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Dabbs, Haney, Hoggatt

Joseph Dabbs and Nancy Ann Hoggatt


Proposed Dabbs Lineage

Compiled by Judy Griffin, 2007 - email address




Early Dabbs

The grandfather of our Joseph Dabbs may be this James Dabbs: “James Dabbs and Edward Palmer were transported to Henrico Co. Virginia by John Greenhough. James settled on Four Mile Creek and was probably the father of Rebecca Dabbs and Joseph Dabbs.” (1) The researcher citing this information states that this James Dabbs may have been born circa 1630 in England and immigrated on December 6, 1652. Rebecca Ann Dabbs is said to have been born in 1654 in Henrico County, Virginia.

This same researcher states that the son of James Dabbs was Joseph Dabbs, born circa 1674 in Richmond, King & Queen County, Virginia and died circa 1754 in Lunnenburg County (Will book, p. 172). From a Rohlfing-Spurgeon Family tree, source not stated, the researcher believes that this Joseph Dabbs married, circa 1700, an Ann who was born circa 1674 in Richland, King and Queen County, Virginia. Their children are said to have been: Joseph Dabbs born circa 1705 in Lunnenburg, Goochland County, Virginia; Ann Dabbs, born circa 1716 in Charlotte, Virginia; and William Dabbs, born circa 1738 in Lunnenburg, Goochland County.

In the 1991 History of Jersey County, Illinois, it was stated that our Dabbs family were descendants of a Dobbs family of Antrim, Ireland, that the Dobbs castle is still standing in Ireland. In the Jersey County, Illinois publication, The Red House 150th Anniversary 1834-1984, the entry for Dabbs states: “The Dabbs family of Jersey County were the descendants of a Dobbs family of Antrim, Ireland. The transposing of hand written records in an early census led to the change in the spelling of the name. The Dobbs castle is still standing in Antrim, Ireland. The first “Arthur” Dobbs, one of the four Dobbs brothers, was commissioned by the Queen of England to be the Governor of a province in America that is now the state of North Carolina. His descendants migrated into Kentucky, Missouri and into Jersey County in 1836.” Research on this Dobbs family indicates that we are not related.



Joseph Dabbs

Joseph Dabbs was born in 1700 in Goochland County, Virginia, and died circa 1749 in Lunenburg or Goochland County. (2) It is unlikely that Joseph was born in Goochland County, since Goochland wasn’t formed until 1728 from the original shire, Henrico County. Joseph married Nancy Ann Hoggatt on July 1, 1733 in Goochland County, Virginia, daughter of Anthony Hoggatt and Eleanor Crow. (3) Nancy Ann, “Nanny,” was born in 1716 in Essex County, Virginia and died between 1780-1790. When Nanny married Joseph, her father, Anthony Hoggatt, was surety for the marriage, as found in the Marriage Bonds in Goochland County: “July 1, 1733. Joseph Dabbs to Nanny Hoggett; sec., Anthony Hoggett; witn,. H. Wood.” (4) (See Crow-Hoggatt family history.) Their children were: William, Richard, Nathaniel, Joseph, Eleanor (died in infancy), and Mary Penelope.

Joseph was a ‘sub-sheriff’ in Goochland County at the time he married Nanny Hoggatt, according to the court records of Goochland County (1728-1733). In this role, he was paid for carrying out the ancient and gruesome practice of hanging and quartering people convicted of a crime. In this case, it was the execution of two negro slaves, documented in the following court record: (5)

The County Levy Court in October, 1733, allowed Thomas Walker and Joseph Dabbs, Sub-Sheriffs, 4970 pounds of tobacco for their services in connection with the trial and execution of Champion and Valentine, such services including: “executing Champion and Valentine, providing tarr, burying the trunks, cutting out the quarters, a pott, carts and horses, carrying and setting up the heads and quarters of the two Negroes at the places mentioned by Order of Court, for gallows and ropes to hang the said two Negroes, and for ‘jusolvents’ and persons twice lifted.” The lives of Champion and Valentine were valued at thirty and forty pounds current money, respectively.

Typically, this involved a partial strangulation, disembowlment, and finally quartering of the body, not necessarily in four parts. The body parts were drenched with tar, and then hung up in various parts of the realm as a warning. This practice, for cases of treason, was abandoned in England in 1821, and was last performed there in 1746. The English colonists in America evidently applied the practice in their efforts to maintain control over their slaves.

Information on the trial of the slaves accused of the murder: (6)

Joseph was named in a number of Virginia land patents from 1734 to 1751, in Goochland County until 1745, then in Albemare County. It is doubtful that Joseph moved, more likely his property was on land that became Albemare county in 1744. The July 20, 1738 patent for Joseph Dabbs and Thomas Walker, 2,500 acres, encompassed both sides of Willis River on the south side of Randolph Creek. (8) On December 19, 1738, Joseph’s father-in-law, Anthony Hoggat, was granted to add 400 acres to build a mill, added to the 600 acres granted to Hoggatt and Joseph Dabbs on the Appmattock River. Then on June 13, 1739 in Dabbs vs Hoggatt, it was ordered that the surveyor of Goochland County to divide 6,000 acres, with Joseph Dabbs to have his choice. (9) William Mayo’s 1740 patent for 4,740 acres was not only bounded by Joseph Dabbs and others, but also Soak-arse Run, a name whose origin would be interesting to uncover.

Joseph’s ‘neighbor,’ Maj. William Mayo (1684-1744), came to Virginia about 1723 and settled in Goochland County where he was a justice, surveyor, militia major, and vestryman of St. James Parish. (10) At this time Goochland County was all the land west of present-day Henrico and Chesterfield counties. During his lifetime, Mayo accumulated nearly 34,000 acres. When he died in 1744, he left nearly 10,000 acres to his heirs.

Joseph Dabbs was mentioned in the land transactions for what became known as the Clover Forest Plantation: (11)

Joseph was found in court records from 1747 to 1748 in Albermarle County, Virginia. These seem to be mainly involving money owed him. (14), (15), (16), (17), (18), (19) Unfortunately, the results of these court actions have not been found. In 1750 Joseph Dabbs (and Nathaniel Hoggatt, Joseph’s brother-in-law) were named in this land transaction:

A copy of Joseph’s will has not been found. However, it does appear that his estate was probated circa 1753, when Nanny Dabbs was listed as the executrix. (21) Although no date is given, there is an account of Joseph’s estate, which confirms that Nanny had re-married a James Webb, Joseph’s former overseer, and gives an account of the estate. From the information, it appears that the estate was settled in October 1754. While the estate account is difficult to understand, it seems that Joseph had five or seven slaves and a number of individuals with whom Joseph had financial and/or legal dealings are named.

Children of Joseph & Nancy:



William Dabbs

Brother of Nathaniel Dabbs

William Dabbs (Joseph1) was born circa 1734 and died in 1804 in Charlotte County, Virginia, buried in Charlotte County Virginia. (22) William married, circa 1753, Catherine __?__, who died in 1790-1791. Researcher James Dabbs states that William Dabbs did not have a will, dying intestate. (23) There is a deed (below) dated 1790, which some Dabbs researchers have confused with his will. William resided in Lunenburg County, Virginia (became Charlotte County in 1765). Their children were: William, Joseph, Anne, Jesse, Susannah, and Mary. (24)

This deed stated that William was the first son of Joseph Dabbs and named his sisters: (25)

According to this deed, William, being the oldest son of Joseph Dabbs (who died in Lunenburg County in 1749) was entitled to some slaves, which had been left to his sister Eleanor who died as a child. In this record, William Dabbs was giving his right to these slaves to his only sister Mary, wife of Patrick Boggan. James Webb, who married Nanny, the widow of Joseph Dabbs, had removed these slaves from Virginia.

According to researcher James Dabbs, (27) William Dabbs was under the guardianship of his grandfather Anthony Hoggatt. Anthony died by 1755 and William chose Daniel Hankins as his guardian. William became a substantial citizen of Charlotte County. He was a founding member of the Briery Presbyterian Church, located in Prince Edward County, just over the county line. His son, William, Jr., was a surveyor of Charlotte County. William died intestate in Charlotte County, but the Records of Administration named the six children.

William’s son, William Dabbs, Jr., the surveyor, married Elizabeth Hatchett on October 31, 1789 in Charlotte County and, second, Sarah Claybrook on October 9 or 19, 1816 in Charlotte County. He left a will that clearly named him a surveyor. (28) Isaac Read, executor, was granted to sell William’s land in Lunenburg County. William stated that his estate “gotten by my wife,” is given to her unless she marries. His daughters Nancy Lewis, Polly Lee Dabbs and Martha Hugerford and son Abner each received one-fifth of the estate. His daughter Betsy Johns, also referred to as “Lisa,” and her two children also received one-fifth. If his wife died, the money from the land was to be divided equally between Abner, Polly, Martha and the heirs of Nancy Lewis (excluding the sons of Corbin Lewis from his first marriage). The will was recorded April 2, 1821 and the witnesses were Thomas Elam, Cuth W. Roash, and Jno. C. Miller.

These represent each of the five children from the Surveyor’s first wife, Elizabeth Hatchett. Abner Dabbs received four payments totaling $885.23 dated: 8 Mar 1825 ($425); 19 Mar 1825 ($50); 1 Aug 1825 ($280); 8 Aug 1826 ($130.23).

In the sum for John Thackston, are sub-payments of $80 on 21 Mar 1825, $300 on 17 Oct 1825, and then on 9 Jun 1826, a sum of $100 [or 700], made to “William L. Morton, son of Martha Dabbs, now Martha Thackston.” It is followed by a “ditto paid to J.T. 8 Aug 1826” for $14.94. Thus, from this and the statements in the Surveyor’s will, it is apparent that William Jr.’s daughter, Martha Dabbs, had three husbands: Hungerford, Morton, and Thackston. Scribbled side-ways in the margin of this record is a caption, which reads something like: “See [????] John Dabbs, July 1832.” No such record was found in subsequent entries for Dabbs.



Richard Dabbs

Brother of Nathaniel Dabbs


Richard Dabbs (Joseph1) was born circa 1735 in Lunenburg County, Virginia and died in 1809. He married, first, Elizabeth Foster in 1758 in Charlotte County, Virginia, the daughter of George Foster and Mary Singleton and the sister of our “Miss” Foster who married Richard’s brother Nathaniel. Elizabeth was born in 1730 in Prince William County, Virginia and died before 1809 in Charlotte County, Virginia. Richard married, second, Anne Cunningham (Mrs. Anne Hannah) on January 11, 1804 in Charlotte County. (30) Researcher Joseph Dabbs states that Anne Cunningham was the widow of an Andrew Hannah. (31) Richard was found in Charlotte County where he was paid by the county for patrolling in 1797. (32) Jack Autrey Dabbs, who compiled a great deal of information on Dabbs from a variety of sources, gave this information on Richard Dabbs, son of Joseph: (33)

The children of Richard and Elizabeth were:




Nathaniel Dabbs

Nathaniel Dabbs (Joseph1) was born between 1737-40 in Lunenburg County, Virginia, and died in 1800 in Union County, South Carolina. (59) He married Elizabeth Haney circa 1760 in Charlotte County, Virginia, (60) daughter of John Haney and “Miss” Foster. Elizabeth was born circa 1743 in Lunenburg County, Virginia, and died after 1820, probably in Union County, South Carolina. See Haney, Foster and Garnett family histories. Note that Lunenburg County was not formed until 1746 (after Nathaniel’s birth) and Charlotte County in 1765 (after Nathaniel’s marriage), the information is based on the county where the records were found.

Nathaniel was close to his sister Mary’s age and went to Anson County, North Carolina with her when she married Patrick Boggan. (61)

Nathaniel was a Revolutionary War Patriot and a Magistrate in Anson County, North Carolina. (62) According to researcher Kate Dobbs Arial, Nathaniel first took up land in Anson County, North Carolina in 1767, ultimately acquiring nearly 2,000 acres during the three decades of his residence there. However, he didn’t farm all of this himself; he seems to have bought and sold land as a lucrative sideline to planting. He resided in Anson County until sometime in the mid 1790s as found deeds.

According to Dabbs researcher, James D. Dabbs, all the children of Joseph Dabbs and Nanny Hoggatt except Nathaniel are documented. He states that there is much information to indicate that they are Nathaniel’s parents. A recently found deed for Nathaniel’s 1792 land sale provides better circumstantial evidence that Joseph and Nanny (Hoggatt) are the parents of Nathaniel: (63)

About 1795 Nathaniel moved with his wife and younger children to Union County, South Carolina, where he bought land on the south side of the Pacolet River near its junction with the Broad River, near the town of Pinckneyville. This is the land that was sold in 1810 by his son Samuel (see below). (64)

Nathaniel Dabbs left a will naming his wife, eleven children and his slaves. The will was proved by oath of Timothy Haney August 16, 1800: (65)

The children of Nathaniel Dabbs and Elizabeth Haney were:



Joseph Dabbs

Brother of Nathaniel Dabbs

Joseph Dabbs (Joseph1) married Hannah Kolb. Hannah is said to have been born circa 1753 in Cheraw, Chesterfield County, South Carolina. Their children are reported to have been William, Nancy, and Samuel. Joseph lived in South Carolina just across the line from Anson County, North Carolina. Captain Joseph Dabbs was killed in the Revolutionary War by Tories. (82) From the genealogy by Margaret Jean Brunson: Hannah Kolb married Joseph Dabbs on July 21, 1768. Joseph voted in the election at St. David’s Parish on October 4, 1768. He was a member of the St. David Society and pledged 50 pounds for the building of the school. Capt. Joseph Dabbs was with his brother-in-law Abel Kolb (Hannah’s brother) on the raiding party that resulted in the retaliation murders of Kolb and Joseph. He was killed at a place called Brown’s Mill on April 28, 1781. (83) Joseph Dabbs and Abel Kolb were members of a band of Patriots under Francis Marion, “The Swamp Fox,” who essentially fought a guerilla war against the British. (84)

There is a deed in the North Carolina State Archives that was copied (printed) from the original at some point, and appears to be the only copy available. It seems that the transcription misspelled the surname Dobbs/Dabbs, using the name Joseph Nobbs. This may be the case due to the locations and people named in the deed and a family of the surname Nobbs has not been found in Anson County. It is believed that this deed was for a Joseph Dobbs/Dabbs, a boat builder living near the Pee Dee River during the Revolution (Darlington County/District, Cheraws Parish), serving in the Northeast St. David’s Parish Volunteer Company under a Captain Lide. Spelling and punctuation have been retained in this transcription of the transcribed deed: (86)



Mary Dabbs

Sister of Nathaniel Dabbs

Mary Dabbs (Joseph1) was born in 1743 and died in 1831 in Anson County, North Carolina. Mary married Patrick Henry Boggan in 1758 in Wake County [Anson County], North Carolina. 87 Patrick was born circa 1725 in Ireland and died in 1817. He first married an Elizabeth _?_. It is not known if any the children listed below were from Patrick’s first marriage. Note that Wake County was not formed until 1771 (after Mary’s birth and marriage), Anson was formed in 1750.

Mary’s mother, Nanny Hoggatt, married James Webb after Joseph Dabbs died. James Webb and Nanny Hoggatt Dabbs Webb, along with Webb’s sons and Nanny and Joseph’s daughter Mary, moved to North Carolina, settling in Anson County where Mary married Captain Patrick Boggan. Boggan was the nephew of another Patrick Boggan who ran an Ordinary on the Trading Path between current Oxford and Durham, North Carolina, and it is possible that Mary and Patrick met there as the Dabbs/Webb family was travelling south. (88) “Keeping an ordinary” meant operating a tavern, often in the owner’s home, if large enough. According to Carolyn M. Wright:

Researcher James Dabbs states that the story about Mary Dabbs Boggan inheriting forty slaves from her father is inacurate: “This family were slaveholders, but not to that extent. The tax list for their father Joseph Dabbs in 1748 Lunenburg Co., VA shows, I think 5 taxable slaves. There is a grain of truth to the looting of the estate by some of the relatives, I believe. The final settlement of the estate of Joseph Dabbs in Lunenburg Co., VA in the 1750s shows that money had to be added to balance the estate. Nanny had remarried, to James Webb their former overseer, and he also became involved in managing the estate and apparently took some of the slaves which were not his to take to North Carolina when he moved the family there in the 1750s.” (89) In addition he states that he has found no evidence that Mary Dabbs’ had the middle name Penelope. The proposed children of Patrick and Mary were: (90) Mary “Polly,” born 1763, died 1830, married John May; Jane, born 1765, died 1845, married Pleasant May; Margaret “Peggy,” born 1769, married Ingo Dozier Cash; Frances “Fanny,” born 1771, died 1817, married James Cash; Patrick Jr., born 1775, married Martha Davidson; Eleanor “Nellie,” born 1776, married Major William Hammond; Richard, born 1778; Flora “Tena,” born 1782, married Colonel Joseph Pickett; Lydia, born 1784, married Moses Coppedge.

Excerpts from an article contains interesting information and gossip on early Anson County and Patrick Boggan and his family: (91)




Anne Dabbs

Sister of Joseph Dabbs

Ann Dabbs, circa 1712-1795, (92) married Charles Lee, as found in a deed dated November 17, 1741, where her brother, and our ancestor, Joseph, deeded property to Ann on the west side of Willis river in Goochland County, Virginia. (93) It appears that Joseph did not deed to Ann and Charles the part of this property on which the house and other buildings were situated. Anne and Charles are said to have been married in 1732 in Goochland County, Virginia. Charles Lee, Son of William Lee and Dorothy Taylor, was baptized on September 18, 1706 in Richmond, Virginia, and died on March 25, 1799 in Cumberland County, Virginia. In 1743, Charles Lee and Anne Dabbs conveyed a deed for the land they lived on to a Thomas Basset. This was the land that was bounded according to the deed from Joseph Dabbs to Charles Lee and his wife in 1741. (94) This land was in the Parish of Southam, Cumberland County, Virginia (when the county lines changed, the Parish of Southam became the Parish of Littleton. Lee family researcher Mollie Shumate provided this information on Charles Lee and his family:

Will of Charles Lee, 1793: (95)



Endnotes

1 Dabbs Family in Texas, Sharon Newton. Online at RootsWeb’s WorldConnect Project, worldconnect.rootsweb.com, accessed January 2005. Newton cites the Reid/Danforth/Pruitt/Eastland family tree on ancestry.com for the details. Ancestry.com itself does have this entry: Early Virginia Immigrants; 16231666D. Dabbs, James, 1652, by John Greenbough, Henrico Co. Ancestry.com. Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666 [database online]. Orem, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997. Original data: Greer, George Cabel. Early Virginia Immigrants 1623-1666. Richmond, VA: W. C. Hill Printing Co., 1912.

2 Re: Joseph Dabbs of Virginia, Dabbs Family GenForum, posted by James Dabbs, October 23, 1999. Court records of Goochland Co., Lunenburg Co., and other documentation show that Joseph Dabbs died between Aug 1748 and March 1749.

3 Marriage Bonds in Goochland County, Virginia 1730-1789, <ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/goochland/vitals/marriages/bonds-b.txt>, Hoggett, Nanny.

4 Marriage Bonds in Goochland County, William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 7, No. 2. (Oct., 1898), pp. 98-106. Page 98: July 1, 1733. Joseph Dabbs to Nanny Hoggett; sec., Anthony Hoggett; witn,. H. Wood.

5 Carolyn May Wright Family Home Page, online at www.familytreemaker.com/users/w/r/i/Carolyn-M-Wright/index.html, Accessed 2/28/1999. Hereinafter cited as Carolyn M. Wright.

6 Carolyn M. Wright.

7 Notes and Queries. Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. I, No. 3 (January) 1894, p. 328-330.

8 Virginia Land Patent Book 18, Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Volume XXV, number 2 (01-MAY-1987), p. 59. Ancestry.com. Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2002. Original data: The Virginia Genealogical Society, Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly and Magazine of Virginia Genealogy. Hereinafter cited as Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly.

9 Virginia Council Journals, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XIV, No. 3, January, 1906, pp. 238, 239, 339, 340.

10 Virginians - The Family History of John W. Pritchett, www.virginians.com/redirect.htm?topics&862, accessed January 2005.

11 The Land of Clover Forest Plantation, by Sebastian Volcker, M.A. http://www.cloverforest.com/history.htm, accessed 2003.

12 The Virginia Gazette, Page: 3, Column: 2, 1739-06-15. Past Portal, digital library of Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. www.pastportal.com/VA_Gazet/Html/D/Dabbs-Dandridge.htm.

13 Goochland Wills and Deeds 1736-1742, Abstracted and compiled by Benjamin B. Weisiger, III.

14 Albermarle County, Virginia Court Orders, 1744/45 - 1748, August Term 1747 - December Term 1747, Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Volume XXIX, number 1 (01-FEB-1991), pp. 18-19. “At a Court held for Albemarle County November 12, 1747. . . . In debt case of Joseph Dabbs agst William Phelps, deft by atty William Battersby granted Imparle with Oyer &c.”

15 Albermarle County, Virginia Court Orders, 1744/45 - 1748, August Term 1747 - December Term 1747, Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Volume XXIX, number 1 (01-FEB-1991), pp. 24, 27. “(p. 330) At a Court continued for Albemarle County December 11, 1747. Petition of Joseph Dabbs agst William Bowler is dismist by the plt.”

16 Albemarle County, Virginia Court Orders, 1744/45 - 1748 March Term 1747/48 - June Term 1748, Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, volume XXIX, number 2 (01-MAY-1991), p. 115. “At a Court continued for Albemarle County March 11, 1747/8. . . . In debt case of Joseph Dabbs agst William Phelps, deft by atty pleads Nil Debit, plt. granted time.”

17 Albemarle County, Virginia Court Orders, 1744/45 - 1748 June Term 1748 - August Term 1748, Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, volume XXIX, number 3 (01-AUG-1991), p. 199. (p. 387) At a Court continued for Albemarle County July 15, 1748. . . . Petition of Edmond Gray, Samuel Scott, Nowel Burton, Thomas Harvie & Joseph Dabbs agst John Douglas & Samuel Taylor is discont. for insufficient service,

18 Albemarle County, Virginia Court Orders, 1744/45 - 1748, June Term 1748 - August Term 1748, Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, volume XXIX, number 3 (01-AUG-1991), p. 200. (p. 387) At a Court continued for Albemarle County July 15, 1748. . . . Petition of Joseph Dabbs agst Williams Bowles is discont. by the plt.

19 Albemarle County, Virginia Court Orders, 1744/45 - 1748, June Term 1748 - August Term 1748, Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, volume XXIX, number 3 (01-AUG-1991), p. 204. At a Court continued for Albemarle County August 12, 1748. . . . In debt case of Joseph Dabbs agst William Phelps, deft formerly pled Nil Debit, plt. by atty James Meredith takes issue to plea, deferred to Jury.

20 Deed Book 1, page 226. Cumberland County, VA, Deeds:1749-1752; T. L. C. Genealogy, Miami, FL, 1990, located at Cumberland Co, VA Public Library.

21 Halifax County, Virginia, Pleas No. 1, May Term 1752 - March Term 1755. Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, volume XXIV, number 2 (01-MAY-1986), p. 34. (p. 162) On petition of Nanny Dabbs, Executrix and Clement Read, Executor &c of Joseph Dabbs, dec’d agst. William Owen, deft. on Oath said he had no dealings with testator in his lifetime; suit dismis’d. [Note: probably 17 July 1753]; Lunenburg County, Virginia, Will Book No. 1, With Inventories, Accounts, Etc, 1746-1762, page 172. Account Current of the estate of Joseph Dabbs, deceased, transcribed by Delorise Sexton.

22 Carolyn M. Wright.

23 Re: Nanny Hoggatt-Long, email from James Dabbs, March 1, 1999. “The statement that William DABBS died in 1790 is not correct. I believe this is a confusion with his deed of some slaves to his sister Mary Dabbs boggan a will. He did not have a will and died intestate in 1804 in Charlotte Co., VA.

24 Dabbs of VA, TN, AR, OK, CA, updated on 2004-09-01, Family Tree on Ancestry.com, accessed January 2005. Children’s names from the research of descendant, James Dabbs. Supposedly William died without a will. His estate administrator was his son, William Dabbs, Surveyor. Marriages from Dodd, Jordan R., et. al, Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850, Bountiful, Utah: Precision Indexing Publishers, 19xx (probably 1990).

25 Carolyn M. Wright. Deed from William Dabbs to Mary Boggan. Book B- 2, p. 342, Nov. 13, 1790 Anson County, Wadesboro, North Carolina.

26 Carolyn M. Wright.

27 Re: Joseph Dabbs of Virginia, Dabbs Family GenForum, posted by James Dabbs, October 23, 1999.

28 Dabbs of VA, TN, AR, OK, CA, updated on 2004-09-01, Family Tree on Ancestry.com, accessed January 2005. Citing Charlotte County, Virginia Will Book 5, page 83.

29 Charlotte County, Virginia Will Book 6, page 109.

30 Dodd, Jordan R, et. al., Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850., Bountiful, UT: Precision Indexing Publishers, 19xx (probably 1990).

31 Posted on GenForum by James D. Dabbs on September 03, 1998.

32 The 1797 County Levy included 11.82 and 7.72 paid to Richard Dabbs for patrolling. 2 October 1797 Charlotte County, Virginia, Order Book No. 11, page 101. Note: I do not have a record of my source for this data.

33 Re: Richard and Jane Dabbs (son Joseph), posted on Dabbs GenForum by Bobbie Williamson-Dabbs Ledbetter on February 04, 2000.

34 Dabbs Family Forum on GenForum, posted, accessed 11/25/2003.

35 Dodd, Jordan. Virginia Marriages to 1800. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia. Confirms this marriage minus the minister.

36 Court order, Vol. 24, p. 5, March 13, 1823.

37 Dabbs/Hoggatt Family, email from James Dabbs, March 6, 1999.

38 Dabbs Family Forum on GenForum, posted by Lou Cox, accessed 11/25/2003.

39 Free and Slave Counties in 1824 (illustration), “The Story Of Illinois And Its People,” by O. P. Barnes, 1913.

40 Dodd, Jordan. Virginia Marriages to 1800. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia.

41 Re: Lamkin, James marr. Mary Y. Dabbs, VA, Lamkin GenForum, posted by James Lamkin on May 29, 1999.

42 Dodd, Jordan. Virginia Marriages to 1800. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia.

43 Dabbs of VA, TN, AR, OK, CA, updated September 1, 2004, Family Tree on Ancestry.com, compiler Lou Cox.

44 Dodd, Jordan. Virginia Marriages to 1800. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia.

45 Dabbs Family Forum on GenForum, posted by Lou Cox, accessed 11/25/2003.

46 Re: Dabbs in TN & VA, Dabbs GenForum, posted Lou Cox on February 24, 2003.

47 Dabbs of VA, TN, AR, OK, CA, updated September 1, 2004, Family Tree on Ancestry.com, compiler Lou Cox.

48 Limestone County Heritage Book Committee, Heritage Pub. Consultants, 1998.

49 Dodd, Jordan. Virginia Marriages to 1800. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia. Gives date October 5, 1789.

50 Dodd, Jordan. Virginia Marriages to 1800. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia. Gives Elizabeth’s name as Elizabeth S. Dodd. Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850, Bountiful: Utah, 19xx, gives a date of February 1, 1790.

51 Dodd, Jordan. Virginia Marriages to 1800. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia.

52 Re: DABBS, Rev. Richard of VA and TENN, Dabbs GenForun, posted by Carolyn Andersen on April 12, 1999.

53 Re: Richard and Jane Dabbs (son Joseph), posted on Dabbs GenForum by Bobbie Williamson-Dabbs Ledbetter on February 04, 2000. She cites much of the information on various Richard Dabbs from Jack Autrey Dabbs’ publication.

54 Re: Rev Richard Dabbs, Dabbs GenForun, posted by Christine W. Smith on June 01, 2004. Her ancestor was William R. Dabbs, brother of Richard Dabbs, Jr., of Charlotte County, VA. Their father, Richard, Sr. married Elizabeth Foster.

55 Rev Richard Dabbs, Dabbs GenForum, posted by Dale Crutcher Parsons, May 26, 2004.

56 Dabbs Cemetery (Removed), online at davidsoncocemeterysurvey.com/Cemeteries/D-G/dabbs_cemetery.htm, accessed February 2005.

57 Dodd, Jordan. Virginia Marriages to 1800. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997. Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia.

58 Dodd, Jordan R, et. al. Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850. Bountiful, UT: Precision Indexing Publishers, 19xx (probably 1900).

59 Nathaniel Dabbs Will. Union County, South Carolina Will Book A, p. 103.

60 Deed Virginia, Deed Book D6, p. 216, Charlotte County, Virginia. October 18, 1792; and J. V. Michael Motes, Descendants of Ancient Planter Thomas Garnett, Marietta, Georgia, Author, 2003, pp. 1-50. Unpublished compiled genealogy. Document sent electronically from Michael Motes on January 17, 2003. Hereinafter cited as J. V. Michael Motes.

61 Carolyn M. Wright.

62 There is a listing in the DAR Patriot Index for Dabbs, Nathaniel b. abt 1740 d. 12 July 1810, married, name of wife unknown, Patriotic service, North Carolina.

63 Deed Book D6, p. 216, Charlotte County, VA. October 18, 1792.

64 Subject: Re: NATHANIEL DABBS APP:1740--some notes, corrections and questions, posted on the DABBS-L RootsWeb message board by Kate Dobbs Ariail, March 25, 2002.

65 Will Book A, pages 103 -106, Union County, South Carolina. Probate records, Box 3, Pack 63, for year 1800.

66 Letter from Pat Poshard, Gibsonia, 29 October 1998. Hereinafter cited as Pat Poshard.

67 Re: [ILHAMILT-L] Josiah Dobbs, 1820s-1830s, posted to ILHAMILT-L RootsWeb email list by Sheila Cadwalader on March 13, 2001.

68 J. V. Michael Motes.

69 North Carolina, Washington: National Archives, John Dabbs household. Anson County, Fayette District. US Census 1790. Roll 637-7, p. 35.

70 Established as a supplemental ancestor in the National Society Sons of the American Revolution by J. V. Michael Motes, NSSAR #91863 (Supplemental: John Dabbs).

71 Abstracts from Pension Application of John Dabbs. National Archives pension application file SF16,359 [North Carolina].

72 Penelope’s Will, Will Book B, pp. 178-179, Anson Co., NC, from J. V. Michael Motes. William’s Will, posted to the USGenWeb Archives by Bobbie Williamson-Dabbs Ledbetter. Will of William Dabbs - Will Book ‘B”, p. 58, Anson County, North Carolina, 23 September 1832.

73 Pat Poshard.

74 Pat Poshard.

75 North Carolina, Washington: National Archives, Nathaniel Dabbs household. Anson County, Fayette District. US Census 1790. Roll 637-7, p. 36.

76 Pat Poshard.

77 North Carolina, Washington: National Archives, Richard Dabbs household. Anson County, Fayette District. US Census 1790. Roll 637-7, p. 37.

78 Pat Poshard.

79 Pat Poshard.

80 Union County, SC, Deed Book M, page 138 17 October, 1810.

81 Pat Poshard.

82 Carolyn M. Wright.

83 May 07, 1998 Subject: Dabbs. Abel’s parents were: Peter Kolb was born circa 1732 and died on October 28, 1779, married Ann James, the daughter of Rev. Philip James, first pastor of the Welsh Neck Baptist Church. Ann died on December 2, 1778.

84 The Swamp Fox: Francis Marion, online at www.geocities.com/BourbonStreet/1786/swampfox.html, accessed January 2004. Muster rolls were virtually non-existent and any effort to identify those who fought with Marion rely heavily on “acceptable” secondary sources. Abel Kolb is listed as officer in Col. Powell’s Regiment of Militia, St. David’s Parish, Volunteer Corps, Captain Abel Kolb, [commissioned] 25th Sept., 1775, Gregg, Bishop. History of the Old Cheraws, 1867, p. 245. Abel and Joseph are listed a serving with Marion in DeSaussure, Wilmot G. Officers Who Served in the South Carolina Regiments, Charleston, 1894, pp. 228, 232.

85 “Bass Mill,” Pee Dee Queue Excerpts, Vol. 20, No. 2, page 4. Posted on SCMARION-L email list on RootsWeb.com by Cindy, October 17, 1998.

86 Anson County, NC - Deeds - Joseph Nobbs (Dobbs?) to William Cox 24 Nov 1761, file contributed for use in the North Carolina USGenWeb by Bobbie Ledbetter, online at USGenWeb Archives, searches1.rootsweb.com/usgenweb/archives/nc/anson/deeds/dobbs02.txt, accessed January 2005.

87 Carolyn M. Wright.

88 Subject: Re: NATHANIEL DABBS APP:1740--some notes, corrections and questions, posted on the DABBS-L RootsWeb message board by Kate Dobbs Ariail, March 25, 2002.

89 Re: Nanny Hoggatt - Long, email from James Dabbs, March 1, 1999.

90 The Boggan Family - Patrick, Benjamin, James and their sister Jane, Including pertinent facts of North Carolina History, Compiled by Frances Henrietta Bingham Krechel, 1975, Hemet, California. Captain Paddy Boggan and His Times, Kate Shepherd Bennett, Office of Clerk of Superior Court, 9 Dec 1895.

91 “Captain Paddy Boggan and the Olden Times”, published in The Messenger and Intelligencer, Wadesboro, N. C., August 27, 1936. Online at yesterday’s tennessee, www.tnyesterday.com/stuff/ansonco.htm, accessed January 2005. Found on microfilm at Clayton Library in Houston, partial transcription.

92 Lee, William - 1678, Northumberland Co., VA. Posted on Rootsweb, Lee-L Archives, December 9, 1996 by Cathy Hilliard Hoover, accessed in January 2005. Hoover provided no documentation for Anne’s birth and death dates.

93 Goochland Co., VA Wills and Deeds 1736-1742, abs and comp by Benjamin B. Weisiger III, p. 67 of the compilation, p 494 of original. Deed 17 Nov. 1741 “Joseph Dabbs of Goochland Co. to Charles Lee and Anne his wife, for love and good will to his brother in law and his sister Anne, wife of said Charles, land on north side of Willis River, bounded by Orson Martin, 200 acres, reserving to himself 4 acres where stone for Rndolph’s Mill were got; with all houses, etc No Witnesses Signed: Jos. Dabbs Recorded 18 Nov 1741”

94 Goochland County, Va - Deeds - Abstracts of Lee Deeds, online at USGenWeb archives, ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/goochland/deeds/Lee01.txt, accessed January 2005. 1743 - Goochland Co., DB 5 12/8/1743 DB 5, p. 150 - CHARLES Lee and Anne Dabbs to Thomas Basset, the land whereon they lived and is bounded according to a Deed from Joseph Dabbs, to the said Charles Lee and his wife and recorded in Goochland County Records, 1741, DB 3, p. 494.

95 November 9, 1793, Cumberland County Will Book 3, p. 134, Probate March 25, 1799.