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PHILIP WELCH (JR.) (1638 – c. 1708) – IMMIGRANT


On 16 September 1638 PHILIP WELCH (JR.) was born in Northern Ireland. PHILIP (JR.)’s parents are Philip Welch (Sr.) and Mary (maiden name unknown).

1649 (about): KIDNAPPED

PHILIP (JR.) was barely eleven years of age when he was snatched from his bed in a quiet seaside home, rushed in the darkness along a road and forcibly carried on board a waiting vessel (George Dill’s ship Goodfellow) where other young youths in similar plight were already imprisoned. The master of the ship continued his nefarious kidnapping until the countryside awakened to the knowledge of his infamous deeds and arose in wrath. The master, fleeing from their just and righteous anger, set said so hurriedly that he was forces to leave some of his provisions and precious water casks behind him.

1654: IMMIGRATION TO AMERICA

The Goodfellow sailed for New England. On 10 May 1654, not knowing the language of the country, PHILIP (JR.) and another young lad, William Downing, were sold for six and twenty pounds in corn merchantable or live cattle at or before the end of October next to Samuel Symonds. PHILIP (JR.) and William were to serve master Samuel Symonds faithfully but to receive in return no wages, only food and clothing for nine years. The boys were taken to live in Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

1659: TESTIFYING REGARDING TRESPASS

On 27 September 1659 PHILIP (JR.) testified in a case of trespass, which Major-General Denison brought against Samuel Symonds.

1660: SENTENCED FOR STUBBORNNESS

On 27 March 1660 in Ipswich PHILIP (JR.) was sentenced for “stubbornness and other offences,” but Samuel Symonds relented and had him respited until he should again give cause for complaint.

25 June 1661 in Salem Samuel Symonds brought suit against William Downing “for absolutely refusing to serve his master any longer, there being several years yet due according to the purchase. Samuel Symonds made a similar complaint against PHILIP (JR.).

1661: DEFENSE

On 26 June 1661 PHILIP (JR.) and William made the following defense:

We were brought out of our own Country contrary to our own wills & minds, & sold here unto Mr. Symonds by the master of the Ship, Mr. Dill, but what agreement was made between Mr. Symonds & ye said master, was never acted by our consent or knowledge, yet not withstanding we have endeavored to do him the best service we could these seven complete years. Which is 3 years more than the you used to sell them for at Barbados, when they were stolen in England. And for our service, we have no callings or wages, but meat & clothes. Now 7 years service being so much as the practice of old England, & thought meet in this place, we being both about 21 years of age, we hope this honored courts and jury will seriously consider our conditions.

Unfortunately the terms of agreement between Samuel Symonds and Shipmaster Dill were deemed legal and PHILIP (JR.) and William would serve out an additional 2 years.

1663: FREE

In May 1663 PHILIP (JR.) and William would be free.

1666/1667: MARRIAGE OF PHILIP (JR.) AND HANNAH HAGGETT

On 20 February 1666/1667 PHILIP (JR.) married Hannah Haggett in Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. PHILIP (JR.) and Hannah had at least eight children:

  1. PHILIP (III) (b. 27 December 1668)
  2. JOHN (SR.) (b. 27 November 1670)
  3. David (b. 27 August 1672)

1673/1674: LIFE IN MASSACHUSETTS

On 4 March 1673/1674 PHILIP (JR.) and Hannah were living in Topsfield, Massachusetts.

  1. Thomas (b. 12 July 1674)

KING PHILIP (JR.)’S WAR 1675-1676

  1. Samuel (b. about 1675)

KING PHILIP’s WAR

During this period of King Philip’s War it was necessary to gather men throughout the colonies and PHILIP (JR.) was among them.

1676: FISHERMAN

Early in 1676 PHILIP (JR.) moved from Topsfield to Marblehead where he was a fisherman. On 31 May 1679 PHILIP (JR.) sued the master of the catch for wages which the court awarded him.

1679: POOR

By 29 April 1679 PHILIP (JR.) returned to Topsfiled. It is said that the town fathers of Marblehead forbade PHILIP (JR.) to reside in their town because he had no money.

1710: PUBLIC DRUNKENNESS

On 11 April 1710 PHILIP (JR.) was fined 5 shillings for public drunkenness.

1713 & 1716: OWING MONEY

On 22 April 1713 PHILIP (JR.) owed George Vaughn.

On 23 April 1716 PHILIP (JR.) owned money to Alcock and Field.

  1. Hannah (b. about 1680)
  2. Moses (b. 25 November 1685)

KING WILLIAM’S WAR 1689-1697

  1. Thomas (b. 13 April 1691)

1708: DEATH OF PHILIP (JR.)

If PHILIP (JR.) had died ate age 70, he would have died in 1708. PHILIP (JR.) died in Ipswich, Massachusetts.

***

Notes On Philip Welch (Jr.)

Information is based on the following sources:

ADDITIONAL SOURCE:

PHILIP (JR.) Welch of Ipswich, Massachusetts 1654 and His Descendents, by Alexander McMillan Welch 1947, p. 3-16. The William Byrd Press, Inc., Richmond, Virginia. 929.2 Welch 1947, Allen County Library, Ft. Wayne, Indiana.

STORIES

Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Mass., vol. 2 (1656-1662), pp. 295-296.

KIDNAP STORY

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vol. 8, p. 77.

NOTE:

In one disposition George Dill is spelled George Dell, and William Downing is spelled William Dallton, and PHILIP (JR.) Welch is Edward Welch (his first name was changed by Samuel Symonds).

Samuel Symonds was an Assistant of the Colony in 1643 and in 1673 was Deputy-Governor. PHILIP (JR.) and William seemed to be treated well being on intimate terms with the family. The boys must have met many important people and learned much of court proceedings.

Marriage is also recorded at Wenham, Massachusetts,

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