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Charles Harvey LEMMON

[77] [78]

ABT 1853 - 1932

Father: Matthew McHenry LEMMON
Mother: Sara L. MCINTYRE

Family 1 : Rebecca Jane "Bessie" NEHRHOOD
  1.  Hugh LEMMON
  2. +Mertle May "Mertie" LEMMON
  3. +William Burton LEMMON
  4. +Newlan DAVIS LEMMON
  5. +Waldo Biddle LEMMON
  6. +Alice Elizabeth LEMMON
  7. +Grace Warner LEMMON
  8. +Ruth Nehrhood LEMMON

                                              _Hugh LEMMON ____+
                           _James Sr LEMMON _|
                          |                  |_Martha MCHENRY _+
 _Matthew McHenry LEMMON _|
|                         |                   _________________
|                         |_Rebecca BLAKE ___|
|                                            |_________________
|
|--Charles Harvey LEMMON 
|
|                                             _________________
|                          __________________|
|                         |                  |_________________
|_Sara L. MCINTYRE _______|
                          |                   _________________
                          |__________________|
                                             |_________________

INDEX

[77] CHARLES HARVEY LEMMON
Served as pastor of the North Congregational Church at Cleveland., Ohio.
Author of a "Lemmon Tree" book[, an excerpt from which follows:]
..............................................................................
ONE LIFE LIVED - A PERSONAL SKETCH
On this, our tenth anniversary, and to fulfill my promise, I will tell you
something of my life. I do this mostly because I promised to and with a
feeling that but little, if anything in my life, has been, or is, worth
writing down. Many good people are under the impression that a Minister's life
is an easy one; that this duty consists in preaching on Sundays and leading a
prayer-meefing during the week. This may be illustrated by a question a
little boy asked me one day. "Where do you work?" He seemingly was sure that
because I did not go morning by morning, with a dinner pail, like his father,
that I was a man of leisure. Perhaps I may disabuse your minds to some extent,
in the simple story of my life. I am glad to say that I was well bom. My
home, while not luxurious, was comfortable, and in it, as a guardian angel,
was a great Mother. I was raised in a good environment. I spent my early life
on the farm. While our parents were poor, they were not "Awful" poor. Perhaps
I should say that they were in moderate circumstances, owning their own farm
and raising a little each year above that necessary for our own subsistence.
From my earliest recollections, my parents were both invalids; one from
disease; the other from accident, and on the farm I had to work, and work
hard. The days were long; very long and sometimes the work was exceedingly
hard. We were in a new country, only part of the farm being cleared so one
may judge what it means to clear up a farm, heavily wooded, with no sale for
the wood nor the lumber. All must be destroyed on the place.
As to my education, I had that of the common country school. The little red
schooI house! I think I can see those seats made from puncheon, with no backs
nor desks, and for a number of years, my feet did not reach the floor. The
teachers were of the ordinary kind, procurable in that country. They ruled
according to Solomon's prescription, and though I escaped, all were not so
fortunate. Our school consisted of a term of three months in the Winter and
three months in the Summer. When I was twelve years old, I could only go in
the Winter term; the Summer months must be given to work on the farm. I want
to stop here and bear my testimony to the influence of one life upon another
life. The influence of Miss Emma Tuttle, daughter of good old Deacon Tuttle,
I am sure had a larger influence on my life than any other person except my
own own parents. She will never know, at least not in this world, how her
Christian character told on my life. One winter I had the help of a private
tutor. A young man came to our community, who had a fine education and he
boarded at my father's house. By paying him a small fee, he taught me most I
ever knew. I read all the books that I could get and all that I could borrow.
We had what was common then in our township, a School Library. While it was
largely out of use, the books were still there in the possession of a man of
unquestionable temper. We quarrelled over every book in that Library, but I
got the books, and I read them. I think I can safely say that I read every
book in that Library.
At fifteen years of age I left home to learn the trade of carpenter. This
was following a general idea prevalent at that time, that one son should stay
on the farm while the other must go out into the world and hew a place for
himself. It seemed to fall to me to be the one to go. In the Spring in which
I was fifteen years old the first great trial of my life came. Saying
"Good-bye" to my Mother was the first great burden. I need not tell you of the
home-sickness nor the sleepless nights, nor of the eight mile walk home on
Saturday nights after supper that I might see my parents. This was the hardest
Summer of my life. I was large for my age and the man for whom I worked had
no judgement; because I was as large as the other men, he expected me to do a
man's work. Our work was, large building. The Timber was heavy and the
carrying was hard, and I did it, did my share for the sum of $8.00 a month. I
think I can say that I suffer yet, physically, from that Summer's service.
When I was eighteen years old, I was receiving $2.00 a day, the highest price
paid for mechanical labor at that time and at twenty, I was in business for
myself and employing from one to six men the year round. It was then that I
made money. It was no trouble for me to make money and I could save it when
once I had it made. I want to tell you here that I always knew from my
earliest recollection that I was to be a preacher and am sure that I preached
better sermons to the stumps in the wooded lot, to the sheep in the pastures,
than I have ever preached since to a living audience. While I knew that I was
to be a minister, it was the last thing that I determined to do, for my
opinion of the ministry I had gathered from the few hard, stern men what came
as pioneers into our community. Had I known then what my Mother told me just
a day or two before her death, Oh, how different, my life might have been. I
am sure my dear father would have made any sacrifice, that I might have had a
requisite education to fit me to that which my Mother had solemnly dedicated
me before my birth. True to her Scotch instincts, she had prayed long and
earnestly that God would give her one son, for the Kirk.
In 1872, in a meeting held by the Rev. M. Long, of the United Brethren
Church, I confessed Christ and united with the Church. It was a great meeting.
While but few remain of the half hundred converts, and some said that it was
not worth while, there remain until this day, at least two ministers and one
ministers wife, as the fruitage of that service.
In 1873 I was married. I need not tell you that I married the best girl in
the world. During these years, in the shadow and the sunshine, in the storm
and in the calm, she has never faltered; never said, "Lets go back", but has
stood close and borne more than her share of the burdens, for to her have come
the heavy burdens.
Soon after my conversion, members of our class began to say that I should
preach and finally persuaded me to accept what is called a Quarterly
Conference License. This was in the Fall of 1875 and one little incident that
occurred on my way to the Church, in which this conference was held might be
of interest to you. On my way to the conference I stopped for dinner with my
friends, the Gunn family. I pu my horse in the stable across the creek; the
water was up to the bridge when we went over. 'After dinner I went for my
horse, and found the water over the bridge, but the planks were still holding.
When I returned with my horse, I found the planks had loosened and were
floating, being held only by a board lx3 nailed upon them and the stream had
become a roaring cataract. My horse was young and full of life. There was no
other crossing for miles. What should I do? I had promised to be at the
conference and I believe that I ought to be there. I dismounted, hesitated,
asked God to help me across, and taking my horse by the head, led her onto the
floating bridge. As I stepped on a plank, my weight would carry it down to
the sleepers but it would float as soon as I was off. It did not matter that
the water was a foot above the plank, and that I must go all the rest of the
day, and the ten mile ride home before a change could be had; the main thing
was, "I must cross that bridge". My horse hesitated, but some coaxing induced
her to step on the first plank, so timidly she tried; one plank after another
she found solid when they reached the sleepers and so with almost human
instinct she put each hind foot just where the fore one had been, and praying
and trembling we crossed the bridge in safety. Afterward I was told by Mrs.
Gunn that within thirty minutes after I had crossed the whole bridge went
down, and they never saw a piece of it again.
But I did not use my license and in the Fall of '76 1 accepted the position
of Chief Deputy in the Auditors Office of our County, in which I spent four
years. While they were not happy years, the experience gathered there in the
way of business has been very helpful to me ever since, I returned to my old
home at the expiration of my term and this I did at the earnest persuasion of
my wife. She felt that the danger of politics would be too much for me. I
n the Fall of '79, again at the solicitation of my brethren, I united with the
Sandusky Annual Conference of the United Brethren Church. I have often
wondered at their faith. I have often wondered that they considered me for a
moment. It simply illustrates how large is Christian Charity.
By this Conference, I was assigned to Flat Rock Circuit which was some
fifteen miles south of my old home. I found there two churches; one with a
few members; the other was only ans appointment. But I was ambitious and in a
few weeks I had two more appointments. I went back and forth each week, for I
must work during the week ant my trade. Those rides I made mostly on
horseback, and as the winter came, no one can tell you in cold type of the
suffering of those Winter rides. It was an exceedingly cold Winter, and to
reach my appointments I must ride often fifteen to twenty miles. Two of my
preaching places were in communities where no one cared enough to for the
preacher to ask him to either eat or stay over night. One place was named
"Hell's Half Acre", and very appropriately. A dance was held on Saturday night
in the Hall, and I had it on Sunday evening. Now, those rides home after an
evening service were surely enough to try one's faith; hungry; wet and cold;
through snow, rain and mud, often led to the question of "one's call to the
ministry", especially such a ministry. I am not sure but some of the suffering
since endured, may be the result of these exposures. Some of my "friends" have
called me a "fool" for doing it, but I have been so called since for
undertaking less hazardous tasks.
Right here let me tell you of another incident that occurred at Flat Rock.
It was in the hom e of my friendhenry Engel, and it was cold. I had evaded
going with him because I knew he li ved in an old brick house and lived in two
little rooms, the other parts of the house being unused and so unwarmed. But
I could no longer put him off so after service I went. An hour w as spent
trying to to get warm by a 2x4 cook stove; then to my room in the southwest
chamber . Oh say! I can hear that floor creak yet. I carried my overcoat
and overshoes to my room . As I turned down that bed I saw for the first and
last time, a linen sheet. I need not te ll you that my prayer was short, nor
that I did not fully undress. Between those those line n sheets I shivered
and shook. I was sure I was freezing. I stood it as long as I could the n
got out of my bed and dressed, all but my shoes. I piled everything movable
in that room o n that bed, and then got in again., covered up head and ears.
I tried to get warm but in vai n; it was no use and I put in the balance of
the night trying to decide whether my theology w ould bear me out in believing
that the devil had put up a job on me, or I hadn't sense enoug h to know
better. Anyway in the morning I had such a cold I could not speak and closed
my se rvice as a result. My salary for the year nefted the gross amount of
$74.00.
...............................................................................
ONE LIFE LIVED - A PERSONAL SKETCH, PART 11
In the Fall I decided that if I was to preach I must be better prepared, so
I did not take wo rk from the Conference, but with what little money I could
get together I went to Dayton, Ohio and entered the Union Biblical Seminary.
Again we see the "heroic" in my wife;remaining at home the most of the winter,
alone; caring for the stock and showing the kind of material out of which
they make ministers wives. The following Spring we moved to Dayton. I often
think of that move. Faith again! As I remember there was little more than
$1.00 in the treasury when our goods were finally at the home. Here, again I
worked at my trade; worked six days a week and preached on Sundays. Yes, we
will call it that; any way, people came to hear me . I might say here that
during my entire seminary course, I worked. I was janitor; I was carpenter;
I was painter and brick mason; I was landscape gardener and in fact I think I
graduated from the school of wood sawing. To show the extent of my work, I
must tell you a little incident that some of my friends like to tell me. The
day of the dedication of the big Church I was asked to be one of the ushers.
It was a warm day in June. The audience was very large and perhaps the good
bishop was not very enthusing; anyway, I remember his text but I do not
remember any more until my fellow usher woke me to tell me that the service
was over, a lmost two hours later. One year I preached at the Ludlow Street
Church, the only colored Church we had in the City. In my association with
them I was very happy. They were a good people and we enjoyed ourselves
together. I concluded the full course and graduated in June 1883.
In a class of thirteen, I graduated third in my class. I must tell you of
one incident of th is graduation of mine that made a larger impression on me
than perhaps any other one thing. Maybe you will say that I had not religion
enough to take my pride away. Be that as it may, I pray you may be saved
from such an experience. Each one of the graduation class was required to
give an oration. My only dress coat was a "hand down" for which I had paid
Fourteen Dollars for the suit four years before and it had done faithful
orthodox service upon all occasions. But it had reached the shiney age; it
had become decrepit in more ways than one. I interviewed the president; I
pleaded in vain; deliver the oration I must. Need I tell you how I passed
that last night? I was but human and I pray that you may be saved from such
an experience; the hardest of my life. I delivered my oration and while no
friend placed a flower in my hand, my classmates, Kirk and Orndorf gave me
some books as a reminder of a friendship alive and true today. I had been
janitor of the Church for the year and the President of the board, Dr.
Funkhouser,invited Mrs. Lemmon and myself to his home and there we found the
entire board. They presented me with a testimonial of faithful service, and a
purse of $8.50 which was just enough to pay our railroad fare home and leave
us 50c with which to begin life.
In 1883 I was ordained by Bishop Glossbrenner of the Sandusky Annual
Conference of the United Brethren Church. In the Summer of '83 before the
meeting of my annual conference, I supplied the Congregational Church at
Castalia, Ohio. This was my introduction to Congregationalism. We had a
happy summer and they honored me with a unanimous call to become their pastor.
But I felt under obligation to my Conference and in the Fall attended my
conference, and was assigned the North Robinson Circuit. This was in
Crawford County, midway between Crestline and Bucyrus. There were four
appointments two to be supplied each Sunday. We moved immedi ately after the
Conference. I had earned but little during the Summer and when our moving
expenses were paid, we were without means. Just here let me tell you again,
of one of God's Providences made possible by the hand of Peter Eby. He moved
our few goods to the parsonage. In the evening he returned and after helping
a little, as he turned to go home, he handed me a Five Dollar bill saying,
"You may need that". Only God and ourselves knew that we did not have money
enough to pay for an eighth sack of flour and the bread was nearly gone. I
am sure that was the largest and most beautiful piece of money I ever saw and
our confidence that He would care, was made a little stronger. That part of
Crawford County is largely peopled with those sturdy Pennsylvania Dutch and
they know how to care for their minister. I am thinking of that first
donation party. They came, fifty of them; 20 sled loads of provisions and
dinner fit for a king. Perhaps I was of the earth, earthy, but I must confess
that that donation party did me as much good spiritually as any one thing that
came to me in that pastorate. It counterbalanced one other experience coming
the next Spring, when I rode 5 miles to one of my appointments and found
there one man and four women; all the rest were in the sugar bush boiling
maple syrup. They were three happy years. We bought a parsonage and paid for
it. We repaired the Church. God gave us great revivals and many of the strong
men in that Church today confessed Christ at that time. But some things
came during our meetings at North Robinson. There came into our meeting one
night a young man of a fine family , but who had been lead away by the drink.
We learned afterward that his chums down at the saloon had bet him $10.00
that he dared not go up to Lemmon's meeting and kneel down at the alter. He
came and he knelt at the altar. He was near the stove; it was a cold night and
he had found a warm place. The warmth without and the warmth within soon put
him to sleep. I guarded him from any interuption; let him sleep until the
meeting were over and most of the people gone; then I woke him up, and he
would have given much more than the $10.00 to have been somewhere else. He
did not accept Christ, but he did remain my loyal friend until the day of his
death.
After three years in North Robinson, we went to Fostoria, Seneca County, the
largest and most influential Church in the Sandusky Conference. I learned
afterwards that it was a question at the Annual Conference who should be the
victim, for they had had wars and rumors of wars ; it was finally finally
decided that I should be the sacrifice. It was an exceedingly har d field.
It was the center of the conference. There were ten local ministers members
of that Church any one of whom knew much better and could preach much better
than the active pastor. We had happy years there, despite the fact that we
had those preachers on our hands. We paid the parsonage debt; the hardest
small amount of money I ever raised, but we paid it. We built a great
church. We added 150 good people to our Church. But these people would rather
see the preacher move than to give money. Many things might be said of
these years in that City. It was just the time of the gas boom and the oil
discovery. Men, yes, and women too , seemingly lost their heads in the mad
rush for money. Fortunes were made and lost in a day, but through it all our
church grew.
From here we went to Vanlue. This was the center of the largest, strongest
and wealthiest circuits in the Conference. In some respects we were glad to
go. No better-hearted people ever lived than some of the people on that
great circuit. They would do anything, be anything and give you anything but
money. The parsonage was out of repair; they promised to repair it or build
a new one but it remained a promise. They were paying $650.00 as a salary out
of which I had to buy a horse, buggy and harness. With all their wealth I
felt that they were wronging me and wronging God and we only stayed six
months. They were good six months. We added eighty people to the church on
confession of faith, in those six months. Then I severed my connection once
and for all with the United Brethren Church. I have but the tenderest and
most sacred feelings for that great Church; she did much for me and mine; more
than I can ever repay and I want to bear my testimony today, to her success.
We accepted the call from the First Cogregational Church of Twinsburgh,
Ohio. This was new ground. Here was new experience. I was from the West;
people here were from the East; New Englanders. They were very conservative.
Perhaps had I known I might have hesitated, but Oh!, What great hearts; surely
they were great-hearted. We were strangers and they took us in. We could
not ask for, nor find more kind, noble, earnest Christian people than we found
in that quiet little New England village. But there was very little work and
I became impatient. To preach but once on one Sunday and twice on the next
and hold one prayer meeting during the week, I was not satisfied. Just then
there came the truly Macedonian call. Three miles west of Twinsburgh is the
village of Macedonia. A few of the Christian men and women invited me to
preach on Sunday afternoon. I gladly did it and after some months we
organized a branch Church with thirty members. Again I found congenial,
happy fellowship. No father was ever more happy in his own home than was I
with my Macedonian children. Five years we remained here. We accomplished
some things; nearly half a hundred were added to the Church. The parsonage
and church were repaired, all was in good shape when there came the call from
Union Church in Cleveland.
My children were growing up and I felt that they needed better educational
advantages. Anyway, five years is as long as one man ought to stay in one
church, I think. I resigned and we came to Cleveland. This proved an
important step in my life. Seven years we served this Church. Not all was
accomplished that should have been accomplished but there are men and women
that today are strong men and women in that Church, who came while we were
there and within a year of our leaving, they became self supporting. While I
claim no credit for this, I did have a little share in leading out to that
important period.
Then came the call to a Church that was not a Church. A call to a district
on St. Clair Ave. Near Gordon Park. There was no Church; no organization;
just a little Sunday School and a Ladies Aid Society, but the call came and
again perhaps you may say it was more foolhardiness than judgement. I felt
that we were needed. I canvassed the ground thoroughly; my wife said, "We
will go". My children were coming to that age where they could help and so,
nine strong, we moved over and settled down to be the pastor of a Church yet
to be born. Some of my friends said I was a fool but as we look back over
these ten years, there is much that only God and I know anything about.
There are the long walks; the long pleadings; the hours ; days, weeks, yes
months, of pleadings with men of money, money, money--and the money has come.
We began with nothing and while we had the backing of the City Missionary
Society, they only paid salaries. Today we have an investment of $25,000.
We have made a place for ourselves and I am not going to tell you of those
long days and those stormy nights. We will leave them for that other record
which shall be opened when the Great Book and the other Book is open. I have
never for one minute been sorry of the choice of my life work. It is the
greatest in this world. During all these years, from the Sunday on which I was
ordained, until today, I have never been one Sunday without a Church, and in
all my travelings, preaching three and four times a day sometimes, and riding
from fifteen to twenty miles, I have only been late twice. I feel like
saying I have been an engineer of a difficult job. I have had to construct
the road; to provide the material; run the train, keep up the schedule while
the road was being built and re-constructed. Sometimes I have been President;
Vice President ; Secretary; Treasurer; Road Master, Section boss, Engineer;
Fireman and Conductor. So is it any wonder that the train sometimes failed to
make connection at the junction?
..............................................................................

[78] Possible birthdate: 13 May 1853

[76] [SOURCE] From Nick's [Melhinch] Line;
http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=nickmel&id=I3608


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Douglas Matthew LEMMON

[1241]

____ - ____

Father: Andrew Richard LEMMON
Mother: Mary Ann KEARNS


                                                 _Warren MAC LEMMON _______+
                          _Richard Mark LEMMON _|
                         |                      |_Vera Virginia SCHLAEFER _+
 _Andrew Richard LEMMON _|
|                        |                       _Smith Hyatt MITCHELL ____
|                        |_Mona Jean MITCHELL __|
|                                               |_Chloe BURNS _____________
|
|--Douglas Matthew LEMMON 
|
|                                                __________________________
|                         ______________________|
|                        |                      |__________________________
|_Mary Ann KEARNS _______|
                         |                       __________________________
                         |______________________|
                                                |__________________________

INDEX

[1241] still living - details excluded


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Marie MANNING

____ - ____

Father: Leslie Harrison MANNING
Mother: Jeannie RASKE


                                                     _Loyal MANNING ____+
                            _Billy Raymond MANNING _|
                           |                        |_Edith May DUDLEY _+
 _Leslie Harrison MANNING _|
|                          |                         ___________________
|                          |_Helen Louise SNYDER ___|
|                                                   |___________________
|
|--Marie MANNING 
|
|                                                    ___________________
|                           ________________________|
|                          |                        |___________________
|_Jeannie RASKE ___________|
                           |                         ___________________
                           |________________________|
                                                    |___________________

INDEX


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Vera Virginia SCHLAEFER

[773]

17 Jan 1895 - 31 Aug 1988

Father: Henry SCHLAEFER
Mother: Sarah KITZMILLER

Family 1 : Warren MAC LEMMON
  1. +Boyd Warren LEMMON
  2. +Jack Phillip LEMMON
  3. +Richard Mark LEMMON
  4. +John David LEMMON

                        __
                     __|
                    |  |__
 _Henry SCHLAEFER __|
|                   |   __
|                   |__|
|                      |__
|
|--Vera Virginia SCHLAEFER 
|
|                       __
|                    __|
|                   |  |__
|_Sarah KITZMILLER _|
                    |   __
                    |__|
                       |__

INDEX

[773] Sources:
Birth certificate, Death certificate and personal knowledge of Richard M. Lemmon
of Pendelton, OR.
Vera died at the Delamarter Nursing Home in Pendleton, Oregon.


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Gregory James VOOGD

[915]

____ - ____

Family 1 : Lori Dianne DIGIROLAMO
  1.  Nicholas Alexander VOOGD
  2.  Tyler Christian VOOGD

       __
    __|
   |  |__
 __|
|  |   __
|  |__|
|     |__
|
|--Gregory James VOOGD 
|
|      __
|   __|
|  |  |__
|__|
   |   __
   |__|
      |__

INDEX

[915] still living - details excluded


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Horace A. WELLS

ABT 1870 - BEF 1970

Family 1 : Elnora LEMMON

       __
    __|
   |  |__
 __|
|  |   __
|  |__|
|     |__
|
|--Horace A. WELLS 
|
|      __
|   __|
|  |  |__
|__|
   |   __
   |__|
      |__

INDEX


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Lafayette WELLS

ABT 1878 - BEF 1978

Family 1 : Phena LEMMON
  1.  Waunita WELLS
  2.  Elizabeth WELLS
  3.  Cathryn WELLS
  4.  Annabell WELLS

       __
    __|
   |  |__
 __|
|  |   __
|  |__|
|     |__
|
|--Lafayette WELLS 
|
|      __
|   __|
|  |  |__
|__|
   |   __
   |__|
      |__

INDEX


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