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FUSHIA COLOR IS MINE AND PEGS RELATIONS
BLUE IS CLUES TO HUDSON JOHNSON
GREEN IS KNOWN MICHAEL JOHNSON DNA INFORMATION AND CONNECTING INORMATION

Haplogroup I  -The I, I1, and I1a lineages are nearly completely restricted to northwestern Europe. These would most likely have been common within Viking populations. One lineage of this group extends down into central Europe. Haplogroup I dates to 23,000 years ago or longer. Lineages not in branches I1a, I1b or I1c are found distributed at low frequency throughout Europe  Group White Oak http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hjohnson/haplogroup.i.html#Group_White_Oak

Purple is my Cousin Joe Matlock’s Research

Maroon is connecting of Johnson surname researcher to A. Euell Johnson

Haplogroup I  -The I, I1, and I1a lineages are nearly completely restricted to northwestern Europe. These would most likely have been common within Viking populations. One lineage of this group extends down into central Europe. Haplogroup I dates to 23,000 years ago or longer. Lineages not in branches I1a, I1b or I1c are found distributed at low frequency throughout Europe Group Sessile Oak http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hjohnson/haplogroup.i.html

 

Olive is the DNA LINE of Leonard Johnson and Todd Johnson

Haplogroup I2A -This subgroup of Haplogroup I is found within the Balkans countries at it's greatest frequency and diversity. These countries probably harbored this subset of Haplogroup I as a refuge during the Last Glacial Maximum. Group Norway Spruce  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hjohnson/haplogroup.i1b.html

 

Lime is the Color assigned to this DNA GROUP OF JOHNSON RESEARCHERS and will be added to Current Files of Johnson and Allied Families in Faquier Co. Va. Halifax Co. Va. Pittsylvania Co. Granville Co. NC

 

Haplogroup R1b1   -Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroup containing the Atlantic modal haplotype . Group Elm

 

Julian Bentley Johnson Jerry Johnson <nodigits@sbcglobal.net> James Granville Johnson <bobmastr@zipnet.us> Judy: For William Thomas Johnson  <jmje36@aol.com>Floyd Junior Johnson: Ronald K. Johnson<jronson@msn.com>

 

 

Gold is the Color for descendants of Colonel Richard Johnson

 

Turquoise is the DNA of Jeffery Michael Johnson

Haplogroup E3a - Haplogroup E3a is an Africa lineage. It is currently hypothesized that this haplogroup dispersed south from northern Africa within the last 3,000 years, by the Bantu agricultural expansion. E3a is also the most common lineage among African Americans

 

My Notes On This Group: The Roman Empire was the first to use troops all over the world they left blood groups ever where they went from Countries of Africa to England: The Roman Empire was one of the VAST spreading Empires in the World to first use troops of other Countries it conquered. The use of using other troops from Conquered Countries spread with each developing Empire.

 

Red is the County lines and Parish Lines: These lines can and will change people in a County or in a Parish. This is to serve as a Time line to show changes, in lines or in changes where families moved to from this area.

 

Notes: Some Quaker dates have been translated Before the 1752 calendar change, the first month of the year was March. The correct date is inserted
before the quoted excerpts below. 
From: Mary E. Stewart  

 

In 1752 the new year began to be counted from Jan 1. Before that it ran from March 26-March 25, Julian Calender changed. So a date in July 1750 would be earlier in the same "year" as one in Feb 1750 (which once 1752 rolled around, would be thought of as the next year). From: Barbara Schenck

 

Rose Color is for Haplogroup R1b1   -Haplogroup R1b is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re-colonized after the last glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroup containing the Atlantic modal haplotype . Researchers matching this DNA ARE; James Russell Johnson, Samuel Frank Johnson, C. Thomas Johnson and Stephen Alexander Johnson http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hjohnson/Pedigrees/1195_et_all.htm.

Haplogroup E3b1a -  This lineage is estimated to have originated in north-eastern Africa about 23,000 years ago. Some of its branches exited Africa during the Paleolithic, and today it can be found in Europe, the Middle East, and north and east Africa: DNA Of Researcher Brett Johnson

 

Haplogroup R1bi is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded throughout Europe as humans re colonized after the last glaciail maximum 10-13 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroups containing the Atlantic modal haplotype: Group is Aspen; Color is Light Orange Researchers are Jane Johnson Williams, James Johnson born Ca 1718 died 1785 Brunswick Co. Va.

 

Haplo groups R1b-R1b1C is the most common haplogroup in European populations. It is believed to have expanded through out Europes as humans re colonized after the las glacial maximum 10-12 thousand years ago. This lineage is also the haplogroups containing the Atlantic modal haplotype. Group is Black Oak: Color is Brown: Researcher is Dean Johnston: Thomas Johnson reside Pits.Co Va 1776 moved to Washington Co.

 

These files come from numerous Johnson-Johnston-Johnstone-Jonson-Jonston researchers and Sent to Tony L. Johnson who compiled the information” Please share with Other researchers”

                      

Report made by Tony L. Johnson a descendant of Hudson Johnson and Agness Johnson of Bartons Creek, Dickson Co. Tn, Big Creek Hawkins Co Tn and Buffalo Creek of Henry Co.Va.

 

 

PRESIDENT LYNDON BAINES JOHNSON

 

1795 April 29 Jesse Johnson born Oglethorpe Co. Ga. Death: 15 May 1856 in Lockhart, Caldwell, TX

1798 Jan 14 Lucy Webb Barnett Born Elbert, Georgia  Death: 13 Mar 1857 in Lockhart, Caldwell, Texas,

Married 14 Nov 1817 in Greene, GA

 

Children

John Leonard Johnson Dr. Born 1818 Sept 28 Griffin, Spalding, Ga.  died 1890 Nov 5 Fort Worth, Tarrant, Tx

Nathan Barnett Johnson Born 1820 Aug 10 Henry Co. Ga died 1851 Aug 20 Henry Co. Ga.

Ava Anna Johnson born 1823 May 18

Frances Washington Johnson 1820 May 5

Andrew Jackson Johnson 1825 Jan 27 Henry Co. Ga.; died 1891 Dec 5 Oglesby, Coryell Co, TX 

Amanda Melvina Johnson 1827 March 7

Elizabeth T. Johnson born 1830 Dec 8

Mary Ann Elizabeth Johnson born 1831 Jan 29 Henry Co. Ga. died 1897 Feb 11 Morgan, Bosque , Texas 

Jesse Thomas Johnson born 1837 July 6 Henry Co Ga. died 1877 March 12

Lucy Ann Johnson born 1838 Nov 12

Samuel Ealy Johnson born 1838 Nov 12 died 1915 Feb 25 Stonewall, Gillespie County, Texas, USA 

 

 

1825 Jan 27 Andrew Jackson Johnson Henry Co. Ga.; died 1891 Dec 5 Oglesby, Coryell Co, TX 

General History of the Founding of Johnson City Texas

The Site of the Johnson Ranch on Town Creek, the site of present day Johnson City, was at a very old crossroads.

A north-south route from Blanco to the Colorado River was known as early as Spanish Times. Miranda in 1579 passed this way crossing the Pedernales in the vicinity of Johnson City on his way to inspect the supposed Silver deposits near Llano.

McCarty Spring just four miles to the northwest of town was a favored way station for travelers between Austin and Fredericksburg. Andrew Jackson Johnson, an older brother to Tom and Sam Johnson, located his home near this spring in 1858 or 1859.

Topography and the conditions of early day travel by horse or horse and wagon had long established this section of the Pedernales Valley as a natural stopping place and cross-roads.

However, none of the early sites grew into a lasting settlement other than as Ranch stations.

When Lyndon B. Johnson’s Grandfather, Sam Ealy Johnson, Sr., gave up his cattle-driving business (driving cattle up the Chisholm Trail had become unprofitable), he and his brother, Tom Johnson, sold out their interests to a nephew, James Polk Johnson.

The nearest post office, mill and general store were located fourteen miles south in Blanco/Pittsburg. There were still renegade Indians roaming the area as well, so travel over any distance was viewed with great apprehension. For that reason, settlers in the north end of Blanco County began to plan for a city in the northern area.

In 1879, a barbecue was held at the springs on Town Creek located on the Johnson Ranch. At this meeting three sites for a town were offered, and the one accepted by vote of the settlers was a 320 acre plot of land on the Pedernales River offered by James Polk Johnson. After the decision, his many friends took him up on their shoulders and cheered him for his victory and for the decision by the residents to name the new town after him.

James Polk made the transition from rancher to businessman very successfully. It was the organizational ability of James Polk Johnson that converted a natural way station to a settled community and a county seat. James Polk’s Grist Mill was a steam-powered cotton gin and gristmill on Town Creek. Principal crops in this area were corn and cotton. In the early 1940’s the gin was purchased by George Crofts and converted to a milling and grain operation, which flourished until the late 1970’s.

By the time of his premature death at age 40 in 1885, James Polk had built the first gristmill, the Pearl Hotel and had under construction the building (now the Johnson City Bank) that was to be a general merchandise store. This building came to have the first jail in its basement, and served as the first Johnson City courthouse. The first church congregation (Methodist) met in an upstairs room of this building until their church building was constructed, and later Lyndon B. Johnson had his local offices in this building constructed by his second cousin.

Blanco County was created on February 11, 1858, from Burnet, Comal, Gillespie and Hays Counties. In establishing the county the legislature mandated that the "county set thereof shall also be called Blanco and should be within five miles of the center of the county." Judge William E. Jones of Curry’s Creek was appointed by the legislature to organize the county.

Following the formation of Kendall County in 1862 from portions of Blanco and Kerr Counties with the subsequent loss of territory and population on the south, pressure grew to move the seat of government. This was the major factor in the relocation of the county seat to Johnson City in 1890. The boundary line changes had positioned Johnson City within two miles of the center of the county. http://www.johnsoncitytexaschamber.com/history/index.html

McCarty Spring just four miles to the northwest of town was a favored way station for travelers between Austin and Fredericksburg. Andrew Jackson Johnson, an older brother to Tom and Sam Johnson, located his home near this spring in 1858 or 1859.

http://www.texashillcountry.com/johnsoncity/johnsoncity.htm

Andrew Jackson Johnson, an older brother to Tom and Sam Johnson, located in the area around 1858. In the 1870s, Sam Early Johnson, Sr. (LBJ’s grandfather) sold his interest to a nephew, James Polk Johnson. During a barbecue in 1879, he donated a 320-acre plot of land on the Pedernales River for the location of a new town. In appreciation, the residents named the new town after him. http://www.lakeonflatcreek.com/location.php

Looking for information on Andrew Jackson Johnson b.1825
Henry Co., GA, d.1891 Coryell Co., TX.
Decendants of Andrew lived in these counties of
Texas:
Brown, Coryell, Caldwell, Bell, Tarrant, Coleman, Gillispie,
Bosque, Hill.
Please email me at coert35@aol.com
Thanks,
Myrtle

E mail addy is not good http://genforum.genealogy.com/tx/coryell/messages/357.html

 

1838 May 24, JESSE CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON,  (1838 ~ 1911). Jesse Johnson was born in Alabama son to John Leonard Johnson and Elizabeth Johnson and was the grandson of Jesse Johnson and Lucy Webb Johnson

Sources included "The Johnsons: Descendants of John Johnson, A Revolutionary Soldier of Georgia: A Genealogical History" by Rebekah Baines Johnson, Unpublished monograph, 1958; "100 Years of Blanco County History," published Blanco County, 1991.

 

 

JESSE CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON (1838 ~ 1911). Jesse Johnson was born in Alabama on May 24, 1838 to John Leonard Johnson and Elizabeth Johnson and was the grandson of Jesse Johnson and Lucy Webb Johnson. He had three siblings,

James P. Johnson (founder of Johnson City),

John T. Johnson,

Nathan Johnson

Sister: Melissa Elizabeth Johnson (married R. J. Johnson).

When Jesse was ten years old his mother died and his father was a physician and unable to raise his children alone. Their grandparents raised the children.

During the Civil War, Jesse Johnson served in Co. C. of the 8th Texas Cavalry, C. S. A. Following the War, he moved to Blanco County by 1870. In 1872, he went into the cattle business with his brother-in-law, R. J. Johnson. He was admitted to the Confederate Men's Home in Austin on several different occasions and died on July 13, 1911.

Information provided by William Johnson. Sources included "The Johnsons: Descendants of John Johnson, A Revolutionary Soldier of Georgia: A Genealogical History" by Rebekah Baines Johnson, Unpublished monograph, 1958; "100 Years of Blanco County History," published Blanco County, 1991

http://www.cemetery.state.tx.us/pub/user_form.asp?step=2&pers_id=792&last_name=&eligibility=

 

1838 Nov 12 Born Samuel Ealy Johnson, Sr., in Alambama died 1915 Stonewall Texas, he was a cattleman, and a soldier.

Johnson was raised a Baptist, but later became a member of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). In his later years, he became a Christadelphian.[1]

He was the grandfather of Lyndon Baines Johnson, the father of Texas politician, Samuel Ealy Johnson, Jr., and the uncle of Johnson City, Texas founder James Polk Johnson. He was the tenth child of Jesse and Lucy Webb (Barnett) Johnson.

After serving in the Civil War, Sam married Eliza Bunton of Caldwell County on December 11, 1867.

 

1845, August 24, James Polk Johnson was the son of Dr. John Leonard Johnson and Elizabeth Barnett Johnson who were born in Georgia then moved to Alabama where James was born.   He left Alabama with his parents at an early age and settled in Dewitt Co., Texas, where he spent most of his youth. At 16, he volunteered for service in the CSA, then after the Civil war joined his uncles in Blanco CountyThe brothers, Thomas Jesse Johnson and Samuel Ealy Johnson, Sr. had settled in the Pedernales River Valley and bought land in Blanco County before the Civil war and have become partners in a cattle driving business.   Between 1868 and 1871 the Johnsons made four great cattle drives north up the Chisholm Trail to Abilene, Kansas, each with herds numbering between 2,500 and 3,000 head, being the largest trail-driving outfit in Blanco and the six surrounding counties, as well.  This partnership was dissolved in 1871, and the brothers sold their holding to their nephew, former ranch hand and drover, James Polk Johnson.

James with this acquisition of land went back to Hockheim, DeWitt County to marry his childhood sweetheart, Julia Ann Moore, on November 23, 1871, and traveling in covered wagon brought her to the Johnson Ranch in Blanco County, then located about fifteen miles from the nearest settlement. 

This isolation was a dangerous thing as there were many Indians in the area.   The settlers made plans for the establishment of a town in the North end of Blanco County, with a barbecue being held on July 4, 1879 at a spring on Town Creek for the purpose of selecting a new town site.  Three sites were offered:  one by Mr. W. A. Kemp -- a plot of land on Deer Creek; one by Mr. Cockran on a plot on Flat Creek; and another by Mr. James Polk Johnson near the Pedernales River.  Mr. Johnson's land was accepted after much discussion.  About this same time the idea was conceived to have the county seat moved from Blanco to the new Johnson City nearer the geographical center of the county. A Dec. 1876 effort to call an election failed. In August 1879 petition of the citizens from the northern section of the county were presented to the County Commissioners Court for the election of Oct 28, 1879. Blanco won out by a small margin of 7 votes.

James Polk Johnson built many structures in the new Johnson City, which would eventually become the County Seat. Among these is one of his buildings still standing at Seventh St. and Nugent, the two-stroy, double-front porched old Pearl Hotel.  The hotel was built in the early 1880s.  He also built the cotton gin and mill located on the south side of US Hwy 290. At the time of his death on Oct. 18, 1885, Johnson had under construction the building now housing the Johnson City Bank, which was to be used as a general merchandise store.  The building housed the Court House until the present courthouse built of white limestone quarried from the surrounding hills, was constructed.

The children of James Polk Johnson and Julia Ann Moore Johnson:

Thomas Samuel Johnson 1872-1935

Mark Johnson 1873-1875

Julia Ann Johnson Stubbs 1875-1935

Pearl Johnson Roper 1876-1966

Nathaniel J. Johnson 1878-1936

Myrtle Ione Johnson Fawcett 1881-1953

Melissa Loma Johnson Fawcett 1881-1953

Olla Sunshine Johnson Chapman Stribling 1882-1975

Their fifteen grandchildren are:

Elizabeth Roper Clemons,

Charles Roper,

Lois Roper Perry,

Fredericka Johnson,

Carrie Ben Johnson Hahn,

Nathaniel M. Johnson,

James William Johnson,

Doris Leigh Johnson,

Theodora Johnson Matthews,

Edna Earle Johnson Benton,

Ruth Chunn Walker,

Grace Chunn Nelson,

Lorine Facwett Golden,

Nathaniel Truman Fawcett,

Lillian Fawcett Stewart.

http://www.cemeteries-of-tx.com/Wtx/Blanco/cemetery/JOHNSON.htm

James Polk Johnson Cemetery
Blanco Co Cemeteries of Tx

Submitted by Joel Honeycutt and Pat Althaus Prepared for Cemeteries of TX  by Wanda Qualls

of the Blanco County Historical Commission,  101 Pitchfork, Johnson City, TX 78636. James Polk Johnson

From The Heritage of Blanco County, published 1987 by the Blanco County News, paraphrased from the     article therein by Lillian Stewart                                      

Thomas Jesse Johnson brother of Samuel Ealy Johnson

Dr. John Leonard Johnson brother of Samuel Ealy Johnson

JESSE CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON,  (1838 ~ 1911). Jesse Johnson was born in Alabama on May 24, 1838 to John Leonard Johnson and Elizabeth Johnson and was the grandson of Jesse Johnson and Lucy Webb Johnson. He had three siblings, James P. Johnson (founder of Johnson City), John T. Johnson, Nathan, and Melissa Elizabeth Johnson (married R. J. Johnson). When Jesse was ten years old his mother died and his father was a physician and unable to raise his children alone. Their grandparents raised the children.

During the Civil War, Jesse Johnson served in Co. C. of the 8th Texas Cavalry, C. S. A. Following the War, he moved to Blanco County by 1870. In 1872, he went into the cattle business with his brother-in-law, R. J. Johnson. He was admitted to the Confederate Men's Home in Austin on several different occasions and died on July 13, 1911.

Information provided by William Johnson. Sources included "The Johnsons: Descendants of John Johnson, A Revolutionary Soldier
of Georgia: A Genealogical History" by Rebekah Baines Johnson, Unpublished monograph, 1958; "100 Years of Blanco County History," published Blanco County, 1991..

John T. Johnson,

Nathan Johnson

R.J. Johnson husband of Melissa Elizabeth Johnson

Melissa Elizabeth Johnson (married R. J. Johnson)

James Polk Johnson

8-30-2008: Tony,  I received your email about this project from the Blanco Co. Rootsweb email list.  I am a female heir of James Polk Johnson and would love to see the results of the project.

 

The Descendants of James P. Johnson had a reunion in 2004 which I jointly planned with two other cousins.  I still have addresses for the participants, but there are few male Johnsons left.  I don't believe they receive email.  I would be happy to provide you with addresses if you are willing to contact them and explain the project.  Please advise me.  Gayle

8-30-2008: Tony, Thank you for your willingness to provide this information to me.  I have been working on the genealogy for this family since 2002 and started with the information from Rebekah Baines Johnson's book then came forward.  My great-grandmother was Pearl Johnson Roper.  Thanks for taking on this project.  Gayle Newkirk (Gaylenewk@aol.com) <Gaylenewk@aol.com>

8-30-2008: Tony, The following two men are all I have:

 

William Jackson Johnson son of James William Johnson son of Nathaniel Jackson Johnson (Nace Johnson)

Bill Johnson

 

London, TX 76854

 

Thomas Gerald Johnson son of Nathanial Mogford Johnson, son of Nathaniel Jackson Johnson (Nace Johnson)

Jerry Johnson

 

London, TX 76854

 

Jerry also has two sons, but I do not have their addresses.  Jerry was very excited about the reunion, so I would expect that he might be willing to participate.  Let me know if I can help in any other way,

In the late 1850s, Samuel Ealy Johnson Sr. settled with his brother Jesse Thomas "Tom" Johnson in a one-room log cabin on 320 acres that became headquarters for the largest cattle driving operation in seven counties.

Sam enlisted in Col. Xavier Blanchard Debray's regiment on September 18, 1861, and served until the end of the American Civil War on the coast of Texas and in Louisiana. He was present at the Battle of Galveston and at the Battle of Pleasant Hill in Louisiana.

In the fall of 1892, Sam Ealy Johnson Sr. offered himself as the Populist candidate for Blanco and Gillespie County's seat in the state legislature. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Ealy_Johnson,_Sr.

Jesse Thomas "Tom" Johnson

 

1850 census. It lists Andrew J. and Samuel E. Johnson with their parents and 9 siblings. They are living in Caldwell, Texas.

Hope this helps.

Andrew J. Johnson

age 25

born abt1825 in Georgia

Home in 1850-Caldwell, Texas

Parents:

Jesse Johnson-age 55

Lucy Johnson-age 52

Siblings:  Elizabeth age19,

Francis Johnson age 20,

James P. Johnson age 6,

Jesse Johnson age13,

Jesse T. Johnson age14,

John T. Johnson age11,

Lucy Ann Johnson age 17,

Malissa Johnson age7,

Mathias Johnson age 3 

Samuel E. Johnson age 12

 

From:  Elizabeth Douglass  joharco5557@bellsouth.net

 

1850 - De Witt Co., TX, Pg. 115B, #13

John L. Johnson - 31 b. GA

Maryann - 20 b. GA

Jesse - 12 b. AL

John - 10 b. GA

Malisa - 8 b. GA

James - 6 b. AL

Nathan - 4 b. TX              

William M. Miscall - 20 b. TX

From Carmen M. Johnson <carmenmjo@cableone.net>

 

1860 - Gonzales PO, Gonzales Co., TX, Pg. 50, #323

J. L - 42 b. GA

Jacob - 9 b. TX

Jesse - 22 b. AL

John - 20, b. TA

 Malissa - 17, b. GA

 Jas K - 15, b. AL

 W. - 12 b. TX

 Geo - 7 b. TX

 Frank - 5 b. TX

 EP Russell - 45 b. MA

 Wm August - 30 b. Baden

 Philip Tobias - 24 b. Poland

 AD Crowder - 25 b. VA

From Carmen M. Johnson <carmenmjo@cableone.net>

 

1870 - Prec. 3, Gonzales Co., TX, Pg. 1, #2

John L. Johnson - 51 b. GA

Mary A. - 42 b. NC

James - 25 b. OK

Jacob - 19 b. TX

George - 18 b. TX

Mary - 7 b. TX

Mattia - 6 b. TX

From Carmen M. Johnson carmenmjo@cableone.net
 

1877 Samuel Ealy JOHNSON Jr, born. To Eliza Bunton and Samuel Ealy Johnson, Sr

Samuel Ealy Johnson, Jr. Buda, Texas October 11, 1877October 23, 1937 was the father of thirty-sixth President Lyndon Baines Johnson and the son of Samuel Ealy Johnson, Sr. for whose nephew, James Polk Johnson, Johnson City, Texas was named. He was a struggling farmer and cattle speculator who lived in the hill country of Texas and provided an uncertain income for his family.

Politically active, Sam Johnson served five terms in the Texas legislature as a Democrat. He is remembered for attacking the Ku Klux Klan on the floor of the Texas legislature during a time when many of his colleagues were Klan sympathizers (an event famously referred to by his son). He also was instrumental in the legislation that enabled the state of Texas to acquire the Alamo property in San Antonio, enabling that monument to be preserved as an important part of American history.

He married Rebekah Baines, daughter of Joseph Wilson Baines, on August 20, 1907. According to Lady Bird Johnson, Johnson's daughter-in-law, Sam Ealy Johnson, Jr., joined the Christadelphian Church, where his father and mother belonged, toward the end of his life.[1] He is buried in Johnson City, Texas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Ealy_Johnson,_Jr.

SAMUEL EALY JOHNSON, JR. (1877-1937). Samuel Ealy Johnson, Jr., legislator and father of Lyndon Baines Johnson,qv the son of Eliza Bunton and Samuel Ealy Johnson, Sr.,qv was born at Buda, Texas, on October 11, 1877. He moved with his parents to Gillespie County, where he attended school at Johnson City. Although forced to leave school at an early age, he passed the teacher's examination and was awarded a teaching certification. He taught school in 1896 at White Oak School in Sandy and later at Rocky School near Hye. In 1904 he was elected to the state legislature from the Eighty-ninth District, succeeding his future father-in-law, Joseph Wilson Baines.qv He served in the Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, Thirty-fifth, Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh, and Thirty-eighth legislatures. He was the author of the Alamo Purchase Bill (which appropriated $65,000 for the purchase of the Alamo property), a bill providing $3 million to aid drought-stricken farmers and ranchers of West Texas, the Blue Sky Law,qv and other important legislative measures. On August 20, 1907, Johnson married Rebekah Baines (see JOHNSON, REBEKAH BAINES). The couple were parents of five children, including the thirty-sixth president of the United States. In 1906 Samuel E. Johnson, Jr., suffered severe financial losses, which wiped out his cotton holdings and left him deeply in debt. For a number of years he was engaged in real estate transactions. In 1935 and 1937 he was stricken with heart attacks. He died on October 23, 1937, and was buried in the family cemetery at Johnson City.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Robert Dallek, Lone Star Rising: Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1908-1960 (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991). Robert A. Caro, The Years of Lyndon Johnson: The Path to Power (New York: Knopf, 1982). Rebekah Baines Johnson, A Family Album, ed. J. S. Moursund (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1965).

Dayton Kelley http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/JJ/fjo24.html

  Johnson City is the County Seat of Blanco County.  It was named for the pioneer Johnson Family, ancestors of President Lyndon B. Johnson.    Blanco County is a farm and ranch area.  Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park Information Center is two blocks south of  U. S. 90.   The old Johnson Ranch was called the Johnson Settlement, owned by President Johnson's grandfather and great-uncle from 1867 to 1872.  It was the gathering point of  a seven county area for cattle drives.  It also served as an aid station for those wounded in the Deer Creek Indian Battle.  It originally was a dog run cabin, barn and other buildings.  
    The Pedernales Falls State Park which has 4,800 scenic acres is also located in
Blanco County.

Eliza Bunton and Samuel Ealy Johnson, Sr

The had five children 3 daughter and 2 sons.

 

Nephew, James Polk Johnson, Johnson City, Texas

 

1880 - Dist 69, Gonzales Co., TX, Pg. 55, #431

Jno L. Johnson - 61 B. GA

Wife: Mary A. - 52 b. NC

George - 28 b. TX

Mary - 16 b. TX

Martha - 14 b. TX

Jas F. Browning - 21 B. MD

From Carmen M. Johnson <carmenmjo@cableone.net>

 

1881: Rebekah BAINES, b. Near Stonewall, Texas
Rebekah Baines, 

Daughter of Joseph Wilson Baines,

 
1890 Nov 5 Died: John Leonard Johnson Dr. Born 1818 Sept 28 Griffin, Spalding, Ga.  died Fort Worth, Tarrant, Tx: Son of Jesse Johnson and Lucy Webb Barnett

1908 AUG : 27 Lyndon Baines Johnson  Born Near Stonewall, Texas Died : 22 JAN 1973, San Antonio, Texas
Buried : L.B.J. Ranch, Stonewall, Texas

Parents:

Samuel Ealy JOHNSON, b. 1877
Rebekah Baines
Lyndon Baines Johnson  

36th United States President, US Congressman, US Senator. His term, served from 1963 to January 1969, was marked by widespread unrest due to the unpopular war in Vietnam and by racial and political unrest at home. Born in a farmhouse near Gillespie, Texas, the oldest of five children of Samuel Ealy Johnson, a farmer and schoolteacher who served five terms in the Texas House of Representatives. His mother, Rebekah Baines Johnson, was also a schoolteacher. He attended school in nearby Johnson City, and in 1924, graduated from high school at age 15. After a year off, he entered Southwest Texas State Teachers College, where he excelled in campus politics. Graduating in 1930, he taught public speaking and debate at the Sam Houston High School, in Houston, Texas, before taking a job as secretary to Representative Richard Kleberg, where he learned how to work the politics of Washington DC. There he met and married Claudia Alta Taylor (nicknamed Lady Bird) on November 17, 1934. They had two daughters, Lynda Bird and Luci Baines.

 

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=550 

 

1914 Jan 31 Born; Sam Houston Johnson died 1978 Dec 11: brother of President Lyndon Baines Johnson; Burial LBJ Ranch Stonewall
Blanco County Texas, Us
a http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Johnson&GScid=641460&GRid=6955485& 

 

Samuel Houston Johnson

 

Samuel Houston Johnson (January 31,1914-December 11,1978) was the younger brother of President Lyndon B. Johnson. He was notorious for getting drunk and then talking to the press. Eventually, the Secret Service put him under surveillance. He died of lung cancer at 64, at the same age his brother was at his death. Sam wrote the book My Brother Lyndon after LBJ left the White House. (en) http://dbpedia.org/page/Sam_Houston_Johnson

 

Notes of Interest: Samuel Houston Johnson of Humphreys Co. Tn. Born 1878 Dec 25: