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Genealogy of the Jackson and Associated Families

 

Generation 3

Grandchildren of Ralph Jackson and Leah Williams

Children of William/Williams Jackson and Sarah (Mary) Burton

 

4. John Jackson

 

     John Jackson was born in Dale Parish, Henrico County, Virginia, and died in Nottoway County, Virginia. John (1718/1723 – 1787/1788) can be traced through Amelia County, Virginia records for a period of 49 years from 1739 through 1788. Although his birth date and place are not known, at least from primary source records, the date of his death can be fairly accurately pegged as occurring sometime between 14 August 1787 and 28 February 1788. He wrote his will on the earlier date, and it was presented in court after his death on the latter date, which brackets his death as occurring sometime during the intervening time period. There is a peculiar bit of information about his son Abner that may suggest that John’s death took place during the earlier part of this time period. In August of 1787 it was noted in Charlotte County records that Abner Jackson had abandoned his property in that county and had left the area (to parts unknown) without paying taxes. This was, presumably, the same Charlotte County land bequeathed to Abner from his father in his August 1787 will. If Abner left the area without bothering to sell the land he had inherited from his father, and Charlotte County officials noticed his absence in 1787, then it certainly makes sense that John must have passed away sometime in 1787.1,2,3,4,5,25
 

     John Jackson was probably born in either Chesterfield or Henrico County, Virginia. Amelia County tithable lists extend back to 1736, but John does not appear in them until 1739, which means either he just moved to the area, or he had just reached taxable age (16) when he first appeared. In the latter case, it is more likely that he would have appeared in his father’s household as a minor rather than in his own household. A reasonable upper end member on his date of birth date, thus, can be ascertained by assuming John was 16 years old in 1739. This yields a birth date of 1723. More likely, he was at least 21 in 1739, which places a lower limit of 1718 for his birth date. This analysis brackets the date of John Jackson’s birth as probably occurring sometime between 1718 and 1723. Consequently, his age at the time he died (based on a late 1787 date of death) must have been somewhere between 64 and 69.59

 

     At an unknown date and place he married a woman named Sarah (? - ?), whose last name has been lost to history. While the date and place of the wedding have not been documented, it, surely, must have taken place in Virginia, probably Amelia County where John lived. Very little personal information, other than her name, the fact that she existed and was married to John Jackson, is available for Sarah.

 

     As noted above, John Jackson passed away in late 1787 or early 1788 in Amelia County, Virginia. According to John’s will, Sarah was to live on the farm for the rest of her days or until she remarried. Since she only appears as the head of household in the tax records once (in 1788) after her husband’s death, it is presumed either that she, too, passed away, or that she remarried sometime after 1788. The burial site for both John and Sarah is unknown. A best guess is that they were buried on the family farm or in a local cemetery. If Sarah remarried, it seems more likely that she would have been buried near her second husband.

 

Timeline of John Jackson and Sarah ? (Unknown Last Name)

 

~1718 - 17231,2,3,4,5,25

Birth of John Jackson in Dale Parish, Henrico County, Virginia

26 Nov. 173838

Colonial Wills of Henrico County, Virginia Part Two 1737 - 1781, page 1095
Will of William Jackson of Dale Parish
To son Mathew 150 acres in Henrico County on south side of Swift Creek, upon Licking Creek, where he lately lived and 1 negro after death of his mother Sarah Jackson; to son William 177 acres in Amelia County on Mayes Branch on lower side, and 1 negro; To son John, 200 acres in Amelia on lower end of my survey on Beaver Pond Branch, negro and items; To cousin Thomas Neal, son of Thomas Neal, 200 acres; To my friend John Brown all of my land on Mayes Branch, part of a survey of 260 acres, Rest of land on upper side of Mayes Branch to my son Francis, 200 acres, plus 1 negro and items; To son Mark,100 acres on north side of Swift Creek on upper end of land where I live, 1 negro and items; To son Thomas, all land and plantation where I live, also 80 acres on Licking Creek, at lower end of his brother Mathew’s line, and 1 negro
To daughter Ruth Moor, 1 shilling
To daughter Agnes Jones, 1 cow & calf
To wife Sarah, use of all above Negroes and my plantation during widowhood and to be executrix
Dated 26 Nov. 1738
Wit: John Green, John Blankenship and William Turner
Recorded 5 Sept. 1739

173951

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Edward Booker’s List between Deep and Flatt Creeks
Jno Jackson
1 tithable

174051

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Thomas Tabb’s List between Deep and Flatt Creeks
Jno Jackson
1 tithable

174151

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Edward Booker’s List below Flatt and Nibbs Creeks
Jno Jackson
1 tithable

1741

Earliest Estimated Date for Birth of John Jackson Jr.

174151

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Edward Booker’s List Between Deep and Flatt Creeks
Joh Jackson

174251

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Edward Booker’s List below Flatt and Nibbs Creeks
Jno Jackson
1 tithable

1743

Earliest Date for Birth of Arthur Jackson

174451

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Edward Booker’s List below Flatt and Nibbs Creeks
John Jackson
1 tithable

174651

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Edward Booker’s List between Flatt and Deep Creeks
Jno Jackson
1 tithable

1746

Latest Date for Birth of John Jackson Jr. and Arthur Jackson

174851

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Col. Edward Booker’s List below Flatt and Nibbs Creeks
Jno Jackson
1 tithable

174951

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Edward Booker’s List below Flatt and Nibbs Creeks
Jno Jackson
1 tithable
6 head of cattle

175051

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Samuel Terry’s List between Flatt and Nibbs Creeks
Jno Jackson
1 tithable
6 head of cattle

1750

Approximate Birth Date of Daniel Jackson

10 June 175151

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Samuel Terry’s List between Flatt and Deep Creeks
Jno Jackson
2 tithables
Slaves: Peg

175251

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Capt. Thomas Tabb’s Poles
Jno Jackson

3 Jan. 175259

Amelia County, Virginia Deed Books Volumes 3 - 4, 1747 - 1754, Deed Book 4, page 287

This indenture made the third day of January in the year of our lord one thousand seven hundred and fifty two between John Jackson of the county of Amelia of the one part and Alexander Roberts of the same county of the other part
Witnesseth that the said John Jackson for and in consideration of the sum of one hundred and twenty pounds currant money of Virginia to him in hand paid by the said Alexander Roberts the receipt of the said John Jackson doth hereby acknowledge he hath granted bargained and sold and by these presents doth grant bargain sell and confirm unto the said Alexander Roberts and his heirs and assigns forever on certain tract or par cell of land lying and being in the said county of Amelia on the bever pond branch of Deep Creek and joining Thomas Neale’s William Marshalls and James Longs lines and bounded as followeth to wit
Beginning at James Longs upper corner ash upon the said branch thence along a line of marked trees to Thomas Neales line thence East thirty eight degrees south two hundred and eight poles to a corner in the said Neale’s lines thence North thirty five degrees east one hundred and ninety four poles to two corner white oaks upon bever pond branch and thence up the said branch as it meanders to the beginning containing by estimation two hundred acres being part of one survey granted to William Jackson by Satarn (?) with all houses woods waters and water courses thereunto belonging or in any wise pertaining and all the right title claim and demand whatsoever of him the said John Jackson of in or to the same or any part there of to have and to hold the said tract or parcel of land and premises with there and every of their apertenances unto the said Alexander Roberts his heirs and assigns forever and the said John Jackson doth for himself and his heirs covenant and agree to and with the said Alexander Roberts that he the said John Jackson the above granted land and _(?) _(?_ unto the said Alexander Roberts to his heirs and
(may be a line of text missing)
_(?) will warrant and forever defend by _(?) will witness whereof the said John Jackson hath hereunto set his hand seal the day and year given (?) above
Signed Sealed and Delivered in the Presents of us
Test
Burton John Jackson
John Trabue seal
John Fergusson
Memorandum that on the forth day of January 1752 2 wit and piseably (?) prosession and Lezon (?) of the within mentioned land was taken by the within named Jackson by him delivered to the within named Alexander Roberts according to the form and effect of the within written deed.
Test
Burton John Jackson
John Trabue seal
John Fergusson
At a court held for Amelia County the 26 day of March 1752 John Jackson presented and acknowledged this his deed with livery and sowen (?) endorsed unto Alexander Roberts and ordered to be recorded Sarah the wife of the said John being first privately examined and voluntarily assenting thereunto relinquished her right of dower in the land by the said deed
Samuel Cobb clk

29 Jan. 175259

Amelia County, Virginia Deed Books Volumes 3 - 4, 1747 - 1754, Deed Book 4, page 306

This Indenture made this the twenty ninth day of January in the year of our lord Christ One thousand Seven hundred and fifty two Between Joseph Motley of the county of Amelia of the One part and John Jackson of said county of Amelia of the other part
Witnesseth that the said Joseph Motley for and in consideration of the sum of sixty pounds Currant money of Virginia to him in hand paid by John Jackson the receipt whereof he the said Joseph Motley doth hereby acknowledge hath given granted and sold and by these presents doth grant bargain and Sell unto the said John Jackson his heirs and Assigns forever one certain tract or parcel of Land containing three hundred and ninety acres lying and being in the county of Amelia aforesaid and bounded as followeth to wit
BEGINNING at Richard Wards corner at the hunting path thence along William Echols line south fifteen degrees one hundred and eighty poles to his corner in the road thence south eighty six poles to a faced corner thence east thirty one degrees south one hundred and sixteen poles to a corner pine in Hurts line thence along his line north thirty one degrees east two hundred and eighty two poles to his corner thence along William Mayes line west fifty poles to his corner thence north twelve degrees west one hundred and thirty eight poles to Wards line thence along his lines west fifteen degrees south two hundred and eighteen poles to the BEGINNING
TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said land and appurtenances unto the said John Jackson his heirs & Assigns forever and said Joseph Motley for himself and his heirs covenant and agree with the said John Jackson that he the said Joseph Motley and his heirs the above granted land and premises with the said John Jackson his heirs and assigns against all person and persons shall and will warrant and by these presents forever defend
In Witness whereof the said Joseph Motley Hath hereunto set his hand and affixed his Seal the day and year first above Written
Joseph Motley
His mark
Signed Sealed and Delivered in Presents of
John Baldwin
John Robert
Mark Moor
MEMORANDUM
That on the 29th day of January MDCCVII Livery & Seisen (?)of the within granted land and premises was by the within named Joseph Motley given to the within named John Jackson according to the form and effect of the within Deed
Joseph Motley
His mark
Witness
John Baldwin
John Robert
Mark Moor
Then received of John Jackson sixty pounds currant money it being the consideration for the land within mentioned
At a court held for Amelia County the 23rd day of April 1752 Joseph Motley presented and acknowledged this his deed with the livery and seisen (?) endorsed to John Jackson and ordered to be recorded
Elizabeth the wife of the said Joseph being first privately examined voluntarily relinquished her right of dower conveyed by the said deed
Samuel Cobbs Clk

175251

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Thomas Jack’s List
John Jackson
2 tithables
Slaves: Peg

22 Nov. 175359

Amelia County, Virginia Deed Books Volumes 3 - 4, 1747 - 1754, Deed Book 5, page 102
This Indenture made this twenty second day of November in the year of our lord Christ One thousand Seven hundred and fifty three between Joseph Billups of the county of Lunenburg of the One part and John Jackson of the county of Amelia of the other part
Witnesseth that the said Joseph Billups for and in consideration of the sum of thirty pounds Currant money of Virginia to him in hand paid by the said John Jackson the receipt whereof he the said Joseph Billups doth hereby acknowledge he the said Joseph Billups hath given granted bargained sold aliened and ensossed (?) and confirmed by these presents do grant bargain Sell ensoos and confirm unto the said John Jackson his heirs and Assigns forever one certain tract or parcel of Land containing two hundred acres to be the same more or less lying and being in the county of Amelia aforesaid on a fork of Flatt Creek and bounded as followeth to wit
Beginning at a corner of William Mayes on the north side of the said fork thence up the said fork to William Hurts line thence along his line to the said John Jacksons old line thence along his line to James Mitchells line thence along his line to William Mayes line thence along his line to the place begun at
TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said land together with all buildings, orchards, woods, underwood ways, waters & water courses and all other appurtenances whatsoever to the said land and premises belonging or in anywise appertaining and also the reversion & reversions, remainder or remainders & all the estates right & title interest claim & demand whatsoever of him the said Joseph Billups of in or to the said land premises & every part or parcel thereof with the appurtenances unto the said John Jackson his heirs & Assigns forever and said Joseph Billups for himself & from all and every person & persons whatsoever the above granted land & premises unto the said John Jackson his heirs and assigns shall now warrant and forever defend by these presents
In Witness whereof the said Joseph Billups hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year above written
Joseph Billups
Signed Sealed and Delivered in Presence of us
MEMORANDUM
That on the twenty second day of November 1753 Livery & Season (?) of the within land was made by the within named Joseph Billups to the within named John Jackson according to the form and effect of the within written deed.
Witness
Joseph Billups
At a court held for Amelia County the 24th day of January 1754 Joseph Billups presented and acknowledged this his deed with livery and season endorsed to John Jackson which was ordered to be recorded
Saml Cobb ck

175351

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Charles Irby’s List, Lower End of Nottoway Parish
John Jackson
2 tithables
Slaves: Peg

23 Feb. 175425

The Jacksons of Lower Virginia, Evelyn Duke Brandenburger,

Chesterfield County, Virginia Will Book 1, page 208
He gave his wife Elizabeth the land and the plantation he lived on and movable estate for life and after her death said plantation to William Shapperd Junr; to son John’s heirs 5 shillings; to sons Thomas, Samuel, James; to daughters Sarah Jackson, Elizabeth Tirpin, Susannah Tanner, Febue Johnson, Ann Burton, Ezar Burton, and granddaughter Arrobello Burton each one shilling. His wife was appointed executrix and the witnesses were John Baker, Robert Cayce and Sarah Baker

175451

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Henry Ward’s List, Nottoway Parish
Jn Jackson
2 tithables
Slaves: Pegg

1754

Earliest Potential Birth Date for Abner Jackson

175551

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Henry Ward’s List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson
2 tithables
Slaves: Pegg

175651

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Henry Ward’s List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson
2 tithables
Slaves: Pegg

1756

Earliest Possible Birth Date for William Jackson

1758

Earliest Possible Birth Date for Henry Jackson

14 May 176151

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
A Poll Taken for David Greenhill
John Jackson

1761

Latest Possible Birth Date for Abner Jackson, William Jackson and
Henry Jackson

176251

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Henry Ward’s List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson
5 tithables
Slaves: Pegg, Amey
Other White Males in Household: John Jackson, Jr., Arther Jackson

176351

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Henry Ward’s List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson, Sr.
4 tithables
590 acres
Slaves: Pegg, Amey
Other White Males in Household: Arther Jackson

176451

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Richard Jones’ List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson, Sr.
4 tithables
590 acres
Slaves: Pegg, Amey
Other White Males in Household: Arther Jackson

1764

Earliest Birth Date for Curtis Jackson

176551

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Richard Jones’ List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson
4 tithables
590 acres
Slaves: Pegg, Amey
Other White Males in Household: Arther Jackson

176651

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
John Winn’s List
John Jackson
4 tithables
590 acres
Slaves: Pegg, Amey
Other White Males in Household: Dan Jackson

1766

Latest Birth Date for Curtis Jackson

176751

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Richard Jones’ List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson, Sr.
4 tithables
590 acres
Slaves: Pegg, Amey
Other White Males in Household: Daniel Jackson

176851

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Capt. Munford’s List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson, Sr.
5 tithables
590 acres
Slaves: Pegg, Amey
Other White Males in Household: John Jackson, Jr., Daniel Jackson

21 Apr 176858

Amelia County, Virginia, Deed Books 9 – 11, Deed Book 9, page 343

This Indenture made this the twenty first day of April in the year of our lord Christ One thousand Seven hundred and sixty eight between John Jackson of the county of Amelia of the One part and Williams Jackson of said county of the other part
Witnesseth that the said John Jackson for and in consideration of the sum of twenty pounds Currant money of Virginia to him in hand paid by Williams Jackson the receipt whereof he the said John Jackson hereby acknowledges hath given granted bargained sold aliened and ensossed (?) and by these presents do grant bargain Sell and confirm unto the said Williams Jackson his heirs and Assigns forever one certain tract or parcel of Land containing one hundred and ninety acres to be the same more or less lying and being in the county of Amelia aforesaid on a fork of Flat Creek called Ellises and bounded as followeth to wit
BEGINNING at a corner of Flemings on the north side of the said fork thence along the said fork to a beech or corner tree on Wm Hurts line thence along a line of marked trees to a branch on the said line to up the said branch between the two Jacksons to a corner tree on Mitchells line to down the said line to the first station
TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said land together with all buildings, orchards, woods, ways, waters & water courses and all other appurtenances whatsoever to the said land & premises belonging or in anywise appertaining and also the reversion & reversions, remainder & remainders & all the estates right & title interest claim & demand whatsoever of him the said John Jackson of in or to the said land premises & every part or parcel thereof with the appurtenances unto the said Williams Jackson his heirs & Assigns forever and said John Jackson for himself & from all and every person & persons whatsoever the above granted land & premises unto the said Williams Jackson his heirs and assigns shall now warrant and forever defend by these presents
In Witness whereof the said said John Jackson Hath hereunto set his hand and Seal the day and year above Written
John Jackson Sr
Sarah

Signed Sealed and Delivered in Presents of
Thomas Jackson
Arthur Jackson
James Charters
MEMORANDUM
That on the twenty first day of April 1768 Livery & Seizen (?)within land and premises was made by the within named John Jackson given to the within named Williams Jackson according to the form and effect of the within written deed
John Jackson
Witness
At a court held for Amelia County the 23rd day of June 1768
This indenture and the memorandum endorsed were acknowledged by the within named John Jackson party thereto and ordered to be recorded
Sarah wife of the said John Jackson personally appeared in court & having been first privately examined as the law directs voluntarily relinquished her right of dower in the land & premises by the said indenture
Teste
P. G. Peachy ck

24 Nov. 176858

Amelia County, Virginia, Deed Books 9 – 11, Deed Book 10, page 96
This Indenture made this the twenty fourth day of November in the year of our lord Christ One thousand Seven hundred and sixty eight between John Jackson Senr of Amelia County of the one part and Arthur Jackson of said county of the other part
Witnesseth that the said John Jackson Senr for divers good causes considerations but more especially for the love good will & affection he bears to his son Arthur Jackson also for the consideration of five pounds currant money hath given granted & confirmed and by these presents do fully freely and absolutely give grant and confirm unto the said Arthur Jackson his heirs and assigns forever a certain tract or parcel of land lying and being in the county of Amelia in the upper side of Ellises Fork of Flat Creek by estimation one hundred and ninety acres be the same more or less and bounded as follows
Beginning at Hurts line thence along his line to Webbs line thence along his line to Wrens line thence along his line to John Jacksons Senr line thence along his line to the beginning together with all woods ways water and water courses being ?anding or growing
TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the aforesaid land and premises and every part & parcel with the appurtenances unto the said Arthur Jackson his heirs & assigns forever to the only proper use and behoos of him the said Arthur Jackson his heirs and assigns forever and the said John Jackson Sen doth covenant for himself and his heirs do warrant & defend the above said land and premises unto the said Arthur Jackson his heirs and assigns forever against the claim or demands of all persons whatsoever and further at all times hereafter at the reasonable request and charge of the said Arthur Jackson do make such further or other assurance of the said land and premises for the better making & sure of the said land and premises unto the said Arthur Jackson his heirs and assigns forever as council learned in the law shall devise advise or require
In Witness whereof the said said John Jackson Senr hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year above written
Signed Sealed and Delivered in Presence of us
John Jackson Sr
MEMORANDUM
That on the twenty fourth day of November one thousand seven hundred and sixty eight Livery & Seisen (?) of the within land and premises was made by the within named John Jackson Senr given unto his son Arthur Jackson according to the form and effect of the within written deed
John Jackson Senr
At a court held for Amelia County the 24th day of November 1768
This indenture and the memorandum endorsed was acknowledged by the within named John Jackson Senr party thereto and ordered to be recorded
Sarah wife of the said John Jackson personally appeared in court & having been first privily examined as the law directs voluntarily relinquished her right of dower in the lands & premises conveyed by the said indenture
Teste
P. G. Peachy ck

176951

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1736 – 1771
Stephen Cocke’s List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson, Sr.

1772

Earliest Birth Date for Isaiah Jackson

177852

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1778 – 1782
Edmund Booker’s List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson
4 tithables
Slaves: Ami, other name indecipherable, is possibly Jude
Other White Males in Household: Henry Jackson

177952

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1778 – 1782
Edmund Booker’s List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson
3 tithables
Slaves: Ami, Jude

178252

Amelia County, Virginia Tithables 1778 – 1782
Edmund Booker’s List, Nottoway Parish
John Jackson
5 tithables
Slaves: Niger (?), Ami, Jude
Other White Males in Household: Curtis Jackson

178353

Amelia County, Virginia Personal Property Tax Lists 1782 - 1813
John Jackson
Tithes > 16: 4
Tithes < 16: 3
4 Horses
10 Cattle

1787

Latest Birth Date for Isaiah Jackson

14 Aug. 178749

Amelia County Virginia, Will Book 4, page 94
In the name of God Amen I John Jackson Sr of Amelia County being Sick and Weak of Body but of perfect sound memory do make and Ordain this my last will and Testament in manner and form following after all of my Just Debts are paid I Give to my son Abner Jackson one Negro boy Called Abner (?) one Negro Girl called nancy I also Give the tract of Land he now Lives upon in the County of Charlotte being by estimation one hundred and thirty three acres to the same more or less I Give to my son Henry Jackson two pounds Current money to be raised out of my estate and paid him after my wifes decease I Give to my son Isaiah Jackson one Negro boy called Jack one feather bed and furniture and two head of misling (?) siged (?) Cattle I Give to my wife Sarah Jackson during her natural Life or Enter marriage my Plantation on which I am dwelling with all the Land I hold Joining the said Plantation and on her Death or intermarriage (?) I desire it may return to my son Curtis Jackson, I also Leave (?) to my wife Sarah Jackson the following Negroes, _?_, Amey, Jude, Tawney, Milley, Sally (Tally?), Sampson, with all my stock and house hold furniture and Still all which I _?_ her During her natural life or Enter marriage and at her Death or intermarriage I desire all the Negroes I left (?) her with the stock household furniture and Still may be Equally Divided Between all my Children (viz) John Jackson, Arthur Jackson, Daniel Jackson, Abner Jackson, William Jackson, Henry Jackson, Isaiah Jackson and Curtis Jackson my Desire is that their be no appraisment of my Estate by order of Court and Lastly I appoint my wife Sarah Jackson Executrix with my son Arthur Jackson Executor of my Last Will and testament In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this Fourteenth day of August Ann. Dom. One thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven
John Jackson
Seal
Signed Sealed and Acknowledged
In the presence of
Barthow Dupree
James Dupree
Josiah Foster
William Hindby

28 Feb. 178849

Amelia County Virginia, Will Book 4, page 116
At a court held for Amelia County the 28th Day of February 1788 This Last will and Testament is as exhibited into Court and record by the Oathes of two of the Witnesses thereto and Sworn to by Arthur Jackson Executor in the will named and ordered to be Recorded and on the motion of said Executors who took the oath and entered into Bar (?) with Security as the Law directs Certificate is Granted him for obtaining a Probate in Due (?) Form (?)
Teste J. Hohnobe (?) DC

25 Apr 178853

Amelia County, Virginia Personal Property Tax Lists 1782 - 1813
George Baldwin’s Comm
Sarah Jackson
1 White Male > 16
3 Blacks > 16
2 Blacks 12 – 16
5 Horses

25 Sept. 178849

Amelia County Virginia, Will Book 4, page 116
An Inventory of the Estate of John Jackson deceased Containing of 6 negroes viz. Amey, Jude, Tawney, Molley, T(?)ab, Sampson, 13 cattle, 2 (?) Horses, 7 Sheep, 2 Beds & Furniture, Steats (?) and Cords (?), one mare saddle, one Womans Snoak (?), one Stett (?), 2 _?_, 1 Cart, 3 Wedges, 3 wheels & 5 Spindles, 2 tr (?) cotton cards @ parsel of corks (?), 2 potts, 2 pr. Hooks, 3 Dishes, 14 Spoons, 3 Bowles, 6 Cups & Saucers, 2 Tumblers, 2 Pruggs (?), 1 Tea pott, one basin, 6 knives and forks, one X cut saw, one hand saw, 1/3 of a whipsaw, one Jointer, 1 foot adds (?), 1 Auger, 1 Drawing knife, 2 Chisels, 1 pr of Compases, 2 shovels, some Shoe Tools, 1 Gun, Sword and Bayonet, 12 Bottles, 1 Pitcher, 1 State (?), one Funnel, 1 Gun (?), _?_, 1 Rawhide, 2 Sides of Tand Leather, 12 Hoes, 4 Arpes (?), 12 Glass (?), 1 Looking glass, 1 Butter Pott, 1 Jug, 1 Brush, 2 Flat Irons, 1 Bore (?) Iron of Chains (?), 1 Wire Peddle (?), 1 bore, 2 pales, 2 Tubbs, 4 Rip (?) hooks, 1 Cain (?) bail (?), 1 pr. Sisors, 4 balls (?) Razor (?), 1 Gone (?), 3 books, 1 table, 1 candle stick, 1 armchair, 1 loom, 2 Trays, pared (?) of Barrels, 1 Grindstone, Chamber pott, 2 Bee Hives, 1 Meal (?) Lifter (?), 1 Deam (?) Glass, 1 vial of tarter, 1 fro, 1 Duch oven, 1 Griddle Iron, 2311w (?) of Tobs (?), 2 Barrels of corn, 2 Felis (?) hogsheads Crows, 1 Hatchett, 5 evertons (?), _?_ _?_ 100 of tobacco, 1 G_?_, 2 bridles, 3 ox yokes, rings & staples, 1 p House _?_, _?_ _?_ Rings & Staples, One Meal Bag
At a court held for Amelia County the 25th day of Sept. 1788 This inventory of the Estate of John Jackson deceased was returned into Court and Ordered to be Recorded.
Teste G. Hohn _?_

 

Analysis of the Timeline

 

     John and Sarah Jackson, along with most of the children in their household, can be traced for a period of nearly 50 years through colonial Virginia land, will and tax records. Analysis of this data reveals much information about the family structure, where they lived and some general information on their lifestyle.

 

     A birth order of John and Sarah’s male children, as well as an approximation of their birth dates, can be derived from tax records of pre-Revolutionary, colonial Virginia. A 1705 Virginia law taxed all males 16 years of age and over, so, in a continuous series of tax records, the first appearance of a male in his father’s household would closely approximate the year in which he turned 16, thus allowing a fairly accurate calculation of his birth date. Successive appearance of males in the father’s household in succeeding years would, thus,define the birth order of other sons. Unfortunately, for various reasons, the tax data for Southside Virginia counties comprises a discontinuous series of records. Individual tax lists were lost and courthouse fires destroyed records, especially during times of war, so Virginia county tax lists are characterized by numerous gaps. Despite these deficiencies, much family information can be gleaned from these records.59
 

     Table ? shows tax data for the John and Sarah Jackson household in Amelia County, Virginia from 1739 through 1788, and perhaps one of the more striking features of this graphic are the gaps in data, which are shown in gray. The data is fairly continuous through the 1740’s and mid 1750’s, characterized only by scattered one-year data gaps. A five year gap then occurs from 1757 through 1761, and is followed by eight years of continuous records. Then, from 1770 through 1777, there is another gap, followed by alternating periods of missing data and full data coverage until 1788. All totaled, there are 23 tax years of missing data and 27 years of preserved data, so there is, actually, a great deal of tithable and property tax data available, containing a sufficient amount of information to allow the structure of this Jackson family to be reconstructed.

 

     John Jr. and Arthur are the first to appear as males over 16 in their parent’s household in 1762, and since the first major record gap (1757 – 1761) occurs immediately prior to their first appearance, they must have turned 16 sometime during that time. This brackets their birth dates as occurring sometime between 1741 and 1746. Since John left his parent’s household much earlier than Arthur, it is here interpreted that he is the oldest son. While the order in which they left home may not necessarily reflect birth order, John Jr is, clearly, named after his father, possibly supporting the notion that he was the first born son. Of particular note is the fact that the first year that John Jr. appears in his own household, his father is identified in the tax records as John Sr. This was most likely an identifier used by the county clerks or the tax list owner to differentiate between two individuals having the same given and surnames within a tax district. Arthur remained in his parent’s household until 1765, and appears on his own the next year, which could mean that he got married and moved out sometime during that year. Daniel makes his first appearance in 1766, so he must be next in the birth order with a birth date that calculates to 1750. The second large “data hole” starts in 1770, and by the end of this eight year gap, three more males have come of taxable age: William, Abner and Henry. Both William and Abner are living either in their own household (William), in the household of another individual (Abner), or in their parent’s household (Henry), which means they turned 16, and possibly 21 sometime during the preceding gap in the records. Their birth dates, thus, can be bracketed as occurring sometime between 1754 and 1761. Finally, in 1782, Curtis makes his first appearance in the tax records of his father’s household, but this is immediately after a two year gap in the records. He must have turned 16 during the hiatus, so his birth, thus, can be bracketed as occurring sometime between 1764 and 1766. In 1788, after John Sr had passed away, Sarah is listed as the head of household, which includes one male under the age of 16. John’s 1788 will identifies a son named Isaiah, and since he never appears in previous tax records, it can be assumed that Isaiah must have been the youngest son. Since he was 16 or younger in 1788, calculation of his birth date indicates that Isaiah was born in 1772 or afterwards.

 

     In his will, John Jackson lists all of his children in the following order: John Jackson, Arthur Jackson, Daniel Jackson, Abner Jackson, William Jackson, Henry Jackson, Isaiah Jackson and Curtis Jackson. While there may never have been an attempt to list his children in birth order, except for the last two children, this sequence is supported by the tax records, and is here considered to be birth order for this family. Birth dates and/or ranges for all of John and Sarah’s known children, thus, can be defined as follows, from oldest to youngest: John Jr. (1741 - 1746), Arthur (1743 - 1746), Daniel (1750), Abner (1754 – 1761), William (1756 – 1761), Henry (1758 – 1761), Curtis (1764 – 1766) and Isaiah (1772 –1787). Unfortunately, the tax data gives no indication of the presence of daughters, but no daughters are mentioned in John’s will, so it is here presumed that John and Sarah either had no daughters or had none that survived beyond infancy.

 

     A key method for reliably tracing John Jackson through what are essentially minimally descriptive personal property tax records is through the identification and location of his property. During this time period of John Jackson’s lifetime covered by these records (1739 – 1788) there were several types of taxable property expressed in the tax data, the most prominent being land, slaves and livestock. The county government assigned tax collection to individuals who were responsible for specific, geographically-defined regions, and, in the early records, these regions were bounded by the drainage basins of the principal streams in the area. From 1739 through about 1753, the tax districts consisted of three areas: the area between the Flat Creek drainage and the Appomattox River, the drainage basin containing Flat Creek and Deep Creek and the drainage basin beyond Deep Creek. The Flat/Deep Creek district was often further subdivided by the drainage basin of Nibbs Creek. (See Figure ?) Taxpayers that appeared in the same tax district year after year, quite clearly, owned property within that particular district. Early tax records identified all taxable slaves by name, thus allowing individual slaves and slave owners to be traced from year to year. Consequently, slave ownership, especially when corroborated by will data, is quite useful in confirming an identification. Finally, while livestock and other personal property does not relay much, if any, family information, it does shed much light on the nature of the lives of these pioneers. The tithable and tax data can be used to generally locate John and Sarah’s farm in Amelia County. The early tax records refer to the location of their land as being between Deep and Flat Creeks and, beginning around 1753, within Nottoway Parish. From about 1753 onward, the county was, apparently, subdivided into Raleigh and Nottoway Parish, with Nottoway Parish being split off to become Nottoway County in 1789. (source) Based on this data, it can be seen (Figure 1?) that John and Sarah lived in the Flat Creek drainage basin in the part of Amelia County that was later split off to become Nottoway County.

 

     John Jackson can also be definitively traced through Amelia County records based upon his record of slave ownership and the geographic location of his property within the county (Table 1?). In his 1787 will he named nine slaves (Abner, Nancy, Jack, Amey, Jude, Tawney, Milly, Sally and Sampson), most, of whom (Amey, Jude, Tawney, Molly and Sampson), were also itemized in his subsequent estate inventory. Two of these slaves were African women, Amey and Jude, who can be used to positively identify John from 1778 through 1783. Amey appears, along with another African female named Peg, from 1762 through at least 1768, and from 1751 through at least 1756, Peg is listed as John and Sarah’s only slave. Except for gaps in the record, the record of slave ownership, alone, can be used to successfully identify John Jackson in the Amelia County tax records back in time to 1751. While he owned no slaves prior to 1751, there is only one John Jackson in Amelia County records from 1739 through 1750, and he is located in the Flat Creek/Deep Creek tax district. Furthermore, except for the later years when they owned several male slaves, John and Sarah owned only one or two female slaves for most of the time period, and female slaves were, most likely, not field hands. This Jackson family had a house full of boys to help with the farm work, so these African women, no doubt, were used to assist in household chores and in raising the boys. When the boys had mostly left the household and John and Sarah were elderly, it appears that male slaves were purchased, and were most likely put to work in the fields.

 

     Further information on the composition and structure of John and Sarah’s family, as well as insights into their lifestyle can be discerned from John’s 1788 will and his estate inventory. Table 2? shows the items from this inventory classified into eight categories. The categories themselves, as well as an analysis of the items placed in the categories yield interesting insights into the life and times of what appear to be typical residents of Amelia County, Virginia in the late 18th century. Two crops were itemized, so it can be seen that these Jacksons raised, at the very least, corn and tobacco. The tobacco, most likely, was a cash crop for export to England, while the corn was probably used for subsistence living with the excess possibly being available for local barter or sale. A grindstone in the inventory must have been for grinding corn or wheat to flour, which would have been used to make bread, among other food items. The basic farm implements, hoes and shovels, clearly serve to further underscore the agricultural root of their existence. The agrarian nature of their life is further defined by the livestock they owned – cattle, horses, sheep and bees. Since they were beekeepers, they obviously produced honey which could be used in the home as well as for local trading. The oxen yoke and the butter pot indicate that the cattle were used both as a food source and as draft animals. The horses, no doubt, were used mostly for personal transporation or for hauling material, or both, as evidenced by the saddle and the cart. The spinning wheel, spindles, cotton cards and loom indicate that this Jackson family probably made yarn from the wool of their sheep, and wove it into cloth with the loom for barter, sale, as well, most likely, to produce their own clothes. The candles and chamber pot indicate the primitive level of their pioneer existence without the modern day luxuries of electricity and indoor plumbing. Very few items of furniture were identified - some bedroom furniture, an armchair and a table are all that are listed, which may indicate the sparse furnishings of a yeoman farmer’s home. With the exception of the looking glass (or mirror) all of the furniture in this list could easily have been hand made. In fact, the saws, drills, chisels and wedges all show that John was a very active wood worker. Not only was wood the main fuel for heating and cooking in this preindustrial society, but it was also an easily obtainable and available construction material. Two guns were itemized in addition to a sword and a bayonet, all of which seems to suggest the need to be able to defend oneself against dangerous enemies – the sword, in particular, suggests some formal military experience. The rawhide and tanned leather indicate that every part of a butchered animal had some useful application, not to mention that leather items were probably made in the home. Kitchen items were of particular importance, since they made everyday life in such a harsh environment much more tolerable. All in all, an analysis of the estate inventory paints a picture of a self sufficient, rural, pioneer farming family that probably spent the bulk of their time raising crops, tending livestock, not to mention hand crafting wood and leather items. They probably grew and processed much of their own food, bartered for necessities they could not produce themselves by trading specialty items they could produce, like honey and homespun cloth, and, with the heavy concentration of wood and wool working tools, as well as the leather items, they, undoubtedly, met many of their basic functional needs by handcrafting needed items on their own. They also had the assistance of several female slaves to assist, not only in handling many of these chores, but also in raising a houseful of boys. These Africans also required food, shelter and clothing. (The froe and the drawing knife – for making shingles.)


Table 2?
Categorization of Items from Estate Inventory

 

Tools

wedges

froe

cross cut saw

hand saw

whip saw

jointer

auger

drawing knife

chisels

compasses

flat irons

scissors

grindstone

hatchet

pales

tubs

barrels

hooks

hoes

shovels

Animals

horses

cattle

sheep

bees

Animal Gear

saddle

brush

bridles

meal bag

shoe tool

ox yokes

cart

Crops

corn

tobacco

Household Items

wheels

spindles

cotton cards

loom

beds & furniture

armchair

table

candlestick

looking glass

butter pot

books

chamber pot

Kitchen Items

pots

hooks

dishes

spoons

bowls

cups & saucers

tumblers

tea pot

knives & forks

bottles

basin

pitcher

funnel

jug

Slaves

Amey

Jude

Tawney

Molly

Tab

Sampson

Miscellaneous Items

guns

sword

bayonet

rawhide

tanned leather

 

     While most, if not all, of the Jacksons living in Amelia, Chesterfield and surrounding Southside Virginia counties during this time period were, undoubtedly, related in some way, further research is needed to accurately define these relationships. (Southside Virginia is that part of Virginia that lies between the James River and the North Carolina border). SOURCE There is an intriguing hint, however, of a possible family relationship between John Jackson and a Francis Jackson of Amelia County through the Hamblin family that also requires additional research. John’s son, Abner Jackson, unaccountably appeared in the tax records in 1778 and 1779 in the household of a Steven Hamblin in Amelia County. Francis Jackson, whose Amelia County will was written in 1792, left property to a Kitty Hamblin and Sarah Hamblin, although he did not define his relationship to either woman. There exists the possibility that Steven Hamblin is related to Kitty and Sarah Hamblin, and, as noted, to francis Jackson, either by blodd or through marriage. Steven Hambllin could be a relative from Abner’s mother’s side, or, for that matter from his father’s side by marriage to a sister or cousin of John Jackson.

 

 

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Last Revised: 10 Oct 2006