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[NI0017]





Cord was named for his uncle Corder Vineyard. He was born in a log house, that was located in the Wash Bottom, behind Glen Moore's house on East Piney Road. Little is known of his life, other than the fact he was a 'country boy', and he evidently was influenced by his father who had fought under Andrew Jackson in the Indian Wars, since he entered Company H, 11th Regiment of Tennessee Infantry, Army, CSA, 1 May 1861, under the command of CPT Thedford (later Col), COL G.W. Gordon, Lt Col Long, MAJ P.V. Weems, CPT F.P. Tidwell (Company Cdr). He was wounded by a shot to the right shoulder blade. The shot split on the scapular bone mist passing in the lungs. The other trussing down the muscle of the back near the spine. The Regimental Surgeon W.B. Maney, when he examined him after Cord was wounded stated it was his opinion that a mortal wound had been received, and he did not amputate the right arm. Dr. Maney later reaffirmed his opinion in a sworn statement date 26 September 1892. J.K. Clifton & B.A. Clifton, along with C. Slayden, M.D., witnessed Cord's Disability Application of 29 August 1892. J.K. & B.A. Clifton were in the same battle with Cord, since J.K. stated he carried him from the battle field, and B.A. Clifton stated he was present when Cord was shot and was the first man to brush the flies off of him. Both of the Cliftons stated that they had known Cord ever since they were paroled, and that he has not been able to do manual labor at any time and he was a good soldier. C.T. Weems is buried in the Weems' Cemetery, located on the hill above his old farm, just off of East Piney Road. COL Thedford is buried in the Woodard Cemetery, which is located on a hill behind the Yates, and just a short distance from where he lived out his last years on East Piney Road.
Cord learned a sign to give railroad conductors from one of his army buddies, and after he had recovered from his wounds, he traveled each fall to visit relatives located in Rome, Georgia; Oklahoma; and other places. He never did tell where he traveled, he would simply state, "all of the folks of doing fine."

[NI0021] Fought in Indian Wars under General Andrew Jackson. Came to Dickson County Tennessee for part he fought in Indian Wars in Florida in 1838.
The story was told by Cousin Mintie that Tup was out hunting one day, and was attacked by Indians. He was able to hold them off for a while, but was at the point of being killed, when another hunter happened by and together they bested the Indians. The rescuing hunter then gave the Indian scalps to Tup. Cousin Mintie said she remembered playing with those scalps and some old confederate money, when she was just a child.
Another story of Tup was that he went to the garden to pick some turnips for dinner. While he was at the garden some neighbor men came by and said they were going to fight the Indians with Andy Jackson. Tup left with them, and one year to the day returned through the garden, picked a mess of turnips, and went back to the house. Upon entering the house, he placed the turnips on the table, and his wife picked them up and washed and cooked them -- but, she never did ask where he had been or what he had been doing!
Tup was evidently a rough frontier man, since he drank and played cards. Grandpa Cord (C.T.) Weems was a religious man and did not approve of such, so he seldom visited his father, and highly disapproved of his children going there.

[NI0027] Birth date of Philisia Weems and James Howell Weems was recorded in Family Bible of James Yates. Mary Carson Weems was the first wife of Jackson Morgan Yates.

[NI0042] Nancy Ann Frances Jones was the daughter of Isaac Newton Jones, who was the son of Izme Jones, who in turn was the son of Issac Newton Jones. Although My grandfather and his two sisters stood to inherit part of their grandfather's farm, they were told by Lawyer Black that they had filed too late, and therefor would not receive anything.
Nancy was a school teacher, and was also somewhat of a prankster. It was told that when Aunt France (Yates) Weems was laying corpse in the "old Weems Mansion" , Nancy, who bore a close resemblance to Aunt France, sneaked out of the kitchen side of the house, went around to the stairs and up to the loft room to get a bed sheet. She then put the sheet around her face and went up to the kitchen window, where the other ladies were still washing dishes. She threw such a fright into them, and they created such a comotion, that the men sitting in the other side of the house with the deceased ran over to check. In the process of leaving the room, one of the men grabbed a shotgun, and upon seeing my great grandmother, took a shot as she went running East into the cornfield. I never heard whether or not she was hit, but she did manage to get the sheet back to the room and then she reappeared in the turmoil inquiring about what had taken place.
Evidently Dalton and Eunora took after their mother. Both of them were pranksters, and when visiting each other at family reunions, I remember they would look at each other and start giggling, and individually they would pick at the grandchildren.

[NI0049] Although James Yates died in 1880, it was not until the year 1884 that his heirs completed, as indicated on pages 133 thru 136 of Book T, Dickson County Registrars Office: "For the consideration of Thirty Dollars, to each one of the heirs, in hand paid, we have this day bargained, sold, and do hereby transfer and convey unto G.C. Redden, his heirs and assigns forever, all our undivided interest in a tract of land lying in the State of Tennessee, Dickson County, District No2, known as the James Yates farm, and subject to the widows dower, bounded on the North by Tim Petty, and East by him, on the South by Loftis, and West Horner. To have and to hold the said undivided interest in said land to said G.C. Redden, his heirs and assigns forever, we bind ourselves, our heirs, and representative to warrant and defend the title to the same undivided interest the lawful claims of persons whatever this the 18th day of July 1884.
Signed : Aidy Donagan (his mark), M. Yates , J. M. Yates, T.A. Yates (her mark)
John M. Yates, Mary J. Yates (her mark), J.H. Yates, Annie Yates, Isaac O. Yates, E.J. Yates, B. H. Yates, W.M. Yates, S.V. Yates, Suffrona Holland (her mark), Nancy Holland (her mark), C.R. Yates, R.P. Nall, Jas. W. Nall, Witnessed by: A. Myatt (Notary), E. Y. Andrews, A.C. Donagan, Aadoline Donagan.

The original house, which James built in the 1820's, was still standing in the 1970's. The Family Graveyard is located south of the house, and was kept up by Aunt Ola Kimbro's son, Carl. James, his wives and younger children, and Charles Riley (C.R.) Yates, are buried there. Isom and Dicey were buried in a graveyard just past the family plots, and their grandson Sherman had just died , when I started to do the family geneology in 1969. Gail Yates.

[NI0052] Known to family members as 'Aunt France', she was crippled and sat in a rocking chair which had been equipped with casters for her to move around.
Nancy Ann Frances Jones Yates was said to have strongly favored Aunt France.

[NI0059] At Chillicothe, Missouri, Uncle Britt mustered out of the 4th Provisional Regiment, Missouri Militia, he had entered during the Civil War as a drummer, or musician . He was going home to Kentucky, after he mustered out. After walking all day in the hot sun, and missing the ferry, he decided that the Mississippi River was low enough for him to swim across. After walking upriver for a short distance, he ducked behind some bushes, stripped off his clothes, tied them in a bundle, placed them on his head, and then swam across the Mississippi River just above Memphis, Tennessee. He then put his clothes back on and walked home to Pilot Oak, Kentucky, or to his brother James Henry Yates' house.
Uncle Britt owned a cabinet shop at Pilot Oak, KY, for several years, and made quilt boxes of walnut boards, and those were held together with wooden pegs.
He was a dead shot, since he hit anything he aimed at to shoot. Uncle Aubrey Luther held Uncle Britt as a hero. My father said Uncle Britt could jump in the air, click his heels three times, and take off at a run, and that was when he was in either his 60's or 70's. He said all of the young people were soft . Uncle Britt moved to Poplar Bluff, Missouri, from Kentucky, and lived there until his death.
Marriage records of Dickson County Tennessee show he married Daminty Pistol. I have not been able to find other records to verify who S.V. was.

[NI0121] When Jethro was about 12 years old, he hired out to work for an older couple that did not have any children. Their farm was located either around Newport or Jonesboro, Tennessee. He was to be paid one dollar per month, in addition to his room and board. At the end of that year, he had done such a fine job for them, that they paid him an extra dollar, making a total of thirteen dollars for the year of work. Now for the year of 1795, that was good payment, but it was also the only year that the State of Franklin was in existence. That thirteen dollars was in paper money, and it belonged to the Bank of the State of Franklin. Jethro carried that money with him the rest of his life, and he would state that it was one of the most valuable lessons that he ever learned. Jethro moved to Dickson County Tennessee in about 1836, and worked with a man names Spencer in a gunpowder mill located on Nails Creek, just off of Highway 46 in Dickson. Jethro smoked a corncob pipe, and it is believed that since the bowl would flip around as he was smoking the burning tobacco fell out and set off an explosion that killed him in October 1851. Jethro was uneducated, since he could not write; however, his prior planning of transferring land and slaves to his children was recorded on 23 March 1846.

"For the love and affection I entertain for Rosey McGhee my daughter, I do hereby give, transfer, and convey to her a negro girl by the name of Dicey, in the County of Dickson, Tennessee, District No 2, to have and to hold the same to the said Rosey McGhee, her heirs, and assigns forever. I covenant and agree for myself and heirs to warrant and defend the title to the said Negro Girl to the said Rosey McGhee, her heirs and assigns against the lawful claims of all persons, whtsoever, this 25th day of March 1846. Jethro (X) Yates (his mark). Witnessed by James and William Thedford.

"For the love and affection I entertain for Fanning Yates, my son, I do hereby give and transfer and convey to him a Negro Girl, by the name of Gilley, in the County of Dickson, Tennessee, District No 2, to have and to hold the same to the said Fanning Yates, his heirs and assigns forever. I do covenant and agree for myself and heirs to Warrant and defend the title to the said Negro Girl
to the said Fanning Yates, his heirs and assigns against the lawul claims of all persons whatever, this 25th day of March 1846. Jethro (X) Yates (his mark)
Witnessed by James and William Thedford.

"For the love and affection I entertain for James Yates, my son, I do hereby give, transfer, and convey to him two Negroes, one named Isum, the other named Martha, in the County of Dickson, Tennessee, District No 2, to have and to hold the same to the same James Yates, his heirs and assigns forever. I
covenant and agree for myself and heirs to warrant and defend the title to the said negro to the said James Yates his heirs and assigns, against the lawful claims of all persons whatever, this 25th day of March 1846. Jethro (X) Yates
(his mark), Witnessed by James and William Thedford.

"For the love and affection I entertain for my son John Yates, I do hereby give and transfer and convey to him a certain part of my tract of land in Dickson County Tennessee, District No. 2, containing by estimation one hundred acres and bounded as follows, to wit: Beginning at a stake in the East boundary line of John T. Cliftons old tract of land, runs South with said Cliftons line 61 3/4 poles passing an Elm, the South West Corner of a fifty acre tract deeded to Wiley Myatt by Kendrick Myatt, thence with a marked line south, supposed to be 50 poles to a Red Oak, thence East 34 poles to a Black Walnut,thence North one pole to a hickory, thence East one hundred and forty five poles and 3/4 to a White Oak, thence North supposed to be one hundred and fifteen poles to a Black Walnut, Thence West one hundred 30 1/2 poles to the Beginning, to have and to hold the same to the said John Yates, his heirs and assigns forever, I covenant and agree for myself and heirs to warrant and forever defend the title to the said tract of land to the said John Yates, his heirs and assigns against the lawful claims of all persons whatever, this the 15th day of June 1846. JETHRO(his mark) YATES
Test: Mosses Tidwell
J.C. Rye STATE OF TENNESSEE, Dickson County, Personally appeared before me Thomas McNeilly, Jethro Yates with whom I am personally acquainted and who acknowledged that he executed the foregoing deed for the purposes this in contained, Witness my hand at office this 15th June 1846 THOMAS McNEILLY

STATE OF TENNESSEE: Registers office June 19th 1846. 3 O'Clock P.M. then was the foregoing deed of Gift with the clerks certificate thereon received and noted in Note Book A, page 28, and Recorded June 19th 1846 in Book I page 114 & 115. Henry A. Bibb, Register

For the love and affection I entertain for Fanning Yates, I do hereby give, transfer, and convey to him a part of my tract of land in Dickson County Tennessee District No 2 containing by estimation Fifty acres and bounded as follows, to wit: Beginning on a Whit Oak running North fifty five poles to a White Oak, Thence West one hundred forty five 1/3 poles to a Hickory. Thence South fifty five poles to a Red Oak. Thence East one hundred and forty five 1/3 poles to the Beginning to have and to hold the same to the said Fanning Yates, his heirs to warrant and forever defend the title to the said tract of land to the said Fanning Yates, his heirs and assigns against the lawful claims of all persons whatsoever this the 15th day of June 1846.
TEST: Moses Tidwell JETHRO (his mark) YATES
J.C. Rye
STATE OF TENNESSEE DICKSON COUNTY Personally appeared before me Thomas McNeilly, Clerk of the County Court of said County, Jethro Yates with whom I am personally acquainted and who acknowledged that he executed the foregoing deed for the purposes therein contained Witness my hand at office this 15th June 1846. Thomas McNeilly
STATE OF TENNESSEE
DICKSON COUNTY Registers Office June 19th 1846 3 O'Clock P.M. then was the foregoing deed of gift with the Clerks Certificate thereon executed, recorded, and noted in Note Book A page 2 and Recorded June 19th 1846 in Book I page 115 Henry A. Bibb Regs

April 6, 1846

State of Kentucky, Graves County

Dear Father, Friends, and connections
We are in tolerable health at present, hoping these few lines may find you all enjoying the good blessings. James, I don't know how he is just now. He lives over in district 75, and I have no letter just now from him. Dear father, I want you to summon up your recollection as well as you possibly can about the money that you paid Jonathan Johnson--------------------------and the 50cents ------
lines missing -- Bid your part and the 20$ was for payment for all of which he paid away to Nappier, he said when he came back he told me all about it, and told me he would credit my note that he held against me for John's land for 35$ (he never gave me no credit. And unless you will go before the Magistrate of that county and make oath of the money I shall have it to loose and pay again by the law of this county. I want you if you please to do it and send your deposition here in a letter as soon as possible. I would be very glad to come and see you all if it were in my power but James is gone and there is no way to do anything at all. Jonathans family is gone to Arkansas and have left John Henry here to get along as he can, We desire to be remembered to you all inquiring friends, so no more at present remembering yours J.A. Henry H. Cole and Fannie
Major Jethro Yates, I want you to fix this matter amediately and yours sir will state the deposition and send it in a letter. I shall think it very hard to pay that money twice and take care of John at last.

Major Jethro was Buried at the intersection of Nails Creek Road and Iron Hill Road, which is just east of Highway 46 in Dickson, if you turn south on it from Interstate Highway 40

Miscellaneous NOTES:
Henry Cole married Frances Johnson in Dickson County, 21 Apr 1841
Henry H. Cole married Milly Yates 18 Jan 1817 NC Bondsman Shadrack Cole witness B.A. Barham
Mary Yates married Sterling Beesley 07 Oct 1797 (Sister of Jethro ?) witness J(im) Rice (lived on Hurricane Creek in TN) Bondsman Henry Beesley Bond #000151500
Thomas Yates m. Martha Nickins 20 Sep 1820 Bondsman Jethro Yates (?) Bond #000052843
Matthew Yates m. Elizabeth Baucom 20 Mar 1807 Bondsman Alsey Yates witness William Hill Bond #000159551
NOTE: The first story, above, was handed down through the generations, but is thougth to be actual, since I personally saw and counted the money that was in a leather wallet, along with considerable Confederate money, located at the home of Bertha Redden, on South Main Street in Dickson. Gail Yates.

Major Jethro did not come to Dickson County until circa 1830-40, since he is shown in the 1830 census of Guilford County North Carolina with William, Charley, and Hardy Yates.

[NI0123] John arrived in Dickson Co, about 1851, which coincided with the death of Jethro his father. Jethro wrote his will, and recorded it in Dickson Co, TN. in about March 1846. He named Fanning, Rosey, James, and John as his heirs, so when he died in Oct 1851, his heirs would probably have taken possession of their inheritance.

[NI0126] Fanning Yates was shot by bushwhackers on what is now Highway 96, at the intersection with Turnbull Road. His grave was located where the dam is now for the Turnbull Lake, which caused them to remove the grave to the Gentry Cemetery. The Cemetery is located above the Turnbull Road.

[NI0144] Rosey was given a slave by her father in 1846.
She married O'Kelley McGhee, and they owned a large farm located on old Highway 70S just North of Waverly, Humphreys County, Tennessee. The house and large log barn was situated on the hill across the highway from a limestone operation. The graveyard was located south and east of the barn on top of a hill.

[NI0147] Check for Fannie & Henry Cole. They knew Jethro, Fanning's father, and wrote a letter to him from Kentucky in 1846. Also, John M. Yates, of Wingo , Kentucky, had a son John, who moved to Success, Arkansas. Uncle Brit joked about John having to move to Arkansas to be Succ