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Sunderland, Hansell, Hutchinson, Snedeker

Ann Sunderland, wife of William Hansell


Proposed Sunderland Lineage

Compiled by Judy Griffin, 2007 - email address




Samuel Sunderland

There is little to no documentation for these ancestors of Ann Sunderland.

Samuel Sunderland was born in 1704 in England and died in Middlesex County, New Jersey. Researcher Neil Sunderland stated that Samuel was born April 14, 1698 in Horbury, Yorkshire, England. Samuel married Elizabeth Barraclough on October 30, 1721 in Halifax, Yorkshire, England. Elizabeth was born circa 1704 in Hipperholme, England, and died in New Jersey. Samuel came to the United States from Durham County, England in 1737 with his pregnant wife and three sons. (1) He may have first arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (2) According to researcher Bobbi Skerry, the father of this Samuel Sunderland was John Sunderland born between 1680 and 1690, who married Elizabeth (surname unknown). The proposed children of Samuel and Elizabeth were John (no information), Thomas, William and Peter Spencer. Peter, the fourth son, and the only son born in the United States, later became a Revolutionary war soldier who fought at Bunker Hill. (3) Another researcher (4) states that Elizabeth Barraclough was born on September 26, 1703 in Hipperholme and married Samuel Spencer Sunderland, son of Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland.



Thomas Sunderland

Thomas Sunderland was possibly born circa 1725 in Halifax, Yorkshire, England. He married Sarah Runyon in about 1769, in New Jersey. Sarah was born on March 23, 1755, the daughter of Hugh Runyon (1715, New Jersey - 1804 possibly Bedminister, Somerset Co, New Jersey) and Ann Savage/Savige/Savidge (1721-1795). The Runyon (Roignon/Rongnion) and Savage/Savige ancestors were French Huguenots. The Runyons arrived in New Jersey in 1665. (11) Thomas is said to have served in the American Revolution, enlisting as a private from Middlesex County, New Jersey and lived near Princeton, New Jersey. (12) There was a listing for Sunderlin, Thos in Windsor Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey in the 1785 list of freeholders. (13) Another researcher states that Thomas was born July 9, 1742, which is a much more likely birthdate. It is unknown where Thomas and Sarah died. Their children were John Patterson, Hugh, William, Peter and Thomas (most undocumented).



John P. Sunderland

John P. Sunderland (Thomas1) was born on February 4, 1770 in Patterson, Mercer County, New Jersey and died on January 18, 1838 in Trenton, Mercer County at age 67 (possibly John Patterson Sunderland). (14) He married Elizabeth Slack on January 31, 1794 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey. Elisabeth was born on February 2, 1777, possibly in Bucks County, Pennsylvania (15) and died in 1838. Elizabeth’s parents are said to have been Cornelius Slack and Elizabeth Spear. A Cornelius Slack enlisted in the Revolutionary War as a teamster. John and Elizabeth’s children were Ann, Samuel, John, David, Eliza, Harriet, Mary R., Caroline Y., Thomas Reiner, Adelie Virginia, Lloyd Wells, and James L.

Carllene Marek has attempted to research the proposed parents of Elizabeth Slack. Her research has turned up some undocumented information. (16) One researcher stated that Elizabeth Slack was born in 1778 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, daughter of Cornelius Slack and Elizabeth Spear. There is a marriage record for Cornelius and Elizabeth, February 5, 1765 in Pennsylvania. (17) Another source (18) states that John P. Sunderland (born February 4, 1770, died January 18, 1838 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey) married Elizabeth Slack on January 13, 1794. This source says that Elizabeth was born on February 2, 1777 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania and died on March 3, 1838 in Trenton. There is a newspaper clipping from the New Jersey Gazette, March 9, 1838 that gives Elizabeth’s birth as 1774 and death on March 3, 1838 in her 64th year. The gravestones for John P. Sunderland and his wife Elizabeth in the First Baptist Church Yard at Trenton match the information above (this church is named in a number of Sunderland family members below): (19)

Sunderland, Elizabeth, (South wall of Kitchen) - d. Mar. 3, 1838, in the 63rd yr. of her age. (Consrt of John P. Sunderland)
Sunderland, John P., (South wall of Kitchen) - Feb. 18, 1838, in the 68th yr. of his age.
Sunderland, Eliza, (South wall of Kitchen) - d. Apr. 19, 1841, in the 38th yr. of her age. (Daughter of John P. and Elizabeth Sunderland)

There are two Bucks County will abstracts of interest. (20) Elizabeth Spear, of Northampton Township, a widow, dated July 10, 1775, codicil June 18, 1785. Proved June 25, 1785. The executor was Friend John Thompson (Miller). It named sons John Spear and David Spear, daughters Jane Burley, Elizabeth Slack and Mary Johnston, as well as Elizabeth Spear, daughter of son David. This may be the mother of our Elizabeth Slack. The abstract for a John Slack, a yeoman of Lower Makefield, August 12, 1785, proved October 1, 1785, named sons Cornelius, Thomas, Joseph, Timothy, Philip, John and Noah. Witnesses were Thomas Winder, William Brooks and Jos. Hicks. John may be the father of Cornelius Slack.

A researcher who appears to have provided some documentation gives the following information on Cornelius Slack and Elizabeth Spear. (21) Cornelius Slack was born in July 1742 in Lower Makefield, Bucks County, Pennsylvania and died on October 10, 1810 in Newtown, Pennsylvania. He was buried in the Presbyterian Churchyard, Newtown, Pennsylvania. He married Elizebeth Spear on February 5, 1765, probably in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Cornelius served in the Bensalem Company, Bucks County, during the Revolutionary War. He settled on land conveyed to him by his father in Lower Makefield, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Elizabeth Spear died on July 10, 1775 in Northampton Township, Bucks County. The parents of Cornelius Slack were John Slack and Jane Winder. John Slack was born before April 17, 1715 in Maidenhead (now Lawrenceville, north of Trenton), New Jersey and died circa September 1785, probably in Lower Makefield Township, Bucks County. John was baptized at the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia, Maidenhead. He married Jane Winder before 1740 in New Jersey. They moved to Bucks County shortly after they married. Jane Winder died on March 8, 1784 in Lower Makefield. Their children were: Elizabeth, Cornelius, Thomas, Joseph, Timothy (born 1748 in Bucks County), Phillip, Noah and John D.

The children of John P. and Elizabeth:



Samuel Sunderland

Samuel Sunderland (John P.2, Thomas1) was born on February 3, 1796 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey (circa 1798, 1850 census). He married in circa 1821 in New Jersey to Elizabeth Hutchinson, sister of our John M. Hutchinson. Elizabeth was born circa 1802 in Genesee County, New York (circa 1800, 1850 census). Elizabeth must have died between 1860, when she was listed in the census, and 1870 when Samuel was living with his son Charles in Macoupin County and Elizabeth was not listed. Samuel died on May 23, 1875 in Litchfield, Macoupin County, Illinois. The children of Samuel and Elizabeth were Charles B., Elizabeth, David, Virginia, Jonathan, Samuel and Henry. (33) Samuel’s son John provided this information in 1879:

“. . . The Sunderland family is of English ancestry, and emigrated from England to America at a period anterior to the revolution. Samuel, the father of the present sketch, was a native of Trenton, New Jersey. He was a soldier of the war of 1812 [enlisted at age 15]. He was a wheel and mill-wright by trade. He, however, during the last fifteen years resided in his native state, was toll-keeper on the bridge across the Delaware river, connecting New Jersey and Pennsylvania. In 1821 he was united in marriage with Elizabeth Hutchison [sic Hutchinson], who was a native of Geneseo [sic Genesse] County, New York. In 1839 Mr. Sunderland came west and settled in Jersey County, Illinois, which was then a part of Greene county. He engaged in farming, which occupation he continued until his death, which event occurred May 23rd, 1875. Nine children were born to Samuel and Elizabeth Sunderland, five of whom have survived the parents. . . .” (34)

Samuel’s obituary: (35) Sunderland. – On Sunday, May 23 at Litchfield, Ill., Mr. Samuel Sunderland in the 80th year of his age. Mr. Sunderland, or, as he was familiarly known, “Uncle Sam,” was born in Trenton, N. J., Feb. 3, 1796. He served as a soldier during the close of the war of 1812, doing duty on the coast of New Jersey. By trade he was a wheelwright, but did not follow it long, working more at the millwright business, at which branch he was considered a master mechanic. He was for a number of years keeper of the bridge across the Delaware River at Trenton, in which position he became quite popular, making many friends by his universal kindness. In 1838 he came to this city, and bought a piece of land north of town and began making improvements immediately. Being an enthusiastic sportsman, the field opened before him in Illinois at that time afforded him the full gratification of that desire, and long will the little incidents of camp life which he loved so well to related be remembered. Mr. S. was the father of nine children, five of whom still survive him. This another one of the old settlers has gone! Soon there will be none left to tell of early times and the many hardships endured!

Samuel and his family moved to nearby Macoupin County circa 1849 when he purchased three 160 sections of land in sections 11 and 12. (36) However, he was enumerated in Jersey County in 1850, owning a farm valued at $8,000. His sons Charles (age 25) and David (age 17) were assisting Samuel on the farm, neither had married, nor had Elizabeth who was 20. Elizabeth Hutchinson’s mother, Rachel, age 66, was living with them. In 1858 Samuel reported that his apple orchard was doing well: (37) Thursday, July, 29, 1858 - Alton, Illinois. The early June variety of apples are quite plentiful in the Jerseyville market and have been for several weeks. Mr. Samuel Sunderland reports his apple orchard as being as fine as ever, and the same may be said of the county generally. By 1870 Samuel is listed as a retired merchant living with his son Charles in Macoupin. (38)




John Sunderland

John Sunderland (John P.2, Thomas1) was born on February 5, 1798 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey. In 1877, Mrs. Samuel Snedeker (Harriet Sunderland) rented her farm in the southern part of the city to a John Sunderland for six dollars an acre. (58) Researchers have John’s death in Nottingham Township, Mercer County, New Jersey, at age 48. John married a Catharine (surname unknown). It appears that John went to Jersey County, Illinois and returned to Trenton as indicated by his will dated 1846:

John Sunderland . . . Township of Nottingham . . . Mercer . . . my house & lot . . . in Trenton, at the corner of Front & Greene Streets – the shop and lot in Hanover Street, in Trenton . . . to my wife Catharine Sunderland . . . to my brother Lloyd W. Sunderland . . . all that farm . . . [280 acres] . . . at Jerseyville, in the state of Illinois, now in the occupation of George Wharton . . . to my wife . . . a tract of land . . . [160 acres] . . . in the state of Illinois, called The Canfield Tract, bought of me of Mahlon D. Canfield . . . land of . . . [80 acres] . . . in Illinois, called The Wright Tract, if I should recover the same . . . I . . . appoint Catharine Sunderland and James Ewing . . . Executors . . . [Dated - 27 July 1846; witnesses – J. H. Suns, Chas. Gordon, John L. Taylor; proved – 31 August 1846.] (59)

John did appear on the 1840 census in South Trenton, Nottingham Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. It is not conclusive that the John Sunderland in this notice was this John, but it did mention a Samuel Wright and the Wright Tract was mentioned in John’s will. The notice:

Dissolution. Notice is hereby given, that the partnership heretofore existing between the subscriber and Samuel Wright, in the Blacksmithing business, under the firm of Samuel Wright & Co., is dissolved; and all persons indebted to said firm are hereby forbid paying their dues to said Samuel Wright, as he is not entitled to the same; nor has he the right, after this date, to receipt and discharge the same. John Sunderland. Jerseyville, Dec. 17, 1844. (60)

According to Sarah B. Norris (nee Hansell), the only ‘colored’ person in Jerseyville circa 1840s was a Sam Evans brought to Jerseyville by her uncle, John Sunderland, and retained as a helper to Dr. D’Arcy. Samuel Evans, a mulatto or person of mixed blood was living in Jersey County in 1850. In his household were possibly his family, members variously indicated as black or mulatto or person of mixed blood. This seems to be the only instance of a black person, this time apparently a free black, associated with our New England family lines. The obituary of Samuel Evans confirms Sarah’s information and indicates that the Sunderlands and probably Hutchinsons came to Jersey County quite early: (61)

Samuel Evans, colored, well known here, died last Sunday night. He came to this county from Trenton, N.J., in 1836, with Mr. John Sunderland, brother of Lloyd Sunderland, and lived with him awhile, then with Mr. John Kimball, and in 1840 went to live with Dr. D’Arcy, who at that time, kept several race horses. He remained with the doctor until the latter’s death, after which he became a protege of Mr. and Mrs. P. D. Cheney. He was nearly 79 years old, and was the father of sixteen children. The funeral took place Tuesday from the Colored Baptist church, and was largely attended.

In her 1851 will, John’s wife, Catharine, stated that Samuel Sunderland was the brother of her late husband John. Catharine Sunderland (widow) . . . City of Trenton . . . to my grand daughter Sarah Johnson daughter of my son Edward J. Johnson . . . my daughter Jane wife of George Wharton now of . . . Illinois . . . my son Robert McFee . . . Whereas my late husband John Sunderland . . . Samuel Sunderland, brother of my said husband . . . I . . . appoint James Ewing . . . Executor . . . ; [dated 16 August 1851; witnesses J. H. Sims, Chas. Gordon; proved 15 September 1851.] (62)

Catharine probably married twice, possibly before her marriage to John Sunderland, possibly to a McFee and a Johnson. No record of children of John has been found.



Harriett Sunderland

Harriett M. Sunderland (John P.2, Thomas1) was born on December 20, 1806 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey and died on May 17, 1883 in Mt. Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa, at age 76. Harriet was buried circa May 18, 1883 in the family plot in Jerseyville, Jersey County, Illinois. She was married on May 7, 1820 to Samuel James Snedeker. Samuel was born on January 27, 1802 and died on January 12, 1877. They had two children, John and Catherine. Samuel came to Jersey County before 1844 and had a farm south of Jerseyville. (63)

In the roll book for the First Baptist Church, Trenton, New Jersey, Harriet Sunderland was baptized on December 16, 1827, married name Snedeker, transferred September 2, 1843 to Illinois. In 1877, probably after the death of her husband, Harriet went to Mt. Pleasant, Iowa to live with her daughter. (64) Just six years later she was seriously ill and family members traveled to Iowa to see her: “Mr. Lloyd Sunderland and Mrs. Mashon [Mershon?], brother and sister of Mrs. Harriet Snedeker, started for Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, last Monday. Mrs. Snedeker is not expected to live many weeks. Mrs. Samuel Snedeker, . . . sick at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, is not any better. She is suffering from cancer and cannot recover.” (65) Harriett’s obituary:

Mrs. Harriet M. Snedeker was born at Trenton, N.J., Dec. 20th, 1807, and died at Mr. Pleasant, Iowa, May 17th, 1883. Her maiden name was Sunderland, and she was one of twelve children, six boys and six girls. One brother Lloyd Sunderland and three sisters, Mrs. Theodore Mershon, Mrs. Isaac Snedeker and Mrs. Daniel Combs survive her. She married Mr. Samuel Snedeker in 1840, and together they came west in 1845, locating in this county, where they resided till his death Jan. 12th, 1877, a short time after she moved to Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, where her daughter, Mrs. W. R. Hill resided, and made that place her home. She was the mother of two children, John who died from lung disease contracted in the army, and Kate who survives her. She was well known here for her energy and perseverance in all her undertakings, and it was mainly through her labors assisted by Mrs. William Hill that the money was raised to put the roof on the old Baptist church, commonly called the “Cumberland.” She was an active member of the Baptist church of this city, always ready and willing to aid in promoting its welfare. She desired to lead and never seemed fatigued, and this indomitable spirit prevailed to the end of life. For the past two years she has suffered much pain, and yet her nearest relatives knew nothing of it. She was confined to her bed three weeks and suffered the greatest pain possible for a human being to suffer. While in Iowa, she assisted largely in building a Baptist church there, and after it was completed and ready for services to be held a tornado struck the town and among other buildings destroyed the church, scarce a vestige remaining. She aided largely in rebuilding this church, and in all charitable objects was ever ready to lend a helping had. Her remains were brought to this city Friday last, and buried in the family lot in the new cemetery. The funeral took place from the residence of Samuel J. Snedeker, was largely attended by friends and relatives who mourn her loss. (66)

Samuel’s biography:

Mr. Samuel Snedeker was born in Middlesex county, New Jersey, January 27, 1802. He is the third child of Isaac and Catharine Snedeker, who had a family of eleven children, five yet living. Mr. S. and wife were both natives of New Jersey. They were of Holland Dutch and German decent. His occupation was that of a farmer. He died at his residence about 1850, at the age of eighty years. Mrs. S.’s death took place several years previous to that of her husband. Mr. Samuel Snedeker received his schooling in the vicinity of Trenton, the facilities at that early day not being very good for obtaining an education. When about twenty-four years of age he commenced clerking in a dry goods and grocery store at Trenton, for Scudder & Reider. He remained there five years. In the fall of 1830, he obtained the position of deputy keeper at the state penitentiary, located at Trenton. He remained in that capacity for a period of fourteen years. He was married, in May, 1840, to Miss Harriet N. Sunderland, daughter of John and Elizabeth Sunderland, of Trenton, New Jersey. They were of English and Irish extraction. Mrs. Snedeker received her education in that city. Mr S. and wife have had two children, a son and daughter. Their son entered the army, at the age of nineteen, during the late civil war. The hard and tedious marches, and exposure of camp life, so told on his health and constitution that he contracted a disease and died, on the 31st of December, 1866. In the fall of 1844 Mr. Snedeker removed to Illinois, landing at Jerseyville, and settled on the farm which he had previously purchased, which is now within the city limits. Mr. S. has always been a industrious, active, and energetic man, and has been successful in acquiring considerable property, and ranks among the well-to-do farmers of Jersey county. He came here with but little means, except the land that he owned. In 1838 Mr. Snedeker joined a Baptist church at Trenton, his wife having becoming a member of the church previous to their marriage. Their daughter, Kate E. Snedeker, is a graduate of “Monticello Female Seminary.” She is a lady of fine attainments and scholastic culture, and is considerably skilled as an artist in oil painting. She graduated with high honors at the seminary, and by her courteous manners endears herself to those who have the pleasure of her acquaintance. She is now the wife of William Hill, a merchant of Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Politically, in early life Mr. S. became a member of the whig party. His first vote was given for John Q. Adams, after which he became an enthusiastic admirer of General Jackson. After moving to Illinois he became identified with the free soil party, advocating the cause of Fremont, and voting twice for Lincoln for president. Mr. S. is respected by a wide circle of friends, who appreciate his many good qualities, and also those of his amiable wife. (67)

The Snedeker family were apparently active in anti-slavery efforts, according to a 1923 newspaper article: (68)

Old Under Ground Station Is Still Standing Here
House Was One of First Constructed in Jersey County
Once Stood on Open Prairie
Long Cavern in Which Runaway Slaves Were Secreted Erected Before War Under Present Old Structure

One of the last landmarks of pre-slavery days in Jersey county stands on South State street on the farm now owned by Cottingham and son and which formerly belonged for years in the Snedeker family. The old home is a landmark because of its relationship to the underground railroad of the slave days. In the basement under the old portion of the house until its acquisition by the Cottingham family, existed a log cavern joining the main basement proper in which, according to tradition many slaves were secreted during the night while on their journey into Canada and freedom. The log cavern originally did not join the basement under the house, but was under the older portion of the house, being reached through a trap door in the floor of one of the rooms.

More than forty years ago a large addition was built by Orville Snedeker, father of Atty. I. D., and Dr. Frank Snedeker, to the eastern portion of the old house, and a basement dug under the same. When the basement under the new portion was dug, the old log cavern was connected with the new basement. There were two underground passageways for entrance and escape purposes on either side of the log cavern under the old portion of the house. With the acquisition of the farm by Cottingham and son the new portion of the house was torn down and the lumber used to construct a tenant house. The original house, however, remains intact.

The present house is unquestionably the oldest in this section of Illinois. When the pioneer George Washington Perrings came to this part of Illinois, he stated that the old house in question stood on the prairie. Perrings oftentimes told one of the present representatives of the Republican that he had counted twenty-six deer in a drove not a half quarter from the present structure. The story of Perrings was corroborated by the late Chas. N. Adams, another pioneer who first lived in a log cabin, neighbor to the place, on what is now the present site of the C. P. & St. L. depot.

The house was first owned by the pioneer Sam Snedeker, who with his brother, Isaac Snedeker and Newell N. Adams and George W. Burke were generally supposed to be the underground railway men in Jerseyville. At Otterville Hiram White and several others were suspected and at Lofton's prairie were found advocates among the McDows and the Whites. An interesting story is often recalled by Barclay Wedding of Jerseyville, a son of the pioneer, Benjamin Wedding. He remembers hearing the story told by Thomas Ford and Harley Hayes to Benjamin Wedding. Thos. Ford was a son-in-law of the anti-slavery pioneer, Newell Adams. Hayes was a Vermonter and very strongly anti-slavery.

Information had been received that a run-away negro was hiding on Calhoun Point in the timber. Hayes and Ford drove to Mason's landing in a spring wagon. Getting a skiff there they rowed up the river to Calhoun point. On the way there they had talked with a man by the name of Bently who was a strong slavery advocate and constantly on the look out for runaway slaves.

About dark Hayes and Ford with the runaway slave rowed to Mason’s landing. They were met in the dark by Bently, who immediately seized one of the three and drove away with what he supposed to be the negro. The party seized was Hayes who had been blacked with burnt cork. Bently did not discover his mistake until he had driven to his home some seven miles from the point. In the meantime Ford had made off with the runaway slave and had landed him with other friends in Jerseyville. From this point he was sent on to Canada.

The old house was built for the centuries. Its framework is of hewn oak joined together with oaken pins and practically indestructible.

Living with Samuel and Harriet in 1850 and 1860 was a Mrs. Mary L. Tindall/Tindell. Mary was in Jersey County as early as 1846, when there was a letter remaining in the post office at Jerseyville. She was born in Freehold, Monmouth County, New Jersey on June 10, 1782. She died on September 21, 1860 in Jersey County and was buried in Oak Grove Cemetery. Just what her relationship was to either the Snedeker or Sunderland family is not known.

In 1870, Samuel was a farmer with real estate valued at $ 4,100(?) and personal estate valued at $1,900. He certainly was a prosperous farmer. Children of Samuel and Harriet:



Mary Rymer Sunderland

Mary Rymer Sunderland (John P.2, Thomas1) was born on January 20, 1808 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey. She married on March 15, 1836 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey, to Daniel H. Combes. (70) Daniel was born October 23, 1805, at Trenton, New Jersey. Mary died on July 29, 1887 in Plainview, Illinois, at age 79, and Daniel died on July 27, 1885. Their children were: Edward S., Daniel H. and Caroline A. Caroline married an A. P. Richards. Mary’s obituary:

Died, at the residence of her son, Daniel, in Plainview, Ill., Friday, July 29, 1887, Mrs. Mary R. Combes, relict [widow] of Daniel H. Combes. Mary Rymer Sunderland was born in Trenton, N.J., Oct. 20, 1808. She made a profession of religion at the age of 16 and joined the Baptist church of Trenton, N.J. On the 15th, of March, 1836, she was united in marriage to Daniel H. Combes. In 1845, they removed to this state and settled near Jerseyville. Her husband passed to the better world July 27, 1885, just two years ago. Mrs. Combes passed quietly and painlessly away on the morning of July 29, ‘87. “Grandma” Combes, as she was familiarly called by those who were acquainted with her, possessed a character of true womanly grace and of real worth in every respect. In every relation of life she was a true, christian woman. As a daughter in her father’s house she was loving and obedient, a true and faithful wife to her husband during all the years which they spent together. As a mother, her children bear testimony to her faithful devotion in this respect, and not only her own children but several others whom she fathered to her motherly heart, and loved and cared for as her own, rise up to call her blessed. Her christian obligations, both private and public, were always faithfully met.

Upon arriving at Jerseyville, one of her first acts was to connect herself with the Baptist church of which she remained a consistent member for 41 years, making her entire church connection cover a period of 63 years. As a member of the church, was true to all her duties and active in all good work, her associates in Jerseyville will remember her earnest work in the Woman’s Aid Society during the war. A true patriot, she was deeply interested in the soldiers and in the cause for which they were striving, and she united her earnest efforts with others for their relief. She had a heart of sympathy for the poor and was always ready to help them. Even the much-abused tramp always received something from her hand. There is so much to admire in a long, faithful, christian life, that has battled with temptation, that has borne the trials and suffered the sorrows of life, that has struggled to overcome the weakness that beset us all, and thro’ it all has been loving faithful and true in every relation, and then has come down, where the evening shadows fall gently around, covered all over with the glory of our Savior’s righteousness! Such a life was hers who passed from us to the rest that remaineth for the people of God. Grandma Combes had almost reached the ripe old age of 80 years, and for one of that age she was active and strong, she frequently walked a mile, and often further. She was an obedient daughter, a true wife, a faithful friend, a real christian, and we let the mantle of loving christian charity cover a life that for long years walked amid the infirmities of old age. Her life on earth has ended. Her life in her Father’s House above has just begun. The reunion of loved ones who have gone before, the joy of her Savior’s presence, the delight of walking along the river of life and upon the streets of shining gold, and of resting in the mansions of a Savior’s love, and beholding the light of that City where they need not the light of the sun nor of the moon, for the Lamb is the light therof, this is her portion now. When the call shall come to us to leave this world, may we go to stand with her among the white robed throng of those who have washed their robes and made them in the blood of the lamb. She left three children, Edward and Daniel of Plainview, and Caroline, wife of A. P. Richards of this city. Lloyd Sunderland a brother, Mrs. Caroline Snedeker, widow of Isaac Snedeker, deceased, and Mrs. Adelia Mershon, widow of Theodore Mershon, deceased, of this city, were her sisters. - P. (71)

Daniel’s obituary: Daniel H. Combs (Coombs?) departed this life at ten o’clock Monday morning, July 27, 1885. He was born October 23, 1805, at Trenton, N.J., and in that state, March 15, 1837, was united in marriage to Miss Mary R. Sunderland. He removed with his family to Jerseyville in the year 1845 where he has ever since resided. There were born unto them, three children, Edward S., Daniel H., and Caroline A., now the wife of A. P. Richards, who were all present at his bed side at the time his spirit left them. He was a man retiring and unassuming in manner, of decided christian character. A resident amongst us for more than forty years, he gained an acquaintance of so favorable a nature that it tells of his life better than can be written. An old land mark has gone, who will be missed by all who knew him. “Requiescat in pace.” (72)



Caroline Y. Sunderland

Caroline Y. Sunderland (John P.2, Thomas1) was born on September 5, 1810 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey. She married on June 25 1846 in Jersey County, Illinois to Isaac H. Snedeker. (73) Isaac was born November 22, 1812 and died on July 4, 1877. Caroline died on July 5, 1891 at age 81. The 1991 History of Jersey County states that Isaac married, in June 1846, to Caroline Sunderland, daughter of John Sunderland, of Trenton, New Jersey, a sister of Isaac’s brother Samuel’s wife [Harriet]. (74) This account states that Isaac was born on November 22, 1812 at Four Mile Ferry, north of Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey. Isaac came to Jersey County in May 1844 where his older brother Samuel had a farm south of Jerseyville. If the 1870 census can be believed, Isaac had real estate valued at $54,000 and personal estate valued at $9,360. This would make the family quite wealthy for the times. Children of Caroline and Isaac were Orville A., Samuel J., and George W. who died in infancy. (75)

“Isaac Snedeker was born at the Four Mile Ferry, north of Trenton, New Jersey, November 22, 1812. He is the youngest son of Isaac and Catharine Snedeker. When a boy Mr. S. used to attend the district schools of his native state, and most of his early boyhood was spent on his father’s farm, until the age of nineteen, after which, for a few years, he was employed on the public works of that state, — such as the building of the Camden & Amboy Railroad, Trenton Water Works, and Delaware and Raritan Canal, and also in assisting in the sale of, and getting information for, the New Jersey Historical Gazetteer and Map of the State. In those various pursuits he spent four years. He then settled in Monroe county, New York, where he bought a farm jointly with his father. He was there engaged in farming about ten years; then, disposing of his property, he came west to Jersey county, Illinois, arriving in May, 1844, where, for a time, he assisted in carrying on his brother Samuel’s farm, south of Jerseyville. He was married, the 25th of June, 1846, to Miss Caroline Sunderland, daughter of John Sunderland, of Trenton, New Jersey. They have had three children, two of whom are yet living. Their son, Orville A. Snedeker, received his literary education at Shurtliff College, Alton, Illinois, and studied law with Hon. R. A. King, and also for a short time at Chicago. He was admitted to the bar in 1870, after which he opened an office in Jerseyville. Samuel G. is engaged in farming with his father. Mr. S. came here poor, but now owns several hundred acres of as fine lands as Illinois affords, besides considerable other property. Mr. S. in early life became opposed to the institution of slavery, and while in New York was made president of an anti-slavery society. He was also elected president of the Jersey County Anti-Slavery Society. In those times it required a man to he possessed of strong nerve and pluck to dare to advocate anti-slavery measures. He voted first for Henry Clay, twice for Lincoln, the latter with whom he was personally acquainted, and during the dark days of secession Mr. S. was among that class of men who dared to come out boldly and advocate the cause of the Union. That cause in Jersey county had few warmer friends than Isaac Snedeker. He was once a candidate for sheriff on the anti-slavery ticket. Mr. S. is a member of the Baptist church. He is among the more solid men of Jersey county.” (76)

In the 1885 history: “. . . in promoting the temperance work, becoming identified with the Sons of Temperance, and one of its most active members. He was also opposed to the institution of slavery while in New York, and was president of an anti-slavery society. He believed it was wrong and opposed it with might and power, and at an early day was instrumental in organizing an anti-slavery society in this county, when it required nerve, firmness and pluck to dare to advocate their principles. He was frequently threatened, and even life endangered, because of his outspoken principles. In June, 1846, he was married to Caroline Sunderland, daughter of John Sunderland, of Trenton, N. J., and sister of his brother Samuel’s wife. The union was a happy one, all through the years of his useful life. In Oct., 1849, Joseph Crabb, a justice of the peace, committed three young men, all nearly as white as himself, to the county jail, under the authority of the black laws of Illinois. Mr. Snedeker had them taken out on a writ of habeas corpus, and taken before the circuit court, and they were discharged. It is claimed that this was the first time that the black laws, under the new constitution of 1848, had been tested, and the first time a negro had been released from a common jail, by a write of habeas corpus, in Illinois. Mr. Snedeker’s first vote was cast for Henry Clay, and he voted twice for Abraham Lincoln, a warm personal friendship existing between them. At the opening, and during the civil war of 1861, there was a strong disloyal element in this county, and it required pluck and courage to stand true to principle. Mr. Snedeker dared to come out boldly and advocate the cause of the Union, and in him the soldier boys had a true and firm friend. He was one of the chief promoters of the objects of the Illinois State Horticultural Society, a regular attendant on its sessions, and in connection with O. B. Galusha, Dr. E. S. Hull, Jonathan Huggins, A. Hilliand, W. H. Mann, Hon. A. M. Brown, D. Wier, Dr. A. G. Humphrey, H. G. Minkler, M. M. Hooton, Dr. J. Long, M. L. Dunlap, and Hon. John M. Pearson, was instrumental in promoting the cultivation of fruit in all parts of the State. He never failed to attend the annual meeting of the society and take an active part in their deliberations, impressing his practical knowledge and embodying it in their reports. His labors in this connection were not confined to this State but he attended the Missouri State Horticultural Society meetings, and took part in its deliberations. He was eminently a social man. Blessed with abundance, he never was so happy as when dispensing hospitality to his friends. In his family relations he was most happy. Isaac Snedeker departed this life July 4, 1877, at his home, after a sickness of nearly one year, terminating in cancer of the stomach. He contained within himself all the good qualities of head and heart that ennobles a man, and should be emulated. Of him it can truly be said, “being dead, he yet speaketh,” for he will live in the remembrance of a large circle of friends for many years. Mrs. Caroline Snedeker resides with her son Orville, in Jerseyville.” (77)

Isaac’s obituaries:

“Death of Isaac Snedeker. On Wednesday, at 6:30 o'clock p.m., Isaac Snedeker, and old and highly respected citizen of the county died at his residence in the eastern part of this city, in the 66th year of his age. Mr. Snedeker came to Jersey county in 1844, and was a very successful farmer. He owned large tracts of land in this and Macoupin counties and in Nebraska. The funeral will take place Saturday morning from his late residence at 10 1/2 o'clock. Services to be conducted by Rev. C. E. Taylor, assisted by the clergy of the city.” – Jersey County Democrat, July 5, 1877.

“Died. Isaac Snedeker. At his residence, near Jerseyville, Illinois, in the 66th year of his age, on July 4, 1877, at 6:15 p.m. The funeral took place from his late residence, on Saturday, July 7th, at 10:30 a.m. Services were conducted by Rev. C. E. Taylor, assisted by the clergy of the city. Isaac Snedeker was born at the Four Mile Ferry, north of Trenton, New Jersey, on the Delaware, Nov. 11, 1812. He was the youngest son of Isaac and Catherine Snedeker. He was in youth brought up on his father's farm, and received his education at the district schools in the neighborhood where he lived. At the age of 10(?) he was employed on public works of that State, building of the Ambey railroad [missing words in this phrase], Trenton water-works, Delaware and Raratin canal, and also assisted in obtaining information, complication and publication for the New Jersey Historical Gazette and map of the State, in which pursuits he spent about four years. He was then fired with the spirit of going to the frontiers, and with roused energy and determination, he, with his father, emigrated to the western portion of New York State, and settled in Monroe county, and engaged in active farming, which, in that county, at that time, meant clearing away the timber. While there he professed a change of heart, and of that eternal hope of the life beyond the grave, which he very frequently spoke of during his sickness, which hope was fully sustained while life lasted, growing stronger as the body grew weaker, always hopeful and cheerful, very confiding, and relying upon the promises and rulings of a Just God. While in New York State, he, with others, after their conversion, commenced the erection of M. E. Perrington Chapel, and though they met with a great deal of discouragements, incident to such undertakings, he and two other young men put their shoulders to the wheel, and with their own means completed the edifice, which to-day stands neath the shade of the trees planted by himself, as an ornament to the neighborhood, a power for usefulness, and as a promoter of those principles which are high, mighty and enobling, teaching the people to love their God, and he alone supremely. After the completion of this work he with his brother Samuel, who passed into eternity so recently, January 12, 1877, came to Illinois in 1844, and located in Jersey county. We have known him since he has lived among us. He has been one of us. We have known him to be kind to the poor, and charitable toward all; a good citizen, a true man, a good neighbor; a man who tried to live after the examples set by his Maker. He was always a great appreciator of the beauties of nature, as exhibited in her grasses, trees and flowers. He would spend much time in talking of any new variety of fruit or flower that came to his notice. He was never too busy to assist in anything that would assist in the cultivation of fruit or flowers. He was Vice-president of the Illinois State Horticultural Society for several years, and one of the Vice-presidents of the American Pomological Society; also, one of the Vice-presidents of the Missouri State Horticultural Society. He wrote much and said much upon the subjects, and was always identified with all local Horticultural and Agricultural Societies in the neighborhood where he lived. Though he was a man that never sought especial distinction, he was rather backward and unassuming, prefering to attend to his own business, but, when brought forward by circumstances that surrounded him, he spoke out frankly his honest convictions. He often remarked that a man should live for some purpose try and become a substantial man, a permanent fixture and reliable, trusting rather upon his word than upon his bond; as such he lived among us. He leaves behind him his widow, the wife of his youth, two sons, Orville A. and Samuel J., known to us all, and two sisters and one brother: Mrs. Catherine Wells of Victor, New York; Mrs. Mary Curtius(?) of Carrollton; and Jacob M. Snedeker of Bunker Hill. He was a kind, indulgent husband, father and brother. But it is said that man was born to die, and so it has been with Isaac Snedeker.” – Jersey County Democrat, July 12, 1877.

The children of Isaac and Caroline:



Lloyd Wells Sunderland

Lloyd Wells Sunderland (John P.2, Thomas1) was born on May 15, 1817 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey. He married on December 23, 1836 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey to Sarah Ann Steinburg. Sarah was born on May 8, 1819 in Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey and died on December 15, 1892 in Jerseyville, Jersey County, Illinois. Lloyd died on May 12, 1900 in Jerseyville, Jersey County, Illinois. According to his biography, Lloyd came to Jersey County in 1838, but soon returned to New Jersey. He was found in the 1840 census in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. (84) He purchased land in Section 8 of Jersey Township. (85) Their children were Harriett V., James S., Joseph Wood, John Patterson, William S., Justus Buckley, Anna May, Caroline S., Ella McGannon and Lloyd Wells II. Lloyd and his family were found in the Jersey County censuses 1850-1880. Lloyd’s biography:

“Lloyd W. Sunderland first came to this county in 1838, being then 21 years old. He remained here a short time, engaged as clerk in the only store in Jerseyville, but soon returned to his home in New Jersey, where he was born, May 15, 1817. His parents were John P. and Elizabeth Sunderland, natives of New Jersey. At the age of 16, he went to Philadelphia, and there learned the brick mason’s trade. On his return to New Jersey, he remained nine years, engaged the greater part of his time, as deputy sheriff and constable. In 1847 he again returned to Jersey county, and settled on section 8, of Jersey township, where he has since resided. He owns 280 acres of land, and is one of the leading farmers of the township. He was married Dec. 23, 1839, to Sarah A. Steinburg, daughter of William and Nancy Steinburg. They have 10 children - Harriet, James, Joseph, John, William, Justice, Annie, Carrie, Ella, and Lloyd. Of these three are unmarried. Mr. Sunderland is a democrat, politically.” (86)

In 1848 Lloyd paid taxes totaling $6.16 on 160 acres, property known as the Lloyd W. Sunderland farm, 2 ½ miles north of Jerseyville. He also paid 93 cents on 40 acres in section 16. (87)

The Sunderland family held a family reunion on a regular basis. The 1952 reunion gave many of the names of the family members still alive at the time: “Sunderland Family Reunion, September 1952. Descendants of the late Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd W. Sunderland, pioneer residents of Jersey County, held the thirty-seventh reunion at Pere Marquette State Park. President was Lawrence Jasmon of Springfield. Four family members had died in the past year: Dr. J. H. Sunderland, Lloyd W. Sunderland Sr., Mrs. Carrie McReynolds of Jerseyville and Charles Crawford of Kent, Washington. Officers elected were: Lloyd W. Sunderland, Mrs. Frank Powers, Miss Clara Sunderland. Frank Powers, Miss Hazel Sunderland, Mrs. Frank Stelle, Mrs. Frank Powers, Carl Wagner and Max Downey were to make arrangements for the next reunion. The following were present: Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd A. Sunderland and son, William D. of St. Louis, Mrs. Grace Brown, Mrs. Dorothy Shasky and daughter Jeannine and son Dale of East St. Louis, Harry McReynolds, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Jasmon and son Bob, Mr. and Mrs. William Peters and Mrs. Edward Keiffer of Springfield, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Downey and sons David and Ernest of Whitehall, Miss Sadie Sunderland, Allen Sunderland, Miss May Sunderland, Mrs. Frank Stelle, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Powers, Mrs. Lloyd W. Sunderland Sr., Miss Hazel Sunderland, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd W. Sunderland Jr. and son John and daughters Mary Ann, Jane Helen and Nancy, Mrs. Augusta Sunderland, Robert Downey Jr., and Miss Clara Sunderland of Jerseyville.”

The children of Lloyd and Sarah:

Children of James S. Sunderland and Barbara J. Thompson:



Endnotes

1 Rodgers, John; Sunderland, Joseph; Skerry, Bobbie, email/website data. Data from: John Rogers, <rampages.onramp.net/~rodgers/geneal/sunder/john1680.html>, accessed 13 February 2000; Joseph Sunderland, February 2000; and a Gedcom from Bobbi Skerry, received via email on 13 December 1999. There is little documentation from these three sources.

2 Liz Watson, “Sunderlands,” email message 8 July 2003. “I don’t have much on Samuel, but do have some info on his children, much of which comes from a ‘handwritten document prepared cir 1963 by a Mrs. Mueller, San Mateo, CA.’ She wrote, ‘This is the Sunderland outline as it seems to us but much of it must be proven.’ Mrs. Mueller is great great granddaughter of John P Sunderland Sr, great granddaughter of Samuel. I also have input from Clara, great granddaughter of John P Sunderland Sr, granddaughter of Lloyd W. Sr, daughter of Jett B. Samuel arrived in Philadelphia, PA, in 1737. Supposedly descended from Earls of Sunderland, England.”

3 History of Jersey County - 1991 p. 576.

4 [BARRACLOUGH] Elizabeth BARRACLOUGH who m SUNDERLAND, 21 Feb 2000. Barraclough email list.

5 Liz Watson, “Sunderlands,” email 8 July 2003.

6 Liz Watson states this will information is from notes prepared by May D. Kemp (1964).

7 Liz Watson, “Sunderlands,” email 8 July 2003.

8 Sugar Creek Baptist Church Cemetery (Old Centerville Cemetery), Centerville, Washington Township, Montgomery County, Ohio, www.carolynjburns.com/cemeteries/cem_sugarcreek.html.

9 Liz Watson, “Sunderlands,” email 8 July 2003.

10 Commemorative Biographical Record of Prominent and Representative Men of Indianapolis and Vicinity. Contains biographical sketches of business and professional men and of many of the early families. Chicago : J.H. Beers & Co., 1908, pp. 269-272.

11 Carllene Marek, “Hutchinson,” email 31 January 2000. Thomas Sunderland ( b.1742 England) immigrated 1747? m. Sarah Runyon (b.1755). Her parents were Hugh Runyon (1715 NJ-1804 NJ?) and Ann SAVAGE/SAVIGE (1721-1795). My Runyon (Roignon/Rongnion) and Savage/Savige ancestors were French Huguenots. The Runyons arriving in New Jersey 1665. Carllene states that most of the information is not well documented and comes from several publications.

12 Liz Watson, “Sunderlands,” email 8 July 2003.

13 Francis Bazley Lee, Ed., Genealogical and Personal Memorial of Mercer County New Jersey, Vol. I, New York: Lewis Publishing Company, 1907, p. 29.

14 Rodgers, John; Sunderland, Joseph; Skerry, Bobbie, email/website data. Data from: John Rogers, <rampages.onramp.net/~rodgers/geneal/sunder/john1680.html>, accessed 13 February 2000; Joseph Sunderland email February 2000; Gedcom from Bobbi Skerry 13 December 1999. There is little documentation provided from these three sources.

15 Carllene Marek, “Hutchinson,” email 31 January 2000. John P. Sunderland (1770-1838) m. Elizabeth Slack (1777-1838). She was born in Bucks Co, PA. Her parents were Cornelius Slack and Elizabeth Spear.

16 Email from: "Carllene Marek" Subject: Fw: Elizabeth Slack m. Sunderland, 22 Mar 2006

17 Source: Ancestry.com, Pennsylvania Marriages to 1790, Names of Persons for whom Marriage Licenses Were Issued in the Province of Pennsylvania Previous to 1790. Some Pennsylvania Marriages-prior to 1810, Volume I - E.K. Meyers - printed 1890 - Harrisburg, Pa. www.geocities.com/Heartland/6508/MARR.HTM, 1765, Feb. 5 Spear, Elizabeth and Cornelius Slack

18 Biographical Card Index from the NJ Historical Society

19 Gravestones First Baptist Church Yard, Corner of Centre and Bridge Streets, Trenton, New Jersey. Copied Apr. 27, 1943, by Mrs. Alfred P.S. Bellis, Morrisville, Pennsylvania, from records in the possession of the Congregation Of the First Baptist Church, trentonhistory.org/Cem/FirstBaptist.htm, accessed 2006.

20 ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/pa/bucks/wills/willabstbk4.txt, Wills: Abstracts: Book 4 : Bucks Co, PA 1778-1786, Contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives.

21 Roscoe C. Keeney, author of "6,474 Slack Relatives"; "Cornelis Barentse Slecht and Some of his Relatives" by Rev. Lawrence Slaght, pp. 17, 30; Pennsylvania Archives, Vol 5 - 302; Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Will Book, Bucks County Courthouse, letter of administration issued; children listed in "History of Bucks County", by Davis, 3-639; Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Will Book. 1785, Book 5, p. 406, Book 4, pp. 325, 326, 391; Pennsylvania Vital Records, 1700's to 1800's, Volume 1, Register of Baptisms, 1701-1746, First Presbyterian Church of Philidelphia, p. 82, online at www.member-webroots.org/deadrelatives/allg50.htm, accessed 2006.

22 Carllene Marek, “Hutchinson Connections,” email 19 May 1998. John P. Sunderland 1770-1838 married 1794 Elizabeth Slack 1777-1838. The eldest of their 10 children was Ann Sunderland born 1794, married William Hansel. Ann & William had at least 4 daughters and two sons. One daughter, Sarah Hansel born 1832 in New Hope, Bucks Co, PA married in 1854 in IL to Johnston Norris. Another unnamed daughter born before 1830 married John Hutchinson. This undocumented info comes from a distant cousin, Carl Sunderland. [Note: The unnamed daughter is certainly Rebecca Hansell. Supported by the obituaries of both Sarah and Rebecca that state they were sisters and by Rebecca’s marriage record.]

23 William Hansell and Ann, his wife tombstone. Oak Grove Cemetery, Jerseyville, Jersey County, Illinois.; “William Hansell and Ann, his wife. William Hansell, born in Berks Co. PA, 11 mo. 25 day 1792, died 2 mo. 11 da 1872. Ann, his wife, born in Trenton N. J., 12 mo 28 day 1794, died 9 mo 12 da 1872.

24 Bob Ford, “Sunderland,” email December 2, 2000. Deed New Jersey, Mercer County, New Jersey. Deed Book A, p. 420 (possibly 421).

25 Jerseyville Republican, (Jerseyville, Illinois), January 12, 1922 (reprinted in The Prairie Schooner, Jersey Co. Historical Society, Fall 1982, pp. 14-16).

26 Cooper, Marshall M., History of Jerseyville, Illinois, 1822 to 1901, Jerseyville, IL: Jerseyville Republican Print, 1901, p. 20.

27 Jersey County Democrat, 31, August 1876.

28 Jersey County Democrat, January 21, 1892. Weekly Republican, April 16, 1880.

29 Jersey County Democrat, September 10, 1891.

30 Purchaser: Sunderland James. Residence of Purchaser: Greene. Legal Description: Aliquot Parts or Lot: NENW. Section Number: 32. Township: 09N. Range: 12W. Meridan: 3. County of Purchase: Greene. Details of Sale: Acres: 40.00. Price per Acre: 1.25. Total Price: 50.00. Type of Sale: FD. Date of Purchase: 04/19/1837. Volume: 339. Page: 172. Purchaser: Sunderland James. Residence of Purchaser: Greene. Legal Description: Aliquot Parts or Lot: E2SW. Section Number: 29. Township: 09N. Range: 12W. Meridan: 3. County of Purchase: Greene. Details of Sale: Acres: 80.00. Price per Acre: 1.25. Total Price: 100.00. Type of Sale: FD. Date of Purchase: 03/22/1837. Volume: 339. Page: 166.

31 Alton Telegraph & Democratic Review (Alton, Illinois), July 11, 1846. List of Letters remaining in the post office at Jerseyville, Illinois, July 1, 1846. P. Silloway, P. M. Accessed Ancestry: 11/21/2003. Sunderland, James

32 Ebenezer Force household. 1860 Illinois Federal Census, Jerseyville Precinct; Jersey County, Roll: M653_188, dwelling 143, family 141. Ebenezer Force household. 1870 Illinois Federal Census, Township 8 Range 11, Jersey, Illinois; Roll: M593_233; Page: 697, dwelling 11, family 11.

33 Samuel Sunderland household. 1850 Federal Census, Jersey County, Illinois, Township 8, range 11, enumerated August 30, 1850, p. 109.

34 History of Macoupin County, Illinois with Illustrations Descriptive of its Scenery, and Biographical Sketches of Some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Brink, McDonough & Co., Philadelphia 1879, p. 105. On pp. 251-52, the biography of Charles Sunderland states that his father, Samuel, enlisted in a company of soldiers raised for service in the War of 1812 when he was fifteen and that his father was a mill-wright.

35 Jersey County Democrat, May 27, 1875.

36 Macoupin County, Illinois Public Domain Land Track Sales to Patentees (original purchases from U. S. Government), all purchased on June 8, 1849: Sunderland, Charles, SW 1/4, Section 01, Township 09 North, Range 06 West, 160 acres. Sunderland, Samuel, SW 1/4, Section 12, Township 09 North, Range 06 West, 160 acres. Sunderland, Samuel, SE 1/4, Section 11, Township 09 North, Range 06 West, 160 acres. Sunderland, Samuel, NW 1/4, Section 11, Township 09 North, Range 06 West, 160 acres.

37 Alton Weekly Courier (Alton, IL) - Thursday, July, 29, 1858. The early June variety of apples are quite plentiful in the Jerseyville market and have been for several weeks. Mr. Samuel Sunderland reports his apple orchard as being as fine as ever, and the same may be said of the county generally.

38 Charles Sunderland household. 1870 Federal Census, Macoupin County, Township 8, Range 8. Plainview post office, enumerated July 22, 1870, page 13 (264), dwelling 93, family 92, Washington: National Archives. Samuel, age 75, male, white, retired merchant, born New Jersey. Accessed on-line November 2002.

39 Carllene Marek, “Hutchinson connections,” email 19 May 1998. Samuel Sunderland 1796-1875, married 1821 Elizabeth Hutchinson. Samuel & Elizabeth’s oldest child, Charles B. Sunderland 1824-1900 married Leah Tressler.

40 Macoupin County Illinois History, Philadelphia: Brink, McDonough & Co., 1879, pp. 251-52. Biography of Charles Sunderland states he was born September 8, 1824 in Trenton, New Jersey. It names his wife and states he was married on January 18, 1855.

41 Macoupin County Illinois History, Philadelphia: Brink, McDonough & Co., 1879, pp. 251-52.

42 Charles Sunderland household. 1870 Federal Census, Macoupin County, Illinois, Township 8, Range 8. Plainview post office, enumerated July 22, 1870, page 13 (264), dwelling 93, family 92. Washington: National Archives. Accessed online, November 2002.

43 Charles Sunderland household. 1880 Federal Census, Macoupin County, Illinois, Hillyard Township. Washington: National Archives, Microfilm no. T9-0232, page 208B.

44 The Western Star, June 6, 1896.

45 1850 Federal Census, Jersey County, Illinois.

46 From the Litchfield Monitor, printed in the Jersey County Democrat, October 7, 1886.

47 1850 Federal Census, Jersey County, Illinois.

48 1850 Federal Census, Jersey County, Illinois.

49 Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, online <www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html>, Virginia Sunderland data downloaded December 25, 2002. Vol. A, p. 199. Sunderland, Virginia married Edmond P. Wilcox on 22 January 1857 in Jersey County, Illinois.

50 Jersey County Index of Burials, online at www.rootsweb.com/~iljersey/Cemetery/cemeteryW.htm, accessed December 2004.

51 Macoupin County Illinois History, Philadelphia: Brink, McDonough & Co., 1879, p. 105.

52 Virden Record, July 6, 1883. Reprinted in Littleton P. Bradley, “Virden, Illinois, and Vicinity Obituaries. Volume I - 1881 Through 1885. Ferguson, MO: Author, 1994, p. 35. V.R. July 6, 1883.

53 Macoupin County Illinois History, Philadelphia: Brink, McDonough & Co., 1879, p. 105.

54 Samuel Sunderland household. 1870 Federal Census, Macoupin County, Illinois, Township 9, Range 6, Post Office Clyde, enumerated July 18, 1870, p. 8, dwelling 54, family 55. Washington: National Archives. Saml Sunderland, age 28, male, white, occupation farmer, real estate value $3,200, personal property value $100, born Illinois. Accessed online 2002.

55 Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, online at <www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html>, accessed December 2002. Vol. A, p. 175. Samuel Sunderland married Cornie A. Covert on October 18, 1864 in Jersey County.

56 Henry Sunderland household. 1870 Federal Census, Macoupin County, Illinois, Township 9, Range 6, Post Office Clyde, enumerated July 18, 1870, page 8, dwelling 53, family 56. Washington: National Archives. Accessed on-line November 2002. Henry, age 26, male, white, occupation farmer, real estate value $3,200, personal property value $300, born Illinois.

57 Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, online at www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html, accessed on-line, December 2002. Vol. A, P. 177. Henry L. Sunderland married Emma J. Nutt on October 31, 1866 in Jersey County, Illinois.

58 Jersey County Democrat, February 1, 1877.

59 “Mercer County Wills - Book ‘A’,” Mercer County Genealogical Quarterly, Vol. 4, No. 3, p. 55.

60 Alton Telegraph & Democratic Review (Alton, Illinois), January 18, 1845. Accessed online at Ancestry.com in November 2003.

61 Jersey County Democrat, January 31, 1884.

62 Mercer County, New Jersey Deed Book B:285

63 Ruby Postlewait, History of Jersey County, Illinois: Sesquicentennial Edition, Curtis Media Corp., 1991

64 Jersey County Democrat, February 22, 1877.

65 Jersey County Democrat, May 17, 1883.

66 Jersey County Democrat, May 24, 1883.

67 “Old Settlers of Jersey County,” 1872 Jersey County Atlas, p. 30.

68 This newspaper clipping appears to have been printed in the Jerseyville Republican, probably February 15, 1923.

69 Iowa Women’s Archives, University of Iowa Libraries, Iowa City, Iowa, online at sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/iwa/findingaids/html/HillCatherine.htm, accessed December 2003. They hold Catherine’s Papers 1854-1871.

70 Hunterdon County, New Jersey Marriages, 1795-1875, Vol. 3, p. 159. Mary R. Sunderland married Daniel H. Combs, 15 March 1836, Rhees officiating. From <ancestry.com>. Accessed on-line December 2002.

71 Jersey County Democrat, August 4, 1887.

72 Jersey County Democrat, July 30, 1885.

73 Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html, Vol. A, p.8 and Vol. A, p. 167. Sunderland, Caroline married Isaac Snedeker, June 25, 1846 in Jersey County, Illinois. Accessed on-line December 25, 2002.

74 Ruby Postlewait, History of Jersey County, Illinois: Sesquicentennial Edition, Curtis Media Corp., 1991, p. 535.

75 Ruby Postlewait, History of Jersey County, Illinois: Sesquicentennial Edition, Curtis Media Corp., 1991, p. 674.

76 “Old Settlers of Jersey County,” 1872 Jersey County Atlas, p. 27.

77 History of Greene and Jersey Counties, Illinois. Springfield, IL: Continental Historical Co., 1885, p. 535.

78 IGI, Batch No.: M748744, Dates: 1875 - 1876, Source Call No.: 1769061, Type: film.

79 Jersey County Democrat, November 4, 1875.

80 Jersey County Democrat, January 2, 1890.

81 Jersey County Democrat, October 31, 1889.

82 April 29, 1892, newspaper clipping.

83 Rev. Marshall M. Cooper, History of Jerseyville, Illinois 1822 to 1901, Jerseyville Republican Print, 1901, pp. 94,95.

84 1840 Federal Census, Mercer County, South Trenton, Nottingham Township, New Jersey. Washington: National Archives (published by SK Publications, Wichita, Kansas.

85 Ruby Postlewait, History of Jersey County, Illinois: Sesquicentennial Edition, Curtis Media Corp., 1991

86 History of Greene and Jersey Counties, Illinois. Springfield, IL: Continental Historical Co., 1885, p. 476.

87 “Another Old Tax Receipt,” from a newspaper, dated Springfield, Il., March 16, 1916. Reprinted in the newsletter of the Jersey County Historical Society, Spring 2006. The information came from Mrs. J. S. Heizer, nee Sunderland.

88 Jersey County Index of Burials, www.rootsweb.com/~iljersey/Cemetery/cem.html.

89 Illinois State Archives, Database of Illinois Death Certificates 1916-1950, online at www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html, accessed on-line December 22, 2002. Certificate No. 420058. Sunderland, James Slack, male, white, age unknown, died 1931-06-03, Jersey County, Jerseyville, filed 31-06-05.

90 46. Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, online at <www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html>, accessed on-line December 24, 2002. Vol. A, p. 174. Sunderland, James married Jennie Cooper on August 12, 1863 in Jersey County.

91 Jersey County Index of Burials, www.rootsweb.com/~iljersey/Cemetery/cem.html. James S. Sunderland household, Jerseyville, Jersey County, Illinois, Washington: National Archives. National Archives film No. T9-0216, page 67B. James S. Sunderland, married, male, white, age 39, birth place New Jersey, parents born New Jersey, occupation farmer. Jane Sunderland, wife, married, female, white, age 37, born Illinois, parents born New Jersey, occupation keeping house. Edward Sunderland, son, single, male, white, age 14, born Illinois, at school.

92 Illinois State Archives, Database of Illinois Death Certificates 1916-1950, online at www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html, accessed online December 22, 2002. Page 194, license no. 800. James S. Sunderland married Barbara J. Thompson (Mrs) Bridges on October 19, 1883 in Madison County, Illinois.

93 Jersey County Index of Burials, www.rootsweb.com/~iljersey/Cemetery/cem.html.

94 Jersey County Democrat, 1875. Reprinted in Jersey County Historical Society Newsletter, Fall 2004.

95 Jersey County Democrat, December 21, 1876.

96 Cooper, Marshall M., History of Jerseyville, Illinois, 1822 to 1901, Jerseyville, IL: Jerseyville Republican Print, 1901, p. 66.

97 Republican Examiner, (Jerseyville, Illinois), January 25, 1889.

98 Gubser Funeral Record, (Jerseyville, IL: Jersey County Historical Society.), No. 67, October 27, 1924 (also stamped 223), Record of Funeral.

99 The first four children are from 1880 Jerseyville census, second four are from 1918 Prairie Farmer’s Reliable Directory.

100 Cooper, Marshall M., History of Jerseyville, Illinois, 1822 to 1901, Jerseyville, IL: Jerseyville Republican Print, 1901, p. 34.

101 Cooper, Marshall M., History of Jerseyville, Illinois, 1822 to 1901, Jerseyville, IL: Jerseyville Republican Print, 1901, p. 74.

102 Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, online at <www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html>, accessed online December 2002. Vol. A, p. 181. John Sunderland married Sophia Robbins on October 25, 1871 in Jersey County. Bible Record, Family record, photocopy from Robert Ford. John Sunderland and Sophia Robbins were married Oct 25 1871.

103 Gubser Funeral Record, (Jerseyville, IL: Jersey County Historical Society.), Record of Funeral. Yearly No. 77 (stamped 227), December 9, 1932. Record of Funeral.

104 Cooper, Marshall M., History of Jerseyville, Illinois, 1822 to 1901, Jerseyville, IL: Jerseyville Republican Print, 1901, p. 70.

105 Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, online at <www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html>, accessed online December 2002. Vol. 2, p. 161. Lewis J. Sunderland married Augusta Reed on October 25, 1903 in Franklin County, Illinois.

106 Prairie Farmers Reliable Directory, 1918, Jersey County. Sunderland, Louis J. (Augusta Reed). Children: Mildred, Jean, Mary, John. Jerseyville R2, Jersey County Sec 15. Owns 80 acres. Tenant 40 acres, William Hanes. Came to Jersey County 1873.

107 www.kinsitesforfamilies.com/Sunderlands.htm, website accessed December 2002.

108 Liz Watson, “Sunderlands,” email 8 July 2003.

109 www.kinsitesforfamilies.com/wedding.htm

110 Illinois State Archives, Database of Illinois Death Certificates 1916-1950, <www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html>, accessed online, December 22, 2002. Certificate No. 72. Sunderland, William S., death date 23 July 1939.

111 Online at Jersey County GenWeb page.

112 Undated newspaper clipping from Marty Crull, sent December 2002.

113 Jersey County Democrat, November 22, 1883

114 Jersey County Democrat, November 2, 1882.

115 Edwardsville Intelligencer, September, 27, 1921.

116 Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, <www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html>, accessed online, December 22, 2002. License No. 68. Annie W. Sunderland married George Christy in Jersey County on June 3, 1885.

117 Ed Miner, Past and Present of Greene County Illinois, Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1905, p. 382.

118 Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, <www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html>, accessed online, December 22, 2002. Vol. B. Carrie Sunderland married James G. McReynolds in Jersey County on October 31, 1878.

119 History of Greene and Jersey Counties, Illinois. Springfield, IL: Continental Historical Co., 1885, pp. 489-490.

120 Illinois State Archives, Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763-1900, online at <www.sos.state.il.us/departments/archives/databases.html>, accessed online December 2002. Vol B, license 1094. Lloyd W. Sunderland married Mary E. Davis on April 21, 1885 in Jersey County.

121 History of Greene and Jersey Counties, Illinois. Springfield, IL: Continental Historical Co., 1885, pp. 486-487.

122 Jerseyville Republican, March 25, 1920. Scan of newspaper clipping sent by Marty Crull.

123 1991 Jersey Co. history, p. 686

124 JCHS Sunderland file, newspaper article dated 9-2-76.