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Johnson/Johnston/Johnstone

DNA Surname Project

A Pioneer DNA Surname Project

 

 

 

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In Memorial of

Harold Johnson

 

 

 

Fortest and Tree

 

Wise is the person who sees the forest
From its grandeur inspiration glean.
Wiser still the person who sees the tree;
When the tree is what needs seen.

May we then in living life
Be it pleasure, pain, or strife
Steadily that wisdom learn
Their differentially discern.

 

(Participant 58215)

 

 

 

 

 

  Groups Within Haplogroups

 

Chemical Graphics by Paul Thiessen

 

 

 

Haplogroup Study Objective

 

As stated previously, the objective of this project is to display the DNA test results of  participants in a manner best suited for genealogical comparisons. It is these test comparisons that is the core reason to employ DNA testing in the first place. It is our hope that the haplogroup studies web page(s) will allow participants to easily make their desired comparisons and to explore their ancient genealogy through the more scientific analysis of their individual haplogroup.

 

Haplogroup Definitions

Below the name of each Haplogroup list, at the bottom of this page, is a definition of that particular haplogroup provided to us, and with their permission, by the people at FamilyTreeDNA

 

Haplogroup Charts

These haplogroup charts will show the Y-DNA test results of each participant. Clicking on the kit number will take you to the pedigree of that participant. When available, you can send an email by clicking on the participant's name.

In general, the DYS test results are listed in chronological order, not by name or kit number. The charts are further divided into more closely related family groups.
The project administrator makes this determination based on the Y-DNA tests results pointing to a common ancestor and not by reliance on a paper trail depicting a common ancestor. It is important to remember, however, that DNA research supported paper trails, with related pedigrees, remain the core reason for this J/J/J project! It is recognized that, as this project grows, these family groups will be constantly changing. In this regard, the design structure of these haplogroup pages should allow greater flexibility in presenting changes as they arise.

 

Family Group Leaders

The amount of work involved in presenting, promoting and maintaining the Johnson/Johnston/Johnstone Project is quite large. The establishment of a group leader for each family group should help in this regard.

A group leader should consider himself as spokesperson for his group. He should promote communications in such areas as connecting paper trails, and seeking new group related participants for DNA testing.

The design format of these Haplogroup Studies will allow the administrator to create a separate web page for each family group leader to display any charts, comments...etc. (some restrictions, of course)

Haplogroups

 

Below you will find links to the haplogroupís pages.From these pages you can access the test results from all members in said haplogroups.

Haplogroups A & B

Haplogroup B -Haplogroup B is one of the oldest Y-chromosome lineages in humans. Haplogroup B is found exclusively in Africa. This lineage was the first to disperse around Africa. There is current archaeological evidence supporting a major population expansion in Africa approximately 90-130 thousand years ago. It has been proposed that this event may have spread Haplogroup B throughout Africa. Haplogroup B appears at low frequency all around Africa, but is at its highest frequency in Pygmy populations

Haplogroup E3a

Haplogroup E3a is an Africa lineage. It is currently hypothesized that this haplogroup dispersed south from northern Africa within the last 3,000 years, by the Bantu agricultural expansion. E3a is also the most common lineage among African Americans

Haplogroup E3b

Haplogroup E3b1a -  This lineage is estimated to have originated in north-eastern Africa about 23,000 years ago. Some of its branches exited Africa during the Paleolithic, and today it can be found in Europe, the Middle East, and north and east Africa.

 

Haplogroup E3b1- This lineage is found in eastern and northern Africa, the Near East, and Europe, and is estimated to have originated about 23,000 years ago.

Haplogroups G & G2

Haplogroup G and Haplogroup G2 -This lineage may have originated in India or Pakistan, and has dispersed into central Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. The G2 branch of this lineage (containing the P15 mutation) is found most often in the Europe and the Middle East


HaplogroupI Ė I1

The I and I1 lineages are nearly completely restricted to northwestern Europe. These would most likely have been common within Viking populations. One lineage of this group extends down into central Europe. Haplogroup I dates to 23,000 years ago or longer. Lineages not in branches I1a, I1b or I1c are found distributed at low frequency throughout Europe.

Haplogroup I2a-I2b

The I1a lineages are nearly completely restricted to northwestern Europe. These would most likely have been common within Viking populations. One lineage of this group extends down into central Europe. Haplogroup I dates to 23,000 years ago or longer. Lineages not in branches I1a, I1b or I1c are found distributed at low frequency throughout Europe.

Haplogroup I1b -This subgroup of Haplogroup I is found within the Balkans countries at it's greatest frequency and diversity. These countries probably harbored this subset of Haplogroup I as a refuge during the Last Glacial Maximum.

Haplogroup J

Haplogroup J and J1 - both are found at highest frequencies in Middle Eastern and north African populations where each most likely evolved. This marker has been carried by Middle Eastern traders into Europe, central Asia, India, and Pakistan. The Cohen modal lineage is found in Haplogroup J*.

Haplogroup J2  This lineage originated in the northern portion of the Fertile Crescent where it later spread throughout central Asia, the Mediterranean, and south into India. As with other populations with Mediterranean ancestry this lineage is found within Jewish populations.

Haplogroup N

Haplogroup N -This haplogroup is distributed throughout Northern Eurasia. It is the most common Y-chromosome type in Uralic speakers (Finns and Hungarians). This lineage most likely originated in northern China or Mongolia and then spread into Siberia where it became a very common line in western Siberia

Haplogroups O, Q, & T

Haplogroup O probably originated in East Asia and later migrated into the South Pacific. The lineage expanded into Taiwan (high frequency in the aboriginal Taiwanese), Indonesia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. O3 is the predominant sub-group in China. The O1 and O2a lineages are found in Southeast Asian populations of Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia and southern China. The O2b sub-group is of high frequency in the Japanese and Korean populations.

Haplogroup Q arose in Central Asia and migrated through the Altai/Baikal region of northern Eurasia into the Americas. Today it is found in North Eurasia, with some exemplars in European populations. The Q1a3a sub-group is almost exclusively associated with Native American populations.

Haplogroup T:From 2002 to 2008, it was known as Haplogroup K2. It should not be confused with the mitochondrial DNA haplogroup T, of the same name.It is believed to have originated in Asia.Individuals, at some later point, proceeded south to Africa. While these chromosomes are seen in relatively high frequencies in Egypt, Oman, Tanzania, Ethiopia and Morocco, they are especially prominent in the Fulbe, presenting the highest concentration of this haplogroup found so far.A famous member of the T haplogroup is Thomas Jefferson; his Y-chromosomal complement received prominence through the Sally Hemings controversy.

 

Haplogroup R1a

The R1a lineage is believed to have originated in the Eurasian Steppes north of the Black and Caspian Seas. This lineage is believed to have originated in a population of the Korgan culture, known for the domestication of the horse (approximately 3000 B.C.E.). These people were also believed to be the first speakers of the Indo-European language group. This lineage is currently found in central and western Asia, India, and in Slavic populations of Eastern Europe.

Haplogroup R1b

Haplogroup R1b: is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroup containing the Atlantic modal haplotype

R1b Unassigned to Groups

Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroup containing the Atlantic modal haplotype

Haplogroup Unkown

The haplogroups for these members is currently unestablished

 

 

Links To Sites of Interest

 

Our Testing Lab

 

 

Clan Johnston/eís

Associations

 

 

Clan Johnstone

In America

 

Clan Johnstone

In Australia

 

Clan Johnstone

In New Zealand

 

Clan Johnstone

In the UK

Please send

Queries to Cecil Johnson

 

UK Clan Johnstone

DNA

Queries:

Rex Johnson

 

AU & NZ Johnstonsí

Yahoo Group

 

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Colonial Virginia Connections

Website of Linda Sparks Starr

 

 

 

Contacts:

Lee Johnson Administrator | Sherrie BooneCo-Administrator |
Barbara Hockman Pedigree Coordinator | Tony Johnson Librarian US |
Don Johnston Librarian NZ & Australia | Cathy Cadd Librarian Canada
Euell Johnson Research Analysis