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Calvert, Stamper

Ann Calvert, wife of Hugh Parrell


Compiled by Judy Griffin, 2007 - email address




Thomas Calvert

Information on the Calvert family is from other researchers and has not been verified. Much of the information appears to come from “The Hollingsworth Register, The Quaker Hollingsworths Posterity Of Valentine,” by John V. Hollingsworth, Chadds Ford, Penna.; and “The history of the Calverts who were Quakers”, by J. Richard Buckey. (1)

John Calvert was the only child shown for a William Calvert born 1554, who married Elizabeth circa 1578 in Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth was born circa 1558 in England. This John Calvert, born in 1587/1589, Gisbrough, Yorkshire, moved to county Armagh before 1617, and married Grace _?_ (born 1595). Their child Thomas: “Thomas Calvart, son of John Calvart of Mooresome neere Gisbrough in Yorkshire in England, and of Grace, his wife, was borne at Lygakory nere Lurgan in the County of Ardmagh in Ireland” (2) Thomas’ child Ann: “Ann Calvert, daughter of Thomas Calvert, and granddaughter of John Calvert of Moresome neere Gisborough in ye county of Yorkshire in Old England....” who came to northern Ireland before 1617. (3) Hillsborough is a town a few miles east of Lurgan, over the line in County Down. This Calvert family came first into Lurgan, and then moved to what is now Hillsborough, and then back to Lurgan. But the invaluable information is their original English Parish home. “Moresome” neer Gisbrough is correctly called “Great Moresome,” now often written “Great Moorsholm.” It lies within the Parish of Skelton-in-Cleveland, and is a township thereof, being six miles east by south, of the town of Guisborough, in North Riding of the County of York, England. (4)

From an examination of the records of Yorkshire Parish Register Society, there is little doubt that the Calverts did indeed originate in Moorsholm. The “Wills in the York Registry Office,” covering years from the 1500’s until the late 1600’s show: (5)

Calverde, Thomas, Ibrson Psh of Skelton, Will July 1, 1572 19-370
Calverd, John, Morson Par. Skelton, Will Oct. 10, 1562 17-427
Calvart, Thomas, Great Morson (bur Skelton) Will, July 12, 1598 27-524
Calvart, Robert, Skelton, Will Dec. 16, 1597 27-450
Calvart, John, Gisburn, Cleveland, Adm. Sept. 30, 1613. -----
Calverde, Thomas, Westbye Hall Parish of Gysbrn, Adm. Sept. 15, 1553 -
Calvarde, Robert, Morsome, Adm. Mar. 5, 1574. -------
Calvard, Elizabeth, Adm. May 6, 1584. -------

Thomas Calvert was born on April 11, 1617 in County Armagh, Ireland, and died on December 17, 1685 at age 68 at New Castle County, Delaware. Thomas married Jane Glasford, daughter of Hugh Glasford and Margaret _?_, on November 11, 1647. Jane’s father, Hugh Glasford was born about 1594 Stranmillas, Belfast, County Antrim, Ireland. His wife was named Margaret. Their only child of record, Jane, was born about 1626, Stranmillis, Antrim, Ireland who married Thomas Calvert, April 11, 1647, Lurgan, Armagh, Ireland. (6) Thomas and Jane were members of the Society of Friends, (Quaker) religion. The children of Thomas and Jane were John, Ann, Margaret, and Elizabeth.

“Thomas Calvert, son of John Calvert, of Moresome, neere Gisbrough in Yorkshire, in England, and of Gwale his wife, was borne at Lygakowy (now Lurgan) in the County of Ardmagh, in Ireland, in the year 1617 and about the 11th of ye 2nd month (April), 1647 he took to wife Jane, daughter of Hugh Glassond and of Margaret his wife, of Stranmillis (now Belfast) in the County of Antrim, . . .” (7)

At Ulster Province Meeting, 4 Mo. 7, 1680, œ1. 13. 9d. was paid to Thomas Calvert for the apothecary at Carrickfergus, evidently for attendance on Friends confined in Carrickfergus jail; for on 6 Mo. 6, 1681, L. Alyson and T. Calvert were directed to supply the wants of prisoners there, œ2. 10s being appropriated for the purpose. In 1681, Thomas Calvert, of Parish of Carrickfergus, County Antrim, had some hay and oats, valued at 11s., taken for tithes. This may be from William Stockdale, A Great Cry of Oppression, p. 167.

The following was taken from Immigration of the Irish Quakers into Pennsylvania, 1682-1750: (8) “Mary Calvert and William Whitesite, were married 3 Mo. 27, 1696, by Friends’ ceremony at the house of Thomas Calvert near Carrickfergus. at Lygasory, near Lurgan, County Armagh, and about 9 Mo. 11, 1647, Thomas Calvert married Jane Glasford, daughter of Hugh Glasford and wife Margaret, of ‘Stranmillis (nere Belfast),’ County Antrim.”

When Thomas’ son John arrived in Pennsylvania in 1683, he purchased land in Upper Providence Township. After his arrival, he brought his father, Thomas Calvert, and wife, Jane Glassford, to America. Thomas, then in his sixties, had purchased another 300 acres, but died shortly after arriving. Thomas spoke his will in 1684/85 (from the Hollingsworth Register). It is odd that he did not mention his son John or daughter Ann. It is also unusual that Margaret seems to have been administrator. This would typically be a role for a son. The land he willed to his daughter Margaret became a land dispute between his son John and Margaret’s husband, Thomas Hollingsworth.

Thomas Calvert’s Will. “A Testament of the truth Concerning Thomas Calverts Will which will be rehearsed hereafter, he being weake in Body (y)et perfect in memory. Item he Leaving to his Daughter Margaret two hundred Acres of Land with the Improvement Uppon the said Land and the said Margaret to pay Eight pounds Unto her sister Elizabeth when the said land and Plantation were sold. Item. He left to his Daughter Margaret a standing bed and the furniture belonging to the said Bedd. Item he left to his Daughter Margaret a brass still Pott with the furniture belonging to the said Pott. Item. one Chest to his Daughter Margaret. Item. one Chest to his Daughter Elizabeth. Item. he left to his wife and his daughter Margaret all the rest of his goods. Item. he left to his Daughter Margaret one mare & one Cow. Dated the 15th of the 1st Month (March) 1685 (1684/85- Ed.). I, Peter Taylor and George Reade, being witnesses to the fore(sd.)words from the mouth of Thomas Calvert as witnesses our hands witnesses to the said Testimony Joshua Hastings, the R marke of Randall Vernon, Peter P Taylor his mark, George Read.

“Whereas. William Penn by the Providence of God the Kings Authority Proprietary and Governor of the Province of Pennsilvania Hath granted a Commission unto me Christopher Taylor Register Generall for the Keeping a Registers Office for the Proving and Registering of wills & granting of Probates & Letters of Adm’ stracon for the said Province. NOW know ye that I the said Christopher Taylor having Rec’d into my Office the Last Will & Tastam’t nuncupative of Thomas Calvert of Chester County in the Province of Pennsilvania Husbandman, And having Registered the same have granted that a Probate be fixed or annexed to a Coppy thereof it being made manifest unto me the said Christopher Taylor, by Margaret Calvert daughter of the said dec’d & in the Will menconed together with the Witnesses whose names are thereunto subscribed, that the Will aforementioned & is absolutely the very Last Will & Testam’t of the said Thomas Calvert Dec’d as aforesaid. And Whereas I the said Christopher Taylor having granted lawfull probate of the same do further by virtue of my Comission legally & Lawfully impower the said Margaret in the will menconed as aforesaid to enter and be Lawfully possessed of and in all & singular the goods, chattells Credits, rights, Debts, and Estate both Reall and personall as belongeth or appertained to the Dec’d in his lifetime as his owne proper inheritance and Lving within the bounds Lymits and Dyoces (? Diocese) of this Province to the intent and purpose that the said Margaret do & shall pay and discharge all Debts of right due to any person or persons whatsoever as the Dec’d stood indebted to at the time of his Decease as also to pay and Discharge all legacies in the Will b afore menconed & according to the true meaning forme and effect thereof AND also that the said Margaret do and shall within three monthes to be Accounted from the date hereof bring in a just & faithfull Inventory Indented ready cast up under the hands of three Credible Witnesses of the whole Estate, goods, chattels Credits, Rights & Debts of dec’d as the Dec’d was possessed of in his lifetime to me the said Christopher Taylor the originall thereof to remaine in my Office. AND Lastly I the said Christopher do hereby fully impower the sd. Margaret by virtue hereof to sue for and recover any sumes of money Goods or other Estate due to the Deceased in his lifetime from any person or persons whatsoever so far forth as Law or Equity shall adjudge or think fit. Given under my hand & the Seal of my Office at Philadelphia the 17th day of the 12th Month 1685. Christopher Taylor Regr.” Philadelphia County Will Book A, pages 30-32.

The will was “uttered” by Thomas Calvert on 15th of 1st Month (March) 1685 (as recorded) which must be 1684/5, because the proof was given almost a year later, on 17th of 12th Month (February) 1685, which would be 1685/86 in Old Style dating. This testator nuncupative is Thomas Calvert, born 1617 in County Armagh, (now in Northern) Ireland, child of John and Grace Calvert, formerly of Great Morsome, Parish of Skelton-in-Cleveland, Yorkshire.

His wife, Jane Glasford, daughter of Hugh and Margaret Glasford, was living when Thomas Calvert spoke his will, the last she has been found. Daughter Margaret had married Thomas Hollingsworth by May 17, 1686, when John Calvert, Margaret’s brother, entered his Caveat in the Surveyor General’s Office, which called for a fair hearing regarding the lands in question. (9)

The children of Thomas and Jane were:



John Calvert

John Calvert (Thomas1) was born on October 6, 1648 at Stranmillis, near Belfast, Ireland and died in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. John Calvert was buried 7th mo. (September), 23, 1699. (10) He married Judith Stamper on May 12, 1673 at Lurgan, County Armagh, Ireland, daughter of Hugh Stamper (see below). “John Calvert son of Thomas Calvert, of Drumgor, Parish of Segoe, County Armagh, Ireland, and Jane, his wife, was born 8 Mo. 6, 1648, in Stranmillis, near Belfast; was married 3 Mo. (May), 29, 1673, at the house of Roger Webb, to Judith Stamper, daughter of Hugh Stamper and Bridget, his wife, of Lurgan, County Armagh. Judith Stamper was born 3 Mo. 12, 1652, at “bowlton wood,” County Cumberland, England.” (11)

John and his wife Judith, with their children Ruth, Isaac, Thomas and Joshua, left Ireland and came to Pennsylvania in 1683. (12) The family settled in Upper Providence Township, now Delaware County, where he owned 300 acres of land, granted to him by William Penn, 1 Mo. 13, 1683 (March 13, 1683). An adjoining tract of 300 acres was also granted at the same time for Thomas Calvert, the father. Still another tract of 100 acres, contiguous to the above, was granted on the same date to Margaret Calvert, probably the daughter of Thomas.

Chenoweth researcher Gregory George Wulker provided the following information on John Calvert, his wife Judith, and his daughter Mary Calvert (13): “Mary Calvert, wife of John Chenoweth, was born February 19, 1687 in Upper Providence Township, (Delaware County 1789), Pennsylvania. According to J.R. Buckey, who wrote ‘The Calverts Who Were Quakers’ Mary was the daughter of John Calvert and Judith Stamper. John Calvert was born the 6th of October 1648, near Belfast, Ireland. He was married on 29th of May 1673 in Stranmillis, Belfast to Judith Stamper, the daughter of Hugh Stamper and his wife Briget. John Calvert was later living in county Armagh, Ireland and began to embrace the Quaker faith, along with his future brother-in-law Valentine Hollingsworth. Both men were living in the town of Lurgan, Calvert listed as a landowner, and Hollingsworth as a yeoman. A map of Lurgan dated 1703, still showed the name Calvert on a town lot, possibly a brother to John.

“The immigration of this Calvert line into Ireland from Yorkshire, England was for religious freedom, as this line had chosen to follow the Quaker faith, and were being persecuted and jailed for their beliefs. Hugh Stamper, Mary Calvert Chenoweths’ grandfather (Mary, daughter of John Calvert), had been imprisoned in Carlisle Castle Prison in 1663 (Cumbria County, England) for his beliefs, and also fined. Shortly after, he must have fled to Ireland. County Armagh had become somewhat of a safe haven for Quakers, . . . The Calvert family line along with other Lurgan Quakers were instrumental in helping to perpetuate the Quaker religion in County Armagh and the rest of Ireland. Armagh saw more Quaker immigrants come to America than any other county in Ireland, and John Calvert was among them. He came with William Penn’s Quakers into Pennsylvania in 1683. John Calverts’ father and mother-in-law, Hugh and Briget Stamper, continued to follow Quaker teachings, and both remained near Lurgan. When they died, they were buried in what is believed to be the oldest Quaker burial ground in Ireland. The graveyard, called Lynastown . . . Both John Calvert and Valentine Hollingsworth were listed as lsquo;commissioners’ of the graveyard at one time. Hugh Stamper was buried in 1676, Briget in 1681, a son Daniel in 1684, and daughter Sarah in 1674. There are no gravestones, reflecting the early Quaker belief.

“When Mary Calvert’s father, John, arrived in Pennsylvania in 1683, he purchased of William Penn, land in Upper Providence Township. He became one of the largest landowners in what became Delaware County, Pennsylvania. After his arrival, he brought his father, Thomas Calvert, and wife, Jane Glassford, to America. Thomas had purchased another 300 acres, but died shortly after arriving. His will, dated 1684/85 in Philadelphia, mentions his wife Jane, but that is the last we hear of her. John Calvert acquired upwards of 800 acres from his original purchase, his father’s land and sisters. . . . This land became the focus of a dispute between John Calvert and his Hollingsworth in-laws (see below). At the same time, the Quakers asked John Calvert to settle the dispute. He refused to answer them and this must have been the reason for John Calvert to leave the Quaker faith. He had been elected constable of Upper Providence in 1687. There is no indication that John joined another church. When he died in September 1699, the Philadelphia Quaker Meeting graveyard recorded his burial as one not of the Quaker faith.

“Judith Calvert, however, had joined another faith, and in 1697 she was baptized in Ridley Creek, near her home, by Thomas Martin. She was baptized into the Seventh Day Baptist Church but this union did not last long. About 1700, a difference arose about which day to observe the Sabbath, and the society was dissolved. In 1702, and before, a group was forming; some from Christ Church, Philadelphia and many who were former Quakers. They started a church near the Delaware River and the church was to be called St Paul’s Episcopal on the Delaware. In the records of the church were found Judith Calvert and her son Isaac, both who became wardens of the church (found on a list dated 1704). . . . Land records of Bristol, Pennsylvania across the Delaware River from Burlington (New Jersey), record the name of John Chenoweth as a witness to three separate land transactions, dated 1706, 1707, and 1708. It is believed that he was living in Bristol, Pennsylvania, crossing over by way of ferry to St. Mary’s church.

“As noted above, John Calvert moved with his family, late in 1682, to Pennsylvania (it is probable that he came with Valentine and his family), and settled in Upper Providence township, Chester County, Pennsylvania (now Delaware County), where he owned 300 acres of land granted to him by William Penn, 1st month, 13, 1683. (14) An adjoining tract of 300 acres was also granted, at the same time, for his father, Thomas Calvert. Still another tract of 100 acres, contiguous to the above, was granted on the same date to Margaret Calvert, the daughter of Thomas, and a sister to John and Ann. On 2 Mo (April) 11 1691, it was ordered that a patent for the whole tract should be made to John Calvert, to whom it was made appear to belong. At Chester Monthly Meeting, 4 Mo (June) 6 1687, mention is made of a difference between John Calvert and Thomas Hollingsworth (stepson of John Calvert’s sister Ann, who married Valentine Hollingsworth) about dividing their lands in Upper Providence. This difference arose between John Calvert and Thomas Hollingsworth over the division of their lands in Upper Providence Township in Chester Monthly Meeting, of which John Calvert was then a member. . . .”

John and his wife Judith gave testimony in a case of trespassing and a boar in Chester County: (15) “Joshua Hasting Plt. in an Action of trespasse Ffrancis Yarnall Defendt Names of ye Petty Jury: Robert Vernon, Joseph Richards, Edmond Carleidge, John Edge, Edward Carter, Walter Ffaussett, John Taylor, Thomas Minshall, Nathaniel Evins, Caleb Pusie, John Child, John Mendinghall. The Declaration was read. The answer was read. Judith Colvert being attested declareth there was a Boore yet kept Company with their Swine Butt afterward shee did hear yet ye Boore was ye Plaintiff’s Boore and that he went from thence and was away some time and when he came againe he had been bitten on ye right side of ye stones as shee thinks Butt when ffrancis Yarnall came to their House to see ye Boore he said he did thinke this Boores marke was very much like his and that ye Boore was a lighter Collour then his and further saith not. John Calvert being Attested for ye Defendant declareth that ye Boore which ffrancis Yarnall tooke away was about three months att times att his House and afterward about ye 1st moneth Ffran Yarnall ye Defendant tooke him away and that ye Boore was Bitten behind on ye right side of ye stones. John ffox being Attested for ye Defendant declareth yet he Knew ye Boore and yet he had one stone hanging down lower than ye other and that he was Bitten by the dogs on ye right side of ye Stones. Jane Calvert being Attested declareth that ffrancis Yarnall came to John Calverts and did there drive a Boore into ye Hog yard and did there say that he though his Boore was a lighter Collour and that ye marke was not althouether like his marke and further saith not. Margrett Hollingsworth being Attested declareth that ye Bourre was a Right Boore Before he was Bitten and that he was supposed to be Joshua Hasting bore by ye neighborhood and that ye Boore was there most part of ye Winter. After much testimony of other witnesses - The Jury finde for ye Plaintife twenty five shilling with Cost of Suite Hereupon Judgment is granted upon which ye Defendant makes his Appeale to ye next Court of Equity held for this County”

John and Judith are said to have had fourteen children, those found are:


Hugh Stamper

There is undocumented information on Judith's father Hugh Stamper and his family. (19) Hugh Stamper is said to have been born circa 1620. His wife, Bridget was born circa 1624 at Bolton Wood, Cumberland County, England. Hugh and Bridget were married in 1651 at Bolton Wood, Cumberland County. They had at least two children, Judith and Hugh. We know that Hugh lived in Cumberland County, England, where he adopted the Quaker faith and was imprisoned there for his belief in 1655 and 1656. There is a record of Hugh Stamper’s imprisonment at Carlisle in 1654, nine years earlier than the 1663 mentioned by Wulker above: “Thomas Bewley and Hugh Stamper, standing at the Sessions in Carlisle with their hats on, were by the Justices committed to prison without any legal cause assigned. After a month’s confinement they were discharged without paying fees: but Hugh Stamper was afterwards arrested for fees and again imprisoned and detained there one and twenty weeks.” (20) He may have left England soon after; since in 1664, Hugh Stamper was taxed two shillings for one hearth in Lurgan, County Armagh, Ireland. (21) In a list of Shankill Churchwardens, Hugh Stamper, a Quaker converted in England, was appointed ‘overseer of the highway’ by the Shankill Parish in 1674 and 1675. (22) As noted above, Hugh and Bridget Stamper, followed Quaker teachings, and both remained near Lurgan. Hugh died in 1676 and Bridget in 1681. When they died, they were buried in what is believed to be the oldest Quaker burial ground in Ireland, the graveyard, called Lynastown. Their children, Sarah and Daniel were also buried there. Children of Hugh and Bridget:



John Calvert

Most of the information is from Descendants of Virginia Calverts. (23)

John Calvert (John2, Thomas1) was born circa 1689 at Upper Providence Township, now Delaware County, Pennsylvania (son of John Calvert and Judith Stamper). He moved to Orange County, Virginia in 1732 (became Frederick County in 1743), with a group of Quakers who had secured land through Alexander Ross. He is listed as one of the “Fathers of the Colony” (see information on Hopewell Meeting). On November 12, 1735, the State of Virginia granted John Calvert 850 acres of land beginning at two white oaks and a hickory near Abraham Hollingsworth’s line. (24) This land was located in what is now Frederick County, Virginia, east of the village of Kernstown, is a few miles southwest of the town of Winchester. John Calvert’s land of 850 acres was located next to Abraham Hollingsworths on Red Bud Creek. Abraham Hollingsworth house, “Abram’s Delight,” built 1754 is oldest house in Winchester, Virginia, and now houses the Winchester/Frederick County Historical Society. His home is said to have served as the first Quaker Meeting house.

The will of John Calvert dated October 2, 1738; proved June 28, 1739; was recorded in Orange County, Virginia (now Frederick County). (25) He called himself of the Colony of Virginia, and county of Orange, and willed his wife Jane Calvert one-third of all his lands, during her life. To his sons Robert and Isaiah the remainer of land, 850 acres, whereupon John Stephens now lives; to daughter Margaret, 300 acres of land called Hogg Run. To Rebecca and Ann Calvert, 200 acres each. To son Richard Calvert [or Robert, two transcriptions differ] the remainer of 992 acres at the death of his mother. To wife Jane Calvert my young mare 2 years old, with bald face, and the old mare. To son Robert Calvert the gray horse. To son Isaiah Calvert his choice of horses. To niece Elizabeth Carey or Cory, the brindle cow and calf. To daughters Margery, Rebecca and Ann a mare each. Rest of the estate to the children. Sons Robert and Isaiah Calvert executors. Witnesses, Terence Notley and Henry Jones.

The widow Jane Calvert then married John Stephens. The children of John Calvert were:




Ann Calvert

“Ann Calvert [Thomas1], daughter of Thomas Calvert, and granddaughter of John Calvert of Moresome neere Gisborough in ye county of Yorkshire in Old England.” (41) Ann Calvert was born on November 9, 1650 at Kilwarling, County Down, Ireland and died on August 17, 1697 at Shellpot Creek, New Castle County, Delaware, buried in Old Burying Ground, Newark. (42) Anne was the second wife of Valentine Hollingsworth Sr. They were married on June 12, 1672 in Shankill Monthly Meeting, Armagh, Ireland. Valentine Hollingsworth Sr. was born on August 15, 1632 in Ballyvickcrannell,Seagoe, Armagh, Ireland. He died on October 13, 1710 in Newark, Delaware. He was buried in Newark Union Church Yard.

According to Immigration of the Irish Quakers into Pennsylvania, (43) Valentine became a Quaker while still in Ireland, and suffered true persecution for his faith. William Stockdale gives the following account of Hollingsworth's persecutions for tithes: 1671, County Armagh, “Valentine Hollingsworth had taken from him for Tithe, by Thomas Ashbrook, Tithmonger, twenty nine stooks of Barly, and three stooks and a half of oats, all worth one pound one shilling.” 1672, “Valentine Hollingsworth for Tithe by Edward O'Maghan, 26 stooks wheat, 3 car-loads Hey, 26 stooks of oats, 26 stooks of Barley, value 2 pounds 8 shillings;” 1673, corn and hay, valued at 2 pounds; 1674, wheat, hay, oats, barley, valued at 3 pounds, 4 shillings. The deposition of Valentine’s son, Samuel, made before the Mayor of Philadelphia, June 4, 1735, Samuel stated that they “cam into Penn in the latter part of 1682 and was at Chester Penn the day William Penn arrived.”

Valentine Sr. settled on a plantation of nearly 1000 acres in Brandy Wine Hundred, Delaware. Shortly after his arrival a Meeting was established at his house, and in 1687 he granted “unto friends for a burying place half an acre of land for ye purpose, there being already friends buried in the spot.” He was a member of the first Pennsylvania Assembly 1682-83, and of the Assemblies of 1687, 1688, 1695, and 1700. He was a signer of William Penn’s Great Charter and a justice for New Kent County. He was an overseer of Friends’ meeting many years. Anne died Aug. 17, 1697, and his death occurred circa 1711. Both Valentine Hollingsworth Sr. and Anne were buried in the Friends’ graveyard at Newark, Delaware, which he had given them in 1687.

All the Meetings (except the meeting for worship) keep records of their proceedings. Quaker marriage ceremonies were unique. When the couple decided to marry, they presented a request to their Monthly Meeting. A committee was appointed to look into the request and see that there had been no previous engagements or anything that would prevent the marriage. At the next succeeding Monthly Meeting, the couple made a second request. The committee was heard from and if the committee reported favorably, they were “passes,” that is, they were permitted to marry. The time was left up to the couple, when they would appear at a public meeting, usually called for the purpose, and each made a public declaration, after which the certificate of marriage was signed by all who witnessed the ceremony. The signed certificate was not immediately given to the couple, but was handed to the “Recorder,” who copied it in the marriage book. A witnesses to Ann’s request was Hugh Stamper, probably the father of Ann’s grandmother, Judith Stamper.

“This is to certify the truth to all people that Valentine Hollenworth in ye psh of Sego in ye county of Armagh, and Anne Calvert of the same psh having intentions of marriage according to the ordinances of God, and Gods joining, Did lay it before mons meeting before them their marriage being propounded, then ye meeting desired them to wait some time, wch they did, so the meeting makeing inquiry between the time whether ye man be free from all other women, and the woman free from all other man, and so the second time they comeing before the mens meeting, all things being clear, so they being left to their freedome. A meeting of the people of god being appointed and assembled together at the house of Marke? Wright, in the psh of Shankell the twelfth day of the fourth month in ye yeare 1672 whene they tooke one another in marriage in the presence of god and of his people according to ye law of god, we are witnesses of the same whose names are hereunto subscribed ye day and yeare aforesaid Val: Holengworth. Anne Holengworth. Witnesses: ffrancis Robson William Williams Jo’ Calvert Chris Hillery Hugh Stamper George Hodgshon Jam. Harison dorothy Hillery Roger Webb Will pearson Nic’ Harison Elis’ Gaus Robert Hoope Marke Wright John Wright Alice Williams Michael Staise Timo’ kirk James Bradshaw An. Bradshaw Tho. Wederall Rob Chambers Tho. Calvert deborn Kirk Will dixon Antho. Dixon fergus Softly Alice Wright dinc Kirke Mary Walker.”

“Valentine Hollingsworth Sr., first of this family in America, was born in Parish Sego, County Armagh, Kreland, about 1632, son of Henry and Catherine Hollingsworth. He married, Apr. 7, 1655, Ann, daughter of Nicholas Ree, of the same county. She died Feb. 1, 1671, and he then married Ann, daughter of Thomas and Jane Calvert, of Parish Sego, County Armagh, Apr. 12, 1672. In 1682 he and his family, including his son-in-law Thomas Connaway and indented servant John Musgrave, sailed from Belfast to the Delaware River, arriving a few months after William Penn’s ship, the Welcome. He settled on a plantation of nearly 1000 acres in Brandy Wine Hundred, Del. Shortly after his arrival a meeting was established at his house, and in 1687 he granted ‘unto ffriends for a burying place half an acre of land for ye purpose, there being already ffriends buried in the spot.’ He was a member of the first Pennsylvania Assembly 1682-83, and of the Assemblies of 1687, 1688, 1695, and 1700. He was a signer of Penn’s Great Charter and a justice for New Kent County. He was an overseer of Friends’ meeting many years. His second wife died Aug. 17, 1697, and his death occurred about 1711. Both Valentine Hollingsworth Sr. and his second wife are buried in the Friends’ graveyard at Newark, Del., which he had given them in 1687. By his first marriage he had 11 children.” (44)

Children of Valentine and his first wife Anne are said to be:


Children of Valentine and Anne are said to be:



Margaret Calvert

Margaret Calvert (Thomas1) was born on June 24, 1661 in Kullurigan, Seagoe, Armagh, Ireland. (45) She died on August 1, 1687 in New Castle County, Delaware. She married Thomas Hollingworth by May 17, 1686 in Rockland Manor, New Castle County, Delaware. It is likely that Margaret Calvert, sister to Anne (second wife of Valentine Hollingsworth, Sr.), and soon-to-be wife of Valentine’s son, Thomas Hollingsworth, (not a son of Anne Calvert), sailed out of Dublin, Ireland, and landed in Philadelphia 14th day of 8th month (October) 1683. The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine, shows ‘Margaret Colvert, late of Dublin came in ditto ship,’ the Lion of Liverpool. (46) Henry Hollingsworth, son of Valentine, was also aboard that ship as an indentured servant. Margaret had seemingly paid for her passage. Her name was not in the servants’ column. Margaret (Calvert) had married Thomas Hollingsworth by May 17, 1686, when John Calvert, Margaret’s brother, entered his Caveat in the Surveyor General’s Office that called for a fair hearing regarding the lands in question. (47) Abraham Hollingsworth, the only offspring of Thomas and Margaret, was born 19th of 1st Month (March) 1686/7. This may indicate that the marriage (no document has ever been found of the wedding) had taken place very recently when the Caveat was signed, possibly in April or early May 1686.



Endnotes

1 J. Richard Buckey,“The history of the Calverts who were Quakers”, Fairview Park, Ohio (4267 W. 212th St., Fairview Park 44126) : Chenoweth Pub. Co., c1991.

2 Hollingsworth Register Volume 5, Number 1. Lurgan Quaker Record Book of County Armagh, Ireland, p. 200.

3 Lurgan Quaker Record Book, County Armagh.

4 See Samuel Lewis, Topographical Dictionary of England.

5 The Hollingsworth Register Volume I., Number 1, p. 8. Citing Volume XIX., p. 28, of “Wills in the York Registry Office.”

6 From: Latter Day Saints Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Complete source not provided.

7 Thomas Calvert & wife Jane Glasford of Armagh, Ireland & New Castle Co., Delaware. Page created by Sadie Greening Sparks, home.inu.net/sadie/anncalvertancestry.htm, accessed 2006. Citing The Hollingsworth Register Volume I., Number 1, p. 8; Lurgan Record Book, p. 200.

8 Albert Cook Myers, M.L., Immigration of the Irish Quakers into Pennsylvania, 1682-1750 With Their Early History in Ireland.

9 Book D-65, p. 83.

10 Ella Foy O’Gorman, Descendants of Virginia Calverts. Los Angeles: unknown, 1947. Book VI The Calverts of Frederick County, VA. pp. 611-624.

11 Probable source: Buckey’s “History of Calverts,” pp. 19-20, 74. Or Records of Lurgan Meeting.

12 Myers, Albert Cook. Immigration of the Irish Quakers into Pennsylvania, 1682-1750, With Their Early History in Ireland. Swarthmore, PA: Swarthmore College, 1902. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1969, 1985, 1994.

13 Mary Calvert and John Chenoweth, by Gregory George “Greg” Wulker. Chenoweth Family News, Volume 5 Number 4 - Dec 2006, Editor: Peter C. Chenoweth. Online at www.chenowethsite.com/newsletter/nlvol5-4.htm, accessed March 2007.

14 Hollingsworth Register, Volume I, No. 1, p. 10.

15 Records of the Courts of Chester County, Pennsylvania 1681-1697, page 80.

16 Chester Monthly Meeting Minutes of July 27, 1697.

17 Mary Calvert and John Chenoweth, by Gregory George “Greg” Wulker. Chenoweth Family News, Volume 5 Number 4 - Dec 2006.. Online at www.chenowethsite.com/newsletter/nlvol5-4.htm, accessed March 2007.

18 www.mccullough.nl/james_broom.htm, accessed 2007.

19 GenForum, Re: Hugh Stamper(1625) + Bridget of Ireland, posted by Rebecca, December 13, 1998, in reply to: Hugh Stamper(1625) + Bridget of Ireland by Karen Baker. I found some information on them. Judith was born March 12,1652, Bolton Parish, Cumberland Co.,England. Hugh and Bridget were married in 1651,in Bolton Wood,Cumberland Co.,England. Hugh was born ABT 1620, Lurgan,Armagh,Ireland. Briget was born ABT 1624,Bolton Wood,Cumberland Co. England. They had 2 kids. Judith and Hugh. Judith and John married May 29,1673, Lurgan,Armagh,Ireland. They had 14 Children. [Son] Hugh was born May 14,1654, Bolton-Wood,Cumberland Co.,England.

20 Jospeh Besse, Sufferings of the Quakers, Cumberland 1653-1690.

21 Hearth Money Rolls, 1664, County Armagh, Ireland. Barrony of Onealand and Parrish Of Shankill, Lorgan Towne (Lurgan). Hugh Stamper, tax of 2 shillings for 1 hearth. The Hollingsworth Register, Volume I., Number 3. October, 1965, homepages.rootsweb.com/~jayken/hollingsworth/hr/650103101.htm.

22 Shankill Churchwardens – List of Names, email from Mary Doland jester11@hotkey.net.au, to [ARMAGH] mail list, May 22, 2002. Here’s some more info from the leasebook, mostly in the author’s footnotes. Hugh Stamper – a Quaker converted in England. Appointed ‘overseer of the highway’ by Shankill parish in 1674 and 1675.

23 Ella Foy O’Gorman, Descendants of Virginia Calverts. Los Angeles: unknown, 1947. Book VI The Calverts of Frederick County, VA. pp. 611-624.

24 Land Office, Richmond, VA, Book 16, p. 394’

25 Orange County,Virginia, Book No. 1, p. 90.

26 Frederick County, Virginia Order Book 7, p. 88.

27 Frederick County, Virginia Deeds 17, p. 415.

28 Frederick County Order Book 17, p. 197.

29 Frederick County Deeds 20, p. 402.

30 Superior County 4, p. 475.

31 Recorded in Corporation Clerk’s Office, Winchester, Virginia, Will Book 1, p. 70.

32 Book 1, p. 104.

33 Frederick County, Virginia Orders 7, p. 304.

34 Ella Foy O’Gorman, Descendants of Virginia Calverts. Los Angeles: unknown, 1947. Book VI The Calverts of Frederick County, VA. pp. 611-624.

35 Tobacco Payments. List of Frederick County, Virginia Clerk Fees Belonging to James Wood, Anno Dom. 1757, www.rootsweb.com/~vafreder/1757.html, accessed 2007. Calvert, Richd., 100.

36 Recorded in Winchester, Virginia, Will Book 4, p. 14.

37 Hampshire County, West Virginia Records, Book 12, p. 446.

38 Hampshire County, West Virginia Records, Deeds 12, p. 456.

39 Hampshire County, West Virginia Records, Deeds 15, pp. 445 and 478.

40 Hampshire County, West Virginia Records, Book 16, p. 471.

41 Lurgan Quaker Record Book, County Armagh.

42 Information on Anne is from Descendants of Henry Hollingsworth, www.hollygardens.com/hollingsw/index3.htm#Calvert, accessed March 2003. Tom Hollingsworth.

43 Immigration of the Irish Quakers into Pennsylvania, of Chester County, Pa., and New Castle County, Delaware, Established in 1686, p. 312. Published in Hollingsworth – McCaleb Quarterly, Vol. 1, No. 4, December 31, 2002. Online at www.fayette.net/pioneers/HollMcCaleb%2004.pdf.

44 Descendants of Valentine Hollingsworth Sr., J. Adger Stewart (Louisville, 1925) and Immigration of Irish Quakers to Pennsylvania, Albert Cook Myers (Swarthmore, 1902); Hopewell Friends History, 1734-1934, Frederick County, Virginia: Records of Hopewell Monthly, by Joint Committee of Hopewell Friends, Hopewell Friends, John Walter Wayland, published 1975, Genealogical Publishing Com, pp. 205-206. Reprint of the 1936 ed. printed by Shenandoah Pub. House, Strasburg, Va.

45 Information on Margaret from Descendants of Henry Hollingsworth, www.hollygardens.com/hollingsw/index3.htm#Calvert, accessed March 2003. Tom Hollingsworth.

46 Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine, Vol. 24, p. 93, note 88.

47 Book D-65, p. 83.