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JOHNSON AND ALLIED FAMILIES OF HARPETH RIVER

 

The Harpeth River State Park is not a single piece of land; it is scattered throughout ten locations in the southern part of Cheatham County and the southwestern part of Davidson County. Some of the places are scenic in nature, while some are historic in nature. The common link that they all have is that they are all located along the Harpeth River, a tributary of the Cumberland that winds through Williamson, Davidson, Cheatham and Dickson counties. http://www.tnhistoryforkids.org/places/harpeth_river

 

The Harpeth River is one of the major streams of north-central Middle Tennessee and one of the major tributaries of the Cumberland River.

The Harpeth rises in the westernmost part of Rutherford County, Tennessee, just to the east of the community of College Grove, in eastern Williamson County. The upper portion of the river has been contaminated to some extent by the operation of a lead smelting plant located near the Kirkland community which smelted recycled automobile batteries from the 1950s until the 1990s.

The stream flows generally westerly into the county seat of Williamson County, Franklin, which has become an affluent suburb of Nashville since the 1960s. The Harpeth has been put under a great strain by the growth of Franklin and the surrounding area, as it is both the source of the area's drinking water supply and the main site of its sewage disposal. Reportedly the Harpeth was navigable by shallow-draft vessels as far upstream as Franklin in the 19th century during periods of high flow; this is hard to envision today.

At Franklin, the course of the river turns more northwesterly; a few miles northwest of Franklin is the mouth of one of the Harpeth's main tributaries, the West Harpeth, which drains much of the southern portion of Williamson County. Near this site is an attractive antebellum plantation home called, appropriately enough, Meeting of the Waters. The river in this area flows quite near the Natchez Trace (the original road of that name, not the modern Parkway named for it, which is several miles distant). The river shortly crosses into Davidson County and receives the flow of the Little Harpeth River, another important tributary. The stream flows near the unincorporated Nashville suburb of Bellevue and shortly after this flows into Cheatham County.

The course of the river in Cheatham County is very meandering. A few miles into Cheatham County it is joined by the flow of another major tributary, the South Harpeth, which drains some of the southwestern portion of Davidson County, southeastern Cheatham County, and a small portion of northwesternmost Williamson County. In Cheatham County is a remarkable civil engineering feet of the early 19th century. At a place known as the "Narrows of the Harpeth", near a prehistoric site known as Mound Bottom— an area dotted with Native American ceremonial and burial mounds of the Mississippian culture— ironmaster Montgomery Bell built an iron mill, largely through the use of slave labor. At a seven mile (11 km) horseshoe bend, Bell's slaves under his direction cut a tunnel through apporoximately 200 yards (180 m) of solid rock, assisted only by black-powder blasting techniques, to build a diversion tunnel to power the mill, which Bell called "Pattison Forge" (often spelled, incorrectly, "Patterson") after his mother's maiden name. Bell was so pleased with this feat that he curtailed some of his other area operations and even built a home near the site. Today, the tunnel and some "slag" are about all that remains of the operation. The tunnel is a Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The tunnel and the sheef bluffs along the Narrows are now part of the Narrows of the Harpeth section of Harpeth River State Park, a linear park connecting several natural, historic, and archaeological sites along the lower Harpeth.

From this historic site, the flow becomes generally more northerly, but still greatly meandering. The Harpeth soon forms the line between Dickson County and Cheatham County for the last part of its course. A few miles above the mouth are what are known as the Three Islands; the United States Army Corps of Engineers proposed siting a dam near this location on several occasions and even did some preliminary study toward one, but a favorable cost-benefit ratio could never be satisfactorily shown and the project was never built. Partially because of this fact, the lower portion of the Harpeth is very popular with canoeists and canoe outfitting businesses exist to rent canoes to them, which is a popular summertime activity with youth groups especially. The mouth of the Harpeth into the Cumberland is near Ashland City, the Cheatham County seat. Near the mouth is a bridge on State Route 49 named in Montgomery Bell's honor. The mouth is just below the Cumberland's Harpeth Island, and is somewhat submerged by the backwaters of the Corps' Cheatham Dam.

The Harpeth is Middle Tennessee's second longest unimpounded steam (the longest being the Buffalo). The origin of the name "Harpeth" is controversial. It is often cited in the area that it is named for the legendary outlaw brothers of the early 19th century in the area, the Harp Brothers, "Big Harp" and "Little Harp"; this is erroneous, as the name exists on maps and documents predating their fame. A late 18th century map, published in London, purportedly shows the steam as the "Fairpath"; there is some dissension about whether the name is of Native American origin or perhaps a corruption of the rather common English name "Harper". There is no dispute that the title of the song "Harper Valley PTA" by Tom T. Hall is derived from this stream, indirectly. Hall, long an area resident, says that the song's name derives from Harpeth Valley Elementary School in Davidson County near Bellevue, but he also states that the song was definitely not based on any occurrence there; rather, he simply liked the sound of it.

The lower portion of the Harpeth is designated as a "scenic river" under the Tennessee Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harpeth_River

College Grove

Montgomery Bell

THE NARROWS OF THE HARPETH
CCHGA 21

    Located approximately three and one half miles to the North of Highway 70 and accessible by
Cedar Hill Road in Cheatham County you will find this historic site once the homesite of
Montgomery Bell which was destroyed by fire in 1929. You will find there also a man made tunnel
cut through the solid rock bluff, where the flow of the river turns a horseshoe bend, believed to

have been started around 1818 and completed by 1820 with slave labor under the direction of Mr
S. (Sam) W. Adkisson. Utilizing hand drills and black powder a tunnel with a 12 to 15 foot water
fall was created to turn wheels to operate heavy hammers to pound pig iron billets into malleable
bars and plates. The Tennessee Historical Commission recognized this engineering masterpiece and
nominated it to be placed on the Historical Register of Historical Places and the National Park
Service listed the Narrows on the National Register on April 16, 1971.

NOTE: SEE: Cheatham County Fact Book 1994 Published by the "Ashland City Times" With article by Fannie Lou Barfield

"Pattison Forge"

1779 Williamson County.—Beginning at a point forty poles due north of the dwelling-house of Thomas McCrory, on the waters of Little Harpeth; running, thence, east, two miles and one hundred and four poles; thence, south, seventy degrees, east, sixteen miles and two hundred and seventy poles; thence, due east sixteen miles and two hundred and seventy poles; thence, due south to the Indian boundary; thence, with said line, westwardly, to the Robertson County line; thence, with that line, north, to a point due west from the mouth of Little Harpeth; thence, a direct line to a point on South Harpeth, south-west from the mouth of said Little Harpeth; thence, north-east, to the mouth of said little Harpeth; thence, a direct line to the beginning.

http://www.tngenweb.org/cocke/ramseyappendix.htm

1780 - Later in the fall another party of Indians approached the Bluff Station in the night, stole a number of horses, loaded them with such goods and plunder as they could lay hands on and made their escape. The next morning Capt. James LEIPER, with a company of fifteen, pursued and overtook them on Harpeth River. When the savages heard the approach of the whites they made every effort to escape, but their horses, which were heavily loaded with the plunder stolen from the settlement, could make but little headway through the entangled undergrowth. At the first fire from Leiper's party the Indians fled, leaving the horses and plunder to their pursuers.  http://www.greatdreams.com/henry/patrick-henry.htm

1783 Charles "Robinson" was granted preemptive claim number 331 for 640 acres of land on the north side of the Great Harpeth River  Betty Goff Cook Cartwright and Lillian Johnson Gardiner, North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee, 1778-1791 (Memphis: Gardiner-Cartwright, 1958), 78. http://www.robertson-ancestry.com/1223-art.htm

 

Charles Robinson or Charles Robertson

 

Brother of General James Randolph Robertson

 

Nashville in February, 1783, that leaving the Commissioners, Isaac Bledsoe and A.Tatum, and the balance of the guard at the Harpeth Glades, on the Big South road, they set out South to ascertain the Southern boundary of the State, and to hunt a body of good land, to run out General Greene’s 25,000 acres somewhere. South of the line the Commissioners were running. They camped the first night between Harpeth and Flat Creek, about two miles from Duck River, and crossed Duck River at what was called the Shallow Ford and encamped the secbnd night on What they called Floating Camp Creek, now called Cedar Creek; third night on Robertson Fork, fourth night on a branch, of Bradshaw Creek, the next night on Bradshaw, stopping before twelve o’clock to take their latitude, and stayed there two or three nights. They were then one or one and a half miles from mouth of the creek. Rain fell that night so as to raise the Elk River past fording. The next morning they went to Elk, going about two miles, and struck the river where McCutcheon’s trace crossed it. Gen. Daniel Smith took the observations, and concluded they were in about three miles of the South boundary of the State. Their purpose was to make a canoe and send some of the party over to ascertain the Southern boundary; but there being a good deal of fresh Indian signs and Indian horses, they concluded not to cross the river, but to turn back after marking a number of trees, which place is now known by the marked trees, where McCutcheon’s trace crossed Elk River. (The place is on a high bluff on the North-side of the river, and is now called Latitude Hill.) States that they aimed to go South from the Harpeth Glades but at times discovered that they were off the course. They took observations several times; some of the names of the, company I were generally cut upon the trees, at each encampment. The. weather was very, cold and they cut not less than a dozen trees at each encampment for fire wood. Elijah Robertson named Robertson Fork, and probably Haywood. Gen. Robertson himself named Richland Creek. Bradshaw and Indian Creeks were named but does not state who named them. After they left the marked trees at Elk river they went up Indian, Creek, over to and up Buchanan Creek out to and down Haywood, where they camped the first night; over to and down Fountain Creek to near the fork where they camped the second night. From there they went a North-western course to the mouth of Little Bigby, and run out General Greene’s twenty-five thousand acres on the South side of Duck River, including the mouth of Little Bigby.  http://www.tngenweb.org/records/giles/mccallum/57-63.html

 

1784 ERA David Ralston, (ca.1741-1831) left two children, (Robert and Isabell), in County Tyrone and came to Pennsylvania (probably Armstrong County) where he married and started another family.  Before 1784 he was farming on White's Creek in Davidson County, Tennessee.  His son, Alexander, was a cabinetmaker with a mill on the Harpeth River in Williamson County, (later known as the Pettis Place).  Alexander wrote to his half-brother in Ireland and encouraged him to come to Tennessee.  Robert's son Andrew (1793-1863) decided to emigrate. Andrew and wife (Loveagh Wauchop 1790-1848) sent their money ahead to a bank (in New York?) and left Ireland ca. 1819.  A violent storm caused the voyage to be much longer than usual and they spent the money they had with them to buy food on the ship.  When they arrived, the bank had gone broke and they had no money to continue their journey.  Andrew lived in Pennsylvania for some time and his oldest sons Robert and David were born there.  He eventually came to Tennessee, by boat, down the Ohio and Cumberland Rivers.  Andrew rented a farm at Windrow until he bought land on Highway 99 near Eagleville.  The Ralston families who lived at Old Jefferson, Readyville, Nashville, Franklin, Pulaski, Martin, and Memphis were descended from David Ralston's large second family.  The Ralstons around Eagleville are descended from David's grandson Andrew. 

 

William H. Ralston 1835-1926 m. Mary F. Johnson    After the death of Martha, Samuel remarried twice  and had 9 children by wife number 2.

http://www.tngenweb.org/williamson/bios/Ralston/ralstondavid.htm

 

1792 March 15: Covenant made by John Kirkpatrick (Davidson Co. Wills & Inventories, Vol. 1, 1783-1816), John Kirkpatrick"sold & rcvd full satisfaction from my mother Jane Shannon for one negro woman named Cloe & her child Jude, which I sold unto Thos. Shannon and Rcvd a tract of land on the waters of the Harpeth River containing 360 acres adj a 476 acre tract entered in the name of John Kirkpatrick. I sold unto Robert Shannon a tract of land on the Harpeth River containing 274 acres. This 15 Mar. 1792. Wit: Isaac Johnston & James Donelson." http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/e/n/Michael-K-Hendrix/GENE1-0024.html

 

Isaac Johnston

 

Indenture on 11 Nov. 1795, made conveying 120 acres in Davidson Co. to John Kirkpatrick and Thos. & Robert Shannon from Isaac Johnston (all of Davidson Co.). Land is on the s. side of the Cumberland River on the waters of Richland Creek adj. Francis Hodges' preemption. Land granted to Hodge by patent of 26 June 1793.

 

James Donelson

 

John Kirkpatrick and Martha Buchanan 

 

 

i.

 

Henry Kirkpatrick, born Abt. 1790 in Davidson Co., TN; died Bef. October 1845 in Williamson Co., TN; married Mary M. (Polly) Watkins September 23, 1816 in Davidson Co., TN; died Unknown.

 

208

ii.

 

Samuel J. Kirkpatrick, born Abt. 1792 in Davidson Co., TN; died August 1863 in Claiborne Par., LA; married Jane [Templeton] Dobbins October 09, 1815 in Williamson Co., TN.

 

 

iii.

 

Elizabeth (Betsy) Kirkpatrick, born Abt. 1795 in Davidson Co., TN; died Unknown; married William Lynch June 18, 1816 in Davidson Co., TN; died Unknown.

 

 

iv.

 

Cynthia Kirkpatrick, born Abt. 1796 in Davidson Co., TN; died Unknown; married Alexander Craig September 05, 1811 in Davidson Co., TN; died Unknown.

 

 

v.

 

Jennie Kirkpatrick, born Abt. 1800 in Davidson Co., TN; died Unknown.

 

 

vi.

 

John Kirkpatrick, born Abt. March 14, 1802 in Davidson Co., TN; died Abt. February 22, 1862 in Williamson Co., TN; married [Catherine Anderson] Abt. August 08, 1823 in Williamson Co., TN; died Unknown.

 

 

More About John Kirkpatrick:
Burial: Unknown, [Joel Anderson Cem., Williamson Co., TN]

 

 

 

vii.

 

Thomas Jefferson Kirkpatrick, born January 11, 1806 in Davidson Co., TN; died May 01, 1844 in Madison Co., TN; married Anna Dobbins March 20, 1826 in Williamson Co., TN; born March 12, 1809 in TN; died March 02, 1899 in Claiborne Par., LA.

 

 

Notes for Thomas Jefferson Kirkpatrick:
(The will of Thomas J. Kirkpatrick was produced in Madison Co., TN court in May 1844 by David C. Robinson and Henry W. Kirkpatrick. John W. Love was named executor and John B. Robinson and William H. Dunaway were named for security.)

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/e/n/Michael-K-Hendrix/GENE1-0024.html

 

1793, Benjamin Johnson Davidson County, Tennessee Land Grant (Military) #2354, 390 acres, grant date May 20, 1793, entry # 118, Book 81, page 203, "on N. E. side of Harpeth River."

 

Benjamin Johnson

 

1799, Knox County, Tennessee Tax List.

Children of BENJAMIN JOHNSON and NANCY are:

2. i. GRIEF JOHNSON, b. November 10, 1786, South Carolina; d. October 16, 1862, Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

 

GRIEF JOHNSON (BENJAMIN1)2 was born November 10, 1786 in South Carolina, and died October 16, 1862 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. He married MARY HELLUMS March 24, 1807 in Knox County, Tennessee, daughter of WILLIAM HELLUMS and MARY BOX. She was born January 13, 1791 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died January 28, 1863 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

3. ii. EDMOND JOHNSON, b. Abt. 1788, South Carolina; d. Bef. October 24, 1821, Bibb County, Alabama.

4. iii. JOSIAH JOHNSON, b. Abt. 1790, South Carolina; d. Bef. July 02, 1832, Bibb County, Alabama.

5. iv. SARAH JOHNSON, b. Abt. 1790, South Carolina; d. 1870, Bibb County, Alabama.

6. v. LUKE JOHNSON, b. 1795, South Carolina; d. 1847, Tippah County, Mississippi.

7. vi. SOLOMON JOHNSON, b. Abt. 1792.

8. vii. NANCY JOHNSON, b. Abt. 1795, South Carolina; d. Aft. 1840, Mississipp  http://bibbcountyal.org/firstfamilies/johnsonbenj.htm

 

WILLIAM HELLUMS and MARY BOX

 

1793 Nov 26: North Carolina Land Grant # 1580 - Preemption of 26 Nov. 1793 by John Kirkpatrick for 476 acres in Davidson Co. assigned to John Boyd. Land is on waters of Big Harpeth on Arrington's Creek adj. Michael Kirkpatrick's 640 acres on the west. Surveyed for John Kirkpatrick 28 Feb. 1792 by Wm. Nash, D.S. (Isaac Johnston & Thos. Shannon, chain carriers) and described as " beginning at his (Michael Kirkpatrick's) SW corner at a sugar tree & hornbeam, west 195 poles to two sugar trees, north 390 poles
to an ash, east 195 poles to a stake, then south 390 poles to the beginning". This grant was in consequence of NC Military Warrant # 1382 signed by Richard Dobbs on 27 Apr. 1793. http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/e/n/Michael-K-Hendrix/GENE1-0024.html

 

1793 Nov 26: North Carolina Land Grant # 1585, 1586 & 1635 - Preemptions of 26 Nov. 1793 by Michael Kirkpatrick for 640, 640 and 360 acres in Davidson Co. assigned to Auther McDonald, David Burnsides and David Gallaspie, respectively. Lands are on the waters of the Big Harpeth on Arrington Creek, the first beginning about the middle of Gen. Sumner's west boundary line, the second joining John Kirkpatrick's 476 acres on the we stand the third joining a survey of his own on the south of 360 acres. The grants were in consequence of NC Military Warrants # 397, 222 and 161 signed by Richard Dobbs on 27 Apr. 1793. http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/e/n/Michael-K-Hendrix/GENE1-0024.html

 

1794 June 8, Indentures made on conveying 274 & 360 acres in Davidson Co. on the waters of the Big Harpeth on Arrington's Creek, the first joining John Kirkpatrick's survey on the south of 360 acres and the second joining John Kirkpatrick's 476 acre survey on the west, from John Kirkpatrick , heir-at-law of Michael Kirkpatrick, deceased, to Robert and Thomas Shannon, respectively. http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/e/n/Michael-K-Hendrix/GENE1-0024.html

 

1795 May 8: John MARTIN (Glasgow Co., NC) to WATSON, STOTT & Co. (Suffolk, Nansemond Co., Va.), 1000a on the N side of Cumberland River, adj. Simon BRIGHT’s 1000a tract; land was originally granted on 23 Aug 1789 to John McNEESE, and after his death fell to his sisters Polly McNEESE, Sary McNEESE, Hannah McNEESE and Nancy McNEESE; the sisters deeded the land on 3 Mar 1794 to MARTIN; also a 640a tract on the west side of the east fork of Drake’s Creek, adj. SHEPHERD’s grant #2309, which had originally been granted to Benjamin SHEPHERD on 13 Sep 1787 then conveyed on 9 Dec 1794 to MARTIN; also a 640a tract on Sulphur Fork of Red River, which had been granted to Martin Gardner SHEPHERD on 11 Jul 1788, then conveyed on 18 Mar 1794 to MARTIN; also a 274a tract on the south bank of Harpeth River, originally granted on 20 May 1793 to Oliver SMITH; also a 640a tract on the southwest side of Big Harpeth River on Jones Creek, about 2 miles above its mouth, originally granted on 20 May 1793 to Oliver SMITH; wit:  William FISHER, M. HANDY; 8 May 1795  http://www.tngenweb.org/stewart/deed/deed2.htm

1796 Era: Late in the eighteenth century as settlers began pouring into the rich bottom lands of the Harpeth River Valley, many of the early pioneers brought to their new homes, along with the pioneering spirit, a fervent belief in John Wesley’s doctrine of free grace, free will, and sanctification by good works- the basic tenets of Methodism. The often harsh winters, the arduous journey across the mountains from Virginia and North Carolina, and attacks from hostile natives gave Williamson County’s earliest settlers plenty of reason to pray. By the early years of the nineteenth century the Methodist congregations of Middle Tennessee were being served by circuit riders who, following the example of Francis Asbury, rode thousands of miles on horseback and braved extreme conditions to bring their enthusiasm for Wesley’s Methodist faith into local frontier communities.

McCrory’s land grant is one of the locations where the circuit riders held their camp meetings. Winter weather often forced worshippers to meet in local homes, but during the milder seasons many baptisms were held along the shady banks of the nearby Little Harpeth River. These popular gatherings often drew thousands of worshippers together to fire up their souls with some spirited sermonizing. In 1796 Major John Johnston, an Irish immigrant who fought in the Revolution, purchased this part of the McCrory grant. In 1803 Major Johnstone’s son Mathew built the first church on this property, a log cabin used by several denominations for the purpose of spiritual renewal. An early history of the congregation compiled by Lawrence Evans indicates that this building was located in the woods behind the present school building near the graveyard. It was apparently a small structure for when revivals were held, they generally took place in the grove by the Little Harpeth on the old Tyler place, then called the "Edney Camp Ground." People would come great distances and camp for days at a time, igniting their spirits with fire and brimstone oration, uniting their hearts with the old hymns that rang in their heads long afterwards, and nourishing their families and friends with savory dishes from long cherished family recipes.

31 Oct 1798 - 19 Nov 1815 (Dickson TN DBB: 464) Samuel BARTON to Charles CAMPBELL 140 A in behalf of his son John CAMPBELL, Charles CAMPBELL & Amy, his wife; land on Barton's CREEK below Harpeth River; land was granted to Joseph SETGREAVE by a military warrant. Made 31 Oct 1798. Reg. 19 Nov 1815. Wits: James McCUTCHEON of Williamson County, Charles CAMPBELL. ("Dickson Co, Tennessee Handbook," Jill Knight Garrett, SHP, 1984, Easley, SC, p. 166)

Harpeth River

Samuel BARTON

Charles CAMPBELL

Amy CAMPBELL

son John CAMPBELL

Joseph SETGREAVE

James McCUTCHEON of Williamson County

 

1799 Williamson County was formed from Davidson County

 
1804 Feb 29: Robert SEARCY and Robert William SEARCY (Mero District) to James BIGGS and Nathan DAVIDSON (Philadelphia, PA), their ½ acre house lot in Franklin, Williamson Co., TN; also 2 acre lots in Nashville (#17 & #147); also 160a on Richland Creek near Nashville (whereon William KINNEY lives); also 640a in Wilson Co. on Pond Lick Creek (NC grant #2472 to George WALKER); also 640a in Wilson Co. including the Pond Lick (conveyed 19 Sep 1798 to SEARCY from Samug HOGG); also 428a in Rutherford Co. on the E fork of Stones River near the mouth of Aceralls Creek; also 188a in Montgomery Co. on McAdoo Creek (adj. John DRAKE, Jonathan DRAKE’s heirs, Robert WEAKLEY); also Dyers Island in Stewart County on the Cumberland River (NC grant #227 to SEARCY); also 640a in Williamson Co. on the eastern waters of the South Harpeth (adj. Duncan STEWART and granted by NC #3417 to SEARCY); wit:  Robert WHYTE, W. SEARCY; 29 Feb 1804 http://www.tngenweb.org/stewart/deed/deed1.htm
 
1806, the widow Hannah Blackshear married Isaac Mairs. The inventory of the estate of Jesse Blackshear included 126 acres of land on the Big Harpeth River, bricklayer tools, shoemaker tools, three Bibles, two testaments, other books, a tame deer, and numerous other items
 
Jesse Blackshear

Jesse Blackshear and his wife Hannah were members of the Dillahunty party that came from Jones County, North Carolina, to Williamson County, Tennessee, in the 1790's. They seem to have settled in Williamson County immediately because they paid taxes there in 1800, the first year that taxes were assessed in the county after its formation in 1799.

Jesse Blackshear died in 1803 leaving in addition to his wife Hannah, minor children Luke, David, Elijah, Jacob, and Jesse. Note that they were all Biblical names. Ezekiel (another Biblical name) and possibly another child were of age at the father's death. Zacheus German was appointed guardian for the minor children.

 
 

288

BARRACRAFT, Daniel

100

Wms

Harpeth R

S8 R4

29 Sep 1807

CC Jesse Mize, Jno Cidwell.

http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1-620.html 
 

289

HILL, John

200

Wms

Big Harpeth R

S8 R4

29 Sep 1807

CC Danl Barracraft, Jos Ringegar.

http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1-620.html 
 
1808 Williamson Co, TN Tax List included only Hightower DODSON [land on West Harpeth and William DODSON (no poll tax, over 50) [land on Murphree's Fork]. http://www.tngenweb.org/giles/families/dodson.html 
 

357

JENKINS, Nimrod

109

Wms

Big Harpeth

______

05 May 1808

CC Jno T Williams, Jeremiah Wade. AT David Barcraft.

http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1-620.html 
 

435

HILL, John

32

Wms

H of Big Harpeth

S8 R4

07 May 1808

CC Wm Hill, Jesse Mizi. AT Davd Fullerton, Jno Clark, Danl Barcraft, Nimrod Jenkins

http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1-620.html 
 

436

HILL, John

50

Wms

H of Big Harpeth

S8 R4

06 May 1808

CC Bolen Reems, David McKay. AT Nimrod Jenkins, D Fullterton, D Barcraft.

http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1-620.html 
 

450

McCUSTAIN, Benjamin

125

Wil

H of E Fk of Big Harpeth R

S8 R3

04 Apr 1808

CC Saml Engram, Thos Landram.

Index shows "McKuistan

http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1-620.html 
 

536

MISE, Jesse

48

Wms

H Big Harpeth

______

07 May 1808

CC Tavis? Kelly, Wm Hill. AT Jno Hill, Schools.

http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1-620.html
 

1463

HILL, John

70

Wms

Big Harpeth

______

16 Feb 1809

CC Jeremiah Burns & Jno Smith

 
http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1036-1808.html 
 

1470

PATTERSON, William

50

Wms

Big Harpeth near Bradlys Gap

______

16 Feb 1809

CC Jeremiah Burns & Jno Smith.

 
http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1036-1808.html
 

1476

CANNON, Newton &

25

Wms

waters of Big Harpeth

______

15 Feb 1809

CC Jno Hill & Joel Holbert. AT Jno Hill.

 
http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1036-1808.html
 

1477

CANNON, Clement

10

Wms

waters of Big Harpeth

_______

16 Feb 1809

CC Jermiah Burnes & Jno Smith. AT Jno Hill.

 
http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1036-1808.html
 

1478

CANNON, Clement

5

Wms

H Big Harpeth

______

16 Feb 1809

CC Jerimiah Burns & Jno Smith. AT Jno Hill.

 

1479

CANNON, Newton &

25

Wms

waters of Big Harpeth

______

15 Feb 1809

CC Jno Hill & Jesse Hobert. AT Benj McCuistian, Jno Hill.

 

1479

THOMPSON, Jason

0

""

""

""

""

""

 

 
http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/1036-1808.html
 

1800 ERA  The house in the accompanying picture has been a home for many well-known families in Thompson's Station since it was built. In 1800, Francis and Mary White Giddens sold their 825 acres in Virginia and with their six children and 24 slaves, found their way over the mountains to the Thompson's Station area.

Shortly after their arrival here, they acquired land along Murfree's Fork. This is one of the largest tributaries of the West Harpeth River and has its beginning near Thompson's Station.

they built a log home on this land at the site of the house in the picture and lived there until the completition of Homestead Manor in 1819. These two properties back up to each other.

The original log home was replaced in 1870-71 by Mr. and Mrs. William Douglas Lavender. Mrs. Lavender (Nannie) was a sister-in-law of William Giddens Moss, a descendant of Francis Giddens. William Giddens Moss was the grandfather of Malcolm Moss Gibbs, a present day resident of the community.

During the razing of the log house a large sword, some four and a half feet long, was found. It was probably a relic of Francis Giddens' service in the Revolutionary War.

Mr. Lavender is buried in the Giddens family cemetery behind Homestead Manor along with Joseph and Robert Cochran Lavender, probably his sons.

An interesting incident concerning the Lavender property was that 5,400 square feet of land was annexed by T. J. Timmons (owner of Homestead Manor at the time) through a deed from Mrs. Martha Louise Moss Kennedy, March 24, 1903. This piece of land lies on the southwest corner of the Homestead Manor farm and was desired by Mr. Timmons in order to give access to a small segment of the creek arising from the main spring at the junction of the Lavender and Giddens line. In exchange Mrs. Kennedy was granted a road, leading from the right-of-way of Columbia Pike, twelve feet wide to the cemetery with the same width entirely around the cemetery and the land enclosed within.

John Edward Howard and his wife, the former Nora Rainey of Maury County owned the house next. They had two children, Edward Howard and Margaret Howard who married Sam Kinnard of Columbia. John Edward Howard was also a brother to Mrs. Cora Watson and Mrs. Manie Redman.

Mr. Howard had a store that sat on the road in front of his house. This store was later run by Joe Greer Nichols and, still later, by Vester and Lois Early. It burned in February, 1950.

The next family to occupy this house was the Owens but it is thought by the residents they only lived there and did not own the property.

Mr. Fred Kinnard and his wife, the former Miss James Anderson, owned the house from 1939 until 1973 when they moved to Third Avenue in Franklin. They had three children, Walter Cannon, Margaret Elizabeth and Anna McKay. After the Kinnards, the house was owned by the Cherry family for a short while before being purchased by Sarah and Craig Benson in 1976. Sarah Benson is one of the aldermen for the Town of Thompson's Station. She and Craig have two daughters, Rachel and Helen.

The house has remained basically the same with its nine large rooms which were built by the Lavenders. Bathrooms were added from a back porch by later owners. The Bensons have added a spacious, screened-in porch on the south side. However, the house retains its comfortable, Victorian farmhouse look of the 1870 era. http://www.tngenweb.org/williamson/history/tsfamhisB.html

 

1800 ERA: Adam Derryberry, the first of the Derryberry name in Maury County, married Eve Liggett about 1776, probably in North Carolina. They were appropriately named for the progenitors of the Derryberry family in this area.

Adam was born about 1745, to John and Ann Derryberry, possibly in New Jersey or Virginia. Little is known of John, other than land records and mention in a census of 1778 in Burke County, N.C. He was apparently dead by the 1790 census when Ann is listed as a widow. It is possible that John was one of the Derryberry immigrants who came into New Jersey, 1738-40. These Derryberrys, bearing the spellings of Torenberger and Durenberger, arrived from Germany through Rotterdam, Holland and settled among French Huguenots in the German Valley of New Jersey. Soon after their arrival, they began spelling the name Duraberry, Terryberry and Derryberry. (It is possible that the Derryberrys may have originally been French, because of the spelling they chose for the name shortly after settling in America and because there was an ancient village in southern France called D'Iriberry, near where a few of the name Diriberry still live). Most of the Terryberrys went north to Michigan and Canada. John Derryberry appears in North Carolina records in 1778 and perhaps was there earlier. There is mention in one deed of "the old Terryberry land" which might connect these Derryberrys with the immigrants who settled in New Jersey.

Adam had six brothers, John, Jr, Michael, Daniel, George, Jacob and Andrew Buck. He sold his land in Burke County in 1795 and moved his family through the Cumberland Gap into Kentucky, where they sojourned for a few years, and then down into the Williamson Co. area around 1800. He and Jacob held land in Williamson County when Maury was formed from it. They had first settled near the Harpeth River, where the damp conditions had caused a fever epidemic that killed some of the family. Moving away from the river, they settled in the Lasea area near Flat Creek. There Adam and Jacob built the family home in 1802 in what was then Williamson County. The house is now the oldest standing edifice in Maury County.

Adam died before 1840 and was buried in the cemetery Jacob had established. Little is known of Eve Liggett. She died after 1840 and was buried next to Adam. Their graves were marked with fieldstones, which disappeared sometime in the 1950s. When the Adam Derryberry House was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990, Adam's descendants erected a memorial marker to Adam and Eve in the Old Jacob Derryberry Cemetery.

Adam and Eve Derryberry had six sons, Jacob, Samuel, Daniel, John, Andrew, and Thomas, and three daughters, Caty, Christina, and Elizabeth. Most of the Derryberrys in the Maury - Middle Tennessee areas are descendants of Adam and Eve. Descendants of Adam's brother, Andrew Buck, settled in Madison Co., TN, and most of the Derryberrys in West Tennessee descend from him. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tnmaury/biotext.htm

1800 Nov 20  Peter Looney sold 100 acres in Williamson County, Tennessee, to James Scurlock.

Peter Looney

1810 Peter Looney sold 160 acres on Harpeth River in Williamson County to Nch. Milburn. Also in 1810 he purchased Lot No. 22 in Fayetteville, Lincoln County. (Lincoln Co Minutes 1, p 67.) http://home.flash.net/~johnsonl/p6_11_15.htm

James Scurlock

Nch. Milburn

The proceedings of the Churches in conference on Saturday before the first Lords day (May 1803) at Whites Creek Church of Davidson County by the churches who had withdrawn their membership from the Mero Association. The conference opened with prayer, then Brother Joshua White was chosen and elected as the moderator and Brother Suggs Fort, was elected as the clerk. The churches present were: Whites Creek, Richland Creek, Red River, Big Harpeth, Drakes Creek, Buffalo Creek, in Davidson County. http://www.tngenweb.org/stewart/SBACR.htm

1803 July 4: This Indenture made fourth day of July in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and three between John Dickson of the County of Cumberland and the State of North Carolina of the one part and Hudson Johnson of the County of Williamson and the State of Tennessee of the Other Part. Witness that the said John Dickson for and in consideration of the sum of seven hundred silver dollars to him in hand paid by the said Hudson Johnson at and before sealing and signing of these presents the receipt and payment where of is hereby acknowledged he the said John Dickson for himself and his heirs doth hereby bargain and sell alien inefafe and confirm unto him the said Hudson Johnson his heirs executors and signs forever a certain peice or parcel of land situated and being in ROBERTSON County and the State of Tennessee aforesaid bounded as follows on the Southside of Cumberland River and on both sides of the upper fork of Bartons Creek below Harpeth. Beginning West side of said fork at a Mulberry and Gum the second corner of the Patent and also now John NESBITS corner thence South crossing the creek at fifty poles Eighty chains to a Gum and Sassifras thence West thirty five Chains to a stake thence with TEIRS AND NICHOLS lines North eighty chains to a white oak. John Nesbits corner thence with his line East thirty five chains to the beginning and containing two hundred and eighy acres of land it being a part of the contents of a Military Grant no 1193 granted to William COCHRAN the 30th day of Nov. one thousand seven hundred and ninety and by the said COCHRAN conveyed to the foresaid John DICKSON by deed of Conveyance bearin date the twenty fourth day of March one thousand seven hundred and ninety one and duly recorded which said piece or parcel of land with all ways waters and woods and every other appurtenances there unto belonging or appertaining to the said John Dickson for himself his heirs Executors and Administrators and assigns forever hath hereby sold set over conveyed released and confirmed in open market to the said Hudson Johnson his heirs Executors Administrators or assigns that the said John Dickson for himself his heirs Executors and Administrators shall and will warrant and forever defend the said piec or parcel of land with all and every of its members and appurtenances free from all lawful claims of any person or person whatsoever unto the said Hudson Johnson his heirs and Executors and Administrators and assigns foreve.In witness whereof the said John Dickson hath uhere unto set his hand and seal this day and year above written::: Signed in Presence of NICHOLAS SEALES::ROBERT EDMONSON AND JOHN FARRAR.

John DICKSON

Research Notes:  According to A T Outlaw's Sep 1937 article in the Duplin Times, "Col John Dickson was a very wealthy and influential citizen of Cumberland Co, [NC]. He was one of the founders of the First Presbyterian Church in Fayetteville, [NC], and served as an elder for many years. He was also a legislator and militia officer."
John's Uncle William Dickson commented in a letter dated 28 Dec 1790, "My Brother Robert's Eldest Son John Dickson is Just returned from the Settlement on the Cumberland & Holston Rivers where he has been near twelve month in the office of a Surveyor, he informs that the Crops of Indian Corn there will generally average 60 bushels p acre, which is more than four times the quantity that our common Land will produce here in the middle of North Carolina. The Country is Setling [sic] fast, on his way home he met near four hundred families moving to that Country, they were chiefly from Virginia and the uper [sic] parts of North Carolina. The . . . prinicpal Town Erected on Cumberland River is Nashville,"

Notes: 1779 June 10 to June 10 1780: Henry County list of Surveys By John Dickson and Assoc.

Notes: John Nesbitt:

 

Bartons Creek below Harpeth Robertson Co.

 

1803 August 10 The petition of a number of the citizens of Davidson and Williamson Counties humbly sheweth that the vast extent of said counties renders it inconvenient for your petitioners to attend Courts, General Musters, Elections, etc. at the towns of Nashville and Frandklin, and there being a sufficiency of territory agreeable to the Constitution, to form a new county within the bounds hereafter to be described and leaving constitutional quanities within the bound of the old counties. We your petiitoners therefore pray that you will consider our situation and grant us a new county with the following boundaries , viz: beginning on the top of the ridge dividing the waters of Stones River and Mill Creek, in the Williamson County line, and run southwardly with said ridge so as to leave all the waters of Mill Creek and Harpeth in Williamson County, until the ridge intersects the now Eastern boundary of said Williamson County;- thence conntinue South with said line of Williamson County to the South boundary of this State;-thence with the line of Wilson County North and NorthWestwardly continuing with said county line to an elm and white ash, the corner of said county, which is North East from the mouth of Hurricane Creek, which is four miles and thirty six poles; thence from the mouth of Hurricane Creek South West to the top of the first mentioned ridge; thence with said ridge Southwardly to the beginning. And your petitioners, as in duty bound, will ever pray.
August 10, 1803 http://www.tngenweb.org/rutherford/petition1.htm

 

1807 Maury County was formed from Williamson County and Indian lands.

 

Several early North Carolina land grants were made on the waters of Flat and other creeks or along Duck River. An early popular migratory route into what is now Maury County was from North Carolina, through the Cumberland Gap to Kentucky, down the Cumberland River to the Harpeth river and into the granted land. http://www.tngenweb.org/maury/history/historyindex.htm

 

778

REEMS, Bolin

200

Rut

Big Harpeth

______

06 May 1808

CC Davd McKay, John Hill, Joel Holbert, Stephen Smith. AT Jno Hill.

 

http://www.tngenweb.org/warren/2sd/621-1035.html

 

1808 ERA John Watson (1778-1851) married Jane Reese in 1808. They built the house called "The Willows" on West Harpeth Road which was destroyed by a tornado in 1920. It was home to the Boyd Ridley Critz family for many years.

John and Jane Watson had at least six children: Dr. Beverly Oscar Watson who married Margaret H. Nichol; Thomas Josephus Watson who married Susan Catherine Puryear, daughter of Mordecai and Sarah Reese Puryear; Jane E. Watson who married Stephen S. Bradley; Marietta S. Watson who married Jordan Puryear; Letitia J. Watson who married David M. Currin; and, John J. Watson.

Dr. Beverly Oscar Watson (1810-1857) graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1834. He and Margaret had ten children: Elizabeth A. Watson who married Thomas A. Crutcher; Jennie Watson (1840-1920); Marietta T. Watson (1839-1841); Ida Watson; Eva Watson; Stanton Puryear Watson (1847-1925) who married Alice Turner (1856-1933); Laura D. Watson (1850-1916); Florence Watson; Maggie Oscar Watson; and Augustus P. H. Watson.

Stanton and Alice Watson had four children: Gus Watson (1879-1952) who married Cora Howard, daughter of John Edward Howard, Sr. and the former Laura Walton; Irby Turner Watson (1884-1950) who married Hattie Martha Tulloss; and, Beverly Oscar Watson, II who was born August 22, 1882 but died at age 33.

http://www.tngenweb.org/williamson/history/tsfamhisUZ.html

1808 Nov 26  - (Dickson TN DBB:466) Charles CAMPBELL of Williamson County to James CAMPBELL of Williamson County; part of tract granted to John SEGRAVES [sic], heir of Joseph SEGRAVE [sic], assignee of William Combs, land originally granted by North Carolina; land on Barton's Creek. made 26 Nov 1808.Reg. 22 Nov 1815. ("Dickson Co, Tennessee Handbook," Jill Knight Garrett, SHP, 1984, Easley, SC, p. 166)

 http://www.combs-families.org/combs/records/tn/dick.htm

William Combs,

Notes: The above William Combs not identified; however, this land was in Davidson Co, TN in 1787, then Old Tennessee, which was later split into Montgomery and Robertson Cos in 1796, with Dickson created from these two counties in 1803. (See Also Revolutionary War Records of NC re William Combs who may have been Revolutionary Pensioner William Combs of Wilkes Co, NC, Charlotte Co, VA and Sullivan County, TN.

 http://www.combs-families.org/combs/records/tn/dick.htm

 

Charles CAMPBELL of Williamson

James CAMPBELL of Williamson County

John SEGRAVES

Joseph SEGRAVE

 

 
 
1810 Died on Harpeth River: Gen. Henry Rutherford removed many years afterward to Williamson County, Tennessee, and settled on little Harpeth, where he lived until his death. about 1810. His wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Governor Graham, of North Carolina.

Gen. Henry Rutherford

Henry Rutherford was born in Rowan County, North Carolina August 17, 
1762, and was the second son of Gen'l. Griffith Rutherford, of that 
State.
 

1812 A deed shows John Thompson buying 2000 acres on the headwaters of the West Harpeth River in Williamson County from Jesse Jones, Jr.

Elijah Thompson was born July 5, 1805 in Campbell County, Virginia, the son of John Thompson (1775-1859) and his wife, Elizabeth (c. 1770-1854). They are buried on a hill on the north side of the Harpeth-Peytonsville-Arno Road with Fleming family members.

In his will, written 47 years later, John Thompson divided his large holdings among his sons, Absolom, Elijah and George W. and his sons-in-laws, Samuel Fleming, Sr. and William Fleming, Sr. Mixey Thompson had married William Fleming in 1815 and Jane Thompson had married Samuel Fleming in 1819. Mixey and

William Fleming had five children - Elizabeth, Samuel, Elmyra, John Thompson and William. This family's home was "Sunnyside" which was on Columbia Highway at the Goose Creek By-Pass before it burned several years ago. This is the same "Sunnyside" occupied by the Beaumont Anderson family in later years.

Elijah Thompson was a prominent state legislator, physician and planter. He lived on the farm now known as Laurel Hill on Columbia Highway before establishing a home in this community on the east side of the turnpike, afterwards owned by Dr. Hiram A. Laws, who had married one of Dr. Thompson's daughters, Mary Emma Thompson.

He "read" medicine under Dr. William G. Dickinson of Franklin and received his medical degree in 1830 from Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky. He was elected to the Medical Society of Tennessee and practiced medicine and farmed at Thompson's Station.

Dr. Thompson was also a teacher of medicine and five of his students are known; Samuel Fleming, William Fleming, Isaac House, William Thompson and David H. Dungan, another son-in-law.

Dungan's wife, Alice Thompson, was the young girl who saw the color-bearer of the Arkansas regiment fall during the Battle of Thompson's Station and rushed to take up the flag and waved it over her head, shouting encouragement to the Confederate troops.

Dr. Thompson served as a surgeon during the Civil War. Dr. Hiram A. Laws, III, one of his descendants, has one of two brass candlesticks which were held on each side of the operating table to enable him to operate at night.

Dr. Thompson was married three times - in 1826 to Amelia H. Buford, in 1841 to Mary Ann Riley and in 1863 to Susan E. Elbeck. His ten children were born during his second marriage.

He served in the 23rd and 28th sessions of the House of the Tennessee General Assembly and was responsible and faithful in carrying out his duties.

Dr. Thompson died May 11, 1871, in his 66th year after a protracted and very painful illness and is buried on the old homeplace now located on West Thompson's Station Road.

He was buried with Masonic honors, about 65 Masons being in the procession, consisting of parts of the Spring Hill, Bethesda and Franklin lodges. The burial service was performed by the Franklin Lodge at the request of the Spring Hill Lodge.

The religious services were conducted by the Rev. Thompson, a nephew of Dr. Thompson and by Dr. Hanner of Franklin, assisted by Maj. N. F. Cheairs of Spring Hill and others. Prayers were offered by Dr. Malley.

If Dr. Thompson had diligently collected from his patients, he would have been one of the wealthiest men in the county. He was loved by all who knew him and, it may be, this to him was the best pay of all. http://www.tngenweb.org/williamson/history/tsfamhisST.html

 
1814 Died Neil Thompson wife is Betty apparently settled at the confluence of Turnbull Creek with the Harpeth River near what is now Kingston Springs.  Their property ownership extended up the Turnbull on the north side and included what was known as Hurricane Creek.  Several old family letters give clues as to the possible location of the graves of Neil and Betty Thompson.  http://www.tngenweb.org/dickson/thompsons_of_turnbull_creek.htm 

1816 May 13: Deed Bk. D, p.452 - Heirs of John Stewart, dec'd, from Thos. Molloy's Exrs. - John Overton and James Mulherrin, Exrs. of Thos. Molloy, dec'd. The heirs of John Stewart, dec'd; Thomas Stewart, Jennth Key and the heirs of Robert Stewart to wit: John Stewart, Esther Stewart, Thomas Stewart and Jane Stewart. Thos. Molloy of Davidson Co. in his lifetime executed his bond to John Stewart...... for $411....... 274 acres of land in Davidson Co. on the Harpeth River....... dated 7 Mar. 1797  http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/e/n/Michael-K-Hendrix/GENE1-0024.html

 

1818 ERA:  If you go about a quarter mile west along Cedar Hill Road you will come to the Narrows of the Harpeth, where the Harpeth River comes within a few hundred feet of where the river returns, seven miles downstream. In 1818, a businessman named Montgomery Bell bought this land and (with the help of slaves) dug a tunnel through the embankment that separates the two sides of the Narrows of the Harpeth. In doing so, he created enough moving water to power a forge, known as the Pattison Forge, that was used to turn large pieces of raw pig iron into smaller and more malleable pieces. Most of those were then sold to small manufacturers (such as blacksmiths).  http://www.tnhistoryforkids.org/places/harpeth_river

Pattison Forge,

Montgomery Bell

1824Jul 5 p. 34, "Nicholas Perkins, Jr., Entry 5, , 536 acres lying on the ridge dividing the waters of the Big Harpeth from the south, beginning near a branch that runs into Donaldson's Creek to Samuel Bryan's 25 acre tract - Joseph Orton's 25 acre survey, Mairse's 640 acre tract now owned by John David, 640 acre tract entered by Thomas H. Perkins in the name of Burks Litterals survey." http://www.tngenweb.org/williamson/bios/family/ortonjoseph.htm

 

1828 August 7, Died Francis Hardgraves : Born March 5, 1745 wife is  Sarah: Born 1751- Died November 30, 1832. Horseshoe Bend Hardgrave Cemetery, Williamson County, Tennessee 
Johnson Hardgrave  Was born Dec the 14 1802 and died the 22 of April 1825
 
DIRECTIONS TO THIS CEMETERY:  In the southwest corner of Nashville, Davidson County is a large city park, Warner Parks.  From Old Hickory Blvd. in the
park go south on Vaughn Rd. until you cross the Little Harpeth River which is the park boundary and the county line between Davidson and Williamson Counties.  Within 200 yards on the right is the entrance to a large, upscale housing development, Horseshoe Bend, clearly labeled on the entrance sign. mail CharlieDoggett@Home.com
or call (615) 834-1976 or write me at 5510 Country Dr. #122, Nashville, TN

37211-6449. http://files.usgwarchives.org/tn/williamson/cemeteries/horse.txt

1831 Mathew Johnson deeded the land to the Methodist Episcopal Church which later became the UMC. The spelling of the chapel’s name has streamlined over the years from Johnstone to Johnson. One of the early ministers serving the congregation on this site is Levin Edney, who presided over many of the popular camp meetings and is believed to be the first minister to hold services at Johnson’s Chapel.

William B. Carpenter was born in Virginia in 1792 and his family was among the many who joined the westward migration as Americans trudged across the eastern mountain ranges and descended the rivers of the beckoning frontier. After arriving on the Little Harpeth and beginning his ministry, Carpenter was appointed an itinerant Methodist preacher in 1820. As a circuit riding minister he gave sermons in various residences throughout Wilson, Davidson, and Williamson Counties, traveling on horseback and finding lodging among the welcoming households of a widespread congregation. This was a rough and precarious existence and we must marvel at the spiritual strength and physical fortitude of these early firebrands of the Christian faith.

In 1825 Carpenter rode to Shelbyville to a district conference to receive full ordination as a Methodist minister. In addition to delivering inspiring sermons, Reverend Carpenter and the circuit riders would conduct weddings, funerals, and camp meetings in the outlying wilderness communities. Few of the early itinerant preachers lasted long at this grueling lifestyle, and within a few years Rev. Carpenter’s health began to deteriorate. Although Carpenter gave up circuit riding, he continued to preach and in 1835 bought the old McCrory place near Johnsons Chapel. By this time the church and its adjoining cemetery were institutions in the Methodist community on the Little Harpeth River.

http://www.johnsonschapel.org/custpage.cfm/frm/9017/sec_id/9017

 

McCrory’s land grant

Major John Johnston

Mathew Johnston

old Tyler place

Edney Camp Ground

Levin Edney

William B. Carpenter

 

 

 

The county of Williamson contains three thousand and upwards of qualified voters, according to the enumeration of 1833, and we have laid off said county into twenty-five districts, as follows: 

No. I. - Beginning at the north west corner of Williamson county, running south with the west boundary line of the same, to the top of the ridge, between the waters of Turn Bull and Lick Creek; thence east, with said ridge, around the head waters of Turn Bull and South Harpeth; thence north, along the dividing ridge between the waters of West Harpeth and the Little East Fork of South Harpeth, to the Davidson county line, between where Turner DAVIS and Maj. Benjamin PRICHARD now live; thence west, with the line of the same, to the beginning. And we have, at the time of laying off said district, designated the house of John GRAHAM in said district, as a suitable place, as near the center of said district as practicable, for the purpose of holding elections for the election of officers, &c.

No. II. - Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the south west corner of the first district; thence south with the Hickman and Williamson county lines to the south west corner of Williamson county; thence east, with the line of said county, to the top of the ridge between the waters of Leiper’s Lick and Carter’s Creeks of Duck River and Murfree’s Fork of West Harpeth; thence a north east course, with the old Hunter’s path along said ridge, to John JOHNSTON’s; thence a straight course to Capt. BLACKBURN’s, including said BLACKBURN; thence a straight course so as to include Joseph COWAN; thence north so as to include Joseph COOK and Tapley LIGHTFOOT, and crossing the Centreville road at the new bridge on the Garrison fork of Leiper’s Fork; thence due north to the south boundary of the first district; thence west, with the line of the same, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Thompson DAVIS as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. III. Bounded as follows; - Beginning on West Harpeth at Mrs. BOYD’s ford, running west, with the dividing ridge between Mrs. HUGH’s and Wyatt HALY’s, to the east boundary line of the first district; thence south, along the line of the same, to the north east corner of the second district; thence, with the east boundary of said district, to the head waters of Bear Creek; thence, along the dividing ridge between Murfree’s Fork and Bear Creek, to where the road, leading from Maj. BURNETT’s to Franklin, crosses Murfree’s Fork; thence with said road, to West Harpeth; thence down said creek to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of James ADAMS, in Hillsborough, as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. IV. Bounded as follows: - Beginning where the road, leading from Maj. BURNETT’s to Franklin crosses West Harpeth; thence west, with said road, to Murfree’s Fork; thence, with the line of the third district, to the east boundary line of the second district; thence south, with said line, to the Maury county line; thence east, with the line of the same, to the Columbia road; thence north, with said road, to West Harpeth; thence down said creek to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Joseph YATES, at Sulpher Springs in said district, as a suitable placed for holding elections, &c.

No. V. Bounded as follows: - Beginning where the Columbia road crosses West Harpeth; thence north, with said road, to Fountain B. CARTER’s; thence, a straight course, to Sharp’s branch just above Tilman F. ATKEISON; thence down said branch, to Big Harpeth river; thence down the same, to the mouth of West Harpeth, thence up said creek to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of James SOUTHALL as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. VI. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the mouth of West Harpeth; thence, down Big Harpeth river, to the Davidson county line, thence west, with the county line, to the north east corner of the first district; thence south, with the east boundary of said district, to the north west corner of the third district; thence east, with said district, to West Harpeth; thence, down the same, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Robert HILL as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. VII. Bounded as follows: - Beginning where the county line crosses Big Harpeth river; thence up said river to the mouth of Hurricane Creek, near D.P. PERKIN’s; thence east, with said creek, to the dividing ridge between the waters of Spencer’s Creek and Little Harpeth; thence north with the dividing ridge between Beech Creek and Little Harpeth; thence, to a point between Matthew JOHNSTON and Henry WILLIAMSON; thence north crossing Little Harpeth, to the county line; thence west, with said line, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Wm. LEATON as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. VIII. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the mouth of Hurricane Creek near Daniel P. PERKIN’s; thence up Big Harpeth river to where the Commissioners trace road crosses the same, near Nichol’s Mill; thence north, with said road, to Donnelson’s Creek; thence east, with said creek, so as to include Ruffin BROWN; thence to the dividing ridge between Little Harpeth and Spencer’s Creek; thence, with said ridge, to the head of Hurricane Creek; thence down said creek to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Mrs. Gracey GOFF as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. IX. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the mouth of Sharp’s branch; thence up said branch and the line of the fifth district to the Columbia road, including F. B. CARTER and T. F. ATKEISON; thence a straight course to Big Harpeth so as to include C.H. (tear in the page) es; thence down said river to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the Court House in the town of Franklin as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. X. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at F. B. CARTER’s, on the Columbia road; thence south, with said road, to West Harpeth; thence up said creek to the mouth of the branch on which S. H. KINNARD lives, thence up said branch to the said KINNARD’s; thence a straight line to the head of Neely’s branch near BROOK’s; thence north, with said branch, to Big Harpeth, thence down the same to the south east corner of the ninth district; thence west, with the line of the same, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, Douglas Camp Ground as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XI. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at West Harpeth where the Columbia road crosses the same; thence south, with said road, to the Maury county line, thence east, with said line, to the Hall’s ford road; thence north, with said road, to the ridge north of Mrs. BUGG’s; thence a north east course so as to include George LAVENDER and John D. WARREN; thence to the top of the ridge, including Cornelius MATTHEWS; thence, with said ridge, to the south east corner of the 10th district; thence west, with the line of the same, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the store house of M. M. ANDREWS at Pinkney Post Office, as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XII. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the south east corner of the eleventh district thence east, with the county line, to a point near Reubec REYNOLD’s; thence north to Andrew Ervin's; thence with the road leading from Franklin to the Duck River ridge; thence west, with said ridge, to the north east corner of the eleventh district; thence south, with the line of the same to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, Horton's Camp Ground as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XIII. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the mouth of Neely’s branch; thence south, with the east boundary line of the tenth district, to the south east corner of the same, including Hezekiah Smithson, Sr.; thence eastwardly with the Duck River ridge, to McCall's gap; thence north, with McCrory’s Creek to Big Harpeth thence down the same to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the store house of Andrew Campbell, at Snatchett, as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XIV. Bounded as follows: - Beginning where the Commissioners' road crosses Big Harpeth; thence up said river to the mouth of Arrington's creek; thence up said creek to the road leading from Petersburg to Nashville; thence north, wiyh said road, to the dividing ridge between the waters of Little Harpeth and Hay's creek; thence west with said ridge, to the south east corner of the eighth district; thence, with the south boundary of the same, to the Commissioners trace road; thence south, with the same, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Mrs. Holland Davis, as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XV. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the north east corner of the seventh district thence south, with the line of the same, to the north boundary line of the eighth district, thence south, with the line of the same, to the dividing ridge between Little Harpeth and Hay’s Creek; thence east, with said ridge and the line of the fourteenth district, to the road leading from Petersburg to Nashville, thence north, with said road, to the Liberty Meeting House road leading from Franklin; thence east with said road, to the dividing ridge between Little Harpeth and Mill Creek; thence north, with said ridge, to the Davidson county line; thence west with said line, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Alexander SMITH as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XVI. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at Shannon’s X Roads; thence east, with the old Jefferson road, to the dividing ridge between Nolens' fork and the main east fork of Mill Creek near Esq. BARNS’; thence north, with said ridge and the eastern boundary line of Capt. Thomas NOLEN’s company, to the Davidson county line near Concord meeting house; thence west, with said line, to the north east corner of the fifteenth district; thence south, with the east boundary line of the fifteenth district, to the south east corner of the same; thence south, with the road, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of John M. WINSTEAD as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XVII. Bounded as follows: - Beginning on the Davidson county line at the north east corner of the sixteenth district; thence south, with the east boundary line of the same, to the Jefferson road; thence east with the said road, to the Huntsville road, so as to include Samuel F. BITTICK; thence south, with said road, to the top of the ridge near Dr. John HAY’s; thence east, with said ridge, to the Rutherford county line; thence north, with said line, to the south east corner of Davidson county; thence west, with the county line, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Sutherland M. CHAMP as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XVIII. Bounded as follows: - Beginning on the Rutherford county line at the south east corner of the seventeenth district; thence west, with the line of the same, to the Huntsville road near Dr. HAYS; thence south, with said road, to Arrington’s creek near Howel WEBB’s; thence, with said creek, to the Murfreesborough road; thence east, with said road, to Hardeman’s X Roads; thence south, with the Huntsville road, to the old Franklin road leading to Keer’s mills; thence east, with said roar, to Edmund Lawrence's; thence a straight line to a point just north of Jesse HOUSE’s; thence due east to the Rutherford county line; thence north, with said line, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the store house of H. P. BOSTICK as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XIX. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the creek near the X roads at Petersburg; thence east, with Arrington’s creek, to the Huntsville road at Howel WEBB’s; thence north, with said road to the old Jefferson road; thence west, with the south boundary of the seventeenth district and the old Jefferson road to Shannon’s X roads; thence south, with said road, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Jason WINSETT as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XX. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the mouth of Arrington’s creek; thence up Big Harpeth to the bridge on the Huntsville road; thence east, with the Murfreesborough road, to the Rutherford county line near Windrow’s Camp Ground; thence north, with said line, to the south east corner of the eighteenth district; thence west, with the south boundary of the same, to the Huntsville road; thence north, with said road, to Hardeman’s X roads; thence west, with the Franklin road to Arrington’s creek; thence down said creek to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Dr. Wm. S. WEBB as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XXI. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the bridge where the Huntsville road crosses Big Harpeth river; thence down said river to the mouth of McCrory’s creek; thence south with said creek to McCalls’ gap, thence east to the head of Grove creek; thence, with said creek to the Huntsville road thence north, with said creek to the Beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of William Demmubrune as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XXII. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the south east corner of the twenty first district; thence west, with the south boundary of said district, to McCalls gap; thence south, with the east boundary of the twelfth district to the county line; thence with said line to the Huntsville road; thence with said road to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Isaac SMITH as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XXIII. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the south east corner of the twenty second district; thence east, with the county line, to a point due south of the east boundary line, of George PARK’s five thousand acre survey; thence north, with the east boundary line of said survey, to the military line; thence west, with said line to the east fork of Harpeth; thence west, with said line to the east fork of Harpeth; thence down the same to the junction of the east, and south fork of Harpeth; thence running west, so as to include Wm. B. GLEAVES; Noah Scales, and D.C. KINNARD, thence west, to the Huntsville road, at Allison’s cotton gin; thence south, with said road to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the store house of Chesty Williams in Manchester, as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XXIV. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the north west corner of the twenty third district, thence east, with the north boundary of said district to the north east corner of the same; thence east with the military line, to the Rutherford county line; thence north with said line to the south east corner of the twentieth district; thence west with the south boundary of the same, to the bridge across Harpeth, on the Huntsville road; thence south with said road to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Allen N. McCORD as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. XXV. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the north east corner of the twenty third district; thence south, with the east boundary line of the same, to the county line; thence east, with said line, to the south east corner of Williamson county; thence north, with the line of the same, to the south east corner of the twenty fourth district; thence west, with the south boundary of said district to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the store house of ROBERTSON and RANSOM in Versailles as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

We have also made two fair ideal plats of the county of Williamson and the respective districts, as laid off by us; one of which is hereto annexed.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

In testimony whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names, this 4th day of February 1836.
Signed duplicates.
John D. McEWEN
M. KINNARD
James W. CARSON
Rich. J. HILL
Isaac IVY http://www.tngenweb.org/williamson/history/WmCoDst1836Map.html

 

1834 Tennessee State Pen.

John A. Murrell's Cell---While inspecting the records of the
penitentiary yesterday, records grown musty and yellow with age, an
American reporter came across an entry concerning a noted individual,
whose name, fifty years ago, was a terror, not only to Middle Tennessee,
but to the entire State. The individual referred to was John A. Murrell, and
the entry that startled the reporter, as he nervously clutched the page, was
the notation made on the records when Murrell was received at the
penitentiary in 1834 for stealing a negro in Madison County. The entry, as
it appears on the penitentiary records, is as follows: "John A. Murrell was
received in the penitentiary August 17, 1834. He is five feet ten inches and
a half in height, and weight from 158 to 170 pounds, dark hair, blue eyes,
long nose and much pitted with the small-pox, tolerably fair complexion,
twenty-eight years of age. Born in Lunenburg County, Virginia, and
brought up in Williamson County, Tennessee. His mother, wife and two
children reside in the neighborhood of Denmark, about nine miles from
Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee. His wife's maiden name was
Manghan. Her connections reside on the waters of South Harpeth,
Williamson County, Tennessee. His brother, William S. Murrell, a druggist,
resides in Cincinnati, Ohio. He has another brother living in Sumsterville,
S.C. He has a scar on the middle joint of the finger next the little finger of
the right hand. Has generally followed farming. Was found guilty of Negro
stealing at the Circuit Court of Madison County and sentenced to ten years
confinement in the jail and penitentiary house of the State of Tennessee."
      On the margin of the record is indorsed: "John A. Murrell was
delivered to J.S. Lyon, Sheriff of Madison County, 9th April 1837. See
order of Court of Errors and Appeals, at Jackson, filed with convict record,
1834."
      And below this appears the entry: "Returned April 26, 1837, by order
of Court of Appeals."
      Murrell was discharged at the expiration of his time, but no entry
appears on the penitentiary books showing the date of his discharge.
      While an inmate at the penitentiary, Murrell learned the blacksmith
trade and followed it during the time of his imprisonment. He occupied the
second cell from the entrance in wing No. 2. The cell was inspected by the
reporter, but any marks of Murrell's occupancy that may have existed have
disappeared beneath the white-wash that has been applied scores of times
since Tennessee's noted highwayman called the cell his own nearly fifty
years ago. ---Nashville American.
http://www.tngenweb.org/monroe/news7.txt 

1835 ERA: Near the end of Neptune Road on the Cumberland River, not accessible by the public, Bettstown or Betsytown was located in the early to mid l830's. It lay at the foot of Harpeth Shoals thus playing an important roll in river traffic as did Ashland City which was at the head of Harpeth Shoals. Both thrived as a result of "lighter" business and transfer of freight made necessary by
Harpeth Shoals. In 1838 A. W. Van Leer, Daniel Hillman and R. Baxter opened up the Clay-Steam Forge at Betsytown in connection with Cumberland Furnace and the town became valuable as a shipping port for Pig Iron. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tncheath/tour.html

1836: In pursuance of the act of the General Assembly of the state of Tennessee, entitled "An act to provide for the laying off the several counties in this state into districts of convenient size, within which Justices of the Peace and Constables shall be elected and other purposes."

The undersigned, Richard J. HILL, James W. CARSON, Isaac IVY, Michael KINNARD and John L. McEWEN, commissioners for the county of Williamson, appointed by joint resolution of both branches of the General Assembly, in pursuance of the same act, having been first duly sworn by Gilbert MARSHALL, Esq., a Justice of the Peace in and for the county of Williamson aforesaid, faithfully and impartially to perform the services required by said act; have proceeded to discharge the duties assigned us by said act of Assembly as follows:

The county of Williamson contains three thousand and upwards of qualified voters, according to the enumeration of 1833, and we have laid off said county into twenty-five districts, as follows:

No. I. - Beginning at the north west corner of Williamson county, running south with the west boundary line of the same, to the top of the ridge, between the waters of Turn Bull and Lick Creek; thence east, with said ridge, around the head waters of Turn Bull and South Harpeth; thence north, along the dividing ridge between the waters of West Harpeth and the Little East Fork of South Harpeth, to the Davidson county line, between where Turner DAVIS and Maj. Benjamin PRICHARD now live; thence west, with the line of the same, to the beginning. And we have, at the time of laying off said district, designated the house of John GRAHAM in said district, as a suitable place, as near the center of said district as practicable, for the purpose of holding elections for the election of officers, &c.

No. II. - Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the south west corner of the first district; thence south with the Hickman and Williamson county lines to the south west corner of Williamson county; thence east, with the line of said county, to the top of the ridge between the waters of Leipers Lick and Carters Creeks of Duck River and Murfrees Fork of West Harpeth; thence a north east course, with the old Hunters path along said ridge, to John JOHNSTONs; thence a straight course to Capt. BLACKBURN’s, including said BLACKBURN; thence a straight course so as to include Joseph COWAN; thence north so as to include Joseph COOK and Tapley LIGHTFOOT, and crossing the Centreville road at the new bridge on the Garrison fork of Leipers Fork; thence due north to the south boundary of the first district; thence west, with the line of the same, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Thompson DAVIS as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. III. Bounded as follows; - Beginning on West Harpeth at Mrs. BOYDs ford, running west, with the dividing ridge between Mrs. HUGH’s and Wyatt HALYs, to the east boundary line of the first district; thence south, along the line of the same, to the north east corner of the second district; thence, with the east boundary of said district, to the head waters of Bear Creek; thence, along the dividing ridge between Murfree’s Fork and Bear Creek, to where the road, leading from Maj. BURNETT’s to Franklin, crosses Murfrees Fork; thence with said road, to West Harpeth; thence down said creek to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of James ADAMS, in Hillsborough, as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. IV. Bounded as follows: - Beginning where the road, leading from Maj. BURNETTs to Franklin crosses West Harpeth; thence west, with said road, to Murfrees Fork; thence, with the line of the third district, to the east boundary line of the second district; thence south, with said line, to the Maury county line; thence east, with the line of the same, to the Columbia road; thence north, with said road, to West Harpeth; thence down said creek to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Joseph YATES, at Sulpher Springs in said district, as a suitable placed for holding elections, &c.

No. V. Bounded as follows: - Beginning where the Columbia road crosses West Harpeth; thence north, with said road, to Fountain B. CARTERs; thence, a straight course, to Sharp’s branch just above Tilman F. ATKEISON; thence down said branch, to Big Harpeth river; thence down the same, to the mouth of West Harpeth, thence up said creek to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of James SOUTHALL as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. VI. Bounded as follows: - Beginning at the mouth of West Harpeth; thence, down Big Harpeth river, to the Davidson county line, thence west, with the county line, to the north east corner of the first district; thence south, with the east boundary of said district, to the north west corner of the third district; thence east, with said district, to West Harpeth; thence, down the same, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Robert HILL as a suitable place for holding elections, &c.

No. VII. Bounded as follows: - Beginning where the county line crosses Big Harpeth river; thence up said river to the mouth of Hurricane Creek, near D.P. PERKIN’s; thence east, with said creek, to the dividing ridge between the waters of Spencers Creek and Little Harpeth; thence north with the dividing ridge between Beech Creek and Little Harpeth; thence, to a point between Matthew JOHNSTON and Henry WILLIAMSON; thence north crossing Little Harpeth, to the county line; thence west, with said line, to the beginning. And have designated, in like manner, the house of Wm. LEATON as a suitable place for holding elections, &c. http://www.tngenweb.org/williamson/history/WmCoDst1836Map.html

1838 Hardin TURNER "Bought from N.C. & Matilda Jackson 63
acres on Big Harpeth Dist #23 $500. Wit Presley Jones, Richard Corbett."
That was in Williamson Co, TN. http://www-personal.umich.edu/~cgaunt/etc/comp246.txt 

 

Hardin TURNER

Hardin TURNER b. abt 1810 in NC (or VA depending on which federal Census
listing you believe).  He married Nancy GRAHAM (d/o Samuel GRAHAM) around

1853.  All of their children were born in Marshall Co, TN

 

Matilda Jackson

Presley Jones,

Richard Corbett."

 

1856 February 28, An act of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, passed
, provided that a new county should be established. to be known and distinguished by the name of Cheatham, composed of parts of the counties of Davidson, Robertson, Montgomery and Dickson. "Beginning at a point on the line dividing the counties of Robertson and Montgomery eleven miles north of the mouth of Harpeth River, running thence west two and one-half miles to a post oak and black gum marked with the letters M. C.; thence south forty degrees west, crossing the stage road leading from Nashville to Clarksville at two miles 204 poles, and crossing the Cumberland River in all six and one-half miles to the south bank of said river; thence up the said river with its meanders to the mouth of Barton's Creek; thence up said creek with its meanders to the mouth of the Barren Fork of said creek; thence up said creek with its meanders to the road leading from Clarksville to Charlotte by the road; thence a due south course four and three-quarter miles to a point in the Dickson County line; thence east with said line one mile to a large rad red oak, and pointers one-half mile north of the Family Forge; thence south seventy-two degrees east, crossing said Barton's Creek at 120 poles, and the road leading from said forge to Weakley's ferry, at one mile and 120 poles, and the road leading from said ferry to Cumberland Furnace at three miles and ninety poles, and crossing Johnson's Creek at five miles and sixty-eight poles, continuing in all
seven miles, to three hickories on the east side of a hill; thence south forty-seven degrees east, crossing the road leading from Charlotte to the mouth of Harpeth River, at ninety-eight poles, and crossing said Harpeth River at one mile and 120 poles, and again at two miles and eighty poles, and again at three miles 104 poles, about ten poles above the mouth of Mann's Creek; thence south from the mouth of Mann's Creek with the Davidson County line seven and one-half miles to the Charlotte turnpike; thence east with the pike ten miles to a stake; thence north in a direct line until it intersects the original line of Cumberland County heretofore established, of which this is in lieu; thence north twenty-one degrees east, crossing Big Marrowbone at five miles and sixty-eight poles, continued in all six miles to a chestnut and poplar east of the north fork of said creek; thence north five degrees west crossing the stage road from Nashville to Clarksville at two miles and eleven poles, and the road by the Pinnacle Bluff, on Sycamore Creek, at three miles, 151 poles, and continued in all five miles and sixty-eight poles to a beech on the south bank of Sycamore Creek; thence down said creek with its meanders to the mouth of Hollis' Mill Creek; thence up said creek 140 poles to the month of Jackson's Branch; thence up said branch three-quarters of a mile to a sugar-tree and hickory standing at the mouth of Edward Smith Church's Spring Branch; thence north seventy-three and one-half degrees west, two miles and thirty-four poles to a small black walnut and red oak standing on the east side of the road leading from Springfield to the mouth of Harpeth River; thence a direct course to a point one-half mile east of the point of beginning thence west to the beginning." http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tncheath/goodspeedh.html

 

Barren Fork

Weakley's ferry,

Cumberland Furnace

Mann's Creek

Big Marrowbone

Pinnacle Bluff

Sycamore Creek

Hollis' Mill Creek

Jackson's Branch;

Edward Smith Church's Spring Branch

 

1868 ERA: On the banks of the Harpeth River and Brown’s Creek, a few yards off Old Natchez Trace, lie the remains of an ancient village known today as Old Town.  One of the last extant sites of its kind in Middle Tennessee, it was initially explored by Dr. Joseph Jones in 1868, who wrote about it in his book, “Aboriginal Remains of Tennessee,” published by the Smithsonian 8 years later.  Jones’ findings and more recent excavations have provided us with some basic information about this ancient civilization. However, as with similar sites from this period, there remain more questions than answers. http://www.franklinis.com/old-town-s98

 

Brown’s Creek

Old Town. 

Old Natchez Trace

 

1853 Harden TURNER "Sold to Josiah Johnson for $1,134 dist # 23 63
acres Big Harpeth River. Wit John Wilson, Chesley Williams, Asutin Waller."
Again in Williamson Co, TN. http://www-personal.umich.edu/~cgaunt/etc/comp246.txt 

 

Harden TURNER

Josiah Johnson

John Wilson,

Chesley Williams,

Asutin Waller