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Crawford Family

My Crawford lineage start with John Crawford born 1600 in Ayrshire, Scotland who is said to have been killed “during” Bacon's Rebellion in 1676. I link through his son David Crawford, born about 1625 Ayrshire, Scotland/Ireland who came to America in about 1643. David and wife (Jane?)'s daughter, Sarah, married 1st Thomas Poindexter. After his death in about 1705, she remarried Rev. James Beechin. Sarah and James Beechin had a daughter Anna who married John Sorrell. The link to Sorrell page is found below.

The Crawford family, like all families start, with one link but along the way they divide into many branches. This makes it hard to work on families but Miss Pauline Young work hard in her book relink the lines.

Burke's Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland

"Original data: A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry; or, Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland enjoying territorial possessions or high official rank: but uninvested with heritable honours. , London: Colburn, 1837-38.

Description:

This database details information found in John Burke’s history of landed gentry or commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, printed in 1837 and 1838. The work includes information about those persons who owned land or held high official rank, but were not considered nobility. Biographies often contain information about names, places, dates of vital events such as birth, marriage and death, occupations, and occasionally, an achievement of a coat of arms

The extreme ancestor of the family of Crawfurd in Scotland , as shewn in vol. ii. p. xiv. was Reginald , apparently fourth and youngest son of Alan , fourth Earl of Richmond , who died in 1146 . He seems to have accompanied David I. to the North, when that prince entered his kingdom from the court of his brother-in-law Henry I. of England , "followed," says Chalmers, "by a thousand Norman knights, whom he provided for and established in his dominions for their civilization and protection." Reginald received extensive grants of lands in Strath Cluyd , or Clydesdale , whence his immediate descendants adopted the name-Crawfurd -it forming one of the largest baronies in Scotland whilst entire, some three or four hundred merk lands, and (See Robertson's Topographical Description of Cunningham, p. 335.) signifying, according to Chalmers, in Gaelic , "the Pass of Blood," as commemorative probably of some sanguinary conflict between the Aborigines and their Roman invaders. The Crawfurd Castle , is designated Norman Gill , commemorative equally of their last invaders, or of the people by whom the subversion of the Celtic race in the Lowlands was effected. (The institutions of law and order, observes Chalmers , were now first introduced among a barbarous race, by people of a different lineage and speaking a different tongue.)

The first settler and founder of the family does not appear to have assumed his name from his lands. He probably died previous to the general introduction of that practice, as prior to 1161 , or during the incumbency of Arnot , abbot of Kelso , John de Crawfurd , his son, witnesses deeds in the Chartulary of that monastery along with Baldwin de Biggar , ancestor to the Earls of Wigton , and he is therein styled step son to Baldwin . Where this John established his residence was termed, says Chalmers, "Villum Johannis Privigni Baldwini;" and the circumjacent village that arose John's-town; this portion of the barony constituting the parish of Crawfurd-John , in contradistinction to Crawfurd proper, inherited by his elder brother. "From the elder branch." (observes George Crawfurd the genealogist, quoting the learned professor Thomas Crawfurd 's MSS.) "came heirs female - but another part of the barony remained with the heirs male (desceuded from Reginald ), from whom derived the Crawfurds , of Lowdon ; and from John , his Reginald 's) son, came the designation of Crawfurd-John ."

Dominus Galfredus de Crawfurd , the elder branch, ranking with the Magnate, Scotiæ , is a frequent witness to his sovereign King William the Lion's charters; so much so, observes Crawfurd , "be seems to have had some general relation to the king's service or another;" but for which he was unable to account. The recorded kindred, in John Le Scott 's charter, (nephew to the king), in the chartulary of the monastery of Arbroath , and John Le Scott 's near connexion with the then and last Earl of Richmond of that line, Reginald 's elder brother, render his aggrandizement not of such difficult solution. He had a son,

Galfredus , who died in 1202 , who left an only son,

John de Crawfurd Miles , who dying in 1248 , was buried in Melrose Abbey, and his estates divided between his two daughters and co-heiresses; the elder marrying Archibald de Douglas , (See Chart of New hottle Abbey) from which marriage descended the renowned Earls of Douglas ; and of which lady (by whom, as Chalmers shows, the Dowglass obtained their first considerable addition of property) there is a very perfect and beautiful effigy in Douglas church. Lanarkshire , opposite that of Douglas , Duke of Turin , but a century older. The second married David de Lindsay , from whom descended the earls of Crawfurd , distinguished in Scottish history. Between those two females the territory of Crawfurd proper went; styled afterwards Crawfurd-Dowglas and, Crawfurd-Lindsay .

(John de Crawfurd , of Crawfurd-John , being the earliest bearing the name that Chalmers had met with (see Vol. III. Caledonis); he appears to consider his barony as that that was divided between co-heiresses. But this is contradicted by so many old authorties, and by a note even in his first volume, which be appears to have overlooked as to neutralize this opinion-for he shows in that note, from one of the Douglas" charters, within a year of the demise of Sir John Crawfurd , his father-in-law, that be, Dowglas , was then disputing his boundary with John de Crawfurd ,- which ??tly proved the then existence ?? beirs male to a certain portion of the t?? ?? Crawfurd , after the dismemberment, as above, ?? the principal domain in fact, it proved the integrity of the Crawfurd-John Barony as it l?? after rem??ed, becoming first the patri?? ?? the first Heginald of Lowdon's second see Joh?? and goung subsequently by female to the family ?? Herkley , of Kilb?? , and others.)

We now revert to John Privigni Baldwini , the second son of Reginald , the first settler, and younger brother or uncle to Dominus Galfredus above-designated of Crawfurd-John . From him descended his son or grandson,

Sir Reginald de Crawfurd , a personage of great eminence, who espoused cir. an. 1200 , the beiress of the extensive Barony of Lowdon , in Ayrshire , (which afterwards gave the title of Earl to its possessors) and he became the first Vicecomes or high Sheriff, synonymous with Lord Lieutenant of the county, the office being made hereditary in his family. He died in 1226 , when he was succeeded by his son,

Hugh de Crawfurd , of Loudon , Vicecomes de Air . "He was one of the Magnates et Barones Scotiae ," (Those Barones Majores held immediately with the King and sat in Parliment in virtue of the ??) observes Nesbit , "and with his father Reginald and other great persons witnesses the charters of Walter the High Steward of Scotland ." "He had a charter from the High Constable of the lands of Monoch et de tota terra de Crosby , in 1226 ; which is still enjoyed by his decendants, the inheritors of Crosby ," (An. 1700 , when Nesbit wrote.) "This Hugh , second Baron of Lowdon ," says Crawfurd , "left two sons, Hugh , the heir of the family, and Reginald , the first of that branch of the Crawfurds of Kerse ," and he quotes a charter in the Earl of Lowdon's chartulary which he had seen, "Hugo de Crawfurd filius Hugoni de Crawfurd seedes nos dedissui Reginaldo Kerse ." This last named Hugh succeeded his father in 1246 , in Lowdon , and as Vicecomes de Air , and by his wife Alicia , left a son Reginald and a daughter Margaret , who married Sir Malcolm Wallace , of Ellersley , and was mother of the immortal patriot Sir William Wallace the guardian. Hugh died in 1288 , when he was succeeded by his son,

Sir Reginald Crawfurd , Vicecomes de Air . "During the competition for the crown. between Bruce and Baliol ." says Nesbit , "when matters came to a crisis, no Scotchman ever acted the part more of a firm and inflexible patriot than Sir Reginald Crawfurd , or was more resolute in asserting with zeal and intrepid courage the liberties of his country: so that he was an eye-sore to the English and all that were in their interest in the west, by whom he was, together with Sir Alan Montgomerie and Sir Bryce Blair , treacherously murdered at a banquet at Ayr , in 1297 ;" (The motto of the family "I bide my time," is said to have been adopted by his descendants, descriptive of their desire for revenge.) leaving two sons,

1st, Reginald , his successor in Lowdon , and 2nd, Hugh , who inherited Crosby Monoch , &c. and termed West Lowdon , of whom afterwards "Sir Reginald , called Sir Ronald the younger." says Nesbit , "was just such another patriot, for defence of the liberties of his distressed country, as his father had been. He was among the first of his countrymen who joined Sir William Wallace , and was with him in all the dangers to which he was exposed. He was one of the first that resorted to Bruce when he set about recovering the lost liberties of his country. But being taken prisoner at Galloway , along with Alexander and David Bruce , the king's brothers: they were all three sent prisoners to London , where they were condemned to death, and executed in 1306 ; without respect either to their merit or quality; which lays a great load on the memory of that king (Edward ) who could destroy and cut off such men, whose only crime was their strenuous support of the liberty of their country. He left one only daughter, Dame Susan Crawfurd , who married Sir Duncan Campbell , of Redcastle : whereupon they have an investiture under the great seal of the great estate of Lowdon to them and their heirs, whom failing, to the lady and her heirs." From this marriage lineally descends the present Flora-Muir Campbell-Rowdon-Hastings, Countess of Loudon , in her own right, and her son the present Marquis of Hastings . (See Burke's Peerage.) Sir Reginald thus dying without male issue, the representation of the house of Crawfurd reverted to his cousin-german,

Hugh Crawfurd , of Crosby , &c. second son of Sir Reginald , who was murdered at Air , in 1297 . Those his lands of Crosby , and others named below, are naturally omitted in the enumeration of the lands inherited by Susan , as set forth in her retour or envestiture. They were devised to the now male heir by her grandfather, in whose time we find, in the history of Sir William Wallace , that "be found refuge from the persuit of the English at his uncle's castle of Crosby ." "This family," says Nesbit , "were from their first descent from Lowdon , possessed of the 14 pound lands of Crosby -the 6 pound land of Monoch and Gill -the 5 merk lands of Auldmuir , and 5 merk lands of Whiteside , all in the shire of Air ," and subsequently of the 12 pound land of Auchnames , Renfrewshire . George Crawfurd remarks their possession of the lands of Crosby and Monoch , "how," he observes, "I cannot say, but the thing is certain." And Hamilton , of Wishaw , in his History of the Sheriffdoms of Lanark and Renfrew . says, " This (Crosby ) is ane very ancient family, and claims to be chief of the clan." Hugh Crawfurd , of Crosby , died prior to the year 1320 , when he was succeeded by his son, (The same writer represents the castle of Auchinames as a "War tower now rapidly going to decay by reason of Crosby 's becoming the residence of the family.")

Reginald Crawfurd , of Crosby , who obtained in 1320 , a grant of the lands of Auchinames , in Renfrewshire , for his services to Robert Bruce , as well as an augmentation to his arms of two lances in saltire, commemorative of his exploits at Bannockburn . To him succeeded his son,

Reginald Crawfurd , of Auchinames (Auchinames being the larger possession became the designation of the family, though in a different county and a less ancient estate.) and Crosby , whose name appears prefixed as a witness to a charter by Robert , the high steward, in 1358 . His son and successor,

Thomas Crawfurd , (Crawfurd , the eminent historian and genealogist, deduces the Crawfurds of Kilbirnie from a vouager brother of this Thomas , (see page 552).) of Auchinames , is mentioned by Crawfurd , in his History of Renfrewshire , in which he relates the substance of a mortification to the church of Kilbarchan , dated 1401 , for a monk to say mass for the salvation of his soul, and his wife's, and his father's, and mother's, and for the soul of Reginald Crawfurd , his grandfather. He wedded the daughter and heiress of Malcolm Galbraith , and was s. by his son,

For more information on Burke's Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland go to bottom of this page.

“The History of the Crawford Family, published in Our Ancestors”, Box 129, Liberty, S.C., Feb., 1953, Vol. 1, No. 11

One Generation

Alan Crawford married Bertha Conan

Berth Conan was the daughter/heiress of Conan, reigning Duke of Brittany. Bertha was said to be the great granddaughter of William the Conqueror and his wife Mathilda, daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders, who was 5th in Descent from Ethelwida, daughter of Alfred the great, and 10th in descent from Charlemagne. Comparing the Crawford Coat-of-arms with the one of Brittany bears out this claim.

Alan and Bertha child

1 Reginald Crawford

Generation No. 2

Reginald Crawford married Daughter of Swane

Reginald Crawford was the youngest son of Alan, the IV Earl of Richmond. He is said to have married a daughter of Swane. Reginald received in the 12th Century, extensive grants of land from David I of Scotland in Strath Cluyd of Clydesdale, where his immediate Descendants adopted the name of Crawford, then forming one of the largest baronies Of Scotland."

All the genealogists agree that the following are direct ancestors of The Crawford family, but they do not agree with Clements that they are of The maternal line: Swain (Swane, called Succonus) was the son of Thor Longus, Lord of Tippermuir and superior Lord of the lands of Crawford in Upper Clydesdale, who settled in Scotland between 1069 - 1074. The grandfather Of Swain was Leofwine, born not later than 1000 and lived in Northumberland England.

Taken from Stephen's' Crawford Genealogy by Mrs. Lucinda Frances. Because in 1127 "Reginald beat back the enemies of King David I, of Scotland, at the ford of a stream in the old Roman road about three miles from Kilbirnie, the King bestowed upon him the name and title of Earl of Cruford. His son, Cauterus Cruford, who lived during the reign of King William, 1142-1214, succeeded him.

Reginald Crawford and wife Miss Swane children

1 Domincus Crawford

2 Cauterus Crawford, Succeeded his father as 2nd Earl of Cruford

Generation No. 3

Domincus Crawford (Reginald, Alan) married Miss le Scot.

Miss Le Scot was said to be a sister of John le Scot, Earl of Chester, and niece of the King (i.e. a daughter of David, Earl of Huntingdon, second son of David I and his wife Maud (Matilda)

Domincus Crawford and Miss le Scot Children

1 Reginald de Crawford

2 Hugh de Crawford.

Generation No. 4

Reginald de Crawford (Domincus Crawford, Reginald, Alan) wife unknown

Child of Reginald de Crawford and unknown wife

1 Reginalds de Crawford

Hugh de Crawford (Domincus Crawford, Reginald, Alan) and unknown wife child:

1 Reginald de Crawford

Generation No. 5

Reginald de Crawford (Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) and unknown wife

REGINALD DE CRAWFORD: Part of the Barony remained with him. His son, John, and he were "in a charter of Arnold, Abbot of Kelso, in 1140, is said to have used the name Crawford for the first time as a surname."

Child of REGINALD DE CRAWFORD and unknown wife

1 Johannes (John) de Crawford

Generation No. 6

Johannes (John) de Crawford (Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) and unknown wife child:

1 Galdfridus de Crawford

John de Crawford (Reginald, Hugh, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) and unknown wife had No male heirs found on record, thus the elder branch of the Crawford Family becomes Extinct in the Male line. So title passes to second son of Galfridus.

JOHN DE CRAWFORD and unknown wife children were

1 Margaret de Crawford m’d Archibald de Douglas

ARCHIBALD DE DOUGLAS: Ancestor of the earls and dukes of Douglas. From Browning's "Americans of Royal Descent", 1911, pages 21, 113, 290, 431.

Their daughter de Crawford, b. Scotland; d. Scotland; m’d David de Lindsay

DAVID DE LINDSAY is said to be son of William, ancestors of the Earls of Lindsay and Crawford.

The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Volume I-IV. London: The St. Catherine Press Ltd., 1910-16.

"Lives of the Lindsays or a memoir of the houses of Crawford and Baltarres", by Alexander W. C. Lindsay, styled Lord Lindsay, afterwards [1869-80] Earl of Crawford [S.], 1843 and 1858. This valuable work in generally admitted to be a model for history of a family. Although the account of the Lindsay family here givens begins no earlier then the Title of Crawford, some allusion is not inappropriate to the continuous sittings in Parliament enjoyed by the ancestors of the first Earl, more especially, as though other families in Scotland may have more historic interest, none can in genealogical importance equal that of Lindsay, not as to antiquity in the male line, but in all probability as to the number of Parliamentary sittings, such beginning, also, at the earliest period of which any record exists, and though not conferring of themselves 9as has been held in England) an hereditary peerage dignity, shew at least the high position held from the remotest antiquity by that family. The first of their ancestors who settled to the inquisition of the See of Glasgow, in 1116, having doubtless attended David, Earl of Huntingdon, afterwards King David I, in his colonization of the Lowlands. During a great part of the period of some 300 years the elapsed between of the family of Lindsay (descendants of the above name Sir Walter), holding the following baronies, one branch holding Lamberton in Scotland, as also Kendal and Molesworth in England; another branch holding Luffness and Crawford in Scotland, as also half the Baroney of the Limesis in England; and the third branch holding Breneville and Byres in Scotland, as also certain lands (such as, however, not being held by Barony in chief of the King of England) in England. The heads of these three branches all sat in Earl. holding the highest offices of State in every generation before the elevation in 1398 of the heir male and chief of the house to the rank of Earl. The family (as also was the case with some other families, most of which , however, are now extinct, were undoubtedly "Magnates" ah inties, although the first person noticed in the text is he whom there first existed an hereditary Peerage of the kind now recognized.

The Lindsay claim that "the predecessors of the 1st Earl Crawford were Barons, at the period of the earliest Parliamentary records, and that, in fact , they were never ennobled in the modern sense of the term, but were among the Pares, of which King are Primi, from the commencement of recorded history"

Generation No. 7

Galfridus de Crawford (John, Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) and unknown wife had

1 Reginald de Crawford, b 1190 d. Abt. 1250.

Generation No. 8

Reginald de Crawford (Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) b 1190 d abt 1250 m’d Margaret Loudoun.

Sir Reginald de Crawford appointed heritable Sheriff of Ayrshire 1296 during the reign of King Alexander II. Found in Bardsley's 'A dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames.' Reginald married Margaret heiress of Loudoun, with who came the lands and barony of Loudoun in Ayrshire.

Reginald de Crawford and Margaret Loudoun children were

1 John Crawford

2 Hugh Crawford

Generation No. 9

John Crawford (Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) born 'Crawford-John', Scotland.

Sir John "acquired part of the Lordship and Barony of Crauford (known as Crawfurd-John) Crawfurd-John was the north part of the barony of Crawford

Children of JOHN CRAWFORD John Crawford were

1 Reginald Crawford b 1288 Auchinames, Scotland; d. 1384 Scotland

2 Margaret Crawford m’d Walter Barclay

Hugh Crawford (Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) He was a distinguished patriot who was said to have been "treacherously murdered" in 1297. Crawfords of Auchinames are said to be descended for Viscount Hugh Crawford

Children of Hugh Crawford were:

1 Margaret de Crawford

2 Reginald de Crawford

Generation No. 10

Reginald Crawford(John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) b 1288 Auchinames, Scotland; d. 1384 Scotland

Sir Reginald Crawford, "firm friend of King Robert Bruce", was given lands of Crumshine in Cunningham, 1320, which had belonged to John Baliol. His sister Margaret was given one-half of the lands of Crawford-John.

Witness to a donation to the monastery of Paisley by James, Lord High Steward of Scotland anno 1288. Reginald Crawford distinguished himself at the battle of Bannockburn, receiving a grant for his services to the Barony of Auchinames and the privilege of adding to his coat-of-arms two lances saltire. Sir Reginald, "firm friend of King Robert Bruce", was given lands of Crumshine in Cunningham, 1320, which had belonged to John Baliol. His sister Margaret was given one-half of the lands of Crawford-John.

Child of REGINALD CRAWFORD Reginald Crawford and unknown wife was

1 Roger Crawford b 1324 d 1384

Margaret de Crawford (Hugh, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan). Margaret m’d Malcolm Wallace

MARGARET DE CRAWFORD:

Brokaw's, Julia Penn, Papers of the Virginia Society, Colonial Dames of America, no. 2166 David Crawford, Burgess of New Kent Co., Va., 1692 states:

"Dominicus de Crawford is said to have been the fifth great-grandfather of Margaret de Crawford, the mother of Sir William Wallace. Her brother, Sir Reginald de Crawford, is claimed to have been the direct ancestor of the Crawfords who settled in Virginia from 'Crawfordonia'." Margaret de Crawford married Sir Malcolm Wallace, they were the parents of Sir William Wallace (1272 - 1305).

Child of Margaret de Crawford and Malcolm Wallace was

1 Sir William Wallace b 1272 d 1305

Reginald de Crawford(Hugh, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan).

Children of REGINALD DE CRAWFORD Reginald de Crawford were

1 Susan de Crawford , m’d Duncan Campbell. Duncan was said to be the grandson of Sir Colin-More Campbell, ancestor of Duke of Argyle

2 Archibald de Crawford

Generation No. 11

Archibald de Crawford (Reginald, Hugh, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan).

Children of Archibald de Crawford were

1 Thomas de Crawford

2 Robert de Crawford m’d Isabel Douglas

Roger Crawford (Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) b 1324 d 1384

Roger Crawford accompanied Kind David Bruce in his expedition into England and was taken prisoner at the battle of Durham, 1346. Accompanied Kind David Bruce in his expedition into England and was taken prisoner at the battle of Durham, 1346.

Child of ROGER CRAWFORD was

1. Malcolm Crawford b Eastrn Greencock

Generation No. 11

Malcolm Crawford(Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) was born 1350 in Eastrn Greencock d 1452. He married daughter of Malcolm Galbraith

MALCOLM CRAWFORD married the co-heiress of Malcolm Galbraith of Greenock. Received the accession to the Barony of Green-Easter about 1390 (about a mile from Port Glasgow.)

Malcolm Crawford wife the daughter of co-heiress of Malcolm Galbraith of Greenock and ancient Family of Renfrewshire

Child of MALCOLM CRAWFORD and DAUGHTER GALBRAITH Malcolm Crawford and daughter of Malcolm Galbraith was

1 Roger de Crawford b 1376 d 1445

Generation No. 12

Roger de Crawford (Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) and unknown wife had a son John de Crawford

Generation No. 13

John de Crawford (Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) and unknown wife had son MALCOLM15 CRAWFORD, b. Eastern Greencock.

Generation No 14

Malcolm Crawford (John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) was born Abt 1428 Of Greenock, Ayr, Scotland d 1488 married Marjory Barclay, the daughter of John Barclay

Sir Malcolm Crawford of Eastern Greenock, who received lands from his grandmother (a Galbraith) and who descended from Crawford of Loudon, Married Marjory, only daughter/heiress of John Barclay (d. in 1480s) of Killbirnine, the last Male of this "potent" family, who anciently possessed Killbirnine. The aforementioned Sir John Barclay of Crawford-John was a lineal descendant of Sir John Crawford of Crawford-John when his daughter Margaret married Sir Walter Barclay.

Arms were quartered with the arms of Barclay and Kilbirnie (1499 charter By James IV for lands of Kilbirnie and half of the Barony of Crawford-John).Sir Malcolm Crawford of Eastern Greenock, who received lands from his Mother (a Galbraith) and who descended from Crawford of Loudon, Married Marjory, only daughter/heiress of John Barclay (d. 1470) of Kilbirnie, the last Male of this "potent" family, who anciently possessed Kilbirnie. The aforementioned Sir John Barclay of Crawfurd-John was a lineal descendant of Sir John Crawford of Crawfurd-John when his daughter Margaret married Sir Walter Barclay.

Arms were quartered with the arms of Barclay and Kilbirnie (1499 charter By James IV for lands of Kilbirnie and half of the Barony of Crawford-John).

Malcolm Crawford or Crawfurd was laird of Greenock and Kilbirnie, co. Ayr - he had a charter of Kilbirnie from King James IV, 1499. He was the son of John Crawfurd of Greenock, a lineal descendant of the Crawfurds of Crawfordjohn and of Malcolm Galbraith, laird of Greenock [14th century] from whom that property was acquired.

His wife was Marjory Barclay, [coincidentally ?] heiress of her father Sir John Barclay, laird of Crawfordjohn (d. 1470), whose ancestor had acquired Crawfordjohn from the Crawfords.

Amongst their issue was Isabel, wife of Sir Adam Cunningham of Caprington and Baidland [had charter of Tarbolton, 9 Mar 1506/7].

My ' original ' source for the above was James Paterson, History of the County of Ayrshire (2 Vols.: 1847), pp. 248-249. John P. Ravilious�

MARJORY BARCLAY: Arms were quartered with the arms of Barclay and Kilbirnie (1499 charter By James IV for lands of Kilbirnie and half of the Barony of Crawford-John). Daughter of co-heiress of Malcolm Galbraith of Greenock and ancient Family of Renfrewshire

Children of MALCOLM CRAWFORD and MARJORY BARCLAY are:

1 MALCOLM CRAWFORD b 1454 d 1499

Generation No 15

Malcolm Crawford (Malcolm, John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) m’d Marion Crichton, children”

1 Robert Crawford b 1480 Kilbirine, Ayrshire, Scotland; d. 1513.

2 John Crawford

3 Thomas Crawford

4 Isabel Crawford m’d Adam Cunningham

5 James Crawford ,Ancestor of the Crawfords of Minnoch in Ayrshire.

Generation No. 16

Robert Crawford (Malcolm, Malcolm, John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) was born 1480 in Kilbirine, Ayrshire, Scotland, and died 1513 Kilbirine, Ayrshire, Scotland. He married Margaret Semple/ Semphill the daughter of Thomas Semple/Semphill

Sir Robert Crawford received charter in 1506 for lands of Eastern Greenock. Sir Robert Crawford received charter in 1506 for lands of Eastern Greenock etc. Dispensation from James Beaton, Abbot of Dumfermling.

Child of ROBERT CRAWFORD and MARGARET SEMPLE Robert Crawford and Margaret Semple was

1 Lawrence Crawford, b. Abt. 1506, Kilbirine, Scotland; d. June 1547, Scotland.

Generation No. 17

Lawrence Crawford(Robert, Malcolm, Malcolm, John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) was born Abt. 1506 in Kilbirine, Scotland, and died June 1547 in Scotland. He married Helen Campbell, the daughter of Sir Hugh Campbell

“Cockayne's The Complete Peerage, Vol. VII, page 157.”

Sir Lawrence of the "Illustrious" family of Crawford, Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland, married Helen, daughter of Sir Hugh Campbell of Loundon, Ancestor of the earls of Loudon. On April 5, 1529, he exchanged Crawford-John Lands with Sir James Hamilton for lands in Drumry, Dumbarton. This progenitor of the viscounts of Garnock (merged in the earldom of Crawford in 1749) and immediate ancestor of the Crawfords of Jordanville, Renfrewshire.

Children of LAWRENCE CRAWFORD and HELEN CAMBELL Lawrence Crawford and Helen Campbell were

1 Thomas Crawford (Captain)

2 William Crawford

3 Hugh Crawford b 1532 d 1576

4 Isabel Crawford m’d Gavin Blair

5 Robert Crawford

6 John Crawford

7 David Crawford

8 Catherine Crawford m’d David Fairly

Generation No. 18

Thomas Crawford (Captain) (Lawrence, Robert, Malcolm, Malcolm, John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan). He married JANET KER.

Celebrated Capt. Thomas Crawford of Jordanhill. The baronetcy later fell to a descendant of this youngest son.

Child of CAPTAIN CRAWFORD and JANET KER was

1 Hugh Crawford

Hugh Crawford (Lawrence, Robert, Malcolm, Malcolm, John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan)was born in Scotland, and died 1576 in Scotland. He married 1st Elizabeth Barclay, daughter of David Barclay , no issue and 2nd married Margaret Colquohoun

Hugh Crawford was a staunch friend of Mary, Queen of Scots. Signed a bond for the defense of Mary against all person whatsoever. He fought for her cause at Langside, May 13, 1568. (His brother Captain Thomas fought on the other side.)

Child of Hugh Crawford and Margaret Colquohoun was

1 Malcolm Crawford b 1558 d 1592

Generation No. 19

Malcolm Crawford (Hugh, Lawrence, Robert, Malcolm, Malcolm, John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan)was born in Kilbirine, Scotland, and died 1592. He married Margaret Cunningham, daughter of John Cunningham

Children of Malcolm Crawford and Margaret Cunningham were

1 John Crawford, b bef 1580 d. 1622.

2 Alexander Crawford

3 Anne Crawford m’d William Cunningham

Generation No. 20

John Crawford (Malcolm, Hugh, Lawrence, Robert, Malcolm, Malcolm, John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) b abt 1580 died 1622. He married MARGARET BLAIR, daughter of JOHN BLAIR.

Notes for JOHN CRAWFORD: In 1600 received charter of lands and baronies of Kilbirnie, Eastern Greenock, etc. John’s wife was Margaret Blair

Click here for Blairfamilies

Children of John Crawford and Margaret Blair were:

1 John Crawford b abt 1600

2 Malcolm Crawford

3 James Crawford

4 Margaret Crawford m’d Hugh Kennedy

5 Jean Crawford m’d 1st John Lindsay and 2nd John Buchanan

Alexander Crawford (Malcolm, Hugh, Lawrence, Robert, Malcolm, Malcolm, John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan). He married unknown Critchton

Alexander Crawford, being the younger son of Malcolm, did not inherit lands like his older brother, John. Sometime after, Kilbirnie was broken in to and his father's death in 1595, he (Alexander) was removed along with many friends and relatives to the County of Donegal in Northern Ireland, a part of "The Colonization of Ulster", in 1610. He became the owner of a ship, trading goods between Ireland and Scotland. It is uncertain whether he came with his uncle, Sir John Cunningham and his cousins, or whether he followed later establishing his shipping trade when he found family and friends in Donegal. It is believed that the grant of lands in Donegal (known as the Portlough Patent) was organized by the Duke of Lennox, Ludovic Stuart, who was held in great esteem by King James VI or I of England. Stuart was related in many ways to the Crawfords by blood or marriage

Children of Alexander Crawford and unknown Critchton was

1 Alexander Crawford, attended the funeral of the second Viscount Montgomery of Ardes in 1663.

2 John Crawford d. July 12, 1661.

3 Robert Crawford b. Abt. 1625.

4 Janet Crawford

5 Lawrence Crawford

6 James Crawford

7 David Crawford d. 1702, Drumholm Parish, Ireland.

Generation No. 21

John Crawford (John, Malcolm, Hugh, Lawrence, Robert, Malcolm, Malcolm, John, Roger ,Malcolm, Roger, Reginald, John, Reginald, Galfridus, Johannes (John), Reginald, Reginald, Domincus, Reginald, Alan) b abt 1600, in Ayrs, Scotland, d 1676 Jamestown City, Virginia, (killed during Bacon's Rebellion), married Mary Cunningham, daughter of James Cunningham. He imigrated to America in 1643. "From him are descended all the Crawfords of the Kilbirnie branch in this country." Taken from: Stephen's', Mrs. Lucinda Frances, Crawford Genealogy.

Children of John Crawford and Mary Cunningham were:

1 John Crawford

2 James Crawford

3 Ann Crawford

4 Margaret Crawford

John Crawford b 1600 was said to have had a Mistress/Concubine. They had son David b 1625. Read on to find out more.

There are many conflicting stories about John Crawford, so I am posting all that I have found.

The following information was furnished by Mr. E. A. Crawford, of Midway, Florida and published in the book, "The Alstons and Allstons of North and South Carolina" published in the Genealogical Society of Utah quarterly in October of 1927. "John Crawford was born in Kilbirnie ,in Ayrshire, Scotland in 1600, and came to this country (United States) in 1643, bringing his only child David, born in 1625, with him; the wife and mother having died in Old Scotia. They settled in James City Co., Virginia. John was killed during Bacon's Rebellion in 1676, of which he was one of the organizers. We do not know the name of David's wife, nor the date of his marriage. But the Church and County Records of New Kent Co., Virginia show that his children were: Elizabeth, Lucy, Angelina, Capt. David & John."

THE CRAWFORD FAMILY IN SCOTLAND

http://pages.prodigy.com/genealogy.tn/crawford.htm

John Crawford

Of this line, in 1600 was born John Crawford, who emigrated to America in 1643. From him are descended all the Crawfords of the Kilbirnie branch in this country." Taken from: Stephen's, Mrs. Lucinda Frances, Crawford Genealogy. John Crawford, 1600-1676, a widower and "a cadet of the Kilbirnie (variously spelled) family of Crawford", came from Scotland with his son David, to Jamestown, Virginia in 1643, and settled in James City County near Richmond

“Virkus' Compendium of American Genealogy”, Vol. 1, page 767.

"As the "youngest son of an Earl Crawford", John Crawford, who received "but a small patrimony" (from fifty to 100 pounds yearly), "removed to this country in pursuit of his fortune". His son, David, and he bought fertile lands at a low price, as the colony of Virginia wished for settlers. They were allotted some land, because they brought over with them twenty persons to colonize. (Passage cost at that time five pounds, ten shillings, or approximately $26.00) John Crawford was a landowner, planter, and defender of his countryman from the "savage brutalities of the Indians" - Bacon's Rebellion, 1676, when he was killed."

CONFLICT:

From the book "Lewises, Meriwethers and Their Kin" by Sarah Travers Lewis Anderson, Richmond, VA, The Deitz Press, 1938, pp. 146-148. [It is widely published that this John Crawford is the son of Malcolm Crawford and Margaret Cunningham. Malcolm and Margaret did have a son John, but he stayed in Scotland, according to Scottish records. Malcolm's pedigree is found at http://www.users.mis.net/~chesnet/gendef.htm 10/4/1999] John Crawford, born 1600, came from Scotland to Virginia and died December 13, 1689. THE FIRST CRAWFORD IN AMERICA

Facts and speculation about probable linkage with the Scottish clan. by Arthur L. Crawford

The first Crawford to come to America landed in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1643. The generations link as follows:

1-John, born in Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1600; came to Jamestown, Virginia in 1643.

2-David, son of John, born in 1625; came with his father to Jamestown, Virginia in 1643.

3-Captain David, born 1662 at Assasquin, the seat of the Virginia Crawford estates.

4-Michael, one of the younger sons of Capt. David, born 1707.

5-Thomas Crawford I, son of Michael, born about 1735.

6-Thomas Crawford II, son of Thomas I, born Nov. 8, 1770.

7-Benjamin Hardy Crawford, son of Thomas II, born Sept. 20, 1798.

8-George McIntosh Troup Crawford, son of Benjamin Hardy Crawford, born Nov. 12, 1843.

9-Ida Leola Crawford, daughter of George M.T. Crawford, born April 1, 1884. who married Samuel Leonard Carter.

John Crawford was born the same year (1600) as King Charles I of England and is generally credited with being a loyal Cavalier or supporter of the Stuart line. Some say that since Charles I had already lost decisive battles with Cromwell prior to 1643 John probably joined the Cavaliers of Virginia and stayed in America during the Cromwell period in order to escape the persecution for his partisanship. Some researchers credit John with having owned his own ship, and having brought to America a ship load of immigrants for which he received a bonus of extensive land grants and privileges.

Thus far we have not been able to connect this "first John" with the family tree in Scotland. But a Mrs. Julian Lane of Statesboro, Georgia, in 1940 compiled a "Historical Collection" in which she speaks of John, Earl of Crawford, born in 1600 in Ayrshire, Scotland (who) was the first to reach these shores, in 1643.

This is an intriguing reference with a claim which probably cannot be substantiated, but which, on the other hand might lead to a solution of the "missing link" of this first American Crawford line with the Scottish clan.

Pauline Young and Emmy JT Clemente, in “Our Ancestors”, mention a "John Crawford of Kilbirny (who) married Margaret, daughter of John Blair and his wife Grisel, who was daughter of Robert, Lord Semple. He (John) obtained a charter under the great seal of the lands and baronies of Kilbirny and Easter Greenock, anno 1600. He spent much of his life "in foreign parts" and the story says that he died young, in 1622, January 16. He left 5 children, 3 sons and 2 daughters. The eldest was John, his successor, John the elder, who is reported in "Our Ancestors" to have died young in 1622, "was succeeded by his son John who lived in great plenty. He spent his time rebuilding Kilbirny in 1627. He married the Lady (reported by some to have been his cousin) Mary Cunningham, daughter of the 7th Earl of Glencairn, and by her had two sons and two daughter."

It is interesting to speculate that this John, the husband of Lady Mary Cunningham, might in fact have been the first John Crawford who came to Jamestown, Virginia in 1643. Some of us believe, from fragmentary references we have read, that he was "pressured" into marrying his kinswomen, Lady Mary Cunningham, to keep the estates intact, that he may have had a common law wife in Ireland (where it seems that he spent considerable time) and by this common law wife he may have had a son David who he later brought to America in 1643. Not only did his father spend much of his life "in foreign parts" but also the son John, born about 1600 appears to have done likewise.

The John Crawford, husband of Lady Mary Cunningham, appears to have stayed home and to have built up his estates (around 1627) and then to have disappeared. Whether he went to Sea, to Ireland and then to America and left Lady Mary Cunningham Crawford and her children and the Peerage is interesting to speculate.

"Our Ancestors' quotes Fred E. Crawford in "The Early Ancestors of the Crawfords" as authority for the statement that, "This John was one of the early patentees of land in Donegal in Ireland, but did not stay there and the grant was given to one of his friend, John Stewart." If his estates in Scotland were in danger of being confiscated by Cromwell because of his support of Charles I, this may have been reason enough for him to get out of the country and leave his estates to his wife and children born to the peerage. If he had an illegitimate son in Ireland he probably would have taken him with him to America. The facts of this intriguing mystery await some future researcher who can then supply the "missing link" between the descendants of this first Crawford in America and the multitudinous Crawfords in THE LIVES OF THE LINDSAYS and supplementary genealogical records of pre-pre-American Crawfords in Scotland.

This first John Crawford to come to America must have been a typical restless Scot. Whether he was in fact, as alleged by Mrs. Julian Lane in her "Historical Collection", "a hero of the battle of Gratzha" it is well authenticated that at the age of 76 he was killed in Bacon's Rebellion which he helped to organize.

It is written of his son David, the second Crawford in America, that when he was killed by the Indians in 1710, at age 85, "He owned extensive lands in the countries of New Kent (Hanover) and James City; also, many slaves. The land on which Richmond was built belonged to him", and probably had its name suggested from Riginald de Richmond, "The Good", sometimes referred to as "the extreme ancestor of the Crawfords". Riginald de Richmond was the great-grandfather of Margaret Crawford, the mother of Sir William Wallace, the immortal hero of Scotland. Kilbirnie Castle and Kirk were ancient possessions of the Crawford family.

Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of David, the second Crawford in America, was born in 1656 and married Nicholas Meriwether in 1673, "who was owner of great tracts of land in Hanover and Albermarle counties in Virginia. One of the patents of 17,952 acres was granted by King George II". The second daughter, born 1668, married Robert Lewis. It is interesting to speculate on the possible connection between these family alliances and the Meriwether Lewis who over a century later was the dashing young officer who came out of the South to lead the famous Lewis and Clark Exploration of the Louisiana Purchase for President Thomas Jefferson.

Our third American Crawford ancestor, Captain David Crawford, born in 1662, was the first Crawford in America to live out his natural years. He attained the vulnerable age of 100 years. But his wife, Elizabeth Smith Crawford, outlived him to reach 101. They had 13 children. From this parentage our line of Crawfords inherited longevity and vigor.

The youngest son of the Earl of Crawford and a Cadet of the Kimbirnie Crawfords, came from Ayrshire, Scotland with his family and widowed Mother to Jamestown, VA in 1643. They settled in James City Co. & later moved to St. Peter's Parish, New Kent Co., VA." If I am reading this right "Youngest son of Earl of Crawford" is John Crawford. John brought his family and his widowed mother, this would be Margaret Blair Crawford.

John Crawford ships records have not found but here is David’s

The Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s

Name: David Crawford; Year: 1625-1692; Place: Virginia

Source Publication Code: 1640.9

Primary Immigrant: Crawford, David

Annotation: Date and port of arrival or date and place of mention in the New World. Birth date, occupation, names of family members, and a reference to sources listed on pages ix-xiv may also be provided.

Source Bibliography: DOBSON, DAVID. Scots on the Chesapeake, 1607-1830. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992. 169p. Page: 33

Generation No. 21

DAVID CRAWFORD, known as Col. David, born 1625 Ayrshire, Scotland/Ireland, died 1710 New Kent Co., VA, married 1654 Jane maiden name unknown.

He came to Virginia with his father and received 7 land grants (2,700 acres) from Gov. Berkely for importing 55 immigrants to Virginia. He was a vestryman and member of the House of Burgess. The founder of the "Assasquin" Plantation in New Kent County, Virginia.

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I Omitted Burgesses

Description: The first surviving British colony in what was to become the United States, Virginia has been home to millions since the founding of Jamestown in 1607. This database is a collection of over 20,000 biographical sketches of prominent individuals from the state before the twentieth century. Each entry includes vital information (birth, marriage, and death information), professional pursuits, and family background. This database can be a great aid in identifying Virginia ancestors who distinguished themselves in settlement of the colony and state.

Source Information: Ancestry.com. Virginia Biographical Encyclopedia, Vol. I-V. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Electronic reproduction: Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volumes I-V. Richmond, VA: n.p, 1915.

In order to make the list of the members of the House of Burgesses of Virginia as complete as possible, the following names are added, with the counties represented and the years of service. Sketches of many of them are found in Volume II. under the head of the "Fathers of the Revolution." It is also to be noted that most of the Councilors have been Burgesses.

Name: David Crawford; County Representative: New Kent; Years: 1692 OMITTED BURGESSESS: Crawford, David, New Kent 1692

Children of David and Jane

1. Sarah Crawford b 12 MAY 1666 in ,Amherst,VA and d 1753 in Fredericksville Parish,Louisa,VA m'd 1st Thomas Poindexter After the death of Thomas Poindexter in about 1705, she remarried Rev. James Beechin and had at least 7 children. Rev. Beechin was Priest of an established church at Caple Parish, Westmoreland Co., VA.

2. Elizabeth Crawford Elizabeth was born in 1675 in Kent County, Vitginia. She died on 2 Mar 1753 in Louisa County, Virginia. m'd Nicholas Meriwether II was born on 26 Oct 1667 in Surry County, Virginia. He died on 12 Dec 1744 in Albemarle County, Virginia [great-grandparents of explorer Meriweather Lewis]

3. Judith Crawford

4. Angeline Crawford

5. Capt. David Crawford m'd Elizabeth Smith daughter of George Smith in Nov 1695 in Amhurst County, Virginia. Elizabeth was born on 29 Oct 1673 in Jamestown, Virginia. She died in 1767 in Amhurst County, Virginia

6. John Crawford

7. Peter Crawford

Next Generations.

Captain David Crawford family

This database is a compilation of wills from New Castle County, Delaware from 1682-1800. The records were abstracted and compiled by the Historical Research Committee of the Colonial Dames of Delaware. The wills include information on names, dates, places, relationships, and other important clues for family history research.

In preparing these wills the Colonial Dames of Delaware research committee worked on the original wills as far as they existed in the Register's office and in the original Record of Probate where the wills were missing. According to the committee, "Abstracts have been made of many wills, which, because of technical irregularities, were not probated, and consequently are not matters of record. The genealogical data thus presented gives the volume a unique advantage. For a period of years, in the early life of this Colony the law did not require that the probated wills filed in the Register's office should be recorded. Because of this, genealogists, and others interested in research work, were permitted to use the original wills, with the natural result that many were carried away, and many others suffered destruction or defacement from constant and careless handling."

Source Information: Calendar of Delaware Wills, New Castle County, 1682-1800 ; Original data: A Calendar of Delaware Wills New Castle County 1682-1800. New York, NY: Frederick H. Hitchcock, 1911.

New Castle County, Delaware

William Crawford, Dec 12,1757; Misc ancestors John Crawford's son was John Crawford the 2nd's son was David Crawford.

David son John Crawford is William Crawford link to the Crawford line

Sarah Crawford family:

Westmoreland County, Virginia Wills, 1654-1800

Description: Located on the Potomac River, Westmoreland County was created in 1653 from Northumberland County. It was home to such prominent figures as George Washington and Robert E. Lee. This database contains abstracts from wills probated in Westmoreland from its beginnings in 1654 to 1800. Researchers may find information about the deceased, his or her living heirs, his or her occupation, and other such facts

Extended Description: Original wills may be found at the Westmoreland County Archives, P.O. Box 467, Montrose, VA 22520. For more information, see also the Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) for FHL #34267-34278.

Source Information: Lineages, Inc., comp. Westmoreland County, Virginia Wills, 1654-1800. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Records transcribed from LDS Family History Library microfilm copies of wills for this locality.

Breechin, James, 19 Oct. 1721; 6 April 1722.

My late wife Ann; sons William and James land at falls of Potomac; to Mr. John Rele 50 acres; to Dennis Lynsey 100 acres of land; to Thomas Poindexter 300 acres of land; dau. Anna and Jane land; to James and Anna Sorrell 1 hogshead tobacco each; kinsman Thomas Sorrell a mourning ring; wife and Capt. George Turberville exrs., the latter to have a mourning ring; wife Sarah personal estate

Sarah Crawford born: 12 May 1666 in New Kent County, Virginia died: abt 1752 in Fredericksville Parish, Louisa, Virginia

Sarah Crawford, also shown as Crafford or Crofford, was born about 1675. She was a daughter of David Crawford as proven by a lawsuit filed in Hanover Co., VA, in 1731 by John Poindexter to establish his right to land willed him in 1721 by his stepfather, Rev. James Breechin, Priest of Caple Parish in Westmoreland Co., VA

John Poindexter brought suit in Hanover County to establish his right to land left him in the 1721 will of his stepfather, Rev. James Breechin, Priest of Cople Parish in Westmoreland County.

Evidence stated that "David Crawford, late of the Parish of St. Peter's in the County of New Kent, was in his lifetime seized in fee simple, for and in one neck of land, lying and being in the Parish of St. Paul's in the County of Hanover, containing about five hundred acres, and so being seized, by his certain poll, bearing the date of May 21, 1691, for the natural love and affection which he bore his daughter, Sarah, did give the said land unto his daughter and the heirs of her body, as by said deed more fully may appear, and the said Sarah entered and by vitue of said deed was seized, and intermarried with one Thomas Poindexter, deceased, and by him had issue, John Poindexter, and has since intermarried with one James Breechin, likewise deceased ..."

1. "Poingdestre-Poindexter, A Norman Family" by John Poindexter Landers, S.T.B., M.A. with final chapter by Robert Downs Poindexter.

The book it states that David Crafford deeded 500 acres to his daughter Sarah. The quit rent rolls for the County of Kent (later the portion which became Hanover County) for 1702 show that Thomas Poindexter owned 1,000 acres. We glean much interesting and invaluable information concerning Thomas Poindexter and his wife Sarah Crafford from a deposition made by his son Thomas Poindexter Jr. in the suit of Snead vs. Poindexter in 1765. The following is a detailed quotation from the suit:..... according to deposition of Thomas Poindexter, son of Thos. & Sarah Poindexter, taken in a suit vs. Sneadin 1765, he was 60 yrs. Old. Since John Poindexter was the eldest son & heir at law of Thomas Poindexter Sr. he was born betw. 1702 & 1705.

In the mentioned suit Snead vs. Poindexter in 1767 is the following: "John Snead & Susanna his wife & executors of John Poindexter & others Hanover Co., Va. 5 Nov. 1731 Sarah Brechin of St. Paul's Parish Hanover Co., Va. to her son John Poindexter for 64 L 10s 400 acres of land & three negroes Sarah, Nan & Bess, etc. The deposition of Christian Poindexter 1765 says, "Sarah Brechin agreed to sell 60 acres in Hanover Co. which land was entailed to her (Sarah's) eldest son John Poindexter so Sarah proposed to her heir entail John that he sell all these lands & use 60 lbs in the purchase of negro slaves which slaves were to be used by Sarah during her natural life & after her death to son John.

John agreed to find and provide lands for the sd. Sarah which he did but she preferred to live with her sister Elizabeth Meriwether the reason for laying out the 60acres for Sarah Brechin that she was so poor after the death of her 2nd husband James Breckin, John Poindexter built her a home & she lived there on but was to his advantage to sell whole tract of which the 60 acres was a part.

"The Deposition of Thos. Poindexter taken 3/6/1765 age 60 yrs. sd he had nothing to gain or lose etc. Thomas Poindexter married Sarah Crafford, dau. of David Crafford of New Kent Co. Va. (Member of House of Burgesses). This suit states that David Crafford deeded 500 acres to his dau. Sarah on 5/21/1691 & that she intermarried with James Brechin. Then in the New Kent Co., V. Quit Rent Roll of Wertenbaker's "Virginia Planters," in the Appendix we find that the following had owned the land severn (sic)yrs. by Paying the quit rent: George Poindexter 1400 acres; Thomas Poindexter 1,000 acres.

Then in the Louisa Co.,Va. Will Bk. #1, p. 27 of 27 March 1753

The will of Sarah Brechin -- mentions nine children. John & Thomas Poindexter, Sarah Rice, Ann Rutherford, Jean Ireland.

Thomas Poindexter & son-in-law John Snead, executors.(Will Brooks (sic) of Louisa County, Virginia, 1753).

The records of the Council of the Virginia Colony in Chapter 15 on 1st Nov.1733 & signed by WilliamGooch, Gov. & John Holloway, Speaker with John Randolph there is confirmed the entailed lands of Wm. Meriwether in St. Peter's Parish and Sarah together with the Poindexter names here to fore mentioned. Thomas Poindexter was dead by about 1706 or 1707 when Sarah Crafford Poindexter was remarried to the Rev. James Brechin (or Brekin) and after which she had other children by him. Rev. James Brechin orBrekin was a prominent Angelican minister.

Note:

In "A Lineage of John of 1600", vol. 9, p. 3, of THE CRAWFORD EXCHANGE, the 6th child of David, son of John, was listed as (?).

Information which gave source documentation: that a Sarah CRAWFORD was the daughter of David CRAWFORD of New Kent Co., VA, and son of John; that David was a member of the House of Burgesses; that Sarah married (1) Thomas POINDEXTER and (2) James BRECHIN; and that Sarah's sister, Elizabeth, married Nicholas MERIWETHER.

Thomas Poindexter and Sarah Crawford Children:

1. Susannah Poindexter

2. Elizabeth Poindexter

3. Sarah May Poindexter

4. John Poindexter

5. Thomas Poindexter

Rev. James Breechin/Brechin and Sarah Crawford Poindexter Children:

1. Anna Breechin/Brechin m’d John Sorrell

2 William Brechin

3 Jean Breechin

4.James Brechin

In Hanover County, VA - History of Slash Church by Dianne A. Jones, Historian THE MINISTERS OF SLASH CHURCH Early Anglican Ministers of St. Paul' Parish St. Peter's Parish was a very large area comprising the counties now known as New Kent and Hanover

Rev. James Breechin (or Breckin)

Rev. James Breechin (or Breckin)’s wife Sarah Crawford’s father: David Crawford born: 1625 in Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland died: killed by Indians 13 December 1689, Assaquin Plantation, New Kent, Virginia Member of the House of Burgesses. David wife was Jane

(Rev. James Breechin/Brechin and Sarah Crawford Poindexter Children: 1. Anna Breechin/Brechin m‘d John Sorrell)

Click here for Sorrell

The Poindexter webpage

Descendants of GEORGE POINDEXTER I

Elizabeth Crawford m Nicholas Meriwether II son of Nicholas Meriwether I and Elizabeth Woodhouse Nicholas I died 1678 [great-grandparents of explorer Meriweather Lewis]

Colonial Families in the U.S.

Description:

This impressive database covers the families of the early English colonies in America. Beginning with the first landing at Jamestown this series covers families up through the start of the American Revolutionary War and beyond into the Nineteenth Century. Many vital records are included, as well as locations of births, marriages, and deaths. In addition to containing family genealogies this database also contains armorial bearings, or coats of arms, for some of the more prominent families from England and Scotland. Researchers will find this database filled with important information compiled by George Mackenzie, who was a member of the American Historical Association and National Genealogical Society.

Source Information:

Mackenzie, George Norbury, Ed. Colonial Families of the United States of America. New York: 1907.

Colonial Families of the United States of America: Volume 5 ISSUE

page 393

The MERIWETHERS that came to America from England had the personal friendship of King George II, who gave them immense grants of land. Nicholas MERIWETHER, II, b. in Wales, 26th October, 1647, came to America and settled in Virginia near Charlottesville, where he died in December, 1744. He was a son of Nicholas MERIWETHER, of England, who died in 1678, and from his courses the MERIWETHER blood in nearly every prominent family of Virginia. In 1730, a large grant of land, 17,952 acres was given by King George II, and this patent was signed by William GOOCH, then Governor of the Colony, and is still preserved, besides many other tracts of land amounting to thousands of acres. He was a vestryman of St. Peter's Church from 1685 to 1698; was a Burgess of Virginia from New Kent County from 1702 to 1714. During his term of office, Bruton Parish being the church of the capital of the Colony, His Excellency, the Governor, attended [p.393] by his council of state and surrounded by the members of the House of Burgesses, gave the church an official distinction and in 1710, the old brick church became inadequate to the needs of the situation, so that it was determined that a new church should be built. The House of Burgesses stated that they would appropriate a sufficient sum of money for building pews for the Governor, Council and House of Burgesses, and appointed Mr. Nicholas MERIWETHER to coöperate with the vestry in the undertaking. He acquired very great wealth, which he distributed among his children. He owned many fine horses, some plate and a great many negroes, and several fine tracts of land. He was the oldest of his brothers that came over from England to make their homes in America; was married to a Miss Elizabeth CRAWFORD, dau. of David CRAWFORD, Esq., of Assasquin, New Kent County, Virginia.

Children

1 William MERIWETHER was born about 1689 in Louisa County, Virginia. m. and had seven children.

2 David MERIWETHER . 1690, of whom later

3 Thomas MERIWETHER was born about 1691 in Goochland, Virginia. m. and had one son Nicholas

4 Ann MERIWETHER m. Thomas JOHNSON

5 Sarah MERIWETHER was born on 7 Dec 1697 in Goochland, Virginia. . William LITTLEPAGE

6 Mary MERIWETHER was born in 1698 in New Kent, Virginia. m. John AYLETT.

7 Elizabeth MERIWETHER was born on 20 Jun 1703 in Goochland, Virginia. m. Thomas BRAY.

8 Nicholas MERIWETHER was born on 4 Jul 1699 in Surry County, Virginia. m. Mildred THORNTON

9 Jane MERIWETHER was born in 1705. She died in 1757. married #Col. John LEWIS. Col. was born in 1694. He died in 1765 in Albemarle County, Virginia.

David MERIWETHER [Parents] was born in 1690 in New Kent County, VA. He died on 5 Dec 1744. David married Ann HOLMES. Ann HOLMES was born in 1692 in King and Queen Co., VA. She died on 11 Mar 1736

Children

1 Thomas MERIWETHER was born in 1715 and died in 1756.

2 Ann MERIWETHER was born on 11 Nov 1721 in Louisa County, VA. She died before 1792 in Louisa County, VA.

The progenitor of the Meriwethers was Nicholas, an emigrant from Wales, who died in 1678. He had three sons, Francis, who married Mary Bathurst, and from whom descended Governor George W. Smith, who perished in the burning of the Richmond theatre in 1811, David and Nicholas. Nicholas was the large landholder. Besides obtaining grants of extensive tracts in several of the counties of eastern Virginia, he entered in one body seventeen thousand, nine hundred and fifty-two acres on the eastside of the South West Mountain in Albemarle.

3 David MERIWETHER was born on 5 Aug 1726 in Louisa County, VA.

4 James MERIWETHER was born on 1 Jun 1729 in Louisa County, VA. He died in 1792

5 Nicholas MERIWETHER was born on 11 Dec 1719 in Louisa County, VA. He died on 3 May 1758.

6 Sarah MERIWETHER was born on 12 Feb 1724 in Louisa County, VA. She died on 5 Sep 1725 in Louisa County, VA.

7 William MERIWETHER was born on 25 Dec 1730 in Louisa County, VA. He died on 24 Dec 1790.

8 Francis MERIWETHER was born in 1717 in James City County, Virginia. He died in 1793 in Greenwood County, SC. Francis was born in 1717.

Thomas MERIWETHER [Parents] was born in 1715 in New Kent County, VA. He died in 1756 in Fredericksville, Louisa County, Virginia. Thomas married Elizabeth (Mary) THORNTON [Parents] was born in 1718/1722 in Snow Creek, Spotsylvania County, VA. She died in 1757. Elizabeth married Thomas MERIWETHER in 1735 in Spotsylvania County, Virginia.

children:

1 Lucy MERIWETHER born on 4 Feb 1752 in Albemarle Co., VA. She died on 8 Sep 1837 in Albemarle County, VA. m'd Capt. William LEWIS [Parents] was born in 1735 in Locust Hill, Abermarle Co., VA. He died in 1777 in Louisa County, VA. Children

1 Meriwether LEWIS was born on 18 Aug 1774 in "Locust Hill", Albemarle County, Virginia. He died on 11 Oct 1809 in Natchez Trace, Lewis County, TN.

Personal secretary to President Thomas Jefferson and later led the famous Lewis & Clarke Expedition. Meriwether Lewis was born in Albemarle County Virginia on August 18, 1774. He was the first of three children of Lucy and Thomas Lewis. His father died when we he was five. Lewis's mother, left to raise her children and run a plantation, soon remarried. From age thirteen to eighteen Lewis attended local schools taught by ministers. When he was eighteen, his stepfather died and Lewis returned home to take over the job of running the plantation

2 Dr. Reuben LEWIS.

3 Jane LEWIS.

Here is story about the Lindsay/Crawford family. Could this be a branch of our Crawfurd/Crawford family Story? If not it is nice STORY.

Patrick’s great-grandson, John Lindsay, 17th earl of Crawford and 1st earl of Lindsay (c. 1598—1678), was the son of Robert Lindsay, 9th Lord Lindsay of the Byres, whom he succeeded as 10th lord in 1616. In 1633 he was created earl of Lindsay, and having become a leader of the Covenanters he marched with the Scottish army into England in 1644 and was present at Marston Moor; in 1644 also he obtained the earldom of Crawford in the manner already mentioned. In the same year he became lord high’ treasurer of Scotland, and in 1645 president of the parliament. Having fought against Montrose at Kilsyth, the earl of Crawford-Lindsay, as he was called, changed sides, and in 1647 he signed the “ engagement” for the release of Charles I., losing all his offices by the act of classes when his enemy, the marquess of Argyll, obtained the upper hand. After the defeat of the Scots at Dunbar, however, Crawford regained his influence in Scottish politics, but from 1651 to 1660 he was a prisoner in England. In i661 he was restored to his former dignities, but his refusal to abjure the covenant compelled him to resign them two years later. His son, William, 18th earl of Crawford and 2nd earl of Lindsay (1644—1698), was, like his father, an ardent covenanter in 1690 he was president of the Convention parliament. Mr Andrew Lang says this earl was “very poor, very Presbyterian, and his letters, almost alone among those of the statesmen of the period, are rich in the texts and unctuous style of an older generation.”

William’s grandson, John Lindsay, 20th earl of Crawford and 4th earl of Lindsay (1702—1749), won a high reputation as a soldier. He held a command in the Russian army, seeing service against the Turk, and he also served against the same foe under Prince Eugene; Having returned to the English army he led the life-guards at Dettingen and distinguished himself at Fontenoy; later he served against France in the Netherlands. He left no sons when he died in December 1749, and his kinsman, George Crawford-Lindsay, 4th Viscount Garnock (c. 1723—1781), a descendant of the ,7th earl, became 21st earl of Crawford and 5th earl of Lindsay. When George’s son, George, the 22nd earl (1758—1808), died unmarried in January 1808, the earldoms of Crawford and Lindsay were separated, George’s kinsman, David Lindsay (d. 1809), a descendant of the 4th Lord Lindsay of the Byres, becoming 7th earl of Lindsay. Both David and his successor Patrick (d. 1839) died without sons, and in 1878 the House of Lords decided that Sir John Trotter Bethune5 Bart. (182 7—1894), also a descendant of the 4th Lord Lindsay of the Byres, was entitled to the earldom. In 1894’ john’s cousin, ‘David Clark Bethune (b. 1832), became 11th earl of Lindsay

The earldom of Crawford remained dormant from 1808, when this separation took place, until 1848, when the House of Lords adjudged it to James Lindsay, 7th earl of Balcarres. The earls of Balcarres are descended from John Lindsay, Lord Menmuir (1552—1598), a younger son of David Lindsay, 9th earl of Crawford. John, who bought the estate of Balcarres in Fif’eshire, became a lord of session as Lord Menmuir in 1581; he was a member of the Scottish privy council and one of the commissioners of the treasury called the Octavians. He had great influence with James VI., helping the king to restore episcopacy after he had become, in 1595, keeper of the privy seal and a secretary of state. Menmuir, a man of great intellectual attainments, left two sons, the younger, David, succeeding to the family estates on his brother’s death in 1601. David (c. 1586— 1641), a notable alchemist, was created Lord Lindsay of Balcarres in 1633, and in 1651 his son Alexander was made earl of Balcarres

Alexander Lindsay, 1st earl of Balcarres (1618—1659), the “Rupert of the Covenant,” fought against Charles I. at Marston Moor, at Alford and at Kilsyth, but later he joined the royalists, signing the “ engagement “ for the release of the king in 1647, and having been created earl of Balcarres took part in Glencairn’s rising in 1653. Richard Baxter speaks very highly of the earl, who died at Breda in’ August 1659. His son Charles (d. 1662) became 2nd earl of Balcarres, and another son, Cohn (c. 16541722), became 3rd earl. Cohn, who was perhaps the most trusted of the advisers of James II., wrote some valuable Memo-irs touching tile Revolution in Scotland, ~O88—i6po; these were first published lh 1714, and were edited for the Bannatyne Club by the 25th earl of Crawford in 1841. Having been allowed to return to Scotland after an exile in France, the earl joined the Jacobite rising ~fl 1715. His successor was his son Alexander, the 4th earl (d. 1736), who was followed by another son, James, the 5th earl (1691—1768), who fought for the Stuarts at Sheriffrnuir. Afterwards James was pardoned and entered ‘the English army, serving under George II. at Dettingen. This earl wrote some Memoirs of the Lindsays, which were completed by his son Alexander, the 6th earl (1752—1825). Alexander was with the English troops in America ‘during the struggle for independence, and was governor of Jamaica from 1794 to 1801, filling a difficult position with great credit to himself. He became a general in 1803, and died at Haigh Hall, near Wigan, which he bad received through his wife, Elizabeth Dalrymple ‘(1759—1816), on the 27th of May 1825. This earl did not claim the earldom of Crawford, although he became earl dejure ifl 1808, but in 1843 his son James Lindsay (1783—1869) did so, and in 1848 the claim was allowed by the House of Lords. James was thus 24th earl of Crawford and 7th earl of Balcarres; in 1826 he had been created a peer of the United Kingdom as Baron Wigan of Haigh Hall.

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CRAWFORD, FRANCIS MARION

Burke's Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland

"Original data: A genealogical and heraldic history of the landed gentry; or, Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland enjoying territorial possessions or high official rank: but uninvested with heritable honours. , London: Colburn, 1837-38.

Description:

This database details information found in John Burke’s history of landed gentry or commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, printed in 1837 and 1838. The work includes information about those persons who owned land or held high official rank, but were not considered nobility. Biographies often contain information about names, places, dates of vital events such as birth, marriage and death, occupations, and occasionally, an achievement of a coat of arms

The extreme ancestor of the family of Crawfurd in Scotland , as shewn in vol. ii. p. xiv. was Reginald , apparently fourth and youngest son of Alan , fourth Earl of Richmond , who died in 1146 . He seems to have accompanied David I. to the North, when that prince entered his kingdom from the court of his brother-in-law Henry I. of England , "followed," says Chalmers, "by a thousand Norman knights, whom he provided for and established in his dominions for their civilization and protection." Reginald received extensive grants of lands in Strath Cluyd , or Clydesdale , whence his immediate descendants adopted the name-Crawfurd -it forming one of the largest baronies in Scotland whilst entire, some three or four hundred merk lands, and (See Robertson's Topographical Description of Cunningham, p. 335.) signifying, according to Chalmers, in Gaelic , "the Pass of Blood," as commemorative probably of some sanguinary conflict between the Aborigines and their Roman invaders. The Crawfurd Castle , is designated Norman Gill , commemorative equally of their last invaders, or of the people by whom the subversion of the Celtic race in the Lowlands was effected. (The institutions of law and order, observes Chalmers , were now first introduced among a barbarous race, by people of a different lineage and speaking a different tongue.)

The first settler and founder of the family does not appear to have assumed his name from his lands. He probably died previous to the general introduction of that practice, as prior to 1161 , or during the incumbency of Arnot , abbot of Kelso , John de Crawfurd , his son, witnesses deeds in the Chartulary of that monastery along with Baldwin de Biggar , ancestor to the Earls of Wigton , and he is therein styled step son to Baldwin . Where this John established his residence was termed, says Chalmers, "Villum Johannis Privigni Baldwini;" and the circumjacent village that arose John's-town; this portion of the barony constituting the parish of Crawfurd-John , in contradistinction to Crawfurd proper, inherited by his elder brother. "From the elder branch." (observes George Crawfurd the genealogist, quoting the learned professor Thomas Crawfurd 's MSS.) "came heirs female - but another part of the barony remained with the heirs male (desceuded from Reginald ), from whom derived the Crawfurds , of Lowdon ; and from John , his Reginald 's) son, came the designation of Crawfurd-John ."

Dominus Galfredus de Crawfurd , the elder branch, ranking with the Magnate, Scotiæ , is a frequent witness to his sovereign King William the Lion's charters; so much so, observes Crawfurd , "be seems to have had some general relation to the king's service or another;" but for which he was unable to account. The recorded kindred, in John Le Scott 's charter, (nephew to the king), in the chartulary of the monastery of Arbroath , and John Le Scott 's near connexion with the then and last Earl of Richmond of that line, Reginald 's elder brother, render his aggrandizement not of such difficult solution. He had a son,

Galfredus , who died in 1202 , who left an only son,

John de Crawfurd Miles , who dying in 1248 , was buried in Melrose Abbey, and his estates divided between his two daughters and co-heiresses; the elder marrying Archibald de Douglas , (See Chart of New hottle Abbey) from which marriage descended the renowned Earls of Douglas ; and of which lady (by whom, as Chalmers shows, the Dowglass obtained their first considerable addition of property) there is a very perfect and beautiful effigy in Douglas church. Lanarkshire , opposite that of Douglas , Duke of Turin , but a century older. The second married David de Lindsay , from whom descended the earls of Crawfurd , distinguished in Scottish history. Between those two females the territory of Crawfurd proper went; styled afterwards Crawfurd-Dowglas and, Crawfurd-Lindsay .

(John de Crawfurd , of Crawfurd-John , being the earliest bearing the name that Chalmers had met with (see Vol. III. Caledonis); he appears to consider his barony as that that was divided between co-heiresses. But this is contradicted by so many old authorties, and by a note even in his first volume, which be appears to have overlooked as to neutralize this opinion-for he shows in that note, from one of the Douglas" charters, within a year of the demise of Sir John Crawfurd , his father-in-law, that be, Dowglas , was then disputing his boundary with John de Crawfurd ,- which ??tly proved the then existence ?? beirs male to a certain portion of the t?? ?? Crawfurd , after the dismemberment, as above, ?? the principal domain in fact, it proved the integrity of the Crawfurd-John Barony as it l?? after rem??ed, becoming first the patri?? ?? the first Heginald of Lowdon's second see Joh?? and goung subsequently by female to the family ?? Herkley , of Kilb?? , and others.)

We now revert to John Privigni Baldwini , the second son of Reginald , the first settler, and younger brother or uncle to Dominus Galfredus above-designated of Crawfurd-John . From him descended his son or grandson,

Sir Reginald de Crawfurd , a personage of great eminence, who espoused cir. an. 1200 , the beiress of the extensive Barony of Lowdon , in Ayrshire , (which afterwards gave the title of Earl to its possessors) and he became the first Vicecomes or high Sheriff, synonymous with Lord Lieutenant of the county, the office being made hereditary in his family. He died in 1226 , when he was succeeded by his son,

Hugh de Crawfurd , of Loudon , Vicecomes de Air . "He was one of the Magnates et Barones Scotiae ," (Those Barones Majores held immediately with the King and sat in Parliment in virtue of the ??) observes Nesbit , "and with his father Reginald and other great persons witnesses the charters of Walter the High Steward of Scotland ." "He had a charter from the High Constable of the lands of Monoch et de tota terra de Crosby , in 1226 ; which is still enjoyed by his decendants, the inheritors of Crosby ," (An. 1700 , when Nesbit wrote.) "This Hugh , second Baron of Lowdon ," says Crawfurd , "left two sons, Hugh , the heir of the family, and Reginald , the first of that branch of the Crawfurds of Kerse ," and he quotes a charter in the Earl of Lowdon's chartulary which he had seen, "Hugo de Crawfurd filius Hugoni de Crawfurd seedes nos dedissui Reginaldo Kerse ." This last named Hugh succeeded his father in 1246 , in Lowdon , and as Vicecomes de Air , and by his wife Alicia , left a son Reginald and a daughter Margaret , who married Sir Malcolm Wallace , of Ellersley , and was mother of the immortal patriot Sir William Wallace the guardian. Hugh died in 1288 , when he was succeeded by his son,

Sir Reginald Crawfurd , Vicecomes de Air . "During the competition for the crown. between Bruce and Baliol ." says Nesbit , "when matters came to a crisis, no Scotchman ever acted the part more of a firm and inflexible patriot than Sir Reginald Crawfurd , or was more resolute in asserting with zeal and intrepid courage the liberties of his country: so that he was an eye-sore to the English and all that were in their interest in the west, by whom he was, together with Sir Alan Montgomerie and Sir Bryce Blair , treacherously murdered at a banquet at Ayr , in 1297 ;" (The motto of the family "I bide my time," is said to have been adopted by his descendants, descriptive of their desire for revenge.) leaving two sons,

1st, Reginald , his successor in Lowdon , and 2nd, Hugh , who inherited Crosby Monoch , &c. and termed West Lowdon , of whom afterwards "Sir Reginald , called Sir Ronald the younger." says Nesbit , "was just such another patriot, for defence of the liberties of his distressed country, as his father had been. He was among the first of his countrymen who joined Sir William Wallace , and was with him in all the dangers to which he was exposed. He was one of the first that resorted to Bruce when he set about recovering the lost liberties of his country. But being taken prisoner at Galloway , along with Alexander and David Bruce , the king's brothers: they were all three sent prisoners to London , where they were condemned to death, and executed in 1306 ; without respect either to their merit or quality; which lays a great load on the memory of that king (Edward ) who could destroy and cut off such men, whose only crime was their strenuous support of the liberty of their country. He left one only daughter, Dame Susan Crawfurd , who married Sir Duncan Campbell , of Redcastle : whereupon they have an investiture under the great seal of the great estate of Lowdon to them and their heirs, whom failing, to the lady and her heirs." From this marriage lineally descends the present Flora-Muir Campbell-Rowdon-Hastings, Countess of Loudon , in her own right, and her son the present Marquis of Hastings . (See Burke's Peerage.) Sir Reginald thus dying without male issue, the representation of the house of Crawfurd reverted to his cousin-german,

Hugh Crawfurd , of Crosby , &c. second son of Sir Reginald , who was murdered at Air , in 1297 . Those his lands of Crosby , and others named below, are naturally omitted in the enumeration of the lands inherited by Susan , as set forth in her retour or envestiture. They were devised to the now male heir by her grandfather, in whose time we find, in the history of Sir William Wallace , that "be found refuge from the persuit of the English at his uncle's castle of Crosby ." "This family," says Nesbit , "were from their first descent from Lowdon , possessed of the 14 pound lands of Crosby -the 6 pound land of Monoch and Gill -the 5 merk lands of Auldmuir , and 5 merk lands of Whiteside , all in the shire of Air ," and subsequently of the 12 pound land of Auchnames , Renfrewshire . George Crawfurd remarks their possession of the lands of Crosby and Monoch , "how," he observes, "I cannot say, but the thing is certain." And Hamilton , of Wishaw , in his History of the Sheriffdoms of Lanark and Renfrew . says, " This (Crosby ) is ane very ancient family, and claims to be chief of the clan." Hugh Crawfurd , of Crosby , died prior to the year 1320 , when he was succeeded by his son, (The same writer represents the castle of Auchinames as a "War tower now rapidly going to decay by reason of Crosby 's becoming the residence of the family.")

Reginald Crawfurd , of Crosby , who obtained in 1320 , a grant of the lands of Auchinames , in Renfrewshire , for his services to Robert Bruce , as well as an augmentation to his arms of two lances in saltire, commemorative of his exploits at Bannockburn . To him succeeded his son,

Reginald Crawfurd , of Auchinames (Auchinames being the larger possession became the designation of the family, though in a different county and a less ancient estate.) and Crosby , whose name appears prefixed as a witness to a charter by Robert , the high steward, in 1358 . His son and successor,

Thomas Crawfurd , (Crawfurd , the eminent historian and genealogist, deduces the Crawfurds of Kilbirnie from a vouager brother of this Thomas , (see page 552).) of Auchinames , is mentioned by Crawfurd , in his History of Renfrewshire , in which he relates the substance of a mortification to the church of Kilbarchan , dated 1401 , for a monk to say mass for the salvation of his soul, and his wife's, and his father's, and mother's, and for the soul of Reginald Crawfurd , his grandfather. He wedded the daughter and heiress of Malcolm Galbraith , and was s. by his son,

Archirald Crawfurd , of Auchinames , who m. Margaret , daughter and co-heiress William Douglas , of Peircetoun , and had (with a younger child, Thomas , ancestor of the Crawfurds of Thirdpart ) a son and heir,

Robert Crawfurd , of Auchinames , who wedded, first, -, daughter of Archibald , Earl of Angus ; and secondly, a daughter of Houstoun , of Houstoun . He was s. at his decease by his eldest son,

Robert Crawfurd , of Auchinames , who, in 1488 , acted as arbiter between the abbot and convent of Paisley , and the burgh of Renfrew . This gentleman accompanying his sovereign, James IV. to the battle of Flodden , was there slain in 1513 , and was s. by his eldest son,

James Crawfurd , of Auchinames , who obtained from his father in 1498 , a charter of Crosby and Monoch . To him succeeded his son,

Thomas Crawfurd , of Auchinames , living in 1535 . This laird m. Marion , daughter of Montgomery , of Hazlehead , great grandau. of Alexander , Master of Eglinton , son of Alexander , 1st Lord Montgomerie , and by whom he had three sons. successive Lairds of Auchinames , by the eldest of whom,

John Crawfurd , of Auchinames , he was succeeded at his decease. This gentleman being slain at the battle of Pinkie in 1547 , and dying without issue, the estates devolved on his next brother,

William Crawfurd , of Auchinames , who wedded Annabel , daughter of Chalmers of Gadgirth , and had one son, James , who m. the Lady Elizabeth Cunningham , daughter of William sixth Earl of Glencairn , by a daughter of Gordon of Lochinvar , and predeceasing his father, left an only child,

Jane , on whom he settled the lands of Crosby . This lady wedded, about the year 1606 , Patrick Crawfurd , of Auchinames , and thus the ancient estates of the family were reunited.

William Crawfurd died in 1582 , when the barony of Auchinames reverted to the male heir his uncle,

Patrick Crawfurd , of Auchinames , who m. a daughter, of John Frazer , third laird of Knock (A branch of the Lovat family.) (by Margaret , his wife, only child and heiress of Sir John Stuart , of Glenderston , fourth son of John , first Earl of Lennox , grandson of the celebrated Sir John Stuart , Count Devereux, field-marshall of France ), and had a son and successor,

Patrick Crawfurd , of Auchinames , who espoused in 1606 , Jane Crawfurd , heiress of Crosby , and thus again united the ancient estates of Crosby and Auchinames . He had issue,

William , his heir.

James , whose issue is extinct.

Robert , of Nethermains , who continued the family.

Patrick .

John .

Hugh , minister of Cumnock , father of Hugh Crawfurd , of Gride .

Margaret .

Jane .

Katherine .

Elizabeth . m. to Robert Hunter , of Hunterston .

Auchinames was s. by his eldest son,

William Crawfurd , of Auchinames , who was infeft in 1649 . He m. Anna , daughter of Sir Coll Lamout , of Inneryne , and had, with several daughters, a son and heir,

Archibald Crawfurd , of Auchinames , Crosby , &c. the sixteenth baron or chief of this family descended from Loudoun in a direct male line. He m. a daughter of Porterfield , of that Ilk, and had a son,

William , who m. Helen , daughter of Sir Thomas Burnet , of Crimond , and dying vitâ patris left an only daughter, who wedded Patrick Edmonston , of Newton , and had several children.

Archibald having left no male issue the estates of Auchinames and Crosby were brought to judicial sale in 1715 , during the minority of his grand-daughter, and were purchased by Patrick Craufurd , merchant Edinburgh , younger brother to David Craufurd of Drumsoy , (of the Kerse family) and eventually his heir. Hence Drumsoy is styled of Auchinames Crosby , acquired as above, is still posseased by his descendant, John Crawfurd . The above Patrick of Drumsoy , married Jane , second daughter to Archibald of Auchinames , but the representation of the family through female went by his grand-daughter to the Edmonstons -the male representation reverted to his uncle,

Robert Crawfurd , designed by Nisbet "Captain Robert Crawfurd , of Nethermains ;" and that the Nethermains so alluded to, was the Nethermains of Kilwinning , whence sprang the Crawfurds of Newfield , is sufficiently attested by the will at Patrick Crawfurd , of Auchinames , lately discovered among the records of the Commissary Court of Glasgow . This testament bears date at Crosby , parish of Largs , the 12 Dec 1648 , and in it an enumerated his children by name; it is "witnessed by William Craufurd , younger of Auchinames , my son: Robert Hunter of Hunterston , my son-in-law; and Robert Crawfurd , Nayrmains , (Although the parish registers do not extend sufficiently back to show by record of marriage how this property was acquired, that is shown by the following documents. There is upon record a process which attests the grandmother of Robert Crawford , portioner of Groateholme below, (the grandson of Robert and Christian Crawfurd ), to have been the proprietress (heiress) of Nethermains . And from the registry of Sasins and Retours. it is clearly established that there was no heiress or female proprietor during the seventeenth century, except Christian Brown its first, and Agnes Crawfurd this Robert of Groateholme's cousin-german, its last proprietrix. In the registry of Sasins, An. 1649 , there appears the deed of resignation to his daughter, by Robert Brown , of Mout , Burrowlands and Nethermains , "of all the lands antiqui extentus of Nethermains , Kilwinning , in favour of Robert Crawfurd and Christian Brown , his spouse and their heirs," &c. This shows the property came by female, and who she was. Now for aimilar proof of her husband. The tenour of Agnes's Retour below in 1723 . attest this: "Qui jure dicunt quod quondam Capitanus Robertus Crawfurd tertius legitimus filius Patricii Crawfurd de Auchenames Avus Agnate Crawfurd," &c. And farther, "in favorum dicti quondam Capitani Roberti Crawfurd et quondam Christiane Brown , &c. Et quod dicta Agneta Crawfurd est legitima et propinquior hæres dicti quondam Capitani Roberti Crawfurd sui avi in Omnibus et Singulis prædictis Terris de Nethermains ," &c. Nor was there any proprietor during the seventeenth century of the name of Crawfurd , except Robert or Captain Robert Crawfurd and his three immediate successors and descendants. See Supplement to Robertson's Ayrshire County History quoting further proof illustrative of this point, continued by parish registers and other documents corroborative of entries of baptisms in an old family bible of Captain Crawfurds ' as he is styled in the MSS. , the same as in Retour , now in possession of his great-great grandson, Colonel Crawfurd , of Newfield . Also notorial copy of parole evidence of Colonel Boyle , of Shewalton , corroborated by his mother's the late honourable Mrs. Boyle , touching this (the Newfield branch) being the representative as the male descendants of Auchnames . Christian Brown or Crawfurd , died in 1700 , aged ninety-three.) also my lawful son," and written by his son James , who was bred to the bar. (See Robertson's intereating "Account of the Principal Families in Ayrshire.")

Robert Crawfurd married Christian , dau. and co-heiress of Robert Brown , of Nethermains and Burrowlands ; which latter estate was conveyed by the younger sister to her husband, Alexander Blair , of Giffordland . He died in 1678 , leaving three sons,

Robert , Patrick , Moses , successive heirs.

Captain Crawfurd was succeeded by his elder son,

Robert Crawford , M.D. of Nethermains , who m. first, a daughter of the Rev. George Crawfurd , minister of Kilbride , (Representative of the Thirdpart branch, cadets of Auchnames , whom Robertson mistakingly inserts in the pedigree of this family, but rectifies in his Supplement. He was ancestor to Crawfurd of Newark .) and secondly Agnes Dickie , but dying s. p. was s. by his brother,

Patrick Crawfurd , esq. of Nethermains , who had an only daughter Agnes , who wedded in 1709 , John Boyd , esq. of Craneberry Moss , and appears to have alienated Nethermains to a family of the name of Glasgow . Her retour, dated 1723 , calls her nearest heir to her grandfather, Captain Robert Crawfurd , who was "tertius legitimus filius Patricii Crawfurd , de Auchenames ."

On the demise of Patrick Crawfurd , of Nethermains without male issue, the representation devolved on his brother,

Moses Crawfurd , esq. who m. first Marion Francis , of the ancient family of Francis of Stane , and had a son Archibald , (named after his cousin-german, the last of Auchinames , then resident at Crosby ,) who died in infancy, and a daughter Christian . He wedded secondly, Janet Allason , grand-daughter of Allason , of Curreath , and had by her (who died in 1738 ,)

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