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The Lyrics Page

Song Lyrics

For your enjoyment, this page is provided for you to listen and sing along with the tunes on this site.

Instructions

This page is not hard to work, however some instructions should be posted for those who are not familiar with the computer and/or music on WEB Sites. You can read this section, or scroll past it... but no matter what you do, these instructions will be hear for you to come back to. :)

The Table of Contents

The first thing to comment on is the table of contents. All this section does is list the songs on this page and by clicking on the song name, you will be transported to the song lyrics section.

You don't have to click on the Song Titles, you can simply use the "Page Down" button on your keyboard or use the scroll bar on your browser to navigate this page.

Now this wasn't very complicated, was it? :)

The Lyrics Section

The first thing to note about this section is that it is not marked as "The Lyrics Section".

This section is s little more difficult to use than the Table of Contents, but it isn't much more difficult. :)

The Song Titles in this section are "Clickable" too, but by clicking on the Song Titles here will cause the music to start playing (instead of taking you somewhere else. Once you click on the Song Title in this section, most people will notice their Windows Media Player (or other sound program) firing up. All you have to do is "Drop", or "Minimize" that new screen and this will bring your browser screen with the Song Lyrics to the forefront again so that you can read the lyrics as the song plays.

In order to download the Song, I suggest that you right click on the Song Title and click on "Save Target As", then when that window pops up -- Save the midi file into a Folder where you will remember where the Song is at. My Documents is a good place to store your download, however it is best to create a folder on your hard drive especially for songs and download the files to there.

See, I told ya this wasn't much more complicated than the first section. :)

Some Useful Information

When you play the songs you should be forewarned that the songs will download to your Temporary Internet Folder in your Windows Directory. This is nothing to worry about for everything you see and download on the net gets stored here and most systems will delete the items stoored in this Folder when the computer is shut down.

If you are unsure of whether your system is deleting these temporary files, you can click on your Start Button, then you click Programs, then you click Accessories. After you do this, you then click Sytem Tools then click Disk Clean up. When the new window opens for Disk clean up, then just let it clean up your C: Drive.

You also can check your Windows Help Files for Disk Clean up to be sure you are doing things right. :)

Please note: Some of the songs here have the same tune as other songs. :)

Table of Contents
The Irish National Anthem

Believe Me If All Those
Endearing Young Charms

Botany Bay, version 2

Carrickfergus

Cockles and Mussels (Molly Malone)

Convict of Clonmel

Danny Boy

Enniskillen Dragoons

Galway City

Garryowen

I'll take you home again, Kathleen

Isle of Innisfree

Johnny We Hardly Knew Ye

Kilgary Mountain

"Leaving of Liverpool"
or
"Fare Thee Well My Own True Love"

"Londonderry Air"

Red Is The Rose

The Bard of Armaugh

The Cliffs of Doneen

The Coulin

The Girl I Left Behind Me

The Irish Emigrant

"The Mountains O'Mourne"

The Old Orange Flute

The Rose of Tralee

The Star of County Down

The Wearin' Of The Green

The Wild Colonial Boy

Tu Ra Lura Lura Loo

Tu Ra Lura Lura Loo
Version 2

When Irish Eyes are Smiling

Whiskey In The Jar

Who Put the Overalls in
Mistress Murphy's Chowder

Will Ye Go, Lassie?
(Wild Mountain Thyme)

The Irish National Anthem
Amhán Na bhFiann

Sinne Fianna Fáil,
Atá Fá gheall ag Éirinn,
Buidhean dár sluagh tar rúinn do ráinig chughainn
Fámhoídh bheírh saor,
Sean-tír ár sinnsear feasta
Ní fágfar fá'n tíorán ná fa'n tráil;
Anocht a theigeamh sa bhearna baoghail,
Le gean ar Gaedhí chun báis nó saoghail,
Le gunna sgréach: Fá lamhach na piléar.
Seo Libh canaidh amhrán na bhFiann.

Seo dhibh a cháirde duan oglaidh
Caithréimeach, bríoghmhar, ceolmhar.
Ár dteinte cnámh go buacach táid,
`S an spéir go min réaltógach.
Is fionmhar faobhrach sinn chun gleo
'S go tiúnmhar glé roimh tigheacht do'n ló,
Fa ciúnas chaoimh na h-oidhche ar seol,
Seo libh, canaídh amhrán na bhFiann.

Cois banta réidhe, ar árdaibh sléibhe.
Ba bhuadhach ár rinnsear romhainn,
Ag lámhach go tréan fá'n sár- bhrat séin
Tá thuas sa ghaoith go seolta;
Ba dhúthchas riamh d'ár gcine cháidh
Gan iompáil riar ó imirt áir,
'Siubhal mar iad i gcoinnibh rámhaid
Seo libh, canaidh amhrán na bhFiann.

A buidhean nach fann d'fuil Ghaoidheal is Gall
Sinn breacadh lae na saoirse,
Tá sgéimhle 's sgannradh í gcroidhthibh namhad,
Roimh ranngaibh laochra ár dtíre;
Ár dteinte is tréith gan spréach anois,
Sin luinne ghlé san spéir anoir,
'S an bíodhbha i raon na bpiléar agaibh:
Seo libh, canaidh amhrán na bhFiann.

 
 
 
 
 

A Soldier's Song

Soldiers are we,
whose lives are pledged to Ireland
Some have come from a land beyond the wave,
Some to be free,
no more our ancient sireland
Shall shelter the despot or the slave;
tonight we man the Bearna Baoghal
In Erin's cause.
come woe or weal;
'Mid cannon's roar and rifle's peal
We'll chant a soldier's song.

We'll sing a song, a soldier's song
With cheering, rousing chorus
As round our blazing fires we thong,
The starry heavens o'er us;
Impatient for the coming fight,
And as we wait the mornings light
here in the silence of the night
We'll sing a soldier's song

CHORUS

In valley green or towering crag
Our fathers fought before us,
And conquered 'neath the same old flag
That's floating o'er us,
We're children of a fighting race
That never yet has known disgrace,
And as we march the foe to face,
We'll sing a soldier's song

CHORUS

Sons of the Gael! Men of the Pale!
The Long watched day is breaking;
The serried ranks of Innisfail
Shall set the tyrant quaking.
Our camp fires now are burning low;
See in the east a silvery glow,
Out yonder waits the saxon foe,
So sing a soldier's song.

Believe Me If All Those
Endearing Young Charms

Believe me, if all those endearing young charms
Which I gaze on so fondly today
Were to change by tomorrow and fleet in my arms
Like fairy gifts fading away.

Thou wouldst still be adored as this moment thou art
Let thy loveliness fade as it will
And around the dear ruin each wish of my heart
Would entwine itself verdantly still.

It is not while beauty and youth are thine own
And thy cheeks unprofaned by a tear
That the fervor and faith of a soul can be known
To which time will but make thee more dear.

No, the heart that has truly loved never forgets
But as truly loves on to the close
As the sunflower turns to her God when he sets
The same look which she turned when she rose.

Botany Bay, version 2

Farewell to old England the beautiful!
Farewell to my old pals as well!
Farewell to the famous Old Baily
Where I used to cut such a swell.

Chorus

My Too-ral li Roo-lal li Laity
Too-ral li Roo-lal li Lay
Too-ral li Roo-lal li Laity
Too-ral li Roo-lal li Lay!

It's seven long years I been serving,
It's seven I got for to stay,
For beatin' a cop down our alley
An' takin' his truncheon away.

Chorus

There's the captain what is our commander,
The bos'n an' all the ship's crew,
The married and also the single ones
Knows what us poor convicts goes through.

Chorus

It ain't that they don't give us grub enough,
It ain't that they don't give us clothes;
It's all 'cause we light-fingered gentry
Goes about with a chain on our toes.

Chorus

O had I the wings of a turtle dove,
I'd spread out my pinions and fly
Into the arms of my Polly love
And on her soft bosom I'd lie.

Chorus

Now all you young viscounts and duchesses
Take warning by what I do say,
And mind it's all yours what you touches-es
Or you'll land down in Botany Bay.

Carrickfergus

I Wish I was in Carrickfergus, only for nights in Ballygran
I would swim over the deepest ocean, the deepest ocean for my love to find
But the sea is wide and I cannot swim over and neither have I wings to fly
If I could f ind me a handsome boatman to f erry me over to my love and die

My childhood days bring back sad reflections of happy times I spent so long ago
My boyhood friends and my own relations have all passed on now like melting snow
But I'll spend my days in endless roaming soft sit the grass my bed is free
Ah to be back in Carrickfergus on that long road down to the sea

And in Kilkenny it is reported there are marble stones as black as ink
With gold and silver I would support her, but I'll sing no more now till I get a drink
I'm drunk today and I'm seldom sober, a handsome rover from town to town
Ah, but I'm sick now, my days are numbered so come all ye young men and lay me down

The Cliffs of Doneen

You may travel far far from your own native land
Far away o'er the mountains, far away o'er the foam
But of all the fine places that I've ever been
Sure there's none can compare with the cliffs of Doneen.

Take a view o'er the mountains, fine sights you'll see there
You'll see the high rocky mountains o'er the west coast of Clare
Oh the town of Kilkee and Kilrush can be seen
From the high rocky slopes round the cliffs of Doneen.

It's a nice place to be on a fine summer's day
Watching all the wild flowers that ne'er do decay
Oh the hares and lofty pheasants are plain to be seen
Making homes for their young round the cliffs of Doneen.

Fare thee well to Doneen, fare thee well for a while
And to all the kind people I'm leaving behind
To the streams and the meadows where late I have been
And the high rocky slopes round the cliffs of Doneen.

Cockles and Mussels (Molly Malone)

In Dublin's fair city, where the girls are so pretty
I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone
As she wheeled her wheel-barrow
Through streets broad and narrow
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!

Alive, alive-O! alive, alive-O!
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!

She was a fish-monger, but sure 'twas no wonder
For so were her father and mother before
And they each wheeled their barrow
Through streets broad and narrow
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!

Alive, alive-O! alive, alive-O!
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!

She died of a fever, and no one could save her
And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone
But her ghost wheels her barrow
Through streets broad and narrow
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!

Alive, alive-O! alive, alive-O!
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!

Danny Boy

Oh Danny boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling
From glen to glen, and down the mountain side
The summer's gone, and all the flowers are dying
'Tis you, 'tis you must go and I must bide.

But come ye back when summer's in the meadow
Or when the valley's hushed and white with snow
'Tis I'll be here in sunshine or in shadow
Oh Danny boy, oh Danny boy, I love you so.

And if you come, when all the flowers are dying
And I am dead, as dead I well may be
You'll come and find the place where I am lying
And kneel and say an "Ave" there for me.

And I shall hear, tho' soft you tread above me
And all my dreams will warm and sweeter be
If you'll not fail to tell me that you love me
I'll simply sleep in peace until you come to me.
I'll simply sleep in peace until you come to me.

Convict of Clonmel

How hard is my fortune, how vain my repining;
The strong rope of death for the young neck is twining.
My strength is departed, my cheeks sunk and sallow,
While I languish in chains in the jail of Cluain Meala.

No boy in the village was ever yet milder;
I'd play with a child and my sport be no wilder.
I'd dance without tiring from morning 'til evening,
And my gold ball I'd stike to the light'ning of heaven.

At my bed foot decaying my hurley is lying,
Through the lads of the village my gold ball is flying.
My horse 'mong the neighbors neglected may follow,
While I pine in my chains in the jail of Cluain Meala.

Next Sunday the pattern at home will be keeping,
All the young active hurlers* the field will be sweeping,
The dance of fair maidens the evening will hallow,
While this heart once so gay will be cold in Cluain Meala.

Enniskillen Dragoons

A beautiful damsel of fame and renown
A gentleman's daughter from Monaghan town
As she went through the barracks this beautiful maid
Stood up in her coach to see dragoons on parade

Fare ye well, Enniskillen, I must leave you for a while
And all thy fair waters and Erin's green isle
And when the wars are over, I'll return in full bloom
And they'll all welcome home their Enniskillen dragoons

They were all dressed up the like of gentleman's sons
With their bright shining rapiers and carabine guns
Their bayonets fornemst them, oh she saw them full soon
Just because that she loved an Enniskillen dragoon

She looked to the bright sons of Mars on the right
Their armor outshining the stars of the night
"Oh Willie, dearest Willie, you have 'listed full soon
In the royal, loyal Enniskillen dragoons"

"Oh Flora, dearest Flora, your pardon I crave
Both now and forever, you know I am your slave
But your parents they have slighted me, morning, night, and noon
Just because that you loved your Enniskillen dragoon"

"Oh Willie, dearest Willie, head not what they say
For children their parents must always obey
And when you've left Ireland, they'll soon change their tune
Sayin' 'The good Lord be wi' ye, Enniskillen dragoon'"

Galway City

As I roved out thro' Galway city
At the hour of twelve at the night,
Who should I see but a handsome damsel,
Combing her hair by candlelight.
"Lassie, I have come a courtin'
Your kind favours for to win;
And if you'll but smile upon me,
Next Sunday I'll call again."

Chorus Raddy a the too dum, too dum too dum
Raddy a the too dum doo dum day,
Raddy a the too dum too dum too dum
Raddy a the too dum doo dum day.

"So to me you came a courting,
My kind favours for to win;
But t'would give me the greatest pleasure
If you never did call again.
What would I do when I go walking,
Walking out in the morning dew?
What would I do when I go walking,
Walking with a lad like you?

Chorus

"Lassie I have gold and silver;
Lassie, I have houses and lands;
Lassie, I have ships on the ocean;
They'll be all at your command."
"what do I care for your ships on the ocean?
What do I care for your houses and lands?
What do I care for your gold and silver?
All I want is a handsome man.

Chorus

Did you ever see the grass in the morning?
All bedecked with jewels rare?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie,
Diamonds sparkling in her hair?
Did you ever see a copper kettle
Mended with an ould tin can?
Did you ever see a handsome damsel,
Married off to an ugly man?

Chorus

Garryowen

Note: This song was the official song
of Col. George A. Custer's 7th Calvary.

Let Bacchus' sons be not dismayed
But join with me, each jovial blade
Come, drink and sing and lend your aid
To help me with the chorus:

Chorus:

Instead of spa, we'll drink brown ale
And pay the reckoning on the nail;
No man for debt shall go to jail
From Garryowen in glory.

We'll beat the bailiffs out of fun,
We'll make the mayor and sheriffs run
We are the boys no man dares dun
If he regards a whole skin.

Chorus:

Our hearts so stout have got no fame
For soon 'tis known from whence we came
Where'er we go they fear the name
Of Garryowen in glory.

Chorus:

I'll take you home again, Kathleen

I'll take you home again, Kathleen
Across the ocean wild and wide
To where your heart has ever been
Since you were first my bonnie bride.
The roses all have left your cheek.
I've watched them fade away and die
Your voice is sad when e'er you speak
And tears bedim your loving eyes.

Chorus:

Oh! I will take you back, Kathleen
To where your heart will feel no pain
And when the fields are fresh and green
I'II take you to your home again!

I know you love me, Kathleen, dear
Your heart was ever fond and true.
I always feel when you are near
That life holds nothing, dear, but you.
The smiles that once you gave to me
I scarcely ever see them now
Though many, many times I see
A dark'ning shadow on your brow.

Chorus:

To that dear home beyond the sea
My Kathleen shall again return.
And when thy old friends welcome thee
Thy loving heart will cease to yearn.
Where laughs the little silver stream
Beside your mother's humble cot
And brightest rays of sunshine gleam
There all your grief will be forgot.

Chorus:

Isle of Innisfree

I've met some folks who say that I'm a dreamer,
And I've no doubt there's truth in what they say.
But sure a body's bound to be a dreamer,
When all the things he loves are far away.

And precious things are dreams unto an exile,
They take him o'er the land across the sea,
Especi'lly when it happens he's an exile,
From that dear lovely Isle of Innisfree.

CHORUS

And when the moonlight peeps across the rooftops,
Of this great city, wondrous tho' it be, I'm once again back home in Innisfree.

I wander o'er green hills thro' dreamy valleys,
And find a peace no other land could know.
I hear the birds make music fit for angels,
And watch the rivers laughing as they flow.

And then into a humble shack I wander,
My dear old home and tenderly be-hold
The folks I love around the turf fire gathered
On bended knees their rosary is told.

(new CHORUS)

But dreams don't last, tho' dreams are not forgotten,
And soon I'm back to stern reality,
But tho' they paved the footways here with gold dust,
I still would choose the ISLE OF INNISFREE.

Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye

While goin' the road to sweet Athy, hurroo, hurroo
While goin' the road to sweet Athy, hurroo, hurroo
While goin' the road to sweet Athy,
A stick in me hand and a drop in me eye,
A doleful damsel I heard cry,
Johnny I hardly knew ye.

With your drums and guns and drums and guns, hurroo, hurroo
With your drums and guns and drums and guns, hurroo, hurroo
With your drums and guns and drums and guns,
The enemy nearly slew ye
Oh my darling dear, Ye look so queer
Johnny I hardly knew ye.

Where are your eyes that were so mild, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your eyes that were so mild, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your eyes that were so mild,
When my heart you so beguiled
Why did ye run from me and the child
Oh Johnny, I hardly knew ye

Where are your legs that used to run, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your legs that used to run, hurroo, hurroo
Where are your legs that used to run,
When you went for to carry a gun
Indeed your dancing days are done
Oh Johnny, I hardly knew ye

I'm happy for to see ye home, hurroo, hurroo
I'm happy for to see ye home, hurroo, hurroo
I'm happy for to see ye home,
All from the island of Sulloon;
So low in flesh, so high in bone
Oh Johnny I hardly knew ye

Ye haven't an arm, ye haven't a leg, hurroo, hurroo
Ye haven't an arm, ye haven't a leg, hurroo, hurroo
Ye haven't an arm, ye haven't a leg,
Ye're an armless, boneless, chickenless egg
Ye'll have to put with a bowl out to beg
Oh Johnny I hardly knew ye

They're rolling out the guns again, hurroo, hurroo
They're rolling out the guns again, hurroo, hurroo
They're rolling out the guns again,
But they never will take our sons again
No they never will take our sons again
Johnny I'm swearing to ye

Kilgary Mountain
Same tune as "Whiskey in the Jar"

As I was a-walkin' 'round Kilgary Mountain
I met with Captain Pepper as his money he was countin'
I rattled my pistols and I drew forth my saber
Sayin', "Stand and deliver, for I am the bold deceiver"

Chorus:

Musha rig um du rum da
Whack fol the daddy o
Whack fol the daddy o
There's whiskey in the jar.

The shinin' golden coins did look so bright and jolly
I took 'em with me home and I gave 'em to my Molly
She promised and she vowed that she never would deceive me
But the devil's in the women and they never can be easy

Chorus:

When I was awakened between six and seven
The guards were all around me in numbers odd and even
I flew to my pistols, but alas I was mistaken
For Molly's drawn my pistols and a prisoner I was taken

Chorus:

They put me into jail without judge or writin'
For robbing Colonel Pepper on Kilgary Mountain
But they didn't take my fists so I knocked the sentry down
And bid a fond farewell to the jail in Sligo town

Chorus:

Now some take delight in fishin' and in bowlin'
And others take delight in carriages a-rollin'
But I take delight in the juice of the barley
And courtin' pretty girls in the morning so early

Chorus:

Leaving of Liverpool
or "Fare Thee Well My Own True Love"

Farewell to Prince's Landing Stage
River Mersey, fare thee well
I am bound for California
A place I know right well

Chorus:

So fare thee well, my own true love
When I return united we will be
It's not the leaving of Liverpool that's grieving me
But my darling when I think of thee

I'm bound off for California
By the way of stormy Cape Horn
And I'm bound to write you a letter, love
When I am homeward bound

I have signed on a Yankee Clipper ship
Davy Crockett is her name
And Burgess is the Captain of her
And they say she's a floating Hell

I have shipped with Burgess once before
And I think I know him well
If a man's a seaman, he can get along
If not, then he's sure in Hell

Farewell to lower Frederick Street
Ensign Terrace and Park Lane
For I think it will be a long, long time
Before I see you again

Oh the sun is on the harbor, love
And I wish I could remain
For I know it will be a long, long time
Till I see you again

Londonderry Air

Would God I were the tender apple blossom
That floats and falls from off the twisted bough
To lie and faint within your silken bosom
Within your silken bosom as that does now.
Or would I were a little burnish'd apple
For you to pluck me, gliding by so cold
While sun and shade you robe of lawn will dapple
Your robe of lawn, and you hair's spun gold.

Yea, would to God I were among the roses
That lean to kiss you as you float between
While on the lowest branch a bud uncloses
A bud uncloses, to touch you, queen.
Nay, since you will not love, would I were growing
A happy daisy, in the garden path
That so your silver foot might press me going
Might press me going even unto death.

Mountains O'Mourne

Oh Mary this London's a wonderful sight
With people here workin' by day and by night
They don't sow potatoes, nor barley, nor wheat
But there's gangs of them diggin' for gold in the street
At least when I asked them that's what I was told
So I just took a hand at this diggin' for gold
But for all that I found there I might as well be
Where the Mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea.

I believe that when writin' a wish you expressed
As to how the fine ladies in London were dressed
Well if you'll believe me, when asked to a ball
They don't wear no top to their dresses at all
Oh I've seen them meself and you could not in truth
Say that if they were bound for a ball or a bath
Don't be startin' them fashions, now Mary McCree
Where the Mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea.

There's beautiful girls here, oh never you mind
With beautiful shapes nature never designed
And lovely complexions all roses and cream
But let me remark with regard to the same
That if that those roses you venture to sip
The colors might all come away on your lip
So I'll wait for the wild rose that's waitin' for me
In the place where the dark Mourne sweeps down to the sea.

Red Is The Rose

Come over the hills, my bonnie Irish lass
Come over the hills to your darling
You choose the rose, love, and I'll make the vow
And I'll be your true love forever.

Chorus

Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows
Fair is the lily of the valley
Clear is the water that flows from the Boyne
But my love is fairer than any.

'Twas down by Killarney's green woods that we strayed
When the moon and the stars they were shining
The moon shone its rays on her locks of golden hair
And she swore she'd be my love forever.

Chorus

It's not for the parting that my sister pains
It's not for the grief of my mother
'Tis all for the loss of my bonny Irish lass
That my heart is breaking forever.

Chorus

The Bard of Armaugh

Oh list' to the tale of a poor Irish harper
And scorn not the string of his old withered hands
But remember those fingers they once could move sharper
To raise up the strains of his dear native land.

It was long before the shamrock, dear isle's lovely emblem
Was crushed in its beauty by the Saxon's lion paw
And all the pretty colleens around me would gather
Call me their bold Phelim Brady, the Bard of Armagh.

How I love to muse on the days of my boyhood
Though four score and three years have fled by them
It's king's sweet reflection that every young joy
For the merry-hearted boys make the best of old men.

At a fair or a wake I would twist my shillelah
And trip through a dance with my brogues tied with straw
There all the pretty maidens around me would gather
Call me their bold Phelim Brady, the Bard of Armagh.

In truth I have wandered this wide world over
Yet Ireland's my home and a dwelling for me
And, oh, let the turf that my old bones shall cover
Be cut from the land that is trod by the free.

And when Sergeant Death in his cold arms doth embrace
And lull me to sleep with old Erin go bragh
By the side of my Kathleen, my dear pride, oh place me
Then forget Phelim Brady, the Bard of Armagh.

The Coulin

Though the last glimpse of Erin with sorrow I see,
Yet wherever thou art shall seem Erin to me;
In exile thy bosom shall still be my home,
And thine eyes make my climate wherever we roam.

To the gloom of some desert or cold rocky shore,
Where the eye of the stranger can haunt us no more,
I will fly with my Coulin, and think the rough wind
Less rude than the foes we leave frowning behind.

And I'll gaze on thy gold hair as graceful it wreathes,
And hang o'er thy soft harp as wildly it breathes;
Nor dread that the cold hearted Saxon will tear
One chord from that harp, or one lock from that hair.*

The Girl I Left Behind Me

The dames of France are fond and free,
And Flemish lips are willing;
And soft the maids of Italy,
And Spanish eyes are thrilling;
Still, though I bask beneath their smile,
Their charms fail to bind me.
And my heart goes back to Erin's Isle,
To the girl I left behind me.

For she's as fair as Shannon's side,
And purer than its water,
But she refused to be my bride
Though many years I sought her
. Yet, since to France I sailed away, Her letters oft remind me
, That I promised never to gainsay
The girl I left behind me.

She says: "My own dear love come home,
My friends are rich and many;
Or else, abroad with you I'll roam,
A soldier stout as any;
If you'll not come, nor let me go,
I'll think you have resigned me."
My heart nigh broke when I answered "No,"
To the girl I left behind me.

For never shall my truve love brave
A life of war and toiling
And never as a skulking slave
I'll tread my native soil on.
But were it free or to be free,
The battle's close would find me
To Ireland bound, nor message need
From the girl I left behind me.

The Irish Emigrant

I'm sitting on the stile, Mary, where we once sat side by side
On a bright May morning long ago, when first you were my bride
The corn was springing fresh and green, and the lark sang loud and high
And the red was on your lips, Mary, and the love light in your eyes.

Tis but a step down yonder lane, the village Church stands near
The place where we were wed, Mary, I can see the spire from here
But the graveyard lies between, Mary, and my step might break your rest
Where I laid you darling down to sleep with a baby on your breast.

I'm very lonely now, Mary, for the poor make no new friends
But oh they love the better still the few our Father sends
For you were all I had, Mary, my blessing and my pride
And I've nothing left to care for now since my poor Mary died.

Yours was the good brave heart, Mary, that still kept hoping on
When the trust in God had left my soul and my arms young strength had gone
There was comfort ever on your lip and a kind look on your brow
And I thank you Mary for the same though you cannot hear me now.

I'm bidding you a long farewell, my Mary kind and true
But I'll not forget you, darling, in the land I'm going to
They say there's bread and work for all, and the sun shines always there
But I'll ne'er forget old Ireland, were it fifty times as fair.

And often in those grand old woods I'll sit and shut my eyes
And my heart will wander back again to the place where Mary lies
And I think I'll see that little stile where we sat side by side
In the springing corn and the bright May morn' when first you were my bride.

The Old Orange Flute

In the County Tyrone, near the town of Dungannon,
Where many the ructions meself had a hand in.
Bob Williamson lived, a weaver by trade,
And all of us thought him a stout Orange blade,
On the Twelfth of July as it yearly did come,
Bob played with his flute to the sound of a drum.
You may talk of your harp, your piano or lute,
But none can compare with the Old Orange Flute.

Bob, the deceiver, he took us all in;
He married a Papist named Bridget McGinn.
Turned Papist himself and forsook the old cause
That gave us our freedom, religion and laws.
Now, boys of the townland made some noise upon it,
And Bob had to fly to the province of Connaught.
He fled with his wife and his fixings to boot,
And along with the latter his Old Orange Flute.

At the chapel on Sunday to atone for past deeds,
He'd say Pater and Aves and counted his brown beads.
'Til after some time, at the priest's own desire
He went with that old flute to play in the choir.
He went with that old flute for to play for the Mass,
But the instrument shivered and sighed, oh, alas,
And try though he would, though it made a great noise,
The flute would play only "The Protestant Boys."

Bob jumped and he stared and got in a flutter
And threw the old flute in the blessed holy water.
He thought that this charm would bring some other sound;
When he tried it again, it played "Croppies Lie Down."
Now, for all he could whistle and finger and blow,
To play Papish music he found it no go.
"Kick the Pope" and "The Boyne Water" it freely would sound,
But one Papish squeak in it couldn't be found.

At the council of priests that was held the next day
They decided to banish the old flute away.
They couldn't knock heresy out of it's head,
So they bought Bob a new one to play in it's stead.
'Twas fastened and burned at the stake as a heretic.
As the flames soared around it, they heard a strange noise;
'Twas the old flute still whistling "The Protestant Boys."
"Toora lu, toora lay,
Oh, it's six miles from Bangor to Donnahadee."

The Rose of Tralee
C. Mordaunt Spencer

The pale moon was rising above yon green mountain,
The sun was declining beneath the blue sea,
When I strayed with my love to the pure crystal fountain,
That stands in the beautiful vale of Tralee.

She was lovely and fair, as the rose of the summer,
It was not her beauty alone that won me.
Oh no, t'was the truth in her eye ever dawning,
That made me love Mary, the Rose of Tralee!

The cool shades of evening their mantles were spreading,
And Mary, all smiling, stood listn'ng to me,
When all through the valley her pale rays were shedding,
When I won the heart of the Rose of Tralee.

She was lovely and fair, as the rose of the summer,
It was not her beauty alone that won me.
Oh no, t'was the truth in her eye ever dawning,
That made me love Mary, the Rose of Tralee!

The Star of County Down

Near to Banbridge Town, in the County Down
One morning in July,
Down a boreen green came a sweet colleen,
And she smiled as she passed me by;
Oh, she looked so neat from her two white feet
To the sheen of her nut-brown hair,
Sure the coaxing elf, I'd to shake myself
To make sure I was standing there

CHORUS:

Oh, from Bantry Bay up to Derry Quay,
And from Galway to Dublin town,
No maid I've seen like the brown colleen
That I met in the County Down.

As she onward sped I shook my head
And I gazed with a feeling quare,
And I said, says I, to a passer-by,
"Who's the maid with the nut-brown hair?"
Oh, he smiled at me, and with pride says he,
"That's the gem of Ireland's crown,
She's young Rosie McCann from the banks of the Bann,
She's the Star of the County Down."

I've travelled a bit, but never was hit
Since my roving career began;
But fair and square I surrendered there
To the charms of young Rose McCann.
I'd a heart to let and no tenant yet
Did I meet with in shawl or gown,
But in she went and I asked no rent
From the Star of the County Down.

At the crossroads fair I'll be surely there
And I'll dress in my Sunday clothes
And I'll try sheep's eyes, and deludhering lies
On the heart of the nut-brown Rose.
No pipe I'll smoke, no horse I'll yoke
Though with rust my plow turns brown,
Till a smiling bride by my own fireside
Sits the Star of the County Down.

The Wearin' Of The Green

"O Paddy dear, and did ye hear the news that's goin' round?
The shamrock is by law forbid to grow on Irish ground!
No more Saint Patrick's Day we'll keep, his color can't be seen
For there's a cruel law ag'in the Wearin' o' the Green."

I met with Napper Tandy, and he took me by the hand
And he said, "How's poor old Ireland, and how does she stand?"
"She's the most distressful country that ever yet was seen
For they're hanging men and women there for the Wearin' o' the Green." For they're hanging men and women there for the Wearin' o' the Green."

"So if the color we must wear be England's cruel red
Let it remind us of the blood that Irishmen have shed
And pull the shamrock from your hat, and throw it on the sod
But never fear, 'twill take root there, though underfoot 'tis trod.

I met with Napper Tandy, and he took me by the hand
And he said, "How's poor old Ireland, and how does she stand?"
"She's the most distressful country that ever yet was seen
For they're hanging men and women there for the Wearin' o' the Green." For they're hanging men and women there for the Wearin' o' the Green."

When laws can stop the blades of grass from growin' as they grow
And when the leaves in summer-time their color dare not show
Then I will change the color too I wear in my caubeen
But till that day, please God, I'll stick to the Wearin' o' the Green."

The Wild Colonial Boy

Note: This song has, at least, three different versions. One is Australian, another appears to be Irish and the third seems to be Canadian.

There was a wild colonial boy
Jack Duggan was his name
He was born and raised in Ireland
In a house called Castlemaine
He was his father’s only son
His mothers pride and joy
And dearly did his parents love
That wild colonial boy.

At the early age of sixteen years
He left his native home
And to Australia’s sunny shore
He was inclined to roam
He robbed the rich he helped the poor
He shot James MacEvoy
A terror to Australia was
That wild colonial boy.

One day upon the prairie
As Jack he rode along
A-listening to the mocking bird
Singing their cheerful song
Out jumped a band of troopers
Kelly, Davis and Fitzroy
They all set out to capture him
That wild colonial boy.

Surrender now Jack Duggan
For you see we’re three to one
Surrender in the Queen’s high name
You are a plundering son
Jack drew two pistols from his belt
And proudly waved them high
I’ll fight but not surrender
Said the wild colonial boy.

He fired a shot at Kelly
Which brought him to the ground
And turning round to Davis
He received a fatal wound
A bullet pierced his proud young heart
From the pistol of Fitzroy
And that was how they captured him
The wild colonial boy.

Tu Ra Lura Lura Loo
Version 1

Over in Killarney
Many years ago,
Me Mither sang a song to me
In tones so sweet and low.
Just a simple little ditty,
In her good ould Irish way,
And l'd give the world if she could sing
That song to me this day.

Chorus:

"Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ral, Too-ra-loo-ra-li,
Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ral, hush now, don't you cry!
Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ral, Too-ra-loo-ra-li,
Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ral, that's an Irish lullaby."

Oft in dreams I wander
To that cot again,
I feel her arms a-huggin' me
As when she held me then.
And I hear her voice a -hummin'
To me as in days of yore,
When she used to rock me fast asleep
Outside the cabin door.

Tu Ra Lura Lura Loo
Version 2

Chorus:

Tu ra lura lura loo,
They're lookin' for monkeys up at the zoo
At the time I had a face like you
I joined the British army.

O kilted soldiers wear no drawers
So won't you kindly lend them yours
The rich must always help the poor
To save the British army.

Chorus:

When I was young I used to be
As fine a man as ever you'd see
Till the Prince of Wales he said to me
Come join the British army.

Chorus:

Corporal O'Kelly's a terrible lout
But give him a couple of jars of stout
And he'll whip the enemy with his mouth
To save the British army.

Chorus:

When Irish Eyes are Smiling

When Irish eyes are smiling
Sure it's like a morning spring.
In the lilt of Irish laughter,
You can hear the angels sing.
When Irish hearts are happy,
All the world seems bright and gay.
And when Irish eyes are smiling,
Sure, they steal your heart away.

There's a tear in your eye,
and I'm wondering why,
For it never should be there at all.
With such power in your smile,
sure a stone you'd beguile,
So there's never a teardrop should fall.
When your sweet lilting laughter's
like some fairy song,
And your eyes twinkle bright as can be,
You should laugh all the while
and all other times smile,
And now smile a smile for me.

Chorus:

When Irish eyes are smiling
Sure it's like a morning spring.
In the lilt of Irish laughter,
You can hear the angels sing.
When Irish hearts are happy,
All the world seems bright and gay.
And when Irish eyes are smiling,
Sure, they steal your heart away.

Whiskey In The Jar

As I was going over
The Cork and Kerry mountain
I met with Captain Farrell
And his money he was counting
I first produced my pistol
And then produced my rapier
Saying 'Stand and deliver
For I am a bold deceiver

CHORUS

With me ring am a do ama dah
Whack fol the daddy o
Whack fol the daddy o
There's whiskey in the jar.

He counted out his money
It made a pretty penny
I put it in my pocket
And I gave it to my Jenny
She sighed and she swore
That she never would deceive me
But the devil take the women
For you know she tricked me easy

Chorus

I went into my chamber
All for to take a slumber
I dreamt of gold and jewels
And for sure it was no wonder
But Jenny drew my charges
She filled them up with water
She sent for Captain Farrell
To be ready for the slaughter

Chorus

'Twas early in the morning
Before I rose to travel
Up comes a band of soldiers
And likewise Captain Farrell
When I drew my pistol
For she had stole my sabre
I couldn't shoot with water
So a prisoner I was taken

Chorus

If anyone can aid me
It's my brother in the army
If I but knew his station
Be it Cork or in Killarney
And if he would join me
We'd go roving in Kilkenny
He would treat me fairer
Than my darling sporting Jenny

Chorus

Who Put the Overalls in Mistress Murphy's Chowder

Mistress Murphy gave a party just about a week ago,
Everything was plentiful, the Murphys, they're not slow.
They treated us like gentlemen; we tried to act the same
And only for what happened, well it was an awful shame.
When Mrs. Murphy dished the chowder out she fainted on the spot;
She found a pair of overalls at the bottom of the pot.
Tim Nolan he got ripping mad, his eyes were bulging out,
He jumped upon the piano and loudly he did shout.

cho:

"Who threw the overalls in Mistress Murphy's chowder?"
Nobody spoke so he shouted all the louder.
It's an Irish trick that's true, but I can lick the Mick that threw
The overalls in Mistress Murphy's chowder.

They dragged the pants from out the soup and laid them on the floor;
Each man swore upon his life, he'd ne'er seen them before.
They were plastered up with mortar and were worn out at the knee,
They had their many ups and downs as we could plainly see.
And when Mrs. Murphy she came-to she 'gan to cry and pout,
She had them in the wash that day and forgot to take them out.
Tim Nolan, he excused himself for what he said that night,
So we put music to the words and sang with all our might.

Will Ye Go, Lassie?
(Wild Mountain Thyme)

Oh the summertime is coming
And the trees are sweetly blooming
And the wild mountain thyme
Grows around the blooming heather
Will ye go, Lassie go?

Chorus

And we'll all go together
To pluck wild mountain thyme
All around the blooming heather
Will ye go, Lassie go?

I will build my love a tower
Near yon' pure crystal fountain
And on it I will build
All the flowers of the mountain
Will ye go, Lassie go?

If my true love she were gone
I would surely find another
Where wild mountain thyme
Grows around the blooming heather
Will ye go, Lassie go?

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