 1456. His name then disappears from the records. Had he been alive on 1 March 1459 it is difficult to imagine that his name would have been left out of a commission entrusted to his two sons, Thomas and Owen, with Jasper and Owen Tudor. It is, therefore, impossible to accept the reports that he was mortally wounded either at the battle of Wakefield, 1460, or at Mortimer's Cross, 1461. His praises were sung by Dafydd ab Edmwnd, Hywel Ap Dafydd Ap Ieuan Ap Rhys, Rhys Llwyd Ap Rhys Ap Rhicert, Gwilym Ap Ieuan He, and Lewis Glyn Cothi. It is probable that the englynion attributed to him and Owen Dwnn and Griffith Benrhaw had their origin in the humour of bardic festivities. It is said that he was thrice m: (1) to Mabel, daughter of Meredith Ap Henry Dwnn, (2) to a daughter of Sir Thomas Perrot, and (3) to Jane, daughter of Jenkin Ap Rhys Ap Dafydd of Gilfach-wen. Three of his sons have been named, John who disappears early from the records, Owen, heir of Bryn y Beirdd, and Lewis Glyn Cothi's companion in hiding, and Thomas, who was slain in a skirmish at Pennal, probably during lord Herbert's expedition into North Wles in 1468. He was the father of Sir Rhys Ap Thomas (1449-1525). [Dictionary of Welsh Biography p313]

GRUFFUDD's last known act was to make over to his son OWAIN the castle and lordship of Narberth in February 1460/1, and he is likely to have died soon afterwards (Griffiths,«i» Sir Rhys «/i»p.24). GRUFFUDD'S wife, MABLI DWNN, will be taken up later with her own important family.

Sir Gruffydd ab Niclas, of Dinefawr, called the " Eagle of Caermarthen," who played a conspicuous part in the annals of the country and in the Wars of the Boses, was the most unflinching and staunchest supporter of the House of York. In more peaceful times he was a great patron of the bards, and was president of a grand eisteddfod held at Caermarthen. His vast resources and political influence, through blood relationship with the chief Houses in South Wales, enabled him to bring an army into the field which made him appear more like a Sovereign than a subject. He married thrice :- 1st, Mabli, eldest daughter of Meredydd ab Harri Dwnn of Cydweli and Cwrt Pibwr, after whose death he married, 2ndly, Marged, third dau. of Sir Thomas Perrot, of Haroldston (Tref Harallt), in the county of Pembroke by his wife Alis (Alice) Picton, of Cemmaes, descended from one of the original Knights of the Garter, temp. Edward III. viz., Sir Guy de Bryan, of Llacharn (Laugharne), K.G., Lord Admiral of the fleet sent against the French, and who is buried in the Abbey Church of Tewkesbury, where also rest the remains of his wife, Lady Elsbeth (Elisabeth) de Montacute, dr. of the Earl of Salisbury. Alis (Alice) Picton was paternally descended from a younger brother, Phylip, of Sir William Picton, of Picton Castle, Knt.); and, thirdly, Jane, daughter and coheiress to Siencyn ab Rhys, of Gilfach Wen, co. Cardigan, descended from Cadifor ab Dinawol, Lord of Castell Hywel. Gruffydd ab Niclas, although a follower and staunch adherent of Edward, Earl of March, as he had been of his father the Duke of York, was nevertheless highly complimented in an ode by the bard Lewys Glyn Cothi (vide his work). He was at last slain at the battle of Wakefield on the side of York, leaving a numerous issue by his three wives, the eldest of whom was [Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi]

Sources:

Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Einion ap Llywarch 7, p.330; Llywelyn ap Gwrgan 2, p.616. Cydifor ap Dinawel 3, p.166

Title: Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi Author: John Rowland Publication: Carmarthen, William Spurrel, 1877

Gruffudd ap Nicholas Father: Nicholas Ap Philip b: Abt 1325 in Dynevor, Carmarthenshire, Wales Mother: Jennet Verch Gruffydd b: Abt 1325 in of Llangathen, Cetheiniog, Camarthenshire, Wales, dau of heir of Gruffudd ap Liewellyn Foethus

Note: Nothing is known of his (Gruffudd Ap Nicolas) early years, but it is said that he was the posthumous son of Nicolas Ap Phylip Ap Syr Eidir Ddu (one of the knights of the Sephulchre). [Dictionary of Welsh Biography p 313]

NICHOLAS ap PHILIP married a near-neighbor JONET f. GRUFFUDD ap LLYWELYN FOETHUS «i»(the Luxurious),«/i» who will be taken up in the line of JOHN ap REES. Little is known of NICHOLAS, and he may have died before he attained an office that would appear in state records, but his brother Gwilym ap PHILIP was important enough for his knowledge of the lordship of Llandovery to be sought in 1391 when its descent was investigated at Carmarthen following the death of the title holder, and he was receiver of the lordship of Kidwelly until 1401 (Griffiths, «i»Sir Rhys«/i», p.10). Gwilym married Gwladus, the daughter of HENRY DWNN, and he became a prominent supporter of Glyn Dwr's revolt and fought alongside his father-in-law for at least the years 1401-03 (R.R.Davies, «i»Glyn Dwr,«/i» pp.232, 273-4). Later Gwilym's son Rhys joined his cousin GRUFFUDD ap NICHOLAS in acting as deputy-constable of Dinefwr castle in 1429 (Griffiths p.11), and was deputy sheriff of Carmarthen c.1443-4 (p.14).

Nicholas ap Philip was grandson of Elidyr Ddu. [Annals and Antiquties of Cymru I:168]

NICHOLAS, the eldest son, was grandfather of Thomas, whose son, Sir Rhys ap Thomas, was created a knight of the garter by HENRY VII. and obtained from that monarch other proofs of the king's recollection of his efforts to place him on the throne. Sir Griffith Rhys, eldest son of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, was the lineal ancestor of George, present LORD DYNEVOR.

Niclas ab Phylip (alias Fitz Urien), of the Crag. His father married Jonnett, widow of Gruffydd Fychan, Lord of Caio and Cil y Cwm, and by him, her first husband, ancestress to the Williams' of Ystrad Ffin, Lord of Cil y Cwm (vide p. 100 of Lewys Dwnn's "Heraldic Visitations in Wales" and the Marches), daughter of Gruffydd ab Llewelyn Foethus, who resided at Dryslwyn Castle, Lord of Llangathan, derived through the Lords of Llangathan from Elystan Glodrydd, Prince of Fferlis, founder of one of the Four Royal Tribes of Wales.* He died soon after his marriage, leaving a posthumous son who became a noted man in his time. [Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi]

Sources:

Title: Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales Author: Thomas Nicholas Publication: London: Longmans, Green, Reeder, 1875 Page: I:168

Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Einion ap Llywarch 7, p.330; Elystan Glodrydd 54, p.406 Title: Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi Author: John Rowland Publication: Carmarthen, William Spurrel, 1877

Nicholas ap Philip father was Father: Philip Ap Elidir b: in Dynevor, Carmarthenshire, Wales Mother: Gwladys ferch Dafydd Fras dau of Dafydd Fras ap Einion Goch ap Fruffudd ap Einion Fychan

Note:

Nothing is known of his (Gruffudd Ap Nicolas) early years, but it is said that he was the posthumous son of Nicolas Ap Phylip Ap Syr Eidir Ddu (one of the knights of the Sephulchre). [Dictionary of Welsh Biography p 313]

NICHOLAS ap PHILIP married a near-neighbor JONET f. GRUFFUDD ap LLYWELYN FOETHUS «i»(the Luxurious),«/i» who will be taken up in the line of JOHN ap REES. Little is known of NICHOLAS, and he may have died before he attained an office that would appear in state records, but his brother Gwilym ap PHILIP was important enough for his knowledge of the lordship of Llandovery to be sought in 1391 when its descent was investigated at Carmarthen following the death of the title holder, and he was receiver of the lordship of Kidwelly until 1401 (Griffiths, «i»Sir Rhys«/i», p.10). Gwilym married Gwladus, the daughter of HENRY DWNN, and he became a prominent supporter of Glyn Dwr's revolt and fought alongside his father-in-law for at least the years 1401-03 (R.R.Davies, «i»Glyn Dwr,«/i» pp.232, 273-4). Later Gwilym's son Rhys joined his cousin GRUFFUDD ap NICHOLAS in acting as deputy-constable of Dinefwr castle in 1429 (Griffiths p.11), and was deputy sheriff of Carmarthen c.1443-4 (p.14).

Nicholas ap Philip was grandson of Elidyr Ddu. [Annals and Antiquties of Cymru I:168]

NICHOLAS, the eldest son, was grandfather of Thomas, whose son, Sir Rhys ap Thomas, was created a knight of the garter by HENRY VII. and obtained from that monarch other proofs of the king's recollection of his efforts to place him on the throne. Sir Griffith Rhys, eldest son of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, was the lineal ancestor of George, present LORD DYNEVOR.

Niclas ab Phylip (alias Fitz Urien), of the Crag. His father married Jonnett, widow of Gruffydd Fychan, Lord of Caio and Cil y Cwm, and by him, her first husband, ancestress to the Williams' of Ystrad Ffin, Lord of Cil y Cwm (vide p. 100 of Lewys Dwnn's "Heraldic Visitations in Wales" and the Marches), daughter of Gruffydd ab Llewelyn Foethus, who resided at Dryslwyn Castle, Lord of Llangathan, derived through the Lords of Llangathan from Elystan Glodrydd, Prince of Fferlis, founder of one of the Four Royal Tribes of Wales.* He died soon after his marriage, leaving a posthumous son who became a noted man in his time. [Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi]

Sources:

Title: Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales Author: Thomas Nicholas Publication: London: Longmans, Green, Reeder, 1875 Page: I:168

Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Einion ap Llywarch 7, p.330; Elystan Glodrydd 54, p.406 Title: Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi Author: John Rowland Publication: Carmarthen, William Spurrel, 1877

Philip ap Elidir father was Sir Elidir Ddu, Knight of the Sepulchre m’d Cecily, dau of Selaylit, of Cantresselyf Mon

Sir Elidir Ddu, father was Elder m Gwladys, dau of Philip ap Bach

Elder father was RHYS ap Gronwy m’d Gwladus ferch Cadwgon

RHYS ap Gronwy Father: Einion ap Ieuan b: Abt 1130 in Caerfyrddin, Cymru and Mother: Ann ferch Llywelyn

Einion ap Ieuan Father: Llywarch b: Abt 1045 in Menai, Ynys Mon, Cymru Mother: Rhael ferch Gronw

Note:

LLYWARCH ap BRAN (fl. c. 1137), 'sylfaen-ydd' un o 'Bymtheg Llwyth Gwynedd.' Dywedir ei fod yn frawd-yng-nghyfraith i Owain Gwynedd-merched i Gronw ab Owain ab Edwin, arglwydd Tegeingl, oedd gwragedd Llywarch ac Owain Gwynedd. Dywedir hefyd iddo, fel Hwfa ap Cynddelw, wasnaethu Owain Gwynedd fel stiward, ei fod yn byw yn nhref-gordd Tref Llywarch, Mon; fe'i disgrifir hefyd yn arglwydd cwmwd Menai. Am enwau rhai teuluoedd yr oedd eu haelodau yn hawlio bod yn ddisgynyddion Llywarch gw. Philip Yorke, Royal Tribes (arg. 1887), 177-80.

The royal tribes of Wales By Philip Yorke (arg. 1887); T. Pennant, Tours {arg. 1883). W.LL.D.

"LLYWARCH AP BRAN. He lived in the time of Owen Gwynedd, and was the prince's brother in law, for both their wives were sisters, the daughters of Gronw ap Owain ap Edwyn, Lord of Tegaingyl, as Griffith Hiraethog,1 and Sir Thomas ap Ievan ap Deicws, and also an old parchment manuscript, written about four hundred years ago, do testify. What office he bare under the prince I do not know, but some say he was his steward, as in a book of Sir Thomas ap William2 of Trefriw, I found. He dwelt in the township which from him is called Tref Llywarch, which hath in it Caergybi,8 and three parcels bearing the name of his three sons, Wele4 Iorwerth ap Llywarch, Wele Cadwgan ap Llywarch, Wele Madoc ap Llywarch, as in the Extent of North Wales is manifest. He had a grandchild by his son Iorwerth, called Meredydd, who for his good service had the freehold of the township of Escynniog, given him and his heirs for ever, by prince Llywelin ap Iorwerth, whose posterity, Ievan Wyddel and Tudur ap Hywel ap Tudur, held the same by virtue of the grant aforesaid, in the twenty-sixth year of King Edward the Third. Ievan Wyddel's mother was the daughter of the Lord of Cywchwr in Ireland, descended of the Earl of Kildare, of whom the gentlemen of Mwsoglen, Porthamal,1 and many other houses are descended. He beareth «i»argent «/i»between three crows, each bearing a Queen of Ermin in their bills, a chevron «i»sable, «/i»by the name of Llywarch ap Bran.

1 Houses now extinct, or in the possession of men of yesterday, such is the mutability of property ! "You see it alter, From you to me, from me to Peter Walter ; Or in a mortgage prove a lawyer's share, Or in a jointure vanish from the heir." [ADDENDA.]\emdash Llywarch ab Bran was lord of Cwmmwd Menai in Anglesey, and flourished about 1137. He was eighth in descent from Rhodri Mawr."

Llywarch ap Bran (fl c 1137), founder of one of the 'Fifteen (Noble) Tribes of Gwynedd,' is described as brother-in-law of Owain Gwynedd, their wives being daughters of Gronw ab Owain ab Edwin, lord of Tegeingl. Like Hwfa ap Cynddelw, he is said to have been steward to Owain Gwynedd and to have lived in the township of Tref Llywarch, Anglesey; he is also described as lord of the commote of Menai, Anglesey. For the names of some of the families who claimed descent from him see Philip Yorke, Royal Tribes of Cymru (1887 ed), 177-180. [Dictionary of Welsh Biography p596]

Llywarch ab Bran was lord of Cwmmwd Menai in Anglesey, and flourished about 1137. He was eighth in descent from Rhodri Mawr. lorwerth ab Llywarch, according to Rowlands ('Mona Antiqua), lived at Porthamel uchaf, Anglesey. His descendant levan Wyddel had two sons, namely, Rhys, who settled at Bodowyr ; and Howel, who founded the ancient house of Berw (so called, possibly, from the cresses which abound there) which descended to his granddaughter Elinor. She married an Englishman named John Holland, who claimed descent from the Dukes of Valence. The Hollands continued owners of Berw for many generations. Several of them represented Anglesey in Parliament, and they formed alliances with some of the best families in the country. The last of the name was the Rev. Thomas Holland who died about 1750. On his decease, the property descended to his niece and heiress, Elizabeth, wife of Richard Trygarn, Esq., whose daughter, in 1755, married John Griffith, Esq. of Carreglwyd, " a worthy and convivial gentleman," as Pennant calls him, whose descendants still hold it (Arch. Camb. 1868, p. 97.) The ancient and interesting mansion of Berw is still preserved intact. The Anglesey Central Railway passes close to it. levan ab Ednyved, in the time of Henry the Fourth, married the heiress of Jenkin ab Llewelyn ab lorwerth of Myvyrian, a descendant of Llywarch, and from this union came the Prytherchs of Myvyrian, who became extinct in the male line about two hundred years ago, and by marriage were closely related to the families of Berw, Bjdowyr, and the Trevors of Denbighshire. Their matrimonial connexions were indeed so complicated, that Sir Edward Trevor of Brynkinallt, wrote the following epitaph on Eva, his grandmother : i 7 9 " Here lyes by name the world's mother, By nature my aunt, sister to my mother ; By law my grandmother, mother to my mother ; My great grandmother, mother to my grandmother ; All this may be without breach of consanguinity." (Arch. Camb. 1848, p. 293.)

From Cadwgan ab Llyvvarch came the Hughes's of Plas Coch, Anglesey. The old house of Porthamel isaf, where they resided, was rebuilt in 1569 by Hugh Hughes, Attorney General for North Wales, and was thenceforth called Plas Coch from the colour of the stone used on that occasion. The late William Bulkeley Hughes, Esq. of Plas Coch and Bryndu, was lineally descended from Hugh Hughes. He was for many years Member of Parliament for the Carnarvon Boroughs, and died in March, 1882, leaving an only daughter married to Captain Hunter. The family is also represented by his brother's son, Rice William Thomas, Esq. (formerly Hughes) of Coed-helen, Carnarvon (Hist. Powys Fadog, v., p. 311.) The Hughes's of Plascoch intermarried with the Bulkeleys of Bryndu and Beaumaris, the Owens of Clenneneu, and the Trevors of Denbighshire. From Cadwgan were also descended the Meyricks of Bodorgan and Goodrich Court, by the marriage of their ancestor Einion Sais, with Eva, daughter of Meredydd ab Cadwgan (Hist. Powys Fadog, v., p. 312.) Dr. William Lloyd, successively Bishop of St. Asaph, Lichfield, and Worcester, was also descended from Cadwgan. Owen Wynn, only son of Hugh Gwyn of Mwsoglen, was eleventh in descent from levan Wyddel. He married in 1628, Grace, daughter of Sir William Glynne of Glynllifon, but died without issue, and the male line of that family became extinct. His sister, Elizabeth, by her marriage with Hugh Owen, Esq. of Bodeon, conveyed the Mwsoglen estate into that family (Dwini's Vis., ii., p. 208.) Eva, daughter of Llywarch ab Bran, became the second wife of the celebrated Ednyfed Vychan, minister of Llewelyn the Great, and by whom he had six sons, namely Sir Tudor, who had Plas yn Nant and Llangynhafal ; Rees, who had Garth Garmon ; Howell, who became Bishop of St. Asaph ; Llewelyn and Cynfrig, who had the Creuddyn ; and lorwerth, who had Abermarlais (Dwmi's Vis., i., p. 331.)

The latter was the ancestor of the renowned Sir Rhys ab Thomas of Dinevor (see ante, p. 132.) David Goch, his contemporary, another redoubtable warrior and a famous swordsman, who was killed by Sir Rhys's father, Thomas ab Griffith, in a desperate hand to hand encounter at Pennal, Merionethshire, also belonged to this tribe (L. G. Cothts Works, p. 141.)

Tangwystl, another daughter, married Llywarch Goch, lord of Rhos and Meiriadog, and had issue, Llywarch Fychan the ancestor of Jones of Llyfnant, Ddol and Ruthin in Denbighshire (Hist. Powys Fadog, iv., p. 323.) i8o The old family of Meredith of Monachdy Gwyn, Clynog fawr, Carnarvonshire, now extinct were of this tribe. Meurig Meredith the last heir male, left an only daughter and heiress, Anna Maria, who married first, John Mostyn, Esq. of Segrwyd (of which marriage came the Mostyns of Llawesog) ; and secondly, Watkin Edwards Wynn, Esq. of Pengwern, Merioneth, and Llwyn, Denbighshire, by whom she had no issue. She died in 1828 (Hist. Powys Fadog, iv., p. 382.) Catherine, daughter and heiress of Ellis Lloyd, the last male representative of the old family of Rhiwgoch, Trawsfynydd, of this tribe, married Henry Wynn, son of Sir John Wynn of Gwydir (see ante, p. 9), and was the mother of Sir John Wynn, Bart, of Wynnstay, in whom, dying without issue, the title ended. The following families also extinct, according to Pennant, belonged to this tribe: Lloyd of Maesyneuadd ; Wynn and Lloyd of Hendre'r mur, Merionethshire ; Lloyds of Brynhir or Brynkir, Coed y rhygyn, Llandecwyn, Cefnfaes and Cae Adda ; Meredith of Hafod Lwyfog ; Parry of Bodafon, Anglesey (Diamfs Vis., ii., p. 264) ; and Owen of Ruthin ; also the old families of Garregfawr, Amlwch ('Dwnifs Vis., ii., p. 264) ; Rhosgolyn (Ib. 266) ; Twrcelyn (Ib. 267) ; and Lloyd of Tymarian Heilyn, Llanddyfnan (Ib. 268.)

Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Einion ap Llywarch 1, p.324

Herbert Family

Harry JONES Sir Knt married Elizabeth HERBERT. Sir Henry Johnes of Abermarlais, Kt., Sheriff of Carmarthenshire married Elizabeth Herbert of Castell Trefaldwyn, Trefaldwyn, Cymru Elizabeth Father: Matthew Herbert b: Abt 1525 in Swansea, Glamorganshire, Wales and Mother: Mary Gamage b: in Coity, Pen-y-Bont Ar Ogwr, Morgannwg, Cymru

Matthew HERBERT Father: George Herbert b: 1500 in Ewyas Harold, Hereford, Herefordshire, England and Mother: Elizabeth De Berkeley b: Abt 1508 in Beverstone Castle, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, England

Note: George (Sir), of Swansea; ancestor of the Herberts of Swansea. [Burke's Peerage]

Sources:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306

Roath Tewkesbury (so called after the Lord of Glamorgan had given it to the abbey of Tewkesbnry), after the suppression of the abbeys was purchased by Sir George Herbert, Knt., the grandfather of Sir William Herbert, Knt. ; and therein Sir William builded the fair house, called the Fryers, by Cardifle : holden de Rege. The first Sheriff named for Glamorgan is Sir George Herbert, Knt, of Swansea, A.d. 1541. The following tabular arrangement is deemed to be as far as possible correct, and is taken, with slight alteration, from that published by Rev. H. H. Knight (1850), which up to the year 1792 was from the MS. of Evan Simmons, of Nottage, thence to 1850 from a MS. of Howel Gwyn, Esq. It has been completed from further additions by the last-named gentleman, and collated with a copy of a MS. by Thomas Morgan, of Cardiff.

The details in this biography come from the History of Parliament , a biographical dictionary of Members of the House of Commons.

George Herbert born 1494/5, first son of Richard Herbert of Ewyas Herefordshire by Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir Matthew Cradock of Swansea; brother of William Herbert . Married 1st, by 1531 Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Berkeley of The Vyne, Hants., and had 3 sons, including William Herbert of Cogan Pill, and 3 daughters«/b»; married 2nd Grace Bewring, widow of Geoffrey Newton. Succeeded father 1510. Knighted 12 Mar/18 Apr 1543. Steward, lordships of Abergavenny, Mon. by Jan 1516, of Gower and Kilvey, Glam. 1526-death, of Gelligaer, Glam. c. 1540, of Swansea by 1549-?60, of Neath abbey, Glam. 1533, cts. of Abergavenny priory in 1535; receiver, Glam. Jun 1524; esquire of the body by 1533; commissioner tenths of spiritualities, diocese of Llandaff 1535, coastal defense, S. Wales 1539, benevolence, Glam. 1544/5, relief 1549, 1550, goods of churches and fraternaties 1553; ?receiver, estates of the Earls of Worcester, S. Wales by 1538-54 or later; sheriff, Glam. 1540-1, 1552-3; Justice of Peace Glam. 1543-55 or later, other Welsh counties early 1550s, Glos., Herefs., Salop, Worcs. 1554, q. Glam. by 1561-?death; custos rot. Glam. 1543, dep. c.1547; gent. waiter, household of Queen Catherine Parr by 1544-8; receiver, ct. augmentations, Glam. in 1545; v.-adm. S. Wales 1550-8; member, Council in the marches of Wales in 1551-3 or later; mayor, Cardiff in 1553.

George Herbert's career was patterned on, although it did not rival, that of his younger brother William, 1st Earl of Pembroke.Until about 1540 he made his way in South Wales under the aegis of his kinsmen George Neville, Lord Abergavenny and Charles Somerset, 1st Earl of Worcester and his son Henry, later the second Earl, but his position was transformed by his brother's ascendancy at court and King Henry VIII 's marriage to William Herbert 's sister-in-law Catherine Parr . The marriage took place after the close of the second session of the Parliament of 1542, to which George Herbert had been returned for Glamorgan: he had the double distinction of being the first sheriff of the shire which he had helped to set up at the union and its first knight in Parliament. After the «u»dissolution «/u» he and his brother fought in the Boulogne campaign. He could have been re-elected to the Parliaments of 1545 and 1555 for which the name of the knight of the shire is lost, and he was perhaps «b»J«/b»ohn Bassett's replacement in the Parliament of 1547. While sheriff in 1553 he returned his kinsmen George Mathew and Anthony Mansell to Parliament, and in 1558 and 1559 he presumably encouraged his son William's and his grandson William's election. Herbert's relations with his neighbors, kinsmen and colleagues on the bench in Glamorgan were not always happy. He was accused in the Star Chamber « by two of the sons of »Sir Edward Carne of assaulting them at Cowbridge in 1538 and conspiring with Sir Rhys Mansell, with what outcome is unknown. Rivalry between him and Mansell intensified after Mansell's appointment as chamberlain of South Wales, a post which Herbert had coveted while a member of the council in the marches. In 1555 an information was laid in the Exchequer by Mansell or a client about the size of Herberts following, with the result that he was ordered to limit it to 40 men, a figure for which he had received a license. Matters came to a head in Dec 1557 after the wreck of a French vessel near Oxwich. Mansell« arrested the survivors and took the cargo for himself, while Herbert claimed the prisoners for the Admiralty and the freight for Worcester; in the ensuing contest Mansells sister was accidentally killed. The Star Chamber decreed in Mansell's favor in May 1558 and ordered Herbert's committal to the Fleet pending trial for manslaughter, but whether he was found guilty is not recorded. An attempt by the Council to reconcile the pair failed, and local intervention met with no success before Mansell's death in 1559. Herbert sued out of general pardon from Elizabeth and after being left off her commission of the peace he was restored to the bench in 1561 and was one of the quorum until his death, apparently intestate, on 2 Sep 1570. Following the disclosure that he owed the crown 1200 pounds almost certainly money collected «b»by his son Matthew «/b»as receiver for South Wales and not delivered to the augmentatios before Matthew's death, his goods were distrained but within two years his heir and grandson William« was able to enter upon an estat free from debt. Grace Bewring survived him but in later legal proceedings the heir alleged that Herbert had never lawfully been married to her

Sources:

Repository:

Title: Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes Author: Editor: Charles Mosley Publication: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, Crans, Switzerland, 1999 Page: 2306 Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 1400-1500 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: Aberystwyth. Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru / The National Library of Wales, 1983 Page: Vol 3; pp 395, 450, Vol 5; pp 747, 765, 781, 791, Vol 6; p 874 Title: Miscellanea Genealogica Heraldica, Volume 1 Author: Joseph Jackson Howard Publication: London: Hamilton, Adams, And Co., Paternoster Row. 1868 Page: Vol 5; p 192 Title: Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi Author: John Rowland Publication: Carmarthen, William Spurrel, 1877 Title: Heraldic Visitations of Wales and Part of the Marches Between the Years 1586 and 1613 by Lewys Dwnn Author: Lewys Dwnn; edited with notes by Sir Samuel Rush Meyrick Publication: Llandovery: William Rees, 1846

George Herbert Father: Richard Herbert b: Abt 1442 in Raglan Castle, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales Mother: Margaret Cradock b: Abt 1478 in Swansea, Glamorganshire, Wales

Note: Richard, of Ewias, Herefs; Gentleman Usher to Henry VII, Constable and Porter of Abergavenny Castle 1509; married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Sir Mathew Cradock, of Swansea, and widow of John Malefant, and died by 23 Sep 1510. [Burke's Peerage]

Richard Herbert Father: William Herbert b: Abt 1423 in Raglan Castle, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales Death: 27 Jul 1469 in Battle Of Edgecote, Banbury, Northamptonshire, England of beheaded and Mother: Mawd Turberville b: Abt 1427 in Llanfaiscilgedin, Abergavenny, Monmouthshire

Note: "According to my data, this William, who died 1469 July 27, is a 14-great grandfather of the late Queen Mother Elizabeth, through his daughter Maud. His full brother Richard is a 15-great grandfather of myself, connecting through the 1611 Jamestown immigrant John Price. His illegitimate half brother John is an 18-great grandfather of the late Princess Diana.

-- PKD [Paul K Davis, pkd-gm@earthlink.net]"

William, took surname Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke, so created 8 Sep 1468, as also earlier 26 July 1461 Baron Herbert/Herberd by writ, KG (1461/2); knighted 1449, served Hundred Years War (captured by French 1450 at Formigny), Yorkist during War of the Roses, Sheriff of Glamorgan and Morgannoc and Constable of Usk Castle 1459, MP Herefs 1460-61, Chief Justice and Chamberlain of South Wales 1461, granted 3 Feb 1461/2 castle, town and lordship of Pembroke, with other castles, following surrender of Pembroke Castle to him by Lancastrians five months previously, Chief Justice of North Wales 1467; married c1455 Anne (living 1486), daughter of Sir Walter Devereux, and was beheaded 27 July 1469 following his capture at the Battle of Edgcot, near Banbury, Oxon, one or three days earlier; The 1st Earl of Pembroke of the 1468 creation also had two or more illegitimate sons; one of them, by Mawd, daughter of Adam (Turberville) ap William ap Howell Graunt. [Burke's Peerage] ----------------------------------------- When the Lancastrian insurrection [War of Roses] broke out in 1469, Edward IV commissioned the Sir William Herbert, Knight, Earl of Pembroke, and his brother, Sir Richard Herbert, Knight of Coldbrook, to command an army of 18,000 Welshmen against the rebels. In July of 1469, the army was defeated at the Battle of Edgecote. The Herberts were captured by Richard, earl of Warwick and beheaded the next day in Northamptonshire. They were buried in the priory chapel on July 27, 1469, beneath the arch which separates the Herbert Chapel & the choir in St. Mary's Priory Church. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------- Copied from Herbert, George biography, 88.1911 encyclopedia.org/H/HERBERT_GEORGE.htm: -------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------- His sons William and Richard both partisans of the White Rose, took the surname of Herbert in or before 1461. Playing a part in English affairs remote fron the Welsh Marches, their lack of a surname may well hav inconvenienced them, and their choice of the name Herbert can only be explained by the suggestion that their long pedigree from Herbert the Chamberlain, absurdly represented as a bastard son of Henry I, must already have been discovered for them. Copies exist of an alleged commission issued by Edward IV to a committee of Welsh bards for the ascertaining of the true ancestry of William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, whom "th chiefest men of skill in the province of South Wales declar to be the descendant of Herbert, a noble lord, natural son b King Henry the first", and it is recited that King Edward, after the creation of the earldom, commanded the Earl and Sir Richard his brother to "take their surnames after their first progenito Herbert fitz Roy and to forego the British order and Inanner". But this commission, whose date anticipates by some years the true date of the creation of the earldom, is the work of one of the many genealogical forgers who flourished under the Tudors.

Sir William Herbert, called by the Welsh Gwilim Ddu or Black William, was a baron in 1461 and a Knight of the Garter in the following year. With many manors and castles on the Marches he had the castle, town and lordship of Pembroke, and after the attainder of Jasper Tudor in 1468 was created Earl of Pembroke. When in July 1469 he was taken by Sir John Conyers and the northern Lancastrians on Hedgecote, he was beheaded along with his brother Sir Richard Herbert of Coldbrook.

The second Earl while still a minor exchanged at the king's desire in 1479 his Earldom of Pembroke for that of Huntingdon. In 1484 this son of one whom Hall not unjustly describes as born "a mean gentleman" contracted to marry Katharine the daughter of King Richard III, but her death annulled the contract and the Earl married Mary, daughter of the Earl Rivers, by whom he had a daughter Elizabeth, whose descendants, the Somersets, lived in the Herbert's castle of Raglan until the cannon of the parliament broke it in ruins. With the second Earl's death in 1491 the first Herbert Earldom became extinct. No claim being set up among the other descendants of the first Earl, it may be taken that their lines were illegitimate. One of the chief difficulties which beset the genealogist of the Herberts lies in their Cambrian disregard of the marriage tie, bastards and legitimate issue growing up, it would seem, side by side in their patriarchal households. Thus the ancestor of the present Earls of Pembroke and Carnarvon and of the Herbert who was created marquess of Powis was a natural son of the first Earl, one Richard Herbert, whom the restored inscription on his tomb at Abergavenny incorrectly describes as a knight. He was constable and porter of Abergavenny Castle, and his son William, "a mad fighting fellow" in his youth, married a sister of Catherine Parr and thus in 1543 became nearly allied to the king, who made him one of the executors of his will. The Earldom of Pembroke was revived for him in 1551. It is worthy of note that'all traces of illegitimacy have long since been removed from the arms of the noble descendants of Richard Herbert. ------------------------- on the history of the Earldom of Huntingdon:

Eight years later William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, gave up his existing Earldom to the Crown and was made in compensation Earl of Huntingdon. So even at this late date a peerage title could be treated as something which one could simply resign. [Burke's Peerage, p. 1474]

Sources:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306, 1228, 1378 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: X:400-1 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306

Marriage 1 Anne Devereux

Married: 1455

Children William Herbert b: 1455

Marriage 2 Mawd Turberville b: Abt 1427 in Llanfaiscilgedin, Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, Married: mistress

Children

Richard Herbert b: Abt 1442 in Raglan Castle, Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales

Maud Herbert b: Abt 1453 in Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales

William Herbert Father: William Ap Thomas Herbert b: Abt 1377 in Plas Yn-Y-Berth-Hir (Perth-Hir), Monmouthshire, Wales Mother: Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam b: Abt 1385 in Peutun, Llan Ddew, Breconshire, Wales. Gwladus daughter of Dafydd "Gam" Ap Llewelyn b: 1351 in Peutun Llan Ddew, Breconshire, Wales and his wife Gwenllian Ferch Howell b: 1355 in Abercrai, Breconshire, Wales

Notes for William Ap Thomas Herbert:

Sir William Thomas, called "Y Marchog Glas o Went" ("The Blue Knight of Gwent"), of Raglan, Mon, the (feudal) Lordship of which he bought from 1st Lord (Baron) Berkeley; knighted 1415; married 1st his former employer Elizabeth (to whom he had been steward), daughter and heiress of Sir John Bluet, of Raglan, and widow of Sir James Berkeley (by whom she was mother of the 1st Lord (Baron) Berkeley; married 2nd, as her 2nd husband, Gwladus (died 1454), daughter of Dafydd Gam (killed at Agincourt) and widow of Sir Roger Vaughan, of Tretower (also killed at Agincourt), and died 1446. [Burke's Peerage] ---------------------------------------------------- Built the "Great Tower" of Raglan Castle. ---------------------------------------------------- Copied from Herbert, George biography, 88.1911 encyclopedia.org/H/HERBERT_GEORGE.htm:

Thomas's fifth son, William or Gwilim ap Thomas, who died abt 1446, was the first man of the family to make any figure in history. This Gwilim ap Thomas was steward of the lordships of Usk and Caerleon under Richard, duke of York. Legend makes him a knight on the field of Agincourt, but his knighthood belongs to the year 1426. He appears to have married twice, his first wife being Elizabeth Bluet of Raglan, widow of Sir James Berkeley, and his second a daughter of David Gam, a valiant Welsh squire slain at Agincourt. Royal favour enriched Sir William, and he was able to buy Raglan Castle from the Lord Berkeley, his first wife's son, the deed, which remains among the Beaufort muniments, refuting the pedigree-maker's statement that he inherited the castle as heir of his mother Maude daughter of Sir John Morley. ----------------------------------------------------- The following material was copied from Jane Williams Flank, World Connect db=jwflank, rootsweb.com:

Other sources:

Welsh Genealogies AD 1400-1500, Vol 3 - pp 86, 104; Vol 4 - pg 202; Vol 6 pp 378, 422, 425, 439; Vol 8 pg 622 (FHL # 6025561) Wales Visitation, Vol 1 - pp 292-3, 295, 312; Vol 2 - pg 165; Vol 5- pp 740, 785. 790 (FHL 942,9 D2fw) Peerage (Burke), 1876 - pg 923 (FHL 942 D22bup) Peerage (Burke), 1967 - pg 2039 (FHL 942 D22bup) Baronagium Genealogicum, Vol 3 - pg 263 (FHL #0164680 Buckingham Co History, Vol 1 - pg 297 (FHL Q942.575 H2li) Commoners, Vol 2 - pg 24; Vol 4 - pp 552fn, 730 (FHL 942 B2bc) Miscellanea Genealogica 5s, Vol 5 - pg 188 (FHL 942 B2m) Archaeologica Cambrensis 5s, Vol 1 - pg 288 (FHL 942.9 B2c) Wallop Family, vol2 - pg 422 (FHL Q942.242 W159w) Derbyshire Archaelogical Journal, Vol 31 - p 204 (FHL 942.51 B2a) Monmouthshire History, Vol 1 - pp 47, 165, 185, 189, 285; Vol 2 - pg 12, Vol 4 - pg 300 (FHL #0990053-54) Brecknockshire, Vol 2 - pg 394 (FHL Q942.965 H2j) Carmarthenshire Sheriffs - pp 5, 34, 65 (FHL 942.98 D2b) Dorset History Society Proceedings, Vol 66 - pg 83 (FHL 942.33 C4d) Montgomeryshire Collections, Vol 2 - ped; Vol 3 pg 341; Vol 5 pg 159 (FHL 942.94 C4mp) Robertson et Durdin -tb198 (FHL 929.242 R545r) Monmouthshire Historical Tour - pp 148, 171 (FHL 942.43 H2cw) Wales County Annuals - pp 777 (FHL #0832242) Herberts of Wilton - pg 2 (FHL 929.242 H414) Morgan and Blamorgan Geneologies - pp 195, 280, 306 (FHL 942.97 D2c) Earl of Pembroke - ped (FHL #104324) Herbert Pedigrees - pg 4 (FHL #8026552 it3-4) Dorst Antiquarian Club, Vol 66 - pg 83 (FHL 942.33 C4d) Chepstow Catle Annals - pp 178, 270 (FHL 942.43/C1 D2m) Herbert Correspondence - ped (FHL 942.9 B4b #21)

The house of Herbert is of somewhat dubious origin. There are three accounts of its prime ancestor. 1) the race springs from Herbert, a natural sone of Henry I of England (this version has never met with acceptance), 2) gives Henry Fitz Herbert, Chamberlain to Henry I as prime ancestor, 3) henry Fitz Herbert, the Chamberlain was son of Herbert, son of Godwin, son of Elfryd, and that the said Herbert married the daughter of Godwin, Earl of Kent.

WALES AND ENGLISH POLITICS. Stability of government in England was in essence bad news for Wales, for in such a context the Welsh were frozen into their subordinate social position. However the outbreak of civil war in England from 1455, and the fact that both Yorkist and Lancastrian factions in that civil war needed to optimise their support in Wales created a more favourable context for Welshpolitics. The objective of both Yorkists and Lancastrians was best achieved by nurturing Welsh leaders capable of mobilising the native Welsh to their respective cause. That in turn implied that the Welsh - throughout the Wars of the Roses - were strongly placed to bargain for the amelioration of their social subjection. The ending of the first stage of the civil war in a Yorkist victory in March 1461 highlighted that reality for Sir William Herbert was entrusted with the role of chief justice and chamberlain of South Wales as well as a host of other responsibilities and lands. In 1463 his role was extended into North Wales with his appointment as chamberlain and chief justice of Meirioneth. In February 1462 he also secured custody of the five year old Henry Tudor (son of Edmund Tudor) whom he had captured at Pembroke in 1461. Henry was thus reared in the Welsh speaking Herbert household. Herbert's responsibilities and powers were further enhanced during the late 1460's by which time he dominated Welsh politics. His role ended abruptly in July 1469 when he was executed following defeat and capture by Lancastrian forces at the battle of Banbury. See : Fig 48 Monument of Sir William ap Thomas of Raglan p238. Also : Fig 49 Seal of Sir William Herbert of Raglan p239. In : M.P.Siddons - The Development of Welsh Heraldry Vol 1, National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth 1993. THE STRUGGLE FOR WELSH BARDIC SUPPORT. Both the Yorkist and Lancastrian camp were strongly represented in Wales. Richard duke of York was a Marcher lord who secured more than half his annual income from Wales - £3,430 from Wales as compared to c £3,230 from England. Edmund and Jasper Tudor were the sons of Owain Tudur and half brothers of Henry VI. Edmund earl of Richmond was sent to Wales to strengthen the royal position, and his son Henry Tudor was born at Pembroke castle in January 1457, two months after his fathers death. In that context Jasper Tudor as earl of Pembroke assumed the role vacated by his brother. Both sides recognised the importance of bardic support and thus patronised the bards. Owain Tudur and his family had long been patrons - a tradition sustained by Jasper. For the Yorkists William Herbert played a central role in securing bardic support. As a consequence, during the Wars of the Roses the bards sought to promote Welsh interests through both of the contending factions. A WELSH UCHELWR WITHIN THE YORKIST CAMP. William Herbert was the anglicised name of William ap William a descendant of the leading Brecon family. His grandfather was Dafydd Gam, an opponent of the Owain Glyn Dwr revolt who died at Agincourt in 1415. Dafydd's son, William ap Thomas purchased the Raglan estate in 1430. William Herbert built on that foundation being admitted to the House of Lords and elevated to a Knight of the Garter. In 1466 the king created the lordship of Raglan, (the last Marcher lordship created in Wales) in appreciation of services rendered by Herbert. THE WAR OF THE ROSES AND BRYTHONIC TRADITION. In keeping with Brythonic tradition a great feast was held at Raglan prior to departure for Banbury. On the eve of battle, when disagreement between Herbert and the earl of Devon led to the withdrawal of the latter from the scene of battle - traditional visions of the Welsh inflicting defeat on their Saxon enemies were to strongly motivate the forces under Herbert. Despite the fact that this was a battle in an 'English' civil war, the Welsh forces were motivated by long established Brythonic imagery. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - William ap Thomas was the member of a minor Welsh gentry family and was responsible for beginning the construction of Raglan Castle as we recognize it today. He obtained Raglan through his marriage to Elizabeth Bloet, widow of Sir James Berkeley shortly after 1406. When Elizabeth died in 1420, ap Thomas retained Raglan as a tenant of his step-son James, Lord Berkeley, and in 1425 Lord Berkeley agreed that he could continue to hold Raglan for the duration of his life.

William married for a second time, and chose another heiress, Gwladus. She was the daughter of Sir Dafydd Gam and the widow of Sir Roger Vaughan. Both these men had been part of the Welsh contingent that fought with King Henry V in France, and both were at the battle of Agincourt, where William ap Thomas had also fought. In 1426, ap Thomas was knighted by Henry VI, becoming known to his compatriots as Y marchog glas o Went (the blue knight of Gwent). Gradually he began to establish himself as a person of consequence in south Wales.

As early as 1421 William held the important position of steward of the lordship of Abergavenny, and later became chief steward of the duke of York's estates in Wales, 1442-43. Other positions held by Sir William included that of sheriff of Cardiganshire and Carmarthenshire, to which he was appointed in 1435, and his position as sheriff of Glamorgan followed in 1440. Although he became one of the followers of Richard, duke of York, and a member of the duke's military council, Sir William's sphere of influence was largely confined to south Wales.

By 1432 William was in a position to purchase the manor of Raglan from the Berkeleys for about L667 and it was probably from this time that he began to build the castle as we know it. His building programme eventually swept away most of the original structures. The principal buildings surviving from this time are the Great Tower (left) a self-contained fortress in its own right, together with the south gate, both equipped with gunloops. He also raised the hall, though later largely rebuilt, and part of the service range beyond. Two sources indicate that William ap Thomas was the builder of the keep. One of which is a contemporary poem praising ap Thomas, mentioning the tower at Raglan which "stands above all other buildings." There is also a reference to Sir William Thomas' tower from a family chronicle written by Sir Thomas Herbert of Tintern.

William ap Thomas died in London in 1445, and his body was brought back to Wales to be buried in the Benedictine priory church at Abergavenny. His wife Gwladus (the star of Abergavenny), as she was hailed by the poet Lewys Glyn Cothi, died in 1454. William was succeeded by his eldest son, another William (d.1469) who took the surname Herbert.

Sources:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306 Title: Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists, by David Faris, 2nd Edition 1999, NEHGS Page: 23 Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: X:400 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306 Text: date implied by death of James, the prior husband. BP doesn't mention Bartholomew Picot, states this is her 2nd marriage. Title: Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists, by David Faris, 2nd Edition 1999, NEHGS Page: 23 Text: not date, states "married for the second time", but identifies two prior husbands, making this her 3rd. Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306 Text: date implied by death of 1st husband Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000 Page: X:400 Text: no date, 2nd wife

HERBERT , WILLIAM (d. 1469 ), «b»earl of Pembroke , soldier and statesman ; son of Sir William ap Thomas of Raglan and Gwladus , daughter of «u»Dafydd Gam (q.v.) . He served with the English forces in Normandy with his countryman «u»Mathew Gough (q.v.) «/u», was taken prisoner at Formigny ( April 1450 ), and knighted at Christmas, 1450 . In the struggle between Lancaster and York his interests, if not also his sympathies, inclined him to favour the Yorkists , for their strength on the borders of South Wales was overwhelming. However, he made his peace with the king and queen Margaret in 1452 , and again at Leicester in 1457 . During the next few years he was loyal to the Crown , and this partly explains the Yorkist panic at Ludford ( 12 Oct. 1459 ). As a reward he received extensive grants from the confiscated estates of York and Warwick ( 5 Feb. 1460 ). In 1459 he m. Anne Devereux , sister of Walter , lord Ferrers of Chartley . After the battle of Northampton ( July 1460 ) Warwick gave him extensive authority in South Wales . In Oct. he represented Hereford in Parliament . Henceforth he threw in his lot with the Yorkists , and this largely explains their victory at Mortimer's Cross ( 2 Feb. 1461 ). His rise in royal favour was now rapid. He was made a privy chancellor , and was present at Baynard's castle when the earl of March was proclaimed king as Edward IV ( Mar. 1461 ). At the coronation he became lord Herbert of Raglan ( 4 Nov. ). He was chief justice and chamberlain of South Wales . During the next few years Edward IV showered favours upon him 'to the secret displeasure of the earl of Warwick .' Having received the submission of Pembroke castle , a Lancastrian stronghold, Herbert was given the custody of the young «u»Henry , earl of Richmond «/u», whom he betrothed in his will to his daughter Maud ; he was made a K.G. ( April 1462 ) and became a member of the king's Inner Council . The feud between Herbert and Warwick became embittered when Herbert 's son and heir, William , was made lord Dunster Sept. 1466 ), and especially when Herbert accompanied the king to demand the Great Seal from the Chancellor , Warwick 's brother, George , archbishop of York ( June 1467 ). Next year ( July 1468 ), Herbert was commissioned to reduce Harlech , still held by the Lancastrians ; the castle surrendered in Aug. As his reward Herbert received the earldom of Pembroke ( 8 Sept. ). In a striking poem, Guto'r Glyn (q.v.) now appealed to Herbert to become a national leader and rid Wales of English officials. However, he was defeated by Warwick 's forces at Edgecote ( July 1469 ), taken prisoner , and executed . This defeat was regarded by contemporary Welsh poets as a national calamity.

William Ap Thomas Herbert Father: Thomas Ap Gwilym b: Abt 1357 in Wernddu, Monmouthshire, Wales and Mother: Mawd Morley b: Abt 1360 in Llansaint-Freed (St. Brides Head), Monmouthshire, Wales

Notes for Thomas Ap Gwilym

Thomas ap Gwilym, of Perth-hir, Rickfield, Mon; married Mawd, daughter of Sir John Morley, of Llansanffraid, near Abergavenny, and died 1438. [Burke's Peerage] --------------------------------------------- Copied from Herbert, George biography, 88.1911 encyclopedia.org/H/HERBERT_GEORGE.htm: Thomas ap Gwilim Jenkin, called the fourth son, is ancestor of all those who bore the surname Herbert. --------------------------------------------- The following material was copied from Jane Williams Flank, World Connect db=jwflank, rootsweb.com: Note that there are conflicting statements, depending on the source, many of which have been discounted. Pembroke 'wore the garter,' which required for eligibility 'a gentleman of blood,' defined by Beltz on page 84 of his "Order of the Garter" thus; 'He shall have three descents of noblesse, of name and arms, on his father's and on his mother's side.' Sir William Herbert, Lord of Ragland, Earl of Pembroke was third "descent" from the Master Sergeant of Abergavenny. It was when King Edward created Sir William an earl that the 'descent' from the Norman Conqueror was established. Sir William's father Gwillam ap Thomas ap Gwillam, had been knighted on the field of Agincourt, 1415, when he and two other Welsh archers saved Henry V's life. Accolade was bestowed on the spot. Later the Heralds had to give them English names. Why they went so far back for the name Herbert is explained by the fact that Herbert had become English while Thomas was still Welsh. When, in 1461, heralds questioned the about-to-be earl's right to the name Herbert, the king appointed a commission of wise men to decide the matter. At the end of the year they handed in a report written in four languages, Latin, British (Welsh), French, and English. It read: ". . . said honorable Earl is named William Herbert, son of Jenkin, son of Adam, son of Reginald, son of Peter, son of Herbert, son of Peter, son of Herbert, son of Herbert, a noble Lord descended of the blood of the Crown of England, for he was natural son of Henry I, son of William the Conqueror." Sir S. Meyrick, authority on the Herbert family, says the heralds forged the lineage to please the king, but it is amusing. It is what heralds thought in 1461, and what Mr Jones of Tregaron shows on his chart made in 1592, and quoted by Nicholas in "Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County-Founders of Wales." But in 1750 Collins says the Count of Vermandois' son married "Julian who had been the king's mistress." Old Welsh writers call Earl Pembroke "Gwillm Ddu, "Black William." Nicholas say Thomas, youngest son of William ap Jenkin ap Adam, "made a great addition to his fortune by marriage to Maud, daughter of Sir John Morley, and that part of her dowry was Ragland Castle. Bradney says (vol 2, pt 2, p 3) that Thomas' son Gwillam, Sir William Herbert, bought it from his stepson, James, Lord Berkeley. The widow, Berkeley, Sir William's first wive, was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Bluett. Bradney says Ragland Castle was given to Bluett by a De Clare who built it. [Genealogies of Virginia Families III:110-111 ]

Sources:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306 Title: Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com Page: William Addams Reitwiesner, 3 July 2000 Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306 Text: 1438

Thomas Ap Gwilym Father: Gwilym Ap Jenkin b: Abt 1320 in Wernddu, Monmouthshire, Wales Mother: Gwenllian Verch Hywel b: Abt 1335 in Parc Letis, Llangatwg Dyffry, Monmouthshire, Wales. Gwenllian daughter of Hywel "Fychan" Ap Hywel b: Abt 1304 in Parc Letis, Llangatwg Dyffry, Monmouthshire, Wales Hywel wifeAlice Verch Llewelyn b: 1306 in Castell Madog, Llnfhngl Fchn, Breconshire, Wales

Notes for Gwilym Ap Jenkin

Gwilym ap Jenkin; Master Sgt of Abergavenny 1340; married Gwenllian, daughter of Hywel Fychan ap Hywel and died c1377, leaving [Thomas], with numerous other issue. [Burke's Peerage] -------------------------------------------------------------------- Copied from Herbert, George biography, 88.1911 encyclopedia.org/H/HERBERT_GEORGE.htm: Jenkin's son, Gwilim ap Jenkin who followed his father as master sergeant is given six sons by the border genealogists, no less than six score pedigrees finding their origin in these six brothers. Their order is uncertain, although the Progers of Werndee, the last of whom sold his ancestral estate in 1780, are reckoned as the senior line of Gwilim's descendants. But Thomas ap Gwilim Jenkin, called the fourth son, is ancestor of all those who bore the surname Herbert. Sources:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306

Gwilym Ap Jenkin Father: Jenkin Ap Adam b: Abt 1290 in Wernddu, Monmouthshire, Wales Mother: Lowri Verch Philip b: Abt 1300 in Wernddu, Monmouthshire, Wales

Notes for Jenkin Ap Adam

Jenkin ab Adam, of Gwern-ddu, Llandeilo Bertholau, Abergavenny; married Lowri, daughter of Philip ab Adam Fychan. [Burke's Peerage] --------------------------------------------- Jenkin was a clerk to the Lord of Abergavenny, and lived at Llanvapley. His only child was William. --------------------------------------------- Copied from Herbert, George biography, 88.1911 encyclopedia.org/H/HERBERT_GEORGE.htm:

Jenkin ap Adam (temp. Edward III), who had a small Monmouthshire estate at Llanvapley and the office of master sergeant of the lordship of Abergavenny, a place which gave him precedence after the steward of that lordship.

Sources:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306

Jenkin Ap Adam Father: Adam Ap Cynhaethwy b: 1250 in Cilycwm, Llandovery, Carmarthenshire, Wales Mother: Cristin Verch Gwarin b: 1265 in Wernddu, Monmouthshire, Wales

Note: Adam ap Cynhaethwy; married Cristin, daugther of Gwarin Ddu. [Burke's Peerage]

Note: There is an alternate pedigree to this one in Burke's Peerage, which names him Adam FitzHerbert (b. 1310, m. Christian verch Gwaring), son of Herbert FitzPeter (b. 1292, m. Margaret Walsh), son of Peter FitzReginald (b.1275, d. 18 Nov 1322, m. Alice Broadspere). Genealogies of Virginia Families and (probably) Burke's Dormant & Extinct Peerages are referenced as sources for this alternate pedigree found in World Connect db=jwflank, rootsweb.com. Peter FitzReginald is in my ancestry files with Ancestral Roots stating that he m. Ela Martel. For the time being I am sticking with BP and AR.

Sources:

Title: Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999 Page: 2306

Adam Ap Cynhaethwy Father: Cynhaethwy Ap Herbert b: Bef 1183 in Cilycwm, Llandovery, Carmarthenshire, Wales Mother: Miss Verch Rhys b: Abt 1227 in Wales

Cynhaethwy Ap Herbert Father: Herbert Ap Godwin b: Abt 1165 in Cilycwm, Llandovery, Carmarthenshire, Wales Mother: Alice Broadspeare b: 1165 in Usk, Monmouthshire, Wales

This all that I know about them

Dafydd Gam Family

Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam b: Abt 1385 in Peutun, Llan Ddew, Breconshire, Wales. 2nd hubsand William Ap Thomas Herbert

Note 1st Husbband Roger Vaughan b: Abt 1377 in Bredwardine, Herefordshire, England Married: 1403 in Brodorddyn, Herefordshire, England Below you find Roger Vaughan family to the Ap Tomas family

2nd husband 2nd wife

A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British ... By Bernard Burke Sir William ap Thomas alas Herbert knt who resided at Regian Castle in the regin of Henry V m'd 1st Gwladys widow of Sir Roger Vauhan Knt who fell at Agincourth by the side of Henry V Gwladys daughter of Sir David Gam knighted by Henry V m'd 2d Margaret wife of sir Henry Weogan knt of Wiston

Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam Father: Dafydd "Gam" Ap Llewelyn b: 1351 in Peutun Llan Ddew, Breconshire, Wales also known as ( David Gaines) and Mother: Gwenllian Ferch Howell b: 1355 in Abercrai, Breconshire, Wales

Notes for Dafydd "Gam" Ap Llewelyn

Annals and antiquities of the counties and county families of ..., Volume 1 By Thomas Nicholas

"THE GAMES FAMILY, OF NEWTON".

Caradog Freichfras, Kt. of the Round Table, m. Tegaurfron, dau. of King Pelynor. His son was Cawrdaf, Lord of Ferreg and Brecon, so it is recorded. From Cawrdaf in the i4th generation is said to have descended Bleddyn ap Maenarch, Lord of Garthmadryn (Brecon) when Bernard Newmarch arrived. He had ;//. Elinor, dau. of Tewdwr Mawr, and sister of Rhys ap Tewdwr. The son of Bleddyn and Elinor, Gwgan, m. Gwenllian, dau. of Philip Gwys, Lord of Wiston, Pemb., and had issue Walter, who became Sir Walter Wogan, of Wiston, the progenitor of the Wogans, of Wiston and other places ; and Trahaern. Trahaern, the second son, Lord of Llangorse, m. Joan, dau. of Bleddyn, Lord of Cilsant, and their gr. gr.son was Einion Sais who m. for his first wife Joan, dau. of Howel, Lord of Miscin, and their gr. gr. gr. son was Dafydd ap Llywelyn, afterwards called, from a cast or squint he had in one of his eyes, Dafydd Gam, or the crooked. Sir David Gam, Kt., m. Gwenllian, dau. of Gwilym ap Howel y Grach. Their eldest son, Morgan, m. as his second wife Margaret, dau. of Lewelyn Gwilym Rees Lloyd ap Adam, and had a son Meredith, whose descendant m. Lewis Prodger, of Gwernvale (hence the Prodger Arms), and another son, Gwallter, of Porthgwyn, which his descendants sold to John Games of Newton. A third son, Jevan, or Edward, m. Anne, dau. of Gwilym Lloyd. Their son Gwilym m. Margaret, dau. of John Watkin Meredith Havard, of Pencelly, and had two daus. The second son, Morgan, m. Gwladis, dau. of Morgan Bloet, or Blewet (by a dau. of William Burchill) ; and «b»their son John, of Newton, m. Margaret, dau. of Thomas Gwalter ap Jenkin Havard. «/b»Their second son, Meredith Games, of Buckland, m. Gwenllian, dau. of Thomas Gwyn, of Trecastle.«b» The eldest son, Edward Games, of Newton,, m. Elizabeth, dau. of Sir William Vaughan, of Porthaml. He was Sheriff of Brecon 1558, and d. 1564. Their son, Sir John Games, Kt, of Newton (builder of the house still standing), m. for his second wife Elizabeth, dau. of Meredith Games, and had two sons, Edward Games, Sheriff in 1623, who m. Bridget, dau. of Sir Walter Vaughan, of Fallerstone, Wilts, and d. s. p.; and John Games, who m. Elizabeth, dau. of Richard Hoo, or Hoe, of Skerning, otherwise Skarming, Norfolk. From John was descended John Games, of Newton, who d. 1645, vita patris, s.p.

The Games could build houses to last longer than their own posterity. The old house of Newton, which we give p. 83, and which is currently held in the neighbourhood to have been the residence of Sir David Gam, and has been described and published as such in the Art Journal, &c., was most certainly not his place of abode at any time, though the old dwelling on the spot may have been his place of frequent sojourn, being the property of a near relation. His patrimony was more likely to be the castle of his ancestor, Einion Sais, in the parish of Llanspyddid, the site of which is called the " Castle Field " to this day, but of which castle not a trace remains. The land is the property of Mr. Williams, of Penpont. But David's father had also purchased the lands of Peyton in Garthbrengy and Llanddew parishes, and it is conjectured that it was from Peyton, or Peityn Gwyn, that David started for Machynlleth, with the intent of taking the life of Glyndwr.

NEWTON, NEAR BRECON (from a drawing by Birket Foster). This interesting specimen of the strong and not unsightly mansions of the Elizabethan age, half fortress and half domestic residence, was built in 1582 by Sir John Games, Kt., son of Edward Games of Newton. This is shown by Jones (Hist, of JBrec.) to be the case, from an inscription on each side of the shield of arms sculptured in stone on the fireplace in the great hall, " John Games, mab ag etyfedd hena Edward Games ap John ap Morgan ap Edward ap Morgan ap Dafydd Gam, 1582. Ar Dduw y gyd. Games," John Games, the son and eldest 'heir of Edward Games, &c., 1582. On God depends everything. Games.

Sir David Gam, Kt., the most prominent member of this once prominent family, deserves more than a passing notice. The name by which he was known at the time he lived was Davydd ap Llewelyn, the dignity of knighthood being only conferred upon him as his last breath was escaping on the field of Agincourt. Of impulsive and violent temper, prompt in action without calculation of consequences, cruel, unscrupulous, and brave, he was a dangerous man to either friend or foe. To use Jones's words, he lived like a wolf, and died like a lion. He started in life by slaying a kinsman in the street of Brecon, and fleeing to England to escape the consequences. He was a strong partisan, after this, of the English kings, Henry IV. and Henry V., under the former of which he undertook, in 1402, the assassination of the patriot insurrectionist, Owen Glyndwr (Owen having just traversed Breconshire with fire and sword), at Machynlleth ; and for his pains, though spared execution, got several years of imprisonment. This was the darkest blot on the stormy life of David Gam, for though the provocation was doubtless great, the mode of retaliation was base and atrocious. He was no sooner released than he again devoted himself to the cause of the Henrys. In 1415 Henry V. met the French at Agincourt, and there, in the crisis of a signal victory, when Henry himself was hemmed in and borne down by the enemy, " Davydd ap Llewelyn " (with other of his countrymen) rushed to the rescue of the king, and effected his deliverance ; but the brave deliverer fell mortally wounded. Henry, on the spot, as the last blood was ebbing, made him a knight, conferring the same honour on Gam's son-in-law, Roger Vaughan of Tre'rtwr, who also fell.

It has been held by many that Shakspere in his Henry V. has under the character of Fluellin portrayed Sir David Gam. Theophilus Jones gives his sanction to this opinion. It can scarcely be correct, for after the battle, Fluellin being in conversation with Henry, a list of the dead is handed to the king, who reads out the names of the principal men who had fallen, and amongst them is " Davy Gam, Esquire." Shakspere has frequent anachronisms and inconsistencies, but it is inconceivable that he should on the same spot represent the same person as two persons, the one living, the other dead. In Fluellin the dramatist may be considered rather as embodying his own ideal of a brave, irascible, exacting \\Velshman, faithful in the service of the king, and freely admitted to his presence\emdash a type, in fact, of the Welsh people, whom Henry looked upon with a kindly eye, partly because he was born at Monmouth, and chiefly because of their enthusiastic support of his throne. Henry s.xys of him,\emdash

" I do know Fluellin valiant, And touched with choler ; hot as gunpowder, And quickly will return an injury." The character of Fluellin is on the whole higher than that of the real David Gam; it has no tinge of cruelty or baseness; its Welsh patriotism is warm and simple as the ardent love of a child. Flu. I do believe your Majesty takes no scorn to wear the leek on St. Tavy's day. "A". Henry. I wear it for a memorable honour ; for I am Welsh, you know, good countryman. " Flit. All the water in the Wye cannot wash your Majesty's Welsh plood out of your pody, I can tell you that; God pless it and preserve it as long as it pleases his Grace and his Majesty too. "Jf. Henry. Thanks, my good countryman. " Flu I am your Majesty's countryman; I care not who know it; I will confess it to all the 'orld. I need not be ashamed of your Majesty, praised be God, so long as your Majesty is an honest man."

The Welsh national feeling could not be more truly embodied in words. Then, in the contemptuous persistency with which Pistol is compelled to " eat the leek " he had despised, the same character is faithfully portrayed, without the introduction of the excessive violence which belongs to David Gam :\emdash

" I peseech you heartily, scurvy, lowsy knave, at my desires and my requests and my petitions, to eat, look you, this leek. . . . You called me yesterday mountain squire, but I will make you to-day a squire of low degree. I pray you, fall to ; if you can mock a leek you can eat a leek. "Fist. Must I bite? "Flu. Yes, certainly ; and out of doubt and out of questions too, and ambiguities. " Pist. Quiet thy cudgel, thou dost see I cat. "Flu. Much goot do you, scald, knave, heartily. Nay, pray you, throw none away; the skin is goot for you proken coxcomb. When you take occasions to see leeks hereafter, I pray you mock at them, \emdash that is all. "fitt. Good. " Flu. Ay, leeks is goot. Hold you, there is a groat to heal your pate. . . . Yes, verily, and in trulh, you shall take it, or I have another leek in my pocket which you shall cat. . . . God be wi' you, and keep you, and heal your pate."

All this and much more takes place after the announced death of " Davy Gam, Esquire," which is proof conclusive that Shakspere had not in view the temper and conduct of Gam- when presenting us with the character of Fluellin. The name of Sir David Gam will always be a name of mark in Brecknockshire, partly through the weight of the family of which he was a member, partly through the boldness and energy of his own career, and the circumstances of its termination. He has been dead four centuries and a half, but his deeds are fresh in the popular memory; and the old house of Newton, though built a hundred and seventy years after his death, serves as a memento of him and his family"

All this and much more takes place after the announced death of "Davy Gam, Esquire," which is proof conclusive that Shakspere had not in view the temper and conduct of Gam when presenting us with the character of Fluellin.

The name of Sir David Gam will always be a name of mark in Brecknockshire, partly through the weight of the family of which he was a member, partly through the boldness and energy of his own career, and the circumstances of its termination. He has been dead four centuries and a half, but his deeds are fresh in the popular memory ; and the old house of Newton, though built a hundred and seventy years after his death, serves as a memento of him and his family. Games of Tregaer. Edward Games of Tregaer, second son of Edward Games of Newton, who d. 1564, m. Jennet, dau. of John Walbeofife, and had a son, Edward, who m. Gwenllian, dau. of Jenkin ap leuan Ddu, of Glyn Nedd. Roger, their son, m. a dau. of Howel John Powel of Maesmawr. Their eldest son, Bartholomew Games, m. Cissil, dau. of Humphrey Baskerville of Pontrilas. They had several children, 4 daus. and 4 sons. Two sons d. s. p. Of the remaining 2 sons, Edward m. Anne, dau. of Lewis Gunter of Gileston, and had 2 daus. Walter Games (second son) of Pencelli m. Margaret, dau. of William Jeffreys, alias Dilwyn, d. 1744. He had 2 sons, Bartholomew, whose issue was a dau. Anne, who m. Thomas Watkins of Llangynider, and William Games, clerk, Rector of Llandetty, who m. Elizabeth Thomas of Abercriban, and left an only dau., Elizabeth, who m. Thomas, son of John Watkins of Brecon. Thus ended this branch.

Games of Aberbran. c Morgan, son of Sir David Gam, already mentioned, m. (and) Margaret, dau. of Llewelyn Gwilym Rees Lloyd ap Adam, and had a son, Llewelyn of Penfathrin^ who m. Jennet, dau. of Lewis Rhaglan. They had 4 daus., one of whom m. Trahaern Morgan Tew, whose son John m. Jennet, dau. of William Havard of Aberbran. Their son, John Games of Aberbran, m. Anne, dau. of Sir William Vaughan, Kt. They had 9 daus. and 3 sons. Catharine m. William WalbiefFe ; Joan m. David Gwyn of Glanbran, and (2nd) Roger Williams of Park ; Margaret m. Sir David Williams of Gwernyfed ; Elizabeth, levan Rhys of Buallt, and (2nd) John, third son of Sir John Price, of the Priory, Brecon; Joan m. John Gwilym John Vaughan of Ystradfellte ; Maud, a nat. dau. by Joan, dau. of Sir Richard Burchill, m. leuan Rhys John Vaughan of Porthyrogof. William Games, the eldest son, m., but d. s. p. Thomas Games, second son, m. Elinor, dau. of John Morgan of Pen-y-crug, and had issue 2 sons ; the eldest John Games, who m. Wilgiford, dau. of Sir Edward Awbrey of Tredomen, whose family ceased in a grandson, John Games. Richard, third son, m. Mary, dau. of Thomas Prichard, and had issue a dau., who //;. Major Herbert ; a second son, William, who m. Mary, dau. of Sir Richard Basset, and d. s. p. ; Henry, who d. s. p. ; and the eldest son, Richard Games of Llanelly and Penderin, who ///. Elizabeth, dau. of Peers Deere of Glamorganshire, and had issue Edward Games, who d. s. p. Thus ends the Games family The National Library of Wales ...

DAFYDD GAM (d. 1415), Welsh warrior, was the son of Llywelyn ap Hywel Fychan, a Brecknock landowner of the stock of Einon Sais, whose castle stood at Pen-pont on the river Usk. His byname signified that he squinted or had lost an eye. Tradition averred that he fled from his homeland after killing his relative, Richard of Slwch, in the High Street of Brecon

He first appears, as a king's esquire, in April 1400; in this capacity he was to receive forty marks a year («i»Cal. Close Rolls«/i», 79). Since Henry had been for some years, through his marriage to Mary Bohun, in control of the lordship of Brecknock, the association was probably not new; Dafydd, at any rate, remained a loyal Lancastrian until his death. In Nov. 1401 he was rewarded out of rebel lands (Cal. Pat. Rolls«/i», 11), and, according to the Scottish historian, Walter Bower, he had a part in the royal victory over «u»Owain Glyn Dwr at Pwll Melyn, near Usk, on 5 May 1405 (Scotichronicon«/i», ed. W. Goodall, 1759, ii, 452). This date throws doubt upon the familiar story of his treacherous attack upon «u»Owen «/u»at the parliament of Machynlleth in 1404; it has other doubtful features, and, in any case, is not heard of until the time of «u»Robert Vaughan, Hengwrt (d. 1667)

Bibliography: Dictionary of National Biography ; J. E. Lloyd , Owen Glendower / Owen Glyn Dwr , 1931 , 43, 142, 148; Gwaith Lewis Glyn Cothi , 1-15; Heraldic Visitations of Wales and Part of the Marches«/i» , 1846 , i, 56-7. Author: Sir John Edward Lloyd, D.Litt., F.B.A., F.S.A. (1861-1947), Bangor.

In the book, IN SEARCH OF WALES, H.V. Morton says; Among the Welshmen that followed King Henry to the French Wars ...tough warriors under the command of Davy the One-eyed... did gallant service at Agincourt." The King Henry referred to is Henry V of England, and the French Wars are those of Henry's invasion of France culminating in the decisive battle of Agincourt in 1415."Davy the one- eyed" is David Gam, who played a rather conspicuous part in English history and literature.

This David Gam, according to abundant and reliable evidence, was a son of Llewellyn, who traced his family back, through many notable Welsh ancestors to Cradoc Fraich-Fras (Cradoc of the Strong Arm), a knight of King Arthur's Round table; and to Brychan, one of the ancient Kings of Wales. The "Gam" was a nickname, signifying crippled or lame-forerunner of the English word "Game" used in the same sense-and had reference to a defect or injury of one of David's eyes, causing historians to describe him variously as "The Squint eyed" or "The one-eyed". Theophilus Jones states in A HISTORY OF THE COUNTY OF BRECKNOCK that he was probably 55 or 60 years old when he went to France, since he left both children and grandchildren behind. He was an athletic person with red hair and before the invasion he was already rated a squire in the service of the King.

The ancestors and descendants of David Gam came primarily from "A History of the County of Brecknock" by Theophilus Jones, Volume Two, published sold by Blissett, Davies and Co., 14 Bridge Street, in 1909. Theophilus Jones was the Deputy Registrar of the Archdeaconry of Brecon.

It was at AGINCOURT that David Gam won the accolade of Knighthood-at the cost of his life. In a furious action, in which with personal daring he saved the life of the King who was hemmed in and about to be overpowered, he received wounds from which he died, either on the field of battle or shorly after. At any rate, the king knighted him there "Sir Davy Gam". Mr Jones makes this important statement: "From this David Gam or Sir David Gam, all ye Games of Breckockshire and elsewhere are descended...".

Sir Walter Raleigh has an eulogium upon his bravery and exploits in field of Agincourt, in which he prefers his greatness of soul to that of Mago, and compares him to Hannibal. It is believed he was the original of Shakespeare's character of Fluellin, of Henry V, "for," says Jones' history of Brecon County, "there was no other person of that country in the English Army who could have been supposed to have been upon such terms of familiarity with the King; and it must be observed that Llewellyn was the name by which he was kwown in that army."

David's children took the name Gam as their surname. This in the course of a century became Game and eventually Games.

The traditional belief of the Gaines family in America that they are descended are of Welsh origin and descended from Davy Gam and the Games family of Brecknockshire.

David lived at Peytin Gwin, Brecknockshire, Wales

Book, "Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith". pages 787-788:

Dafydd ap Llewllyn, called from a cast or squint he had in one eye, Dafydd Gam, the Crooked. This was the celebrated David Gam, Knight.

There are two references for David Gam, the first being Ancestry of John Whitney, by Henry Melville. pp 102 and 216. (The Robert Whitney who married Constance. Touchet had married 1st Alice Vaughn, daughter of Thomas Vaughn, son of Sir Roger Vaughn and Gladys Gam, daughter of Sir David Gam. You descend from Robert Whitney's 2nd wife, Constance Touchet. This explains the Gam data in the Whitney book.)

Sir David Gam, in the Whitney book, was hero of Agincourt in 1415. His daughter Gladys married Sir Roger Vaughn. Her husband and her father were both killed at the battle of Agincourt, in France, with Henry V, King of England. In a lull of the battle, after the French were rolled back in confusion, these two, known as Davydd ap Llewellyn and Roger Vychen or Vaughn, were found just alive in the midst of a heap of slain, and before they breathed their last, they were held up to receive from the King, Henry V of England, the honour of knighthood. Henry V had been born at Monmouth, the Western county of England, and in the Marches between England and Wales, on the banks of the Wye River, and consequently had for his most devoted adherents some of his old neighbors and boyhood friends.

To the French war there followed him, as personal esquires, David Gam and his son-in-law Roger Vaughn of Bredwardine, and Walter Lloyd. The morning before Agincourt,Gam was sent out as a scout to ascertain the number of the enemy, and finding the whole country covered, as far as the eye could reach, with the forest glittering with lances, outnumbering England 10 to 1, Gam reported laconically:"There are enough to be killed, enough to be taken and enough to run away."

The other references for David Gam is: Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales, by Thomas Nicholas, pub. 1872, pp 91 and 94. Sir David Gam, Knight, the most prominent of this once prominent family, deserves more than a passing notice. The name by which he was known at the time he lived was Dawvydd ap Llewellyn, the dignity of knighthood being only conferred upon him as his last breath was escaping on the field at Agincourt. Of impulsive and violent temper, prompt in action without calculation of consequences, cruel, unscrupulous and brave, he was a dangerous man to either friend or foe. It was said he lived like a wolf and died like a lion.

He started in life by slaying a kinsman in the street of Brecon, but was exonerated. He was a strong partisan of the English Kings, Henry IV and V. He was especially active against Owen Glyndwr, or Glendower, who had traversed Breconshire with fire and sword, for though the provocation was doubtless great, his mode of retaliation was atrocious. He was imprisoned, but no sooner released than he again devoted himself to the cause of the Henrys IV and V. In 1415, Henry V met the French at Agincourt, and there, in the crisis of a signal victory, when Henry V himself was hemmed in and borne down by the enemy, David ap Llewellyn with others of his countryment rushed to the rescue of the King and effected his deliverance; but the brave defender fell mortally wounded, and Henry V on the spot, as the last blood was ebbing, made him a knight, conferring the same honour on Gam's son-in-law Roger Vaughn of Tretwr, who also fell. David Gam:

Gam, David d. 1415, Welsh warrior, is more properly styled Davydd ab Llewelyn. 'Gam' is a nickname meaning 'squinting,' which, like other Welsh nicknames, became equivalent to a surname. David's father was Llewelyn, the son of Hywel, the son of Eineon Sais. Llewelyn possessed fair estates in the parishes of Garthbrengy and Llanddew, which lay within the honour or lordship of Brecon, a dependency of the earldom of Hereford, and after 1399 lapsed to the crown by the accession of Henry IV, who had long enjoyed that earldom. Peytyn was the name of Llewelyn's chief residence. David is described in a verse attributed to Owain Glyndwr as a short red-haired man with a squint. He was faithful to his lord, Henry IV, even during the revolt of Owain [see Glendower, Owen]. He was rewarded for his services by a large share in the South Welsh lands confiscated from rebels in 1401 (Wylie, Hist. of Henry IV, p. 245).

There is a story that David plotted against the life of Owain when attending the Welsh parliament at Machynlleth. But it rests on no early authority, misdates the year of the Machynlleth parliament, and wrongly makes David a brother-in-law of Owain. There seems nothing to show that David ever wavered in his allegiance. David was taken prisoner by Owain, probably at a time when Owain's successes were very few. On 14 June 1412 David's father, Llewelyn ab Hywel, and the seneschal and receiver of Brecon were empowered to treat with Owain, and by ransom or by capturing rebel prisoners to extricate David from his rigorous imprisonment (Federa, viii. 753).

It is said that David soon after got into trouble by killing a kinsman in an affray in Brecon town. In 1415 David, accompanied by three foot archers only, followed Henry V on his invasion of France (Nicolas,Battle of Agincourt, p. 379). It is reported that when, on the eve of the battle of Agincourt, he was questioned by the king as to the number of the enemy, he replied 'that there were enough to be slain, enough to be taken prisoners, and enough to run away.' The story, however, first appears in Sir Walter Raleigh's 'History of the World' (p. 451). David was slain at the battle of Agincourt, which was fought on 25 Oct. 1415. The contemporary chroniclers who notice his death simply describe him as an esquire (Walsingham, ii. 313; cf. 'Chronicles of London,' quoted in Nicolas, pp. 279-80). There is a tradition that he was knighted for his valour when dying on the field of battle, and the fact that one chronicler says that two recently dubbed knights were slain (Gesta Henrici Quinti, p. 58, Engl. Hist.Soc.) is thought to bear out the story. But one writer at least mentions both the two knights and David Gam (Nicolas, p. 280). Lewis Glyn Cothi, a Welsh poet of the next generation, who celebrated the praises of David's children and grandchildren, regularly speaks of him, however, as 'Syr Davydd Gam' (Gwaith, pp. 1, 8). It has been suggested that David is the original of Shakespeare's Fluellen. This is not at all an improbable conjecture, as Fluellen is plainly a corruption of Llewelyn, and David was generally called David Llewelyn, or ab Llewelyn. The reference to him in Raleigh shows also that his name was familiar to the age of Elizabeth.

David is said to have married Gwenllian, daughter of Gwilym, son of Hywel Grach. He left a family. His son Morgan became the ancestor of the Games of Breconshire. His daughter Gwladus was by her second husband, Sir William ab Thomas of Raglan, the mother of William, the first Herbert Earl of Pembroke.

Sources Besides authorities quoted in the text the biography of Gam in Theophilus Jones's Hist. of Breconshire, i. 160-1, ii. 156-69, with pedigrees; the pedigrees in Lewys Dwnn's Heraldic Visitation of Wales (Welsh MSS. Society); Gwaith Lewis Glyn Cothi; Sir Harris Nicolas's Battle of Agincourt; Tyler's Hist. of Henry V. published 1889

Sources:

Title: The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States Author: Gary Boyd Roberts Publication: 1993 Page: 391 Repository:

Title: Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes Author: Editor: Charles Mosley Publication: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, Crans, Switzerland, 1999 Page: 2306 Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Bleddyn ap Maenyrch 18, p.102 Title: Dictionary of Welsh Biography down to 1940 Author: John Edward Lloyd & R T Jenkins Publication: 1957 Page: 101, 354 Title: Y Bywgraffiadur Cymraig Hyd 1940 Publication: Anrhydeddus Gymdeithas y Cymmrodorion Title: The Visitation of Herefordshire made by Robert Cooke, Clarencieux, in 1569 Author: Frederic Williasm Weaver M.A, Publication: Exeter: Privately printed for the editor by William Pollard, 1886 Title: Llyfr Baglan, or, the Book of Baglan, Compiled Between the Years 1600 and 1607: Transcribed from the Original Manuscript Author: John Williams, Ed. Joseph Alfred Bradney Publication: London: Mitchell, Hughes and Clarke, 1910 Title: Castell Gorfod Collection Author: The Golden Grove Book of Pedigrees Publication: MSS 7 (i-xxi) and 12 Text: The original manuscript was arranged in books labeled Book A, B, C, D, G, I, K, L, M, and N. Once bound in the Library of Wales, they became Books 1-21. (An extensive index at the beginning of film no. 104,349 lists what is contained in Books A-N.) Books A, D, G, I, K, and L are divided into more than one bound volume. Additional microfilmed pages from books B and G can be found under: Advenae of Pembrokeshire from the Golden Grove MSS. Page: Book 12, Herberts Descendants, p.B231

Dafydd "Gam" Ap Llewelyn Father: Llewellyn Ap Hywel Fychan b: 1310 in Wales and Mother: Mawd Ferch Leuan b: 1320 in Wales

Notes for Llewellyn Ap Hywel Fychan

Also known as Gwillm ap Howel, Petyn Gwyn, Prince of Wales

Llewelyn Ap Howel (David Gams Father)

Llewelyn possessed fair estates in the parishes of Garthbrengy and Llanddew, which lay within the honour or lordship of Brecon, a dependency of the earldom of Hereford, and after 1399 lapsed to the crown by the accession of Henry IV, who had long enjoyed that earldom. Peytyn was the name of Llewelyn's chief residence.

On 14 June 1412 Llewelyn ab Hywel, and the seneschal and receiver of Brecon were empowered to treat with Owain Glendower, and by ransom or by capturing rebel prisoners to extricate David from his rigorous imprisonment (Federa, viii. 753).

Llewellyn Ap Hywel Fychan Father: Hywel Fychan Ap Hywel b: 1270 in Wales and Mother: Alice Ferch ap Llewellyn

Hywel Fychan Ap Hywel Father: Hywell Ab Einon Sais b: 1235 Mother: Lettice Ferch Cadwalter b: 1240

Hywell Ab Einon Sais Father: Einon Sais Ap Rhys b: 1200 in Wales Mother: Joan Ferch Hywel b: 1210 in Wales

Sir Thomas Johnes father was John ap Thomas, of Abermarlais , Carmarthenshire m’d Elizabeth, dau of Thomas Vaughan, Bredwardine. Sir Thomas's father was John ap Thomas, and his mother was Elsbeth ferch Thomas ap Vaughan. See Bartrum, op. cit., table "Einion ap Llywarch 7 (A5)" for the ancestry of Sir Thomas Jones of Abermarlais.

Notes for John ap Thomas

John ab Tomas, a son by his second wife, Elisabeth a dr. of John the Bold, Duke of Burgundy and Earl of Flanders, had Abermarlais by gift of his half brother Sir Rhys ab Tomas, K.G. John ab Tomas married Elinor, daughter of Sir Tomas Vychan (Vaughan), of Brodorddyn (Bredwardine), by Elinor, his wife, dr, of Sir Robert Whitney, Knt., Lord of Whitney, co. Hereford, by his second wife, Constance, daughter of Touchet, Lord Audley, slain at Blore Heath, 1458, and maternal grandchild of the Lady Constance Plantagenet, Countess of Gloucester, dr. of Edmund Langley Duke of York, son of King Edward III. The above Sir Tomas Vychan (Vaughan) was a grandson of Sir Richard Vychan, of Brodorddyn and Tre Twr, whose wife was Gwladys, daughter of Sir Dafydd Gam, who with his son-in-law were slain at the battle of Agincourt, temp. Henry V. The Arms borne by John ab Tomas were Arg. chev. inter three ravens proper within a bordure engrailed gules bezantee. Crest on two pole axes in Saltire or, a raven perched sa. Motto - " Deus pascit corvos." By his aforesaid wife he left issue

Sons

1. Sir Thomas Jones, or Johnes, son and heir, of whom presently. The original name was leuan or loan, corrupted into Jones. One of the Joneses of Llanfair Clydogau was the first to use Johnes.

2. Morgan Johnes, of Harmaston (co. Pembroke), married Mawd, of Picton, daughter of Sir Thomas Philipps, of Picton, Knight, and left Thomas Johnes, who married Elen, daughter of Sir John Wogan, Knight.

3. William, from whom Sir James Wilyams, of Pant Hywel, Knight banneret.

4. Walter Johnes.

Daughters

1. Elsbeth, married Tomas Lloyd, ab Robert, of Gelli-Gadrog and Glyn, Cydweli.

2. Jennet married Tomas ab Gwilym Fychan, died s. p.

3. ---- married Llewelyn Tomas.

4. Marged married Gruffydd ab Harri

[Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi]

Elsbeth ferch Thomas ap Vaughan Father: Thomas (Vychan) Vaughan b: Abt 1440 in Of Brodorddyn (Brodwarding)and Mother: Elinor Whitney b: Abt 1442 in Whitney, Herefordshire, England daughter of Robert Whitney b: 1410 in Whitney, Herefordshire, England Robert wife: Elsbeth (Alice) ferch Thomas Vaughan b: Abt 1425 in Tretower Castle, Powys, Montgomeryshire, Wales

Notes for Thomas (Vychan) Vaughan

Sources:

Title: The Visitation of Herefordshire made by Robert Cooke, Clarencieux, in 1569 Author: Frederic Williasm Weaver M.A, Publication: Exeter: Privately printed for the editor by William Pollard, 1886 Title: A History of the County of Brecknock Author: Theophilus Jones Publication: Printed and sold by Wm. & Geo. North, 1805 Title: Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi Author: John Rowland Publication: Carmarthen, William Spurrel, 1877 Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 1400-1500 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: Aberystwyth. Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru / The National Library of Wales, 1983 Page: Whitney 1, p.1748. Einion ap Llywarch 7(A5), p.647 Title: The history and antiquities of the county of Cardigan Author: Samual Rush Meyrick, A.B. Publication: Brecon: Published By Davies And Co., 14, Bridge Street; Anthony Bros., Ltd., "Hereford Times," 1907 Title: Heraldic Visitations of Wales and Part of the Marches Between the Years 1586 and 1613 by Lewys Dwnn Author: Lewys Dwnn; edited with notes by Sir Samuel Rush Meyrick Publication: Llandovery: William Rees, 1846 Title: The history of modern Wiltshire, Vol. 3 Author: Sir Richard Colt Hoare Publication: London, 1830

Thomas (Vychan) Vaughan Father: Watkin Vaughan b: Abt 1405 in Bredwardine, Herefordshire, England Mother: Elizabeth Wogan b: Abt 1420 in Weston, Daugleddau Cantreff, Pembrokeshire, Wales

Thomas (Vychan) Vaughan Father: Watkin Vaughan b: Abt 1405 in Bredwardine, Herefordshire, England Mother: Elizabeth Wogan b: Abt 1420 in Weston, Daugleddau Cantreff, Pembrokeshire, Wales

Notes for Watkin Vaughan

WATKIN VAUGHAN was slain by an arrow at Hereford, according to his elegy by Hywel Swrdwal . This elegy does not support the suggestion made by Evans (Wales and the Wars of the Roses, 128-9) that this incident took place at the battle of Mortimer's Cross. Watkin's wife was Elizabeth, daughter of «u»Sir Henry Wogan «/u». He is described in the pedigree books as lord of Bredwardine, Cwm, Tir Ralph, Llechryd, and the Gorred. At least fifteen children are ascribed to him. Mention must be made of the second son, WILLIAM VAUGHAN of Rhydhelig, of whom «u»Dr. John David Rhys «/u» reports that a family tradition maintained that it was he who slew the earl of Warwick when the kingmaker was stealthily escaping from Barnet field, 1471.

He was regarded as a champion in the field of battle with no one to equal him, after the death of his uncle, Thomas ap Roger of Hergest «/u». He was at one time constable of Aberystwyth castle and his praises were sung by «u»Dafydd Nanmor and Lewis Glyn Cothi (qq.v.). Lewis Glyn Cothi also sang to Lewis ap Watkin, calling him the Roland of Llanbedr Painscastle and Rhulen. According to «u»Lewis Dwnn , the Vaughans of Pont-faen, in Cemais, were descended from John Vaughan, another son. It is also said that John Vaughan, father of Sir Hugh Johneys, knight of the Sepulchre, 1441, was an illegitimate son of Walter Vaughan. Walter Vaughan's heir was Sir THOMAS VAUGHAN, who m. Eleanor, daughter of Robert Whitney. Lewis Glyn Cothi wrote a eulogy of him before he was knighted.

His heir was Sir RICHARD VAUGHAN, who was knighted at Tournai, 13 or 14 Oct. 1513, and who was sheriff of Herefordshire, 1530-1, and 1541-2. His wife was Anne, daughter of John Butler, and heiress of Dunraven and Pen-bre. The main line now removed from Bredwardine, and we find WALTER VAUGHAN, Sir Richard's heir, sheriff of Carmarthenshire in 1557, and living at Dunraven in 1584.

Walter's second son was CHARLES VAUGHAN, ancestor of the Vaughans of Cwmgwili and Pen-y-banc, and his heir was THOMAS VAUGHAN, sheriff of Carmarthenshire, 1566 and 1570. The latter m. Catherine, daughter of Sir Thomas Johnes of Abermarlais, and bought the estate of Fallerstone, Wilts. His heir, Sir WALTER VAUGHAN (knighted 27 June 1603) d. 4 June 1637, and was buried at Tenby. He was followed by his son, Sir CHARLES VAUGHAN, who m. Frances, daughter and heiress of Sir Robert Knolles of Porthaml \emdash see Vaughan of Porthaml family. Dunraven was sold by his son, THOMAS VAUGHAN, who, dying without a male heir, left the remainder of his estates to his sister, Bridget, who, in 1677, m. John Ashburnham, who was created lord Ashburnham, 20 May 1698. The estates remained in this family for another two centuries. The main line gave way at Bredwardine to another branch of the family, the Vaughans of Moccas \emdash see «u»Vaughan of Porthaml family «/u». The first of them recorded at Bredwardine is Watkin Vaughan, who wrote a letter to «u»lord Burghley «/u» from there, 17 Dec. 1584. His wife was Joan, daughter of Miles ap Harry of Newcourt, in the Golden Valley, and niece to «u»Blanch Parry (q.v.) «/u», queen Elizabeth's maid of honour. They had two sons, Harry, heir to Moccas and Bredwardine, and Rowland, heir of Newcourt. This Rowland was the author of the remarkable book entitled «i»Most approved and long experienced waterworkes«/i», 1610, which contains a long epistle to «u»William Herbert, earl of Pembroke >«/u». His wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Rowland Vaughan of Porthaml. HARRY VAUGHAN'S wife was a grand-daughter of Hugh Lewis of Harpton. Their heir was ROGER VAUGHAN (matriculated at Oxford, 11 May 1604, aged 15), who rebuilt Bredwardine castle, 1639-40. His son, HARRY VAUGHAN, m. Frances, daughter of Walter Pye, in 1635. After his death, she m. Edward Cornewall, of the Stapleton family, and it was his son who succeeded to Moccas, having purchased Bredwardine for himself.

Watkin Vaughan Father: Roger Vaughan b: Abt 1377 in Bredwardine, Herefordshire, England Mother: Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam b: Abt 1385 in Peutun, Llan Ddew, Breconshire, Wales. Roger was Gwladus first Husband and William Herbert was 2nd Husband above

Gruffudd Family

John ap Thomas Father: Thomas Ap Gruffudd b: Abt 1425 in Maenordeilo, Cantref Mawr, Carmarthenshire, Wales and Mother: Elizabeth ferch Sir John Gruffudd b: Abt 1430 in Burgundy, France, dau Sir John Griffith, of Llansadwrn and Abermarlais, Carmarthenshire, and was k. in a duel (bur. On Bardsey Island, Carmarthenshire.

Notes for Thomas Ap Gruffudd

Tomas ab Fruffydd, of Dinefawr, also a reowned soldier in the Wars of the Roses.. He married Elizabeth daughter and heiress (by his wife daughter of Lord Mountjoy)of Sir John Gruffydd of Abermarlais, Lord of Llanasdwren, seventh in descent from Ednyfed Fychan, Justiciary to Llewelyn ab Iorwertl A D 1240, b his wife Gwenllian, daugther of the Cymrie Prisce Rhys ab Gruffydd, of Dinefawr. It was in consequence of this marriag with this lady that Ednyfed's children her settled and became Lords of Llansadwrn, in South Wales. Thomas ab Gruffydd being disgusted with barbarous wars which then rent the country, traveled abroad in foreign courts, and remained sometime in the Court of Burgundy, where he contracted a second (2) marriage with Elisabeth daughter of John the Bold, Duke Burgundy. This Tomas ab Gruffydd inclined towards peace, hew owing to the unsettled state of the times engaged i several ducis and family lost his life in North Wales, and was buried in Bardsey, Island, Leaving issue from his marriages

Thomas was escheator for Cardiganshire between 1438 and 1450, and he succeeded his father as deputy Chamberlain in 1454 and as leaseholder of Dinefwr in 1460. The two brothers gave strong support to Jasper Tudor, who had been created earl of Pembroke, but their side was defeated at Mortimer's Cross in 1461, where the Yorkist opposition included their cousin John DWNN. After being captured at Carreg Cennen castle they had to make terms with Sir Roger VAUGHAN II and Sir Richard Herbert. Thomas regained possession of Dinefwr, which he held until 1465, but his Lancastrian sympathies caused him to be excluded from all offices thereafter until his death in 1474.

Thomas's wife Elizabeth was the heiress and only child of Sir John Gruffudd (d.1471) of Abermarlais, lord of Llansadwrn and of lands in Cardiganshire. Her family was important in Welsh history, one ancestor having commanded Welsh troops in the French wars including Crecy in 1346, and been knighted. More importantly, the family descended from Ednyfed Fychan, seneschal of Llywelyn the Great, and Gwenllian, the daughter of the LORD RHYS, as did the Tudor family (J.Davies p.140). After Elizabeth's death,

Thomas married Jonet MALEPHANT, sister of OWAIN'S wife ALSWN (Griffiths, Sir Rhys, p. 28).

Sources:

Title: Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi Author: John Rowland Publication: Carmarthen, William Spurrel, 1877 Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Einion ap Llywarch 7, p.330; Marchudd 15, p.682 Title: Heraldic Visitations of Wales and Part of the Marches Between the Years 1586 and 1613 by Lewys Dwnn Author: Lewys Dwnn; edited with notes by Sir Samuel Rush Meyrick Publication: Llandovery: William Rees, 1846 Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 1400-1500 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: Aberystwyth. Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru / The National Library of Wales, 1983 Page: Einion ap Llywarch 7(A1), p.643 Title: Castell Gorfod Collection Author: The Golden Grove Book of Pedigrees Publication: MSS 7 (i-xxi) and 12 Text: The original manuscript was arranged in books labeled Book A, B, C, D, G, I, K, L, M, and N. Once bound in the Library of Wales, they became Books 1-21. (An extensive index at the beginning of film no. 104,349 lists what is contained in Books A-N.) Books A, D, G, I, K, and L are divided into more than one bound volume. Additional microfilmed pages from books B and G can be found under: Advenae of Pembrokeshire from the Golden Grove MSS. Page: Book 2, Yryen Rheged, p.A138 Title: The Pembrokeshire historian: journal of the Pembrokeshire Local History Society, Bowen of Pentre Ifan and Llwyngwair Author: Major Francis Jones Publication: No. 6, 1979 Page: 33

Thomas Ap Gruffudd Father: Gruffudd Ap Nicholas b: Abt 1393 in Llandeilo Fawr, Maernordeilo, Carmarthenshire, Wales Mother: Mabel ferch Maredudd Dwnn

Notes for Gruffudd Ap Nicholas

GRUFFUDD ap NICOLAS (fl. 1425-1456), an esquire and a leading figure in the local administration of the principality of South Wales in the middle of the 15th cent. Nothing is known of his early years, but it is said that he was the posthumous son of Nicolas ap Phylip ap Syr Elidir Ddu (one of the knights of the Sepulchre) by his wife Jennet, daughter of Gruffydd ap Llewelyn Foethus.

Gruffudd Ap Nicolas (fl 1425-56), an esquire and a leading figure in the local administration of the principality of South Wales in the middle of the 15th cent. Nothing is known of his early years, but it is said that he was the posthumous son of Nicolas Ap Phylip Ap Syr Elidir Ddu (one of the knights of the Sepulchre) by his wife Jennett, daughter of Gruffydd Ap Llewelyn Foethus. The first authentic record of him is as holder of the office of king's approver for the lordship and new town of Dynevor in 1425. He was sheriff of Carmarthenshire in 1436. With Edmund Beaufort, parts of the lands of Phillip Clement were demised to him in 1437.

He was a power to be feared in West Wales in 1438, according to the evidence of Margaret Malefant in a petition to Parliament. He was farmer of the lordship of Dynevor in 1439, and his son John shared the office with him. In that same year we find his son Thomas escheator for Cardiganshire. In 1442-3, he again came to the notice of the authorities in London, when he and the abbot of Whitland were summoned to the metorpolis and the Privy Council ordered the arrest of his son Owen. Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, was his patron, and he received, 24 July 1443, the custody of the lordship of Caron and the commote of Pennarth during the minority of Maud, heiress of William Clement. He held session on behalf of duke Humphrey in the counties of Carmarthen and Cardigan. When the English inhabitants of North Wales towns petitioned Parliament in 1444, against the denization of more Welshmen, he and William Bulkeley were excepted by name. He was placed on a commission to enquire into the felonies committed by David Ap Meredith in Aberystwyth 2 July 1445. The fall of his patron in 1447 brought him into trouble, and he was imprisoned with other members of duke Humphrey's retinue. He was soon released and managed to retain the confidence of the court, continuing to act for the Justice of South Wales and, occasionally, for the chamberlain. John Delabere, bishop of S Davids, 1447-c. 1460, committed his bishopric to his care, and the duke of York obtained licence, 13 May 1449, to grant him and the bishop the castle, manor, and town of Narberth. He and his son Thomas were placed on a commission for the defence of the ports of south-west Wales, to muster forces, and erect beacons, 7 Oct 1450. About this time, when he was at the zenith of his power, the Carmarthen eisteddfod was held. The date and details are uncertain - reports vary between 1451 and 1453. Some maintain that it lasted three months at his cost at Dynevor and others state that it lasted a fortnight and that it was held at Carmarthen. It is agreed that Gruffudd Ap Nicolas was judge over the poets, and that the chair was awarded to Dafydd ab Edmwnd. It is pretty certain also that the eisteddfod revised the bardic metres and regulated the bardic fraternity. In 1454-5, the castle of Carregcennen was repaired and garrisoned upon his command. On the verge of the Wars of the Roses, he was on good terms with the court of Henry VI, and after the Yorkist victory at S Albans, 1455, he lost some of his offices. Yet, he appears to have taken offence at the coming of Edmund, earl of Richmond, to Pembroke, in 1456 if he was the 'Gruffith Suoh' who, with the earl of Richmond, was reported, 7 June 1456, by John Bocking, in a letter to John Paston, to be at war greatly in Wales. However, he and his sons, Thomas and Owen, were granted general pardons on 26 Oct 1456. His name then disappears from the records. Had he been alive on 1 March 1459 it is difficult to imagine that his name would have been left out of a commission entrusted to his two sons, Thomas and Owen, with Jasper and Owen Tudor. It is, therefore, impossible to accept the reports that he was mortally wounded either at the battle of Wakefield, 1460, or at Mortimer's Cross, 1461. His praises were sung by Dafydd ab Edmwnd, Hywel Ap Dafydd Ap Ieuan Ap Rhys, Rhys Llwyd Ap Rhys Ap Rhicert, Gwilym Ap Ieuan He, and Lewis Glyn Cothi. It is probable that the englynion attributed to him and Owen Dwnn and Griffith Benrhaw had their origin in the humour of bardic festivities. It is said that he was thrice m: (1) to Mabel, daughter of Meredith Ap Henry Dwnn, (2) to a daughter of Sir Thomas Perrot, and (3) to Jane, daughter of Jenkin Ap Rhys Ap Dafydd of Gilfach-wen. Three of his sons have been named, John who disappears early from the records, Owen, heir of Bryn y Beirdd, and Lewis Glyn Cothi's companion in hiding, and Thomas, who was slain in a skirmish at Pennal, probably during lord Herbert's expedition into North Wles in 1468. He was the father of Sir Rhys Ap Thomas (1449-1525). [Dictionary of Welsh Biography p313]

GRUFFUDD's last known act was to make over to his son OWAIN the castle and lordship of Narberth in February 1460/1, and he is likely to have died soon afterwards (Griffiths,«i» Sir Rhys «/i»p.24). GRUFFUDD'S wife, MABLI DWNN, will be taken up later with her own important family.

Sir Gruffydd ab Niclas, of Dinefawr, called the " Eagle of Caermarthen," who played a conspicuous part in the annals of the country and in the Wars of the Boses, was the most unflinching and staunchest supporter of the House of York. In more peaceful times he was a great patron of the bards, and was president of a grand eisteddfod held at Caermarthen. His vast resources and political influence, through blood relationship with the chief Houses in South Wales, enabled him to bring an army into the field which made him appear more like a Sovereign than a subject. He married thrice :- 1st, Mabli, eldest daughter of Meredydd ab Harri Dwnn of Cydweli and Cwrt Pibwr, after whose death he married, 2ndly, Marged, third dau. of Sir Thomas Perrot, of Haroldston (Tref Harallt), in the county of Pembroke by his wife Alis (Alice) Picton, of Cemmaes, descended from one of the original Knights of the Garter, temp. Edward III. viz., Sir Guy de Bryan, of Llacharn (Laugharne), K.G., Lord Admiral of the fleet sent against the French, and who is buried in the Abbey Church of Tewkesbury, where also rest the remains of his wife, Lady Elsbeth (Elisabeth) de Montacute, dr. of the Earl of Salisbury. Alis (Alice) Picton was paternally descended from a younger brother, Phylip, of Sir William Picton, of Picton Castle, Knt.); and, thirdly, Jane, daughter and coheiress to Siencyn ab Rhys, of Gilfach Wen, co. Cardigan, descended from Cadifor ab Dinawol, Lord of Castell Hywel. Gruffydd ab Niclas, although a follower and staunch adherent of Edward, Earl of March, as he had been of his father the Duke of York, was nevertheless highly complimented in an ode by the bard Lewys Glyn Cothi (vide his work). He was at last slain at the battle of Wakefield on the side of York, leaving a numerous issue by his three wives, the eldest of whom was [Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi]

Sources:

Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Einion ap Llywarch 7, p.330; Llywelyn ap Gwrgan 2, p.616. Cydifor ap Dinawel 3, p.166

Title: Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi Author: John Rowland Publication: Carmarthen, William Spurrel, 1877

Gruffudd Ap Nicholas Father: Nicholas Ap Philip b: Abt 1325 in Dynevor, Carmarthenshire, Wales Mother: Jennet Verch Gruffydd b: Abt 1325 in of Llangathen, Cetheiniog, Camarthenshire, Wales

Notes for Nicholas Ap Philip

Nothing is known of his (Gruffudd Ap Nicolas) early years, but it is said that he was the posthumous son of Nicolas Ap Phylip Ap Syr Eidir Ddu (one of the knights of the Sephulchre). [Dictionary of Welsh Biography p 313]

NICHOLAS ap PHILIP married a near-neighbor JONET f. GRUFFUDD ap LLYWELYN FOETHUS «i»(the Luxurious),«/i» who will be taken up in the line of JOHN ap REES. Little is known of NICHOLAS, and he may have died before he attained an office that would appear in state records, but his brother Gwilym ap PHILIP was important enough for his knowledge of the lordship of Llandovery to be sought in 1391 when its descent was investigated at Carmarthen following the death of the title holder, and he was receiver of the lordship of Kidwelly until 1401 (Griffiths, «i»Sir Rhys«/i», p.10). Gwilym married Gwladus, the daughter of HENRY DWNN, and he became a prominent supporter of Glyn Dwr's revolt and fought alongside his father-in-law for at least the years 1401-03 (R.R.Davies, «i»Glyn Dwr,«/i» pp.232, 273-4). Later Gwilym's son Rhys joined his cousin GRUFFUDD ap NICHOLAS in acting as deputy-constable of Dinefwr castle in 1429 (Griffiths p.11), and was deputy sheriff of Carmarthen c.1443-4 (p.14). Nicholas ap Philip was grandson of Elidyr Ddu. [Annals and Antiquties of Cymru I:168] ..................................... NICHOLAS, the eldest son, was grandfather of Thomas, whose son, Sir Rhys ap Thomas, was created a knight of the garter by HENRY VII. and obtained from that monarch other proofs of the king's recollection of his efforts to place him on the throne. Sir Griffith Rhys, eldest son of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, was the lineal ancestor of George, present LORD DYNEVOR. ...................................... Niclas ab Phylip (alias Fitz Urien), of the Crag. His father married Jonnett, widow of Gruffydd Fychan, Lord of Caio and Cil y Cwm, and by him, her first husband, ancestress to the Williams' of Ystrad Ffin, Lord of Cil y Cwm (vide p. 100 of Lewys Dwnn's "Heraldic Visitations in Wales" and the Marches), daughter of Gruffydd ab Llewelyn Foethus, who resided at Dryslwyn Castle, Lord of Llangathan, derived through the Lords of Llangathan from Elystan Glodrydd, Prince of Fferlis, founder of one of the Four Royal Tribes of Wales.* He died soon after his marriage, leaving a posthumous son who became a noted man in his time. [Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi]

Sources:

Title: Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales Author: Thomas Nicholas Publication: London: Longmans, Green, Reeder, 1875 Page: I:168

Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Einion ap Llywarch 7, p.330; Elystan Glodrydd 54, p.406 Title: Pedigree of the ancient family of Dolau Cothi Author: John Rowland Publication: Carmarthen, William Spurrel, 1877

Nicholas Ap Philip Father: Philip Ap Elidir b: in Dynevor, Carmarthenshire, Wales Mother: Gwladys ferch Dafydd Fras

Notes for Philip Ap Elidir

ELIDIR'S son, PHILIP ap ELIDIR, was one of the attorneys deputed in 1362 to deliver Carreg Cennen castle to John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, into whose service PHILIP passed («i»Calendar of Close Rolls«/i», 1360-4, 418), and he was paid by the duke in 1386 and the following year, presumably for other important functions he had performed (PRO, «i»Duchy of Lancaster, Rentals and Surveys«/i», 15/1 m.3; /2 m.2), as cited by Griffiths (p.10).

This family, long resident in the county of Carmarthen, claims descent from a common ancestor with the noble house of Dynevor. Urien Raged, so styled from his having large possessions in the district of Raged, South Wales, which comprised a portion of the present counties of Carmarthen, Glamorgan, and Pembroke, was ancestor of SIR ELIDIR DDU (or Sir Elidir the Black, from the darkness of his complexion) a crusader, who received the honour of knighthood, as a Knight of the Sepulchre, at the shrine of our Saviour, in the Holy City. The seventh son of Sir Elidir, PHILIP, had himself many children, of whom

Sources:

Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Einion ap Llywarch 6, p.329. Einion ap Llywarch 7, p.330 Title: Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales Author: Thomas Nicholas Publication: London: Longmans, Green, Reeder, 1875 Page: I:268 Title: Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes Author: Editor: Charles Mosley Publication: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, Crans, Switzerland, 1999 Page: 2504 Title: Welsh Genealogies AD 300-1400 Author: Peter Clement Bartrum Publication: 8 Vols. Cardiff, 1974, microfiche edition, 1980 Page: Cadifor Fawr 4, p.190

Philip Ap Elidir Father: Elidir ap Ddu b: Abt 1240 in Dynefor, Llandyfeisant, Caerfyrddin, Cymru Mother: Elsbeth ferch Seisyll

Notes for Eldir

Author: Dr Thomas Nicholas Title: Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales; 1875 Publication: Date: 1875; Note: Dr Thomas Nicholas, Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales; 1875 (, 1875). Page: I:168

Sir Elidyr Ddu, Knight of the Sepulchre. [Annals and Antiquities of Cymru I:268

Elidir ap Ddu Father: Elidir Ap Rhys b: Abt 1220 in Caerfyrddin, Cymru Mother: Gwladys, ferch Philip

Elidir Ap RhysFather: Rhys ap Gronwy Mother: Gwladus ferch Cadwgon

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