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-----Original Message-----

From: Lonny J. Watro [mailto:ptc00562@mail.wvnet.edu]

Sent: Monday, April 17, 2000 10:21 AM

To: ITA-SICILY-L@rootsweb.com

Subject: [{ITA-SICILY-L}] Angelo OLLES and Maria BARONE

Searching for Angelo OLLES m. c. 1905, Maria BARONE. Both were supposedly born in Sicily. The family rumor is that Angelo Americanized his last name from ALLESSI to OLLES. Their first child, Anthony OLLES, was born in Rochester, NY, July 05, 1908.

Thank you for any assistance.

Lonny J. Watro

======================================================================

-----Original Message-----

From: Lonny J. Watro [mailto:ptc00562@mail.wvnet.edu]

Sent: Monday, April 17, 2000 10:16 AM

To: ITA-SICILY-L@rootsweb.com

Subject: [{ITA-SICILY-L}] Alexander Lappettito

Alexander Lappettito was supposedly from Sicily. He moved to the U.S. sometime during the late 1890's to early 1900's. He was nationalized in 1902. He died in Rochester, NY, in the 1920's or 1930's. His wife's name was Mary - maiden name unknown. I am assuming that he arrived in the U.S. in 1897, as I believe the law at that time required a 5 year residency in the U.S. prior to nationalization. I am unsure if he crossed the Atlantic first and then sent for his family prior to nationalization or not. I have been told that when the head of the family became nationalized during the early 1900's in the US, the rest of the family was nationalized automatically.  Therefore, it is possible that he came first and then sent for his family after he was settled in Rochester, NY.

Some of his children were born in Italy and some were born in Rochester, NY.  There is a time lapse between Italian born children and the US born children, which leads me to believe that Alexander Lappettito arrived in the US first sometime in circa 1897.

I am searching for any information on the Lappettito families in Sicily. I am also searching for information, in general, of why Sicilians left Sicily for the U.S. during the late 1890's to early 1900's. And, how did most afford the expense of crossing the Atlantic?

Thanks for any information and direction.

Lonny J. Watro