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ABRAHAM JOHNSON

 

Abraham Johnson S16427 VA Line: Soldier was born in 1754 Hampshire Co. Va. He lived there at enlistment and after the revolution he moved to Belleville in Ohio Co. Va and in 1810 he moved to Sullivan Co. Ind and he applied there 1833 Feb 26 a resident of haddon Township Ind. Soldier referred to his father ( not named) as being in Braddocks defeat. Pg 1840 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ABSALOM JOHNSON

 

Absalom Johnson S15484 MD Line applied 1832 Oct 8 Nelson Co. Ky he was born 1757 Aug 21 in Baltimore Co. MD and he lived there at enlistment and he lived there 3 or 4 years after the Revolution. He moved to Denwide “Dinwiddle Co. Va for 8 years then moved to Henrico Co. Va for 5 years then to Prince George Co. Va for 4 years then moved to Nelson Co. Ky soldiers Uncle Ephriam Johnson was age 80 a resident of Nelson Co. Ky in 1833. pg 1840 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Pg 1840 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ALEXANDER JOHNSON

 

Alexander Johnson wife Jane: R5631 Va Line: Widow applied 1838 Oct 15 Ross Co. Ohio age 81: Soldier had enlisted in Fauquier Co. Va and he married there to Jane (?) 1779 Jan 21 soldier died 1819 July 4 Ross Co. Ohio, a Son Simon Johnson aged 54 and a daughter Susannah Minney aged 60 both of Ross CO. Ohio made joint affdt 1852 July 5 and stated they were 2 of soldiers and widows children and Stated Soldier died at age 64 widow died 1843 Oct 31 at the home of her son Simon Johnson leaving children: Simon Johnson, John Johnson who had moved West abt 1832 and was supposed to have died. They gave childrens birth as Sarah Johnson born 1787 died in 1852, Catharine Johnson born 1790 decd in 1852, Susannah Johnson born 1792 widow of Barney Minney in 1852, John Johnson born 1795 supposedly decd in 1852, Simon Johnson born 1798 March 23, Thornton Johnson and Delphenn Johnson both decd. After the Revolution Soldier and family moved to NC for 3 years then to KY for 9 years then to Ross CO. Ohio. Pg 1841 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ANDREW JOHNSON

 

Andrew Johnson S15905 NJ and PA Lines: also Indian war served of 1791-1797. Soldier lived in Bucks Co. Pa at enlistment and at age of 21 he moved to NJ and in 1791 or 1792 he enlisted at New Brunswick NJ and served abt 6 years against the Indians and immediately after discharge he moved to Preston Co. Va and he married there abt 1797 to Elizabeth daughter of John Green who was murdered by the Indians in Preston Co. Va and said Elizabeth was taken captive and held 11 years. Soldier applied 1834 Jan 13 Preston Co. Va. Soldier died 1846 March 21 leaving children: Rebecca Johnson Castel, Mary Ann Senate, sarah Johnson, Isaac Johnson and Jesse Johnson. Pg 1841 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ANDREW JOHNSON

 

Andrew Johnson R5599 NC Line: Soldier was born 1761 March in Rockingham Co. Va and soldier moved with his father to Guilford Co. NC and he lived there at enlistment and afterwards Soldier moved to KY and then to Franklin Co. Ill. He applied there 1834 Oct. 7 Pg 1841 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

Pension Application Of Andrew Johnson, Natl Archives Series M804, Roll 1441, 
Application #R5599
 
State of Illinois, Franklin County}
               On this 7th day of October, 1834, personally appeared in open court before the county commissioners being judges of the county court, Andrew Johnson, a resident of Franklin County, state of Illinois, of the age of 73 years next March, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration…:
               That he entered the service of the United states in the year 1782 and served as herein stated under the following named officers; This declarant was born in Rockingham County, Virginia in the year 1761. From therewith he removed to Guilford County, state of North Carolina where he resided when he was drafted into the service of the united States. He entered the service as a private militiaman in the spring of 1782. When drafted, he went under the command of Captain Gilford or Guilford from his residence to Hillsborough, North Carolina, where he was mustered and inspected into the service of the United States for 18 months, which term he surely served out before he was discharged.  The country through which he marched as well as he now recollects, was from his residence to Hillsborough to Salisbury, to Camden, to Eutaw Springs, thence to Ashley Hills, where he joined the main army under the command of General Greene. 
 
He served under the command of Captain Guilford for a term of two months and then was transferred to a company commanded by Captain Brevard. This term of service was taken up principally  to join headquarters of the army, and nothing transpired of note. He then served a term of two months more under Captain Brevard, and he under Colonel Lytle, and he under Brigadier General Greene, during which term of service he remained stationary and transpired worthy of note, except some little skirmishes with foraging parties of the British and Americans, Charleston then being under the possession of the British under the command of General Leslie, as he thinks and understood, in some of which skirmishing, Colonel Laurens was killed. 
 
He was then transferred to Captain Rodes [Rhodes] or Captain Rhodes succeeded Captain Brevard, under whom he served another term of eight months, in which last term of service nothing transpired of much note, except the evacuation of Charleston by the British. The army was then marched down to James Island near Charleston, where they took up winter quarters and where they remained until his last mentioned term of service expired. 
 
This declarant was engaged in no battle during his service. He declares that he served his whole term of eighteen months for which he was drafted, but in consequence of old age and loss of memory, he is unable to state the particulars with any certainty more than the above 12 months of which he has a living witness, William McElyea, who can testify of his own personal knowledge 
as to the service. He was discharged at a place called Waxhaw settlement where he received a written discharge from Captain Lytle, which has been lost or destroyed. This discharge was given in the fall of 1783 when peace was proclaimed and put an end to the war and the American army disbanded.
 
He has a record of his age but was destroyed by fire when his fathers house was burned down on the south branch of the Potomac. He removed from North Carolina where he was drafted to the south branch of the Potomac, from thence to Kentucky, thence to Franklin County, state of Illinois, where he now resides. He has no evidence by which he can establish his service except 
William McElyea, who can testify to 12 months. He then states that from his short residence in this county he knows no preacher who can certify as to his belief in his services…etc. Sworn to and subscribed, date and year above mentioned. Andrew Johnson, his mark.
 
Franklin County, Illinois}
Be it remembered, that on the 7th day of October, 1834, personally appeared in open court, William McElyea, a resident of said county, and made oath in due form of law. That he is now, and was during the Revolutionary War, personally acquainted with Andrew Johnson, who has made the foregoing declaration to obtain a pension, and that he knows of his own personal 
knowledge  that the said Andrew Johnson did serve as a private militiaman in the Revolutionary War a term of 12 months. From old age and consequent loss of memory, this deponent cannot state positively to the date of his service, but does recollect distinctly that the declarant as well as this deponent was both discharged from the service of the United States in the time of the Revolution in the fall of 1783, when peace was proclaimed, by one Captain Lytle at a place called Waxhaw settlement. He also recollects that the declarant served under Captains Guilford, Brevard, and Rhodes under Colonel Lytle and Brigadier General Greene, the several terms of service he therein states, making a term of 12 months, and further the deponent saith not. Sworn to and subscribed this day and date above mentioned, William McElyea, his mark.
 

File at: http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/nc/guilford/military/revwar/pensions/johnson507gmt

Notes Capt. Brevard

Notes: William McElyea

This William McELyea is the brother of Patrick Henry McElyea and the Uncle of Hiram McElyea of Humphreys Co. Tn who I descend from Patrick Henry McElyea is the brother of This William McElyea

Notes: Where did our Great Grand Mother Tennessee McELyea Johnson’s Family move to from Humphreys Co. Tn She is in the home of Hiram McElyea and I she was a granddaughter of Hiram McElyea and Matilda no proof of this at this time. She married John S.T. Johnson the son of Joel Johnson going back to Hudson Johnson and wife Agness

 

 

ARTHUR JOHNSON

 

Arthur Johnson or Arthur Johnston: wife Lucy W10152 VA Line. Soldier was born 1757 Aug 7, he enlisted in Brunswick Co.Va, he applied 1818 June 11 in Gibson Co. Ind. and in 1822 and 1824 he was living in Posey Co. In and in 1838 had moved to White Co. Il. To be near his children and grandchildren ( not named) Soldier married Lucy Harmon 1779 Jan 2 both were of Brunswick Co. Va and she was born 1759 Jan 1; Soldier died 1839 Oct 16 widow applied 1840 Dec 15 White Co. Ill. And was living with a son (not named) and in 1843 July she was living in Posey Co. Ind. children were: John Johnson born 1779Sept 27 and married 1800 March 6: Sampson Johnson born 1781 Jan 19: Nancy Johnson born  1783 Dec 30: Ritter Johnson born 1785 Jan 17 and married John William 1801 Oct 15: Elizabeth Johnson born 1781 July 2: Nathaniel Johnson born 1783 may 13, George Johnson born 1785 Jan 17 and married Anna Williams 1816 Oct 19: Benjamin Johnson born 1792 Aug 27 and married Polly Olmon 1821 Jan 4: Winney Johnson born 1794 June 24, Arthur L. Johnson born 1797 June 31: William M. Johnson born 1798 Dec 11 and Lucy Johnson born 1800 May 1, also shown was Zadock Johnson who was born 1802 April and in 1820 was living with Arthur Johnson but no relationship stated. Pg 1841 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

1757 August 7, Arthur Johnson - was born, in Brunswick county, Virginia. He served as corporal in Capt. James Knox's company, Col. Abraham Bowman's Eighth Regiment, from May, 1776, to April 30, 1777. He again enlisted January 2, 1777, for three years. He was in Capt. Thomas Berry's company, Eighth Regiment, serving as sergeant; also with Capt. Abraham Kirkpatrick's company, same regiment. He was acting sergeant in Capt. William Crogan's company, Fourth Regiment, and in May, 1779, in Capt. Leonard Cooper's company with Col. John Nevill's Fourth Regiment. After the war he removed to Kentucky, and from there to Indiana, Gibson county, and later to White county, Illinois, where he died October 16, 1839, and was buried in the Seven Mile Prairie cemetery, four miles north of Enfield. A monument has been erected by descendants, upon which is inscribed his military record. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)  http://genealogytrails.com/ill/revwar3.html

 

ID:

VA08027

 

Last Name:

Johnson

First Name:

Arthur

Suffix:

 

 

Rank:

SERGEANT

Rank Type:

NCO

Ethnicity:

 

 

Brigade:

4TH VA BRIGADE

Company:

CAPT ABRAHAM KIRKPATRICK

 

State:

VA

Regiment:

8 VA

Division:

3RD DIVISION

 

 


 

Monthly Muster Roll Status


December 1777:

FIT FOR DUTY

January 1778:

FIT FOR DUTY

February 1778:

FIT FOR DUTY

March 1778:

FIT FOR DUTY

April 1778:

FIT FOR DUTY

May 1778:

FIT FOR DUTY

June 1778:

FIT FOR DUTY

 

http://valleyforgemusterroll.org/

 

4TH VA BRIGADE

HISTORY:   ORGANIZED FEB-APRIL 1776 AT SUFFOLK COUNTY COURT HOUSE FROM FREDERICK, DUNMORE, (SHENANDOAH) BERKLE, AUGUSTA, HAMPSHIRE, FINCASTLE, CULPEPPER COUNTIES AND WEST AUGUSTA DISTRICT. 

 

ENTERED VALLEY FORGE WITH 86 ASSIGNED, 53 FIT FOR DUTY, LEFT VALLEY FORGE WITH THE 4TH VA. 

 

PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENTS : CHESAPEAKE BAY, CHARLESTON 1776, NORTHERN NEW JERSEY, DEFENSE OF PHILADELPHIA, http://valleyforgemusterroll.org/Reg_8VA.htm PHILA  - MONMOUTH.

 

CAPT ABRAHAM KIRKPATRICK

 

James Looney, who was Capt. in command of Blackmore’s Fort, in the Clinch Valley, in Sept. 1774. He lived at King’s Mills, now Kingsport, Tenn. James Luney was one of the signers of a petition Jan. 1781, Botetourt Co. Va. to Governor and Council to intervene, and have negro “Jack” executed for roberies, etc. A certain pension claimant named Archibald Merritt states that he served in 1781-82 in the Continental Line of Va. under Capt. Lonely, operating near “Point of Work”, and into Va. who were quartered at Cumberland Court House. Capt. Lonely was succeeded by Samuel Finley, afterwards Col., and later Capt. Abraham Kirkpatrick took command. James Looney was on jury in Botetourt Co., Va. on May, 8, 1783.

 

Captain Abraham Kirkpatrick 1st Virginia Regiment, 1782- July or August of 1783 4th Company at Winchester Barracks Captain, 4th Virginia Regiment, May 1779-November 1779  Captain, Wayne’s Light Infantry, July 16, 1779  Posey’s Battalion, Febiger’s Command. Fought at Stony Point-Was on detachment from the 4th Virginia Regiment Captain, 8th Virginia Regiment, August 10 1777  Received Bounty of 4666 2/3 acres (warrant #2052) on 9 December 1783  http://www.wscottsmith.com/VirginiaCampaign/gaskins/Soldiers/kirkpatrick.html

 

Ellis Turner

977

Private

78

2

79,Feb.

4

 

 

Abraham Kirkpatrick's 4th Va. Reg composed of 4,8,12 Reg. Col James Wood

 

79

 

http://dickson-online.com/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=55

 

1776-1783 ERA Arthur Johnson or Arthur Johnston: wife Lucy W10152 VA Line. Soldier was born 1757 Aug 7, he enlisted in Brunswick Co.Va, he applied 1818 June 11 in Gibson Co. Ind. and in 1822 and 1824 he was living in Posey Co. In and in 1838 had moved to White Co. Il. To be near his children and grandchildren ( not named) Soldier married Lucy Harmon 1779 Jan 2 both were of Brunswick Co. Va and she was born 1759 Jan 1; Soldier died 1839 Oct 16 widow applied 1840 Dec 15 White Co. Ill. And was living with a son (not named) and in 1843 July she was living in Posey Co. Ind. children were:

John Johnson born 1779 Sept 27 and married 1800 March 6:

Sampson Johnson born 1781 Jan 19:

Nancy Johnson born 1783 Dec 30:

Ritter Johnson born 1785 Jan 17 and married John William 1801 Oct 15:

Elizabeth Johnson born 1781 July 2:

Nathaniel Johnson born 1783 may 13,

George Johnson born 1785 Jan 17 and married Anna Williams 1816 Oct 19:

Benjamin Johnson born 1792 Aug 27 and married Polly Olmon 1821 Jan 4:

Winney Johnson born 1794 June 24,

Arthur L. Johnson born 1797 June 31:

William M. Johnson born 1798 Dec 11 and

Lucy Johnson born 1800 May 1,

also shown was Zadock Johnson who was born 1802 April and in 1820 was living with Arthur Johnson but no relationship stated. Pg 1841 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

Lucy Harmon

The state of Indiana, Gibson County
On the 11th day of June A.D. 1818 before me one of the Judges in and for the Gibson Circuit Court and State aforesaid Personally appeared Arthur Johnson aged 61 years a resident of said County and State aforesaid who being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the Act of Congress entitled an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval services of the US in the revolutionary war

States that he enlisted in the 2nd Regiment of the Virginia troops in 1775 for one year by Captain Richard Mead commanded by Colonel Woodford and General Stephens that he served during the year and was discharged at Williamsburg in Virginia. And that he served the full [term]. [A]fter his discharge on an
expedition as Adjutant to a Regiment of Virginia Volunteers commanded by Colonel Frederick Mackling [sic] and General Nelson. That afterwards he served as a Lieutenant in a Company of Volunteer Militia under the command of Colonel Thomas Branham and General Green; that he was engaged in the war from the first time he enlisted in the service of the US in 1775 until the close of the war or the most of the time; and was in the following Battles: at the Long Bridge, the Siege of Norfolk, at King's Mountain, at Ramsour's Mill, at Prince's Fort, at the Hanging Rock, the Siege of Ninety Six
and that he was honorably discharged from the Service, and that he is in reduced circumstances and in need of the assistance of his Country for support and that he has no other evidence now in his power to substantiate his claims or proof of his services.
S/ Arthur Johnson
Subscribed and sworn to before me this the day and year aforesaid.
S/ Jesse Emmerson {Seal}
The state of Indiana, Gibson County
I Jesse Emmerson one of the Judges of the Gibson Circuit Court do hereby certify that I am acquainted with Arthur Johnson and it appears to my satisfaction that he served in the regular Army of the US in the revolutionary war as stated in the preceding declaration against the common enemy of the US and I now certify the proceedings and testimony taken and have before me to the Secretary for the Department of War pursuant to the directions of the before mentioned Act of Congress. Given under my hand and seal this 11th day of June 1818.
S/Jesse Emmerson, {Seal}
State of Illinois, White County
On the 27th day of June 1838 before the subscriber a Justice of the Peace for the said County of White personally appeared Arthur Johnson who on his oath declares that he is the same person who formerly belonged to the Company commanded by Captain Richard Mead in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Woodford in the Service of the United States, that his name was placed on the pension Roll of the State of Indiana from whence he has lately removed that he now resides in the State of Illinois (White County) where he intends to remain and wishes his pension to be there payable
in future; the following are his reasons for removing from Indiana to Illinois to be convenient to his children and grandchildren; that they may support him in his old age. S/ Arthur Johnson
Sworn and subscribed the day and year above written before me.
S/ Ja. Ratcliff, J. P.
Gibson Circuit Court October term A.D1820
District of Indiana, Gibson County
On this 16th day of October in the year of our Lord 1820, personally appeared in open court (it being a court of record created so by the Constitution and laws of this State) for the County and State aforesaid Arthur Johnston [sic] aged 63 years on the seventh day of August last, resident within said District who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath declare that he served in the Revolutionary War as follows, to wit: that he enlisted as a regular Soldier in the Revolutionary War in September in the year of our Lord 1775 under Captain Richard Mead in the second Virginia Regiment
commanded by Colonel Woodford of the Virginia line in Brunswick County Virginia and continued in service 12 months and was discharged at Williamsburg Virginia and afterwards off and on in the Service as a volunteer and militia man for about four years and was in the following Battles, to wit: at the long or great Bridge Virginia in the fall or winter of 1775 and at the Battle of Ramsour's Mill North Carolina, at Prince's Fort in the edge of South Carolina, Battle of King's Mountain, Siege of Ninety Six, South Carolina and the date of my original Declaration for the purpose of procuring a pension was
made on the 11th day of June 1818 and a pension certificate granted me bearing the date of the 7th day of July 1819 numbered 12891. And I do solemnly affirm that I was a resident citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time, by gift, sale or in any manner disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provisions of an act of Congress entitled “an act provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the Revolutionary War” passed on the 18th day of March
1818 and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me, any property or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed.

A list of Arthur Johnston's property, debts due you and demands, to wit, one horse, three head of cattle, 21 head of hogs, two acres, one plow, three old hoes, one old sprouting hoe, and I have debts owing to me to the amount of about $10 to the best of my recollection and debts which I owe to sundry persons amount to about $30 and two old broken ovens and some old cupboard furniture, one pair of Horse guns, three clevises, one pair double trees, and I have the following family, to wit, my wife aged
61 years the first day of January last and very sickly and infirm and has been for about 20 years, my son William Johnston aged 22 years next January who has been sickly and not able to do for himself from his infancy,

Zadock Johnston aged 18 last April and my occupation but weakly and infirm and not able to do hard labor and further this deponent saith not.
S/ Arthur Johnson
And the court after examination are of opinion that the property of the said Arthur Johnston not saying anything about the Debts owing by him in due to him amount to about $120.
Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements
Pension application of Arthur Johnson (Johnston) W10152
Transcribed by Will Graves

Notes: Capt. Richard Mead

Jesse Emmerson

BAILEY JOHNSON

Bailey Johnson and wife Hannah: W4006 VA Line: Soldier married Hannah Muffett in 1783 Jan or 1784 in Fauquier Co.Va and later moved to PA and soldier died there in 1805 Sept. Widow applied 1838 Oct 15 in Ross CO. Ohio age 73. In 1839 widow stated she and soldier had 12 children of which one died in infancy. Childrens birth were Metildey Johnson born 1781 Dec 19: Adin Johnson born 1783 Nov 7: James Johnson born 1786 Dec 10: Daniel Johnson born 1789 April 20: William Johnson born 1791 July 18: Melinday Johnson born 1793 Jul 11: James Johnson born 1795 Nov 22: Elijah Johnson born 1798 Nov 6, Jesse Johnson born 1799 June 6, Henery Johnson born 1801 May 6 and Bailey Johnson born 1802 Aug 6. The daughter Metildey Johnson married a Mr. Gates and their children shown were Bailey Gates born Aug 1800, Hannah Gates born Sept 25 1801 and in 1838 Jane Johnson of Ross CO. Ohio stated she was at soldiers and widows wedding and in 1843 a James Johnson witnessed widows signature ( relationship unknown)

 

BENJAMIN JOHNSON

 

Benjamin Johnson wife Elizabeth Price former widow: W27761: MD Line: Soldier applied 1834 May 19 in Fayette Co. Va age 76 on March 25 1834.  Soldier mentioned a brother living in Charles Co. MD who later moved to Ga. Soldier lived in Charles CO. MD at enlistment widow applied 1866 Oct 16 Fayette Co. Va age 63 a resident of Kanawha Co. Va but formerly of Fayette Co. Va soldier married Elizabeth McGraw 1829 Aug 7 in Kanawah CO. Va  and soldier died 1834 July 15 in Fayette Co Va. Widow married 2nd on 1836 April 26 James Price in Fayette Co Va and he in 1859 in IN. Pg 1842 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

State of Virginia, Kanawha County to wit

 

On this 13th day of August 1833. personally appeared in open court, before the justices of the County Court of said County, now setting, Benjamin Johnson, a resident of said County in the state aforesaid, aged seventy seven years and two months who being first duly sworn, according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832

 

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and

served as herein after stated – The first service which the applicant performed was in collecting cattle jointly with one George Richardson, for the use of the soldiers and guards then stationed at New London, in the County of Campbell [sic: formed from Bedford in 1782] Virginia, under the command he thinks of Captain Holt. He was at this time a resident of the adjoining county of Bedford, and was detached and appointed to this service by Capt. Christopher Ervine, who had charge of the provisions and supplies for the magazine & barracks at New London. the applicant served in this capacity for two summers, those of the years 1779. and 1780. during which time he was constantly employed from about the 1st of June untill late in the fall of each of those years, serving about four & half, or five months during each of said years, and using his own horse all that time

 

In February 1781 the said applicant entered the service as a volunteer in a rifle company

commanded by Capt Boen [sic: Bowen] Price of New London, and was attatched to a regiment of Rifle men commanded by Col. Charles Lynch of Campbell County, and Major John Callaway of the same county. about the same time Colo. [William] Campbell marched a regiment of Riflemen from the counties of Bottentout [sic: Botetourt] and Rockbridge. Each regiment was intended for service in the south, and were marched immediately on their completion to join the southern army commanded by Gen’l. Green [sic: Nathanael Greene]. on their arrival near Guilford N. C. the regiment to which the applicant belonged was attached to Col. Wm. Washingtons troop of horse.

 

He was with his regiment in the battle of Guilford Courthouse on the 15th of March 1781. his regiment with Washington’s horse was stationed on the right wing and Colo. Campbell’s regiment, with [Col. Henry] Lee’s horse, occupied the left. The battle was brought on early in the morning by Washingtons troops who advanced upon the enemies line, supported by the regiment to which the applicant belonged, and by about two hundred regulars of the infantry During the action, the applicant and his regiment was in the brunt[?] of the engagement. The British returned the fire and the American forces were under the necessity of retiring[?] from the conflict, an event which this applicant attributes to the flight of about two thousand of the N. Carolina Militia, at the onset, who had been [illegible word] to occupy the center of the line. After losing the field, the American troops were marched about 18 miles to the “[Troublesome] Iron

Works”, where they remained about two days, recruiting. They then pursued the British army to [Ramsey’s Mill in Chatham County on] “Deep River” the rear guard of their army being in sight on the opposite Bank when the American army arrived. The applicant and his Regiment remained at Deep River two days, where the same was disbanded, and the soldiers discharged.

 

This applicant was in this service seven weeks and two days, during all which time he was a private, and for the most part engaged in some marches occupying much of the night as well as day. After his return from Deep River, this applicant remained at home in the County of Bedford, untill the latter part of the month of September of that year, when he was drafted into a company commanded by Capt. Edmund Tate, designed[?] to unite with the American forces to repel the invasion of Cornwallis. He was marched with his company forty miles to Falling River in the County of Campbell, where other companies had collected; and where it was intended to form a Regiment. He and his company remained at Falling River two days, when intelligence arrived of the surrender of Cornwallis and his Army at York Town [on 19 Oct 1781]. The companies were then discharged and returned home.

 

The applicant when discharged at Deep River, was furnished with a written discharge, which has been lost. upon the other two occassions he had no discharge in writing. He has not other documentary evidence of his services, and he knows of no one in this quarter by whom he could prove his said services.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year first aforesaid in open Court

 

[signed] Benj. Johnson

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Benjamin Johnson: R5674

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

George Richardson

 

BENJAMIN JOHNSON

 

Benjamin Johnson wife Phebe: R5651 VA Line: soldier died in 1826 leaving a widow Phebe who died 1847 Feb 1 leaving children: Dudley Johnson, Polley M. Taylor: Cytnthia S. Baker: Wm. W. Johnson and Cicero M. Johnson, the son Dudley Johnson made affdvt 1854 July 31 in Franklin Co. Tn age 64, the son Cicero M. Johnson made affdt Sept 1853 in Franklin Co. Tn

 

 

CAVE JOHNSON

 

Cave Johnson: S8767 VA Line: Soldier enlisted in Orange Co. Va and served under his brother Capt. Robert Johnson, applied 1839 Sept 16 Scott Co. KY, age 72 but lived in an adjacent County (not named) in 1847 soldier had moved to Boone Co. KY the Honorable Richard M. Johnson of Georgetown KY in 1833 was the son of Capt. Robert Johnson PG 1842 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

CHARLES JOHNSON

 

Charles Johnson S5643 VA Line soldier was born 1759 April 24, he lived in Albemarle Co. Va at enlistment. He applied 1832 Aug 20 in Goochland Co. Va. Pg 1843 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

CLABOURNE JOHNSON

 

Clabourn Johnson:S16892: VA Line soldier was born in 1760 Goochland Co. Va and he lived there at enlistment and later moved to Chesterfield Co. Va During the Revolutionary War and after the Revolution he lived in Goochland, Hanover, Louisa and Nelson Counties then moved to Howard Co. Mo and he applied there 1839 Sept 23. Pg 1843 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

DAVID JOHNSON

David Johnson S32349 VA Line: Soldier was born 1759 Oct 10 or 1760 in Frederick Co. Va and he lived there until age of 11 then moved to Montgomery Co. Va and in 1773 he moved to the head of the Clinch River and he lived there at enlistment applied 1832 Nov 12 Jackson Co. Ind Pg 1844 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

State of Indiana} SS On this 12th day of September in the year One thousand eight

Jackson County} hundred & thirty two Personally appeared in open Court before the

Hon’ble Abel Findley Judge of the Probate court of Jackson County State of Indiana it Being a court of Record now sitting David Johnson a resident of Jackson County Indiana aged seventy four or five being first duly sworn according to law doth on his Oath make the following declaration in Order to Obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed 7th June 1832 he was born the 10th day of October 1759 or 60 at Frederick County Virginia and lived there untill he was a bout 11 years old & then moved to Montgomery County in said state & in the year 1773 he moved to the head of Clinch River, and in the year 1774 the Indians drove us back across new river at Bells medows where we Forted then we in the month of November moved back to Clinch River, and in the year 1775 he was called out as a spy, Built a Fort at the little crab orchard 15 miles from the head of Clinch River, we was forted in the fort in 1776 and served as a spy, and in 1777 we Built a Fort at the big Crab Orchard 1778 he volunteered under Colonel [Evan] Shelby, Major Thomas Quirk, Captain Thomas Martin, and Rendezvoused at the long Island on

Holston River [sic: Long Island of Holston River at present Kingsport TN] and went down the river to the Chigumaga [sic: Chickamauga] nation of Indians, where we killed some Indians and destroyed their towns [10 - 20 Apr 1779] then returned home we was out about 40 days in 1779 I was chose as a spy & served about six months in the year  1780 continued as a spy and in the year 1781 he volunteered under Captain James Maxfield and rendesvoused on New River at Harbers ferry 4 miles below the Lead mines [near Fort Chiswell in Wythe County VA] where he Joined Col [William] Preston and marched to north Carolina and joined General Green near Gilford courthouse [sic: Nathanael Greene near Guilford Courthouse] & served out my three months tower and was discharged at Gilford Courthouse & returned home – he has now [sic]

documentary evidence of his discharge And that he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure, who can testify to his services he is well known in his present neighbourhood by Jarrard B Hufman a Precher of the Gospel, and Joseph Stuart and Leonard Shewmaker Esq. who will Testify as to his character for veracity & their belief of his services as a spy & soldier of the revolution he hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declare that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state Sworn to & subscribed the day & year first above written, sworn to and subscribed in open court the day and year aforesaid [signed] DaviD Johnson

 

Jacksonville Illinois

Feb 20, 1860

Secretary of the Interior

Washington D.C.

 

Mrs Mary Ann Sutherland, who is now in the poor house of Morgan

County says she is the daughter of David Johnson a revolutionary soldier. That three years ago, she gave a power of Atty to one James Hester then of Washington Cty. but now of Nashville Brown County Indiana, and she recei’d from him $176 dollars and that is all she ever recei’d. She is desirous of knowing what am’t was paid said Hester and that no more be paid him from the department.

 

Mrs Mary Ann Sutherland is now 65 years old. Her father David Johnson at the time of

the revolution was a resident of Powell Valley on Clinch river Virginia. He moved from thence to Linn Camp near Laurel river Kentucky removed from that place to Washington Cty about 18 years ago, and died there some 12 years ago. She states that he drew his pension in Ky and at Washington and that she is the only heir. And information with regard to it will be very gratefully receiv’d, and if she is entitled to it, certanly she is in very great need.

 

Yours etc J. T. Springer

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of David Johnson: S32349

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

DAVID JOHNSON

 

David Johnson S5641 VA Line: Soldier was born 1763 Sept 17 in Morris Co. NJ and he lived in what became Washington CO. Pa. At enlistment Soldier applied 1833 Feb 12 in Parke Co In in 1845 April Soldier was living with Levi Johnson son in Knox Co. Ohio and in 1845 Sept he was living with a son Amos Johnson in Brooke Co. Va. Pg 1844 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

DILMUS JOHNSON

 

Dilmus, Dalmath or Dillamas Johnson wife Nancy W2662 VA Line widow applied 1844 feb 5 Christian Co. KY age 81, soldier died 1837 or 1838 Aug 30. Soldier and widow had married in 1786. widow died 1845 Dec 23, leaving children: Elizabeth Patton age 65 in 1852, William A. Johnson, Martha Lockhart, David Johnson and Hannah Lacy: The following made affdvt 1852 May 31 in Christian Co. KY to wit William A. Johnson age 61, Martha Lockhart age 60, Hannah Lacy age 57, widows name before marriage was Hannah Ashley and she was married in Fluvanna Co Va and he lived in there at enlistment. Soldier had applied 1832 Nov in Christian Co. KY age 71 on April 3 1832. After the Rev. soldier moved to Albemarle Co. Va then returned to Fluvanna Co Va then to Amherst Co. Va for 7 or 8 years then to Logan Co. KY for 1 year then to Christian Co. KY. Pg 1844 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

EDMOND JOHNSON

 

Edmond Johnson S30509 VA Line Applied 1833 Dec 5 St. Landry Parish LA. Soldier was born in 1763 Caroline Co. Va and he lived in Lunenburg Co. Va at enlistment. Pg 1844 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ELLIS JOHNSON

 

Ellis Johnson and wife Mary: W7941 BLW #26767-160-55 VA Line: Soldier lived in Mecklenburg CO. VA at enlistment and he lived t here for a time after the Revolution. Then moved to Spartanburg Dist SC and he applied there 1833 Oct 3 age 73. And Soldier married there to Mary Brice 1816 march 1 or 28th at the home of Joseph and Sally McMillen who in 1854 were aged 79 and 74 respectively but no relationship was stated. Soldier died 1840 Sept 12 Spartanburg Dist SC and his widow Mary applied there 1853 July 9 age 78 and she was still there in 1856. In 1853 Howell Johnson of Spartanburg Dist. SC stated he had served with Ellis Johnson but no relationship was stated and in 1855 Holly Johnston widow of Howell Johnstons was referred to. . PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ENOS JOHNSON

 

Enos Johnson and wife Levina: W119959 BLW #26160-160-55 VA LINE: Soldier applied 1832 Aug 31 Hawkins Co. Tn age 79. Soldier enlisted in Montgomery Co Va. Widow applied 1854 June 5 Hawkins CO. Tn age 67. Soldier and widow had married 1806 July 29 and soldier died 1836 June 4: Children shown were: Susannah Johnson born 1781 Dec 27: Mary Johnson born 1783 Jan 24: Ann Johnson born 1784 Sept 1: Rebecker Johnson born 1786 March 1: Rachel Johnson born 1787 Oct 1: Rhoda Johnson born 1789 June 7: 2 sons whose names were to dim to read were born in 1792 and 1794 also a child born in 1793 (these children were by soldiers first wife Sary) Chidlren by soldiers 2nd wife Levina were: the first second and third childrens births were to dim to read, ones of which was born in 1810: Levina Johnson born 1812 Oct 4, Hester Johnson born 1814 Oct 14, Wila B. Johnson born 1816 Oct 14, 2 children whose data was to dim to read, Anna Johnson born 1823 March 4 and Noble Washington Johnson born 1825 July 13: See National Archives Series M804 roll # 1421 for a copy of the entire file and perhaps a better microcopy. . PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

GEORGE JOHNSON

 

George Johnson S7096: NC AND VA LINES: Soldier was born 1749 Nov 25 Fauquier Co Va and he lived there at enlistment and in 1781 soldier moved to Wilkes Co. NC and he applied there 1832 Nov 14. . PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, Wilkes County: October Term Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions

 

 Personally appeared in open Court George Johnson Senior a Resident of said State and

County aged 83 years who being duly Sworn according to law Doth on his oath make the

following Declaration that he believes he was born in Faulkquier [sic, Fauquier] County and State of Virginia but this deponent believes then was called Prince Williams [County] when this affiant States that when he was about 30 years old he was drafted for 6 months and marched under the command of Colonel John Churchwill [John Churchwell?] William Edmunds Lieutenant Colonel and Daniel Fluary [could be Tluary] Captain. This was in the year 1778 or 1779. This affiant states that they crossed the Potomac River into Maryland to a town then called Menacacy [Monocacy?] and by some Leesburg. This affiant understood that they or that the Regiment was to march to a place called Bunkershill but this affiant believes they for some cause not now remembered by him returned home. Somewhere high up upon the Potomac while on the march this affiant was taken Sick & his Colonel Churchwoll Sent this affiant home this deponent went home in wagon as he was unable to walk this affiant in a short time there was a call to Supply the place of the men that marched when I did. Colonel Churchwell interposed and said this affiant had served his 6 months tower [tour].

 

 This affiant then moved into the State aforesaid in the County of Wilkes about the year

1781 this affiant further State that Shortly after he settled in the County of aforesaid, he was again drafted to serve some time, but how long he cannot now recollect, he marched under Joseph Herndon who was then a Captain Round the frontiers in pursuit of Tories Deserters and Indians, his Captain and all those who marched with him is since Dead or Removed out of the County this affiant is very hard of hearing otherwise infirm his recollection almost gone. That he has no Documentary Evidence to prove his services & he knows of no person now living by which he can prove Service.

 

Sworn to in open Court. S/ George Johnson

 

S/ R. Martin, C.W.C. C.

 

This affiant Relinquishes Every Claim whatever to any Pension or annuity Except the present and further declares that his name was not on the Pension Roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid

 

sworn to in open Court.

 

Sworn to in open Court. S/ George Johnson

 

S/ R. Martin, C. W.C. C.

 

 [Thomas Fletcher, a clergyman, and George Wheatley gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Where was you born this affiant was born in Faulhquer County & State Virginia

 

Have you any The record of your age and if so where is it this affiant has a Record of his age at home I was born 25th Novmber 1749

 

Where were you living when called into Service where have you lived Since the Revolutionary War and where do you now live this affiant lived in the State of Virginia Faulkquer County when he was first drafted, he then moved to Wilkes County North Carolina where he was again drafted and where he has they have ever since till the present Date

 

 How were you called into Service were you Drafted or did you volunteer or were you a

Substitute and for whom -- this affiant was always drafted

 

 Did you ever receive a discharge from the Service and if so by whom was it signed and what has become of it this affiant Received 2 discharges one from Colonel Churchwell & one from Captain or Colonel Joseph Herndon but they long since lost

 

 State the names of Persons to whom you are known in your Present neighborhood & who can Testify to your Character for veracity and their belief in your Services as a soldier of the The revolution George Wheatley & Thomas Fletcher, clergyman

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of George Johnson S7096 fn20NC/Va.

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08

 

George Wheatley

Thomas Fletcher

 

GILES JOHNSON

 

Giles Johnson S38090 VA LINE: Soldier applied 1818 June 18 Charles City Co. Va age 62 and he lived there at enlistment. Soldiers wife Elizabeth made inquiry through Frederick Mayo on 1843 Oct 12 at Richmond Va. PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

Frederick Mayo

 

HARDY JOHNSON

 

Hardy Johnson R5616 VA Line (?) Inquirey was made 1835 March 2 and it was stated soldier moved from VA to NC about 1805 and had lived in Cumberland Co. NC since that time, papers were removed and never returned. PG 1846 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

HENSON JOHNSON

 

Henson Johnson: S16171 BLW #26778-160-55 : VA LINE: soldier was born in Frederick Co. VA and lived there during the Revolution and after the War he moved to KY and in 1819 he moved to Harrison Co. Ind. and he applied there 1832 Aug 15. Soldier applied for BLW 1855 April 3 in Harrison Co. Ind Soldier died 1858 Jan 9: PG 1846 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

HOWELL JOHNSON

 

Howell Johnson and wife Holly: W4468, BLW #26766-160-55: VA LINE: soldier was born 1762 Jan 18, Chesterfield Co.Va and at an early age was moved to Mecklenburg Co.Va soldier applied 1832 March 7 Spartanburg Dist SC and he died there 1846 Jan 13.  Soldier married Holly Crowder 1796 Oct 23 in NC. Widow applied 1853 July 9 1853 Spartanburg Dist Sc age 73 and in 1868 she was a resident of Spartanburg SC. Soldier and wife had several children but only son William L. Johnson the oldest child who was born 1798 Jan 6 and in 1853 was living in York Dist. SC was named. It was stated another son had moved to NC in 1868 a B.G. and E.R. Johnson were of Spartanburg Co. SC Pg 1846 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ISAAC JOHNSON

 

1776 to 1783 ERA Isaac Johnson enlisted in the Rev. War from Brunswick Co:  1770 Era Lived in Northampton Co;1763 Born ISAAC JOHNSON Private, Virginia Militia, $26.66 Annual Allowance $79.98 Amount Received February 19 1834 Pension Started Age 71, Carroll County, Tennessee (1835 Tn Pension Roll) ISAAC JOHNSON (Pension S27326) served in the VA Line, was born in Charles City Co, VA and moved with his father to Northampton Co, NC for 7 yr, then moved to Brunswick Co, VA, and lived there at enlistment, and for 13 to 14 yrs after the War. He then moved to Montgomery Co, NC for 30 yrs, then in Dec 1826, moved to Carroll Co, TN where he applied for his pension on 19 Apr 1833, aged about 70. http://www.tngenweb.org/revwar/records/j/johnson.html

 

 

ISAAC JOHNSON

 

Isaac Johnson: S21326 VA LINE: Soldier was born in Charles City Co. Va and he moved with his father to Northampton Co. NC for 1 year then moved to Brunswick Co Va and he lived there at enlistment. He lived there 13 to 14 years after the Revolution and moved to Montgomery CO NC for 30 years then in 1826 Dec. he moved to Carroll Co. Tn and he applied there 1833 April 19 age abt 70 Pg 1847 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

ISAAC JOHNSON

 

Isaac Johnson: PA AND VA Lines: applied 1818 June 1 Bullitt Co. KY, in 1820 soldier was aged 72 with a wife age 66 and referred to a married daughter and his son who was born 1799 Oct 12 (both were still living with soldier but were not named) soldier died 1833 Oct 21: Pg 1847 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JACOB JOHNSON

Jacob Johnson VA LINE: Soldiers Name appeared on a list of applicants for invalid pension returned by VA to House of Representatives on 1792 April 25 served as a Private in Capt. Smallwoods CO and was disabled at Waxsaws. Pg 1847 and 1848 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson: S3664 BLW: #1963-100: Cont. Line Va: applied 1818 May 20 Shelby Co Ky, age 58: The page with reference to family was to dim to read in this microcopy ( only daughters Sarah aged 25 and Nancy age 19 were readable) See national Archives Series M804 roll # 1423 for a copy of the entire file) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON OR JAMESTON JOHNSON

 

James Johnson or Jameston and wife Mary: #38096 BLW #1719-100: PA Line soldier applied 1818 May 4 Frederick Co. Va. Aged 83. Soldier had enlisted in York Co. PA. Widow applied 1830 May 5, Winchester Va. Widow stated soldier had no children or other relative living in the US. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson BLW #12257-100-16 1794 April: served as a private in VA Line Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson S15904 Va. Line: Soldier was born 1747 April 27 in Isle of Wright Co. Va. He lived there at enlistment. Applied 1833 Feb 4, Isle of Wright. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson S16891 Va line: Soldier was born in 1759 Louisa Co. Va and was raised in Bedford Co. Va. And he was living with a brother (not named) in Amherst Co. at enlistment and after the Revolution lived in Campbell CO. Va. The part which was formerly a part of Bedford Co. Va. For 2 years. He then moved to SC for 6 years then moved to Sullivan Co. Tn for 33 years. Then moved to Wayne Co. Ky then moved to Washington Co, Mo. He applied there 1833 Feb 5, in 1833 soldiers brother John Johnson was of Washington CO. Mo, and in 1833 a James J. Johnson was a JP from Washington Co. Mo, but no relationship to soldier was stated. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson: S35471 VA Line applied 1818 July 7 Montgomery Co. KY aged 64 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson or James Johnston wife Esther: W7934, VA Line. Soldier applied 1832 Spt 27 Amelia Co. Va aged 88 and he had lived in said County at enlistment. Widows affdt. Too dim to read, see National Archives Series M804 roll # 1423 for a copy of the entire file and perhaps a better microcopy Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

James Johnson R5628 VA Line applied 1840 Jan 15 Mecklenburg Co. Va aged about 76, Howell Johnson of Spartanburg Dist SC made affdt. 1843 Nov 16 stated he had served with James Johnson (They appear to be brothers) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JESSEE JOHNSON

 

Jesse Johnson: S38884: Cont. and NC Line: 1824 March 26: Wilson Co. Tn: aged 61 and referred to wife age 55 and children at home to witt: Rebecca Johnson age 27, William Johnson age 18: John Johnson age 15: Jonathan Johnson age 13: Soldier died 1834 Aug 22. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson: S38082 Cont and Va. Lines: Soldier enlisted in King William Co. applied 1818 July 22 Hanover CO. Va. In 1820 soldier was 60 with a wife aged between 30 and 40: Also 4 sons and 2 daughters the oldest aged 13 and the youngest aged 5 (no names given) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson R53634 Cont. Line Va: Soldier was born in 1763 in Maryland and he lived in Stafford Co. Va at enlistment and he lived there some 27 years after the Revolution then moved to KY and applied 1832 Aug 27 in Clark Co. KY. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson S32345 BLW #26-160-55 VA Line: Soldier was born 1762 May 14 in Hanover Co. Va and he lived there at enlistment and he lived there 10 years after the Revolution. He then moved to KY for 8 years then moved to Marion Co. Ind. with his children (not named) and soldier applied there 1835 Oct 6 and in 1855 he was living in Rochester in Fulton Co. Ind. In 1857 a son in law (not named) was aged 62: Soldiers brother was Richard Johnson age 75 in 1835 and a a minister of the Gospel in Sumner Co. Tn. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson S35480: Va Line: 1819 Aug 2 applied Garrrad Co. KY age 63, stated he had 12 sons and 5 daughters of which 9 were still living at home. 1821 Feb 8 Soldier moved to Madison Co. KY with a wife and 5 sons aged 15, 10, 8 to 9, 7 and 5 years. 3 daughters still at home. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson or John Johnston: S36026: VA Line: Soldier was born 1748 Aug. He applied 1818 April 6 Scott Co. KY in 1820 soldier stated he had no person in his family but himself. Soldier died 1825 March 27. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson and Elizabeth: W9086 Va Line: widow applied 1853 march 25 Garrard Co. KY aged 85: Soldier married Elizabeth Dodd on 1789 March 9 in Va. Widow stated soldier had been dead so long she could not remember the date. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN G. JOHNSON

 

John G. Johnson BLW #1167-300-3 1799 July: Assignee Robert Camp, no papers served as a Capt. In the VA line. It was stated in the file that one John Boswell Johnson recd VA State BLW #2117 for 4000 acres issued 1783 Dec 13 and later emigrated to KY and that in Frankfort KY a John B. Johnson recd BLW #13788 on 1783 Jan 3 for 1137 ½  acres and was surveyed 1798 Sept 24 and located in Washington CO. KY near salt River in what became Anderson Co. KY ( the data concerning the VA State BLW’s was not confirmed Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOSEPH JOHNSON

 

Joseph Johnson, Elizabeth Williamson former widow R11631 Cont Line VA: On Rev. Lewis Chadouin age 90 made affdt. 1843 May 9 in Goochland Co Va. And stated soldier was a son of James Johnson who lived 3 miles North of Cartersville Va and said Joseph Johnson married Elizabeth daughter of Benjamin Anderson of Goochland Co Va 19 May 1786 and in 1788 moved to Lynchburg Va. Soldier was drowned in 1802 and widow married 2nd to Nathan Williamson in 1803 and he died 1836 Oct 6: Widow applied 1843 April 15 in Amherst Co. Va age 73: Widow died 1843 May 17 leaving 4 childre Henry Williamson, Judeth Richardson, Elizabeth Richardson and Ann Fair or Ann Face (not clear) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOSEPH JOHNSON

 

Joseph Johnson or Joseph Johnston S13782 VA line: 1833 April 12 Monroe Co. IN. Soldier was born 1755 Oct 20 in  Frederick Co.Va and he lived there until 14 years of age and his father moved to New River in Va for 6 to 7 years then moved to Clinch River in VA where Soldier was of 18 and he lived there at time of enlistment and later enlisted in Montgomery Co.Va in 1776 where he live and in 1781 he moved to Powell’s Valley in What is now Lee County Va and also enlisted there. He lived there 4 or 5 years after the Revolution then moved to Knox Co. KY for 14 years then moved to Hawkins Co. Ohio for 2 years then to Jackson Co. Ind. for 5 or 6 years then to Owen Co. Ind for a short time then to Monroe Co. In. Soldier mentions his brother David Johnson who served with him. There is an affdt by Ebenezer Johnson who he had not seen for 17 or 18 years until he moved from IN to KY in 1841 and he stated he had also served in the Revolutionary Army with his brother Joseph Johnson. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

State of Indiana} Monroe County}

On this the twelfth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty three personally appeared in open Court before me Amory Kinney President Judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit of our state of Indiana aforesaid and Stephen P Seall and Abram Rusthik[?] Associate Judges of our said Court for the said County of Monroe being a Court of Record now sitting Joseph Johnston a resident of said County in said state aged seventy eight years the twentieth day of October next who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That he was born in the County of Frederick in the State of Virginia on the twentieth day of October in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and fifty five, where he resided untill fourteen years of age when his father removed to New River in Virginia and settled within a few miles of Englishes Ferry [sic: Ingles Ferry near present Radford] on said River where he resided six or seven years, when he removed to Clinch River what county if any at that time unknown in Virginia [Fincastle County 1772 - 1777, then Washington County]. When his Father removed with him as above last mentioned to Clinch River he was about eighteen years of age it was in the spring season of the year he feels pretty certain There were but a few settlers there then: – This Declarants family and a few other. – He resided there untill and at the time of entering the service. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated to wit

 

That in the month of July in the Year seventeen hundred and seventy four he

volunteered in a Company of Foot men under Captain Walter Crocket [Crockett] in the Militia of the State of Virginia in the service of the United States in the War of the Revolution. There was no Regiment formed there. He was rendezvoused under said Captain at New River, and marched to the Levels of Greenbrier Virginia there joining other troops was in said Company put in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Lewis his first name he thinks was Charles not certainly [Charles Lewis, killed at the Battle of Point Pleasant]. He was marched in said Regiment of Virginia Militia from the said Levels of Greenbrier under the said Colonel in said Company down New River on the east side crossing Gauly Mountain [sic: Gauley Mountain in present Fayette County WV] to the mouth of Kenawa [sic: Kanawha] River into the Forks of said River and the

Ohio, where was fought the Battle called the Shawnee Battle [Battle of Point Pleasant] on the 10th day of October Seventeen hundred and seventy four Previous to arriving at that place Colonel Lewis was the highest in command. upon such arrival this Applicant & said Colonel Lewises Regiment was under the command of a general officer whose name he has forgotten [Gen. Andrew Lewis]

 

Before reaching said Battle Ground Col. Lewis had preceeded with three or four

companies leaving Captain Crocket’s Company and this applicant in the rear with the Beeves and Baggage and Colonel Lewis was to have left canoes at Gauly River for said Capt Crocket and other three or four rear companies but from some cause no canoes being so left this applicant and said near companies were delayed a whole day in swimming their beeves and getting their baggage over on rafts. Said rear companies under the command of a Major Christy [sic: Christian] and this applicant in consequence of said delay did not engage in said Battle. The next day after crossing Gauly in the evening a couple of runners came from Colonel Lewis stating that the Battle had been fought and that the Indians threatened to fight them again – Major Christy then commanded that the Beeves and baggage be left and a forced march

commenced which was done, and this applicant in said company joined Colonel Lewis; but no further fighting took place. The Celebrated Cornstalk an Indian Chief as this applicant understood commanded at said Battle on the side of the Indians An Expedition from said Battle Ground was commenced but meeting a flag and the Indians suing for peace, said expedition being intended against their Towns, they this Applicant and his troops returned to and completed the Fort in the forks of said Rivers called Fort Pleasant, the spot being previously called Point Pleasant. He was employed in building said Fort & was there several weeks after said Battle. He had volunteered to go in said Expedition against said Indians but not to serve any particular period At the request of his officers and as a duty he voluntarily served in said Expedition four months; when at said Fort he was dismissed and started home about the latter part of October seventeen hundred and seventy four. He received no discharge in writing. All said services he rendered cheerfully faithfully and satisfactorily to his officers.

 

He remained at home untill the year next after his said expedition under Colonel Lewis

the year seventeen hundred and seventy five

 

In said year seventeen hundred and seventy five in the month of April as near as he is

able to state living at the County of Montgomery in the State of Virginia he volunteered in the Militia of said State in the service of the United States as an Indian Spy under an engagement with Major Robison whose first name he has forgotten. He was employed as such spy principally against the Shawnee Indians in company with James Whitton also an Indian Spy. This applicant spied through the country about Sandy and Clinch Rivers.

 

He engaged to serve three months or as long as there was a necessity in the opinion of

said officer for his said service. He served at least five months in said campaign faithfully and satisfactorily to his said officers. He was by the promise of said Officer to have been paid by him or his paymaster one dollar per day which he never received. He was dismissed in said County in the latter part of Summer or fall of said seventeen hundred and seventy five. He received no discharge in writing.

 

In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy six on the eighteenth

day of May he married and it promising a troublesome year he was prevailed on by his father in law and family to go with them to New River And after reaching New River at the request sent him by an Uncle living on Roanoke River he went down with his wife to stay the season with him.

 

But when he got to his Uncles two of his sons had drafted and this applicant volunteered in the same company commanded by Hugh Crocket Captain, brother to the Captain Crocket under whom he had formerly served. (He can not recollect the name of the County where he volunteered it was near said Roanoke River. no town near [Botetourt County].) in the Regiment commanded by Colonel William Christy [sic: Christian] in the Militia of the State of Virginia. Said Company was of Footmen. He volunteered as above either in June or July in said year seventeen hundred and seventy six for the period of three months to go a Campaign against the Cherokee Indians he rendezvoused in said Company at Jacob Kents near Colonel Rawleigh Madisons and marched and joined Colonel Christy at the Long Islands and Holstein River (Tennessee) [sic: Long

Islands of Holston River at present Kingsport TN, then North Carolina] and proceeded to the Indian Towns, and burned and destroyed them, except two of them belonging to friendly Indians and Traders. After being in the Cherokee Indian country about two months (being about one month going and returning or upwards) they set out on their return. In said Expedition he served upwards of and at least three months He was dismissed on his march homeward about the first of October in said year 1776. he does not know in what county it took place At that time the territory which composed one county now making several He received no discharge in writing nor did any of his comrades within his knowledge and memory

 

In the year seventeen hundred and seventy seven at said County of Montgomery Virginia in the early part of summer he volunteered in the Militia of said state to serve as an Indian Spy under an engagement with Major Robison before mentioned for and during said summer and as long as in the opinion of said officers necessary against the Shawnee Tribe of Indians as well as the Mingos, Wyandots &c (in the service of the United States) through the country about Sandy [probably Big Sandy] Guian [probably Guyandotte] and Cold Rivers. He served in company with Richard Prey[?]. He was to have received one dollar per day which he received from his paymaster through the hand of his said Major. He was dismissed in said County about the end of said summer without any discharge in writing. He served in said engagement three months.

 

In the year seventeen hundred and seventy eight still living at said County of

Montgomery in said state of Virginia in the early part of summer of said year he volunteered as an Indian Spy in company with John Sharp his fellow spy under an engagement with (Major) Walter Crockett who was at one time Colonel he does not know whether then or afterwards, against the before mentioned tribes of Indians for a period of three months or as long in said season as in the opinion of said officers necessary. He served in the country about the before-mentioned Rivers of Sandy &c. He was to receive one dollar per day which he never got. He was dismissed in said County about the end of said summer without any discharge in writing. Said service was in the Militia of the said state of Virginia and the United States. He served faithfully

and to the satisfaction of said officer constantly three months at least

 

In the year seventeen hundred and seventy nine whilst living at said County of

Montgomery in said State of Virginia he volunteered about the first of summer of said year in the Militia of said state and the service of the United States as an Indian Spy in company with his partner in the former season John Sharp under and engagement with Major Thomas Mastin to serve during said Summer season, and to receive one dollar per day. He spied in the country about Sandy and Cold Rivers against the Shawnee, Wyandots Mingos &c Indians. He served constantly and faithfully and satisfactorily to his officer during said summer and probably longer but at least three months. He was dismissed in said County without any discharge in writing. He received no pay for said service. He was dismissed sometime about the end of said summer or beginning of the Fall of said year probably in September not certain

 

In the year seventeen hundred and eighty whilst living at said County of Montgomery in

said State of Virginia he volunteered in the spring or beginning of summer of said year in the Militia of said state in the service of the United States as an Indian Spy in Company with Archibald Prater under an engagement with said Major Thomas Mastin to serve during the need or said season at one dollar per day He spied about said last mentioned Rivers against said last mentioned Indians He served faithfully and constantly and satisfactorily to his said Officer at least three months and dismissed about the end of said summer without any discharge in writing. he received no part of his said pay.

He still continued to reside in the County aforesaid untill entering the following Service.

 

In the year aforesaid of seventeen hundred and eighty he thinks in the month of

December in said year he entered the Service of the United States in the Militia of the state of Virginia as a Volunteer in the company of Fort commanded by Captain Robbin Moffett in the Regiment commanded by Colonel — Preston whose first name he has forgotten [William Preston]. He rendezvoused in said company near the head of Clinch River and marched and joined other companies at Harboards Ferry just below (four or five miles) the Lead mines [near Fort Chiswell in Wythe County] and fell under the command of said Colonel at or near New River thence they marched to Moravian Town [near present Winston-Salem] in North Carolina, and thence joined General [Nathanael] Greene near Guilford Court House, thence marched down to Hawe [sic: Haw] River. They were at Hawe River, the Hanging Rock, and many other places some of which forgotten scouting & traversing the country like playing prisoners baste[?]. He so entered the service for the period of three months which he served out and which expired a few days (perhaps three) before the Battle of Guilford [Guilford Courthouse, 15 March 1781]. He was not in said Battle being dismissed at the end of said period without any discharge in writing. He never has received one cent of pay for said tour. He served faithfully and to the acceptance of his officers. He was dismissed at Guilford Court House in the first part of march in the year seventeen hundred and eighty one

 

In the same said year seventeen hundred and and eighty one he removed to Powells

Valley leaving his family behind untill the Fall season in said State of Virginia he does not recollect the name of the County [Washington] if any formed at that time (now Lee County) At said Powells Valley in said year last mentioned of seventeen hundred and eighty one he entered the service of the United States in the Militia of the State of Virginia as an Indian Spy under an engagement with Colonel Charles Cox at one dollar per day in company with Alexander McFarland his partner Spy in the spring of the year aforesaid. He spied in said Valley down to Hickory Gap on Yellow Creek and Cumberland Waters and on Goose Creek Waters. He served constantly and faithfully during said season at least for three months. He was employed in this spying against the Cherokee Indians He was dismissed at Colonel Coxes in the Valley aforesaid

near Cumberland Gap. He received his pay for said services duly He received no written

discharge for said tour of spying. He served as a volunteer.

 

In the year seventeen hundred and eighty two at said Powells Valley in Virginia he entered the service of the United States in the Militia of the State of Virginia as an Indian Spy to serve during the summer season of said year or longer if requested as necessary by his officers. He commenced service in or about the beginning of said summer or latter part of the spring of said year and spied about the same Rivers and country spied in his former last mentioned spying and against the same Indians (Cherokees) in company for his partner spy with Dan’l Coulson He was dismissed at Colonel Coxes aforesaid in said Powells Valley about the latter part of said summer and received his one dollar pay per day by the hand of said Colonel having served constantly and faithfully to the acceptance of his officers. He received no discharge in writing. He served in said service at least three months.

 

He served as a volunteer in such tours as well as all his other tours heretofore stated. He

has no record of his age; many years ago the last he knew of it, it was in the possession of a sister Elizabeth Monday of Kentucky. Upon reflection he thinks he got a discharge in writing from his Captain Hugh Crocket for the Cherokee Campaign herein described.

 

He never received any pay other than herein mentioned for any of said services. His

memory is much impaired and where in his declaration he has omitted anything it is on account of such failure of memory. He has no documentary evidence of any part of his said services nor does he know of any person or persons whose testimony he can procure of his services except those whose certificates are herewith annexed.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present and

declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

After the War of the Revolution he continued to live four or five years in said Powells Valley, then removed to Knox County Kentucky where he resided fourteen years or upwards, then he removed to Hawkins Ohio and lived there two years or about it then he lived five years or about it in Jackson County Indiana, then he resided five or six years and now resides in Monroe County in the State of Indiana He resided formerly a short time in Owen County in Indiana.

 

He is known to his brother David Johnston [pension application S32349] who served with him in the tour to Guilford North Carolina and is known to Cornelius Cox and William Followell who can testify the said David as to services and the others to his character for veracity and their belief of his services as a soldier of the Revolution Whatever is omitted of dates circumstances and events is by reason of old age, & a remote backwoods life where he has not had the learning or books to refresh his memory, which has failed greatly. Joseph Johnston his X mark

 

State of Kentucky Fleming county Sct.

 

I Ebenezer Johnson of Fleming county Kentucky aged Eighty one years do state on oath that Joseph Johnson who has made the foregoing declaration is my brother and that I had not seen him for seventeen or eighteen years untill he moved from Indiana to this state in the fall of 1841. I also state that I served with him in the company command by General Broadhead [sic: Col. Daniel Brodhead] I think the year 1779 [August]. the detachment marched from Pittsburg [sic: Pittsburgh] up the Alleganie [sic: Allegheny] river to some Indian Towns which were destroyed together with their growing corn &c. I am certain he served at least three months on this campain, of the field officers I recollect Col. Campbell Maj. Byrum and Maj. John Finley. Capt. Ross command the company to which we were attached. Genl. Broadhead and the other field officers mentioned were officers of the Regular army. Capt. Ross commanded a company of Militia which was attached to the regulars.

 

That in the spring of the year 1780. said Joseph Johnson was drafted and attached to the

company of Capt. Andrews and served as a Spye and Ranger a tour of three months garding the frontier along the Ohio river and in the neighbourhood of Holladays Cove [sic: Hollidays Cove at present Weirton WV] – I was serving in another part of the country at the time he was with Capt. Andrews, but in the next year (I think it was in 1782) said Joseph and myself ware both drafted and attached to the company of Capt. Reed in the month of March of that year, and was actively engaged as a Spye guarding the frontier on the Ohio River untill the month of October or

November following.

 

I know said Joseph Johnson also served a tour of three months as a

substitute for William Conyears. he was engaged in guarding country on the Ohio river from Holladays cove to Mingo’s bottom. Capt Andrews commanded the company on this tour as well as the one before mention. I know he was attached to some other companies but cannot state the particulars. Ebenezer Johnson his X mark [3 Nov 1843]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Joseph Johnson (Johnston): S31782

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

So we Have Joseph Johnson

Brother is Ebenzer Johnson

Brother is David Johnson

Sister Elizabeth Monday of Kentucky

Joseph Johnson was 18 and enlisted in the Army when he lived on the CLINCH RIVER in Va. He also enlisted in Montgomery CO Va. In 1776

 

Captain Walter Crocket or Crockett

Major Robison

Hugh Crocket Captain, brother to the Captain Crocket

(Major) Walter Crockett

John Sharp

Archibald Prater

Captain Robbin Moffett

Dan’l Coulson

Sister Elizabeth Monday of Kentucky

David Johnston [pension application S32349]

David Johnson S32349 VA Line: Soldier was born 1759 Oct 10 or 1760 in Frederick Co. Va and he lived there until age of 11 then moved to Montgomery Co. Va and in 1773 he moved to the head of the Clinch River and he lived there at enlistment applied 1832 Nov 12 Jackson Co. Ind Pg 1844 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

Ebenezer Johnson of Fleming county Kentucky

Capt. Ross

Capt. Andrews

Capt. Reed

Substitute for William Conyears.

 

 

JOSEPH PAYNE JOHNSON

 

Joseph Payne Johnson S38095 VA Line: applied 1818 Wilkes Co.Ga aged 70 on 1817 June 4, in Soldier stated he only had a wife in his family (she is not named) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOSIAH JOHNSON

 

Josiah Johnson and wife Susan: R5665 VA Line: widow applied 1840 May 17 in Pittsylvania Co.Va aged 75. Soldier and widow had married 1789 July 24. Soldier died 1839 Dec 18, a son Abraham Johnson made affdt 1854 April 6 in Pittsylvania Co. Va aged 58 and refered to himself as “One of soldiers heirs” and was also reffered to as Abram Johnson. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

MICAH JOHNSON

 

Micah Johnson R5648 VA Line: 1756 Aug 14 born in New Kent Co. Va and he lived there at enlistment and after Revolution he moved to Franklin Co. Va and in 1822 he moved to Patrick Co. Va and in 1828 he moved to Howard Co. Mo. He applied there 1834 Aug. 6 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

on this 6th day of August 1834 personally appeared before the county court of the

county of Howard in the State of Missouri Micah Johnson a resident of the county and state aforesaid aged seventy seven years on the 14th day of August last, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That he was living in the County of New Kent in the State of Virginia at the commencement of the Revolutionary war, that in the year 1775 a company of men then called minute men was raised and organized in the county of New Kent for the defense of the country against the British and placed under the command of Captain Robert Turner. that this affiant was at the organization of this company drafted into it as a private and served under the same captain during the whole of his military service. that about the year 1775 (the precise time he cannot recollect) he was called into actual service and marched with his company under the command of Captain Robert Turner to a place in New Kent County, Virginia, called the “long bridge” across the Chickohomoney [sic:

Chickahominy] River for the purpose of defending the country against an expected attack from the British. that during this tour he was in actual service at least a month & a half. That he afterwards on two different occasions went in the same company under the command of the same captain to the same place for the purpose of defending the country against attacks of the British troops and was in actual service during these two last mentioned tours first was four months, but he cannot recollect the precise times at which he rendered these services. Afterwards in the year 1781 when Lord Cornwallis marched into Virginia he was again in actual service as a drafted militia man in a company commanded by Capt Robert Turner and marched as far as Williamsburgh [sic: Williamsburg] in Virginia and was stationed there during part of the time that Lord Cornwallis was besieged in Yorktown, and that about ten day before the capture

of Cornwallis [on 19 Oct 1781] this affiant was taken sick and permitted by his captain to return home. that he was in actual service as a private upon this occasion at least two months and a half. This affiant does not recollect that he ever received any written discharge. if he did, he has long since lost it. he knows of no living witness by whom he can prove his services as a revolutionary soldier and in consequence of his great age and consequent loss of memory he is unable to give a more circumstantial statement of his services as a soldier of the revolutionary war.

 

He cannot state with precission the length of his several services in the war but

according to the best of his recollection he served not less than the period mentioned below as a private.

 

For eight months he served upon four several occassions as a drafted militiaman under

Capt Robert Turner & for these services he claims a pension.

To the several questions directed to be propounded by the court the applicant answers

 

st th

 

1 . He was born on the 14 of August 1746 in New Kent County in the State of Virginia

2. He has no record of his age

3. He was living in New Kent County, Virginia at the several times when he was called into the service. Since the revolutionary war he removed to Franklin County Virginia, resided there until the year 1822, then removed to Patrick County in the same State where he resided until the year 1828 when he removed to Howard County in the State of Missouri where he now resides

4. He was drafted each service.

5. He cannot recollect the names of any of the regular officers with whom he served.

6. He does not recollect that he ever received a written discharge

7th. He states that he is known in his present neighbourhood with Reverend William M. Burton and Mr. John De hart and to James Hall (the second of whom has known him twenty and the latter fifteen years) who can testify as to his character for truth and veracity and their belief of his services a soldier of the revolution.

 

He knows of no living witness by whom he can prove his services aforesaid.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or an annuity except the

present and he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in any State.

 

Micah Johnson his X mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Micah Johnson: R5648

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

State of Missouri}

County of Howard} Sct.

 

MOSES JOHNSON

 

Moses Johnson or Moses Johnston: S36024: VA Line: 1818 July 13: Ohio Co. KY: in 1820 soldier was age 71 with a wife aged 66 or 67 and no children living with him. 1834 June 2 soldier had moved to Lawrence Co. Il to be near his children (not named) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

NAHUM JOHNSON

 

Nahum Johnson S7079: Wa Line: 1832 Sept 3 applied Charlotte Co. Va aged 82, he lived in Amelia Co. Va at enlistment and soldier was born there in 1750. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

OBADIAH JOHNSON

 

Obadiah Johnson and wife Mary: R5646 VA Line: a copy of soldiers will is in the files dated 1835 Aug 26 in which he names the following: Wife Polly: Sons Monroe Johnson and Anderson Johnson, daughters Louisana Perkins, Mary Perkins, Kitty Tandy, Susan Johnson: Grandchildren Reben, Augustus W and Elizabeth Ann George children of Reuben George: Grandchildre Mary and Elizabeth Ann George children of John George the wives of Reuben and John George are deceased and they were not named in the will of soldier. Soldier had applied for pension 1832 Sept 24 in Cumberland Co.Va a resident of Goochland Co. Va aged 67. Soldier was born in Cumberland Co. Va. and he lived there at enlistment. In 1832 soldier mentioned a son living in Goochland Co. Va aged 67. Soldier married Mary (?) in 1786. Soldier died 1840 June 7 leaving a Widow Mary who died in Goochland CO. Va 1844 July 27, leaving 6 children: Monroe Johnson, Anderson Johnson, and Susan Johnson, Catherine Herndon, Louisana Perkins and Mary Perkins, the son Monroe Johnson applied 1852 March 30 in Goochland Co. Va for himself and other Children. Widow had applied 1843 April 26 in Goochland CO.Va. age 77. Soldier and widow had married 1786 Oct 1. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

State of Virginia Cumberland County to wit

 

On the 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared before the County Court of

Cumberland Obadiah Johnson a resident of Goochland County in the State of Virginia who being first duly sworn according to Law doth on his Oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the Act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832.

 

That he is a native of the County of Cumberland and State of Virginia, and has always resided in the County of Cumberland untill recently when he moved across James River to the County of Goochland where he now resides. That he is 67 years of age, and that the Register of the same is at his sons in the County of Goochland.

 

That in the year 1780 as well as he now recollects he was drafted for a three month tour of duty in the Malitia of Virginia from the County of Cumberland, and marched from said County under Capt. Charles Ballow and joined the Southern Army under General [Horatio] Gates. That this affiant was in the battle of Camden [SC, 16 Aug 1780] when Gates was defeated & after his term of service expired he was discharged & returned home.

 

That afterwards in January 1781. he was again drafted for a three months tour which he performed under Captain Richard Allen from the County of Cumberland, and was stationed for some time at the long Bridge [probably Great Bridge VA], that as soon as that time expired or very shortly afterwards he marched with Capt. William Meredith from Cumberland county to join the Marquis De Lafayette’s Army near Richmond [29 Apr 1781] and remained with the army in service untill the company was discharged which from a Comparison of opinions and recollections with some of the members of that Company was 3 months. That he afterwards marched from Cumberland under Capt Richard Allen to the Siege of York [28 Sep - 19 Oct 1781] and was there in Service when Lord Cornwallis surrendered. This last tour was also a three months tour.

 

This affiant also states that between the time of his service under Capt Wm Meredith and his trip to the Siege of York he was called out under Lieutenant James Guilliam and served for about 10 days at Coslun[?]

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension, or annuity except the present

and declares that his name is not on the pension Roll of any agency of any State Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid Obadiah Johnson

 

NOTE: On 26 April 1843 in Goochland County Mary Johnson, 77, applied for a pension stating that she married Obadiah Johnson on 1 Oct 1786, and he died 7 June 1840. On 30 March 1852 their son, Monroe Johnson, stated that his mother’s application was denied, that she died 27 July 1844, and that he was renewing the application.

 

Another document in the file lists their children as

Monroe Johnson,

Anderson Johnson,

Susan Johnson,

Catherine Herndon,

 Louisianna Perkins, and

Mary Perkins, all still living.

The file also contains a copy of the will of Obadiah Johnson dated 26 Aug 1835. In addition to the above children it names as heirs his wife Polly and his grandchildren.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Obadiah Johnson: R5646

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

Captain Richard Allen
Capt. Charles Ballow

Capt Wm Meredith

 

 

PHILIP JOHNSON

 

Phillip Johnson or Phillip Johnston: S36657: Cont. Line VA: 1818 Sept 12: applied Montgomery Co. KY: age about 60 he had enlisted in Essex Co. Va. In 1820 soldier had 5 children at home towit Berry Johnson 18, Lanston Johnson 15, Clement Johnson 10 (the other 2 children were not named) In 1825 soldier had moved to Ripley Co. Ind. having moved there in 1824 from KY. Soldier died 1835 July 11. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 
 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, Montgomery County, Sct.
 
On this 12th day of September 1818, before me the subscriber, one of the Judges of the
circuit court, in and for the state aforesaid, personally appeared Philip Johnson aged about sixty years;–who being by me first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following statement and declaration, in order to obtain the provision made by the late law of Congress. entitled, “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the Revolutionary War;”
 
That he is a citizen of the state of Kentucky, and resident in the county of Madison; and that he was enlisted for three years or during the war at Hobs hole [Hobbs Hole], Essex County in the state of Virginia on or about the [blank] day of April 1777 by one Leut Bohannon [sic: Ambrose Bohannan] and served in the company commanded by captain James Pendleton of the first Regiment of Artilery Virginia line on continental establishment that he continued to serve in the said corps, or in the service of the United States, in the continental army, against the common enemy, until the close of the war when he was honorably discharged from service at Old Town, Halifax County in the state of Virginia; that he was in service about five years and was in the battles of Monmouth [28 Jun 1778], Stony Point [15 Jul 1779], Gates defeat [defeat of Gen. Horatio Gates at Camden SC, 16 Aug 1780], and at Peters Barg [possibly Petersburg VA, 25 Apr 1781] and that he is in reduced circumstances and stands in need of the assistance of his country for support; and that he* has lost his discharge, and has no evidence in his power, of his services and discharge, other than that which is here transmitted.
 
*Gave his discharge to Capt Bohannan to draw the balance of his pay and has never seen it since
 
Kentucky Madison Circuit sct September Term 1820.
 
On the 5th day of September 1820 personally appeared in Open Court being a Court of
record for the State of Kentucky and Circuit of Madison County Philip Johnson aged Sixty one years resident in Madison County in said State who being first duly Sworn according to Law doth on his oath declare that he served in the revolutionary war as follows
 
He belonged to the 1st Regiment of Virginia artillery and to Capt. James Pendleton’s
Company the date of his original declaration is on the 12th day of September 1818, And that he had not since that time by gift sale or in any manner disposed of his property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring himself within the provisions of an act of Congress entitled an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and Naval service of the United States passed on the 18th day of March 1818 and that he has not nor has any person in trust for him any property or securities contacts or debts due to him nor has he any income other than what is contained in the Schedule hereto annexed and by him subscribed towit One Mare two Cows and calves one Steer Six hogs (Signed) Philip Johnston
 
He states that he is a farmer by occupation but entirely unable to follow it by reason of his having lost the use of one of his shoulders. He states that he has five children living with him of the following names and ages (viz)
Berry 18
Langston 15 years
Clement 10
all of his children are able to maintain themselves by there own labour except Clement who is a Cripple. He states that he states that he is in such indigent circumstances as to be unable to support himself without the assistance of his Country.
 
NOTES: “Phill Johnston” is listed as a Matross (artillery private) on the Mar 1780 payroll of Capt. James Pendleton’s Company. Other documents in the file indicate that Johnston moved to Ripley County KY around 1824 and died 11 Jul 1835.
 
Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements
 
Pension Application of Philip Johnston S36657
Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

Leut Bohannon [sic: Ambrose Bohannan]

Captain James Pendleton

 

 

RICHARD JOHNSON

 

Richard Johnson BLW # 12275-100: 1791 April 13 assignee James Reynolds served as a private in the Va. Line. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

RICHARD JOHNSON

 

Richard Johnson: S2664 Va Line soldier lived in Hanover Co. VA. at enlistment. He applied 1832 Aug 15 in Sumner CO. Tn age 72. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

RICHARD JOHNSON

 

Richard Johnson: S8766 VA Line: Soldier was born in 1762 April in Hanover Co. Va and he lived in Albemarle CO. Va at enlistment and he applied there 1832 Dec 3: Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

RICHARD JOHNSON

 

Richard Johnson S16896 VA Line: Soldier was born in 1760 in Southampton Co. Va and he lived there at enlistment. He applied 1832 Nov 5 Greene Co. Ala. age 72. Soldier also served as a sub. For his brother Jordan Johnson. In 1800 soldier moved from Southampton Co. Va to Johnston Co. NC and in 1823 he moved to Greene Co. Ala. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ROBERT JOHNSON

 

Robert Johnson or Robert Johnston wife Elizabeth: W371: NC Line: Widow applied 1844 Feb 2, Knox Co. Tn age 69. Soldier and widow married 1791 April 1 and soldier died 1840 April 20. Soldier had applied 1834 Sept 6 Hawkins Co. Tn age 74 he lived in Randolph Co NC at enlistment. Soldier was born in 1760 PA. Widow was born 1775 April 19, children shown were Mary Johnson born 1792 March, Sarah Johnson born 1794 July 17, Jane Johnson born 1796 June 5. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ROBERT JOHNSON

 

Robert Johnson S1838: VA Line soldier was born 1759 April 17 in Albemarle Co.Va and he lived in Bedford Co. Va at enlistment and in 1787 he moved to Knox CO. Tn and he applied there 1832 Aug 13. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

State of Tennessee} SS On this 13th day of August 1832 Presonally appeared in open

Knox County}

Court before me Samuel Powell one of the Circuit Judges of law and equity in and for the state of Tennessee and for the first Judicial Circuit in the Circuit Court now sitting Robert Johnston a resident of the County and State aforesaid in the said County and state aged Seventy three years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on

his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passd June 7th 1832

 

That he entered the service of the united states under the following named officers and served as herein stated He lived in Bedford County Virginia at which place he volunteerd on the 21st day of September 1780 under Capt Jacob Early in Col Linchs [sic: Charles Lynch’s] Regiment of volunteers & Riflemen Marched to Petersburgh [sic: Petersburg] Va., had our head quarters about two miles from Petersburgh was in no battle lay there till we were discharged which discharge bears date december 21st 1780 signed by W Leftwich Liut Col and accompanies this declaration Sirved at the above tower three months when we arrived at Petersburgh we joined Gen’l [Robert] Lawson and went under the command of the regular officers

 

Again while living at the same place in the Spring of 1781 voluntered under Capt Bowen Price in Col Linches Regiment of Rifle men marched to North Carolina to Gilford [sic: Guilford Courthouse] and on Haw River after Cornwallaces [sic: Cornwallis’s] men we joined Col [William] Washington who commanded a troop of horse and a number of infantry we was then under his command he Johnston was in the battle at Gilford [15 March 1781] Genl [Nathanael] Green was commander in chief we were defeated we then pursued Cornwallace across deep River and lay in the neighbourhood of the fall of that River [at Ramsey’s Mill above the confluence with Haw River] till it was understood that Cornwallace went on board of his vessels at Cross Creek [present Fayetteville] he was there honouraby but verbally discharged

 

Served three months Prooves that he was in the battle of Gilford by James Crews He served in the whole six months He has his discharge as to the first tour above written and can proove his actual service in the battle of Gilford by James Crews he has no other documentary evidence nor he knows of no other person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his actual service He hereby relinquishes his every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state

 

There is no clergyman living amediately in his neighbourhood nor he knows of none by whom he can proove the report[?] of his actual service

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid [signed] Robert Johnson

 

NOTE: A typed summary adds that Robert Johnson was born in Albemarle County VA on 7 April 1759 and moved from Bedford County VA to Knox County TN in 1787.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Robert Johnson: S1838

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

Capt Jacob Early

Capt Bowen Price

James Crews

 

 

ROLAND JOHNSON or ROWLAND JOHNSON

 

Roland Johnson S21846 VA line: Soldier lived in Lunenburg Co Va at enlistment and in 1783 he moved to Spartanburg Dist. SC and he applied there 1832 Sept. 5 age 74.Soldier was born in Amelia Co. Va. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

SAMUEL JOHNSON

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Kentucky, Daviess County

 

 On this 8th day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court before Alney McLean Esquire sole Judge of the circuit court of Daviess County now sitting Samuel Johnson Senior a resident of said County and State aforesaid aged 88 years in December ensuing who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

 That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers, and

served as herein stated. That he was drafted and entered the service under Colonel William Giles Major Richard Jones Captain William Finney Lieutenant John Walthal Ensign's name not recollected in May (date not recollected) 1779 -- served one month marched from Amelia [county, Virginia] (the place of residence) to Portsmouth, or nearly [indecipherable word] that place was the point to which the troops were ordered the British having left, he returned.

 

That he was drafted in December 1779 entered the service under Captain Bennett Pullum Lieutenant Howel Rose remained in service for 2 weeks and then substituted French Frank to serve out the balance of the term to wit 2 months and a half the tour being for 3 months having previously moved from Amelia Virginia to Granville North Carolina.

 

February 1781 was drafted, entered the service under General Butler Colonel Joseph

Taylor Major Anthony Sharp Captain Richard Harrison Lieutenant James Ellison Ensign Ben Hester marched from Granville old Court house, to Guilford Court house fought the British on a March 1781 -- General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] Commanding. Served 3 months discharged 11th May 1781 at Wake Court-house now Raleigh (North Carolina).

 

Sometime in September following drafted and entered the service under Captain Charles Yancy marched from Granville County North Carolina to the high Hills of Santee (General Greene’s head quarters) guarding of public wagons tour 3 months.

 

 That he has no documentary evidence by which to prove his services.

 

 Interrogatories propounded by the Court

 

1st When and in what year were you born?

 

Ans: Bucks County Pennsylvania and in the year 1744

 

2nd Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?

 

Ans: I have none now there was one, but brother John carried it to South Carolina, it was they are destroyed by the Tories.

 

3rd Where were you living when called into service: where have you lived since the

Revolutionary War and where do you now live?

 

Ans: In Virginia and North Carolina since the revolutionary war in North Carolina and Kentucky and now lives in Kentucky

 

4th How were you called into service; were you drafted; did you volunteer or were you a

substitute, and if in substitute, for whom?

 

Ans: By order of the States, to wit of Virginia and North Carolina as I understood -- I was drafted.

 

5th State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served, such Continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service.

 

Ans: General N. Greene commanded at Guilford, Colonel Washington of the horse; I knew the Regiments in which I served the names of the commanders of which is brought to view in the preceding part of this declaration there was a Regiment from the lower part of the State (North Carolina) commanded by Colonel Eaton who I believe was taken prisoner at Augusta and then killed for an answer to the last clause of the inquiry, reference is made to the body of this declaration.

 

6th Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it?

 

Ans: I received one from James Ellison (Captain) but it has been mislaid or lost long since.

 

7th State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and their belief in your services as a soldier in the revolution.

 

Ans: Captain Benjamin Field and Benjamin Newton

 

 He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State that he knows of.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed, the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ Samuel Johnson Same year

 

[Benjamin Field & Benjamin Newton gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Samuel Johnson S16430 fn43NC [sic VA.]

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/26/08

 

Captain William Finney

Lieutenant John Walthal

Captain Bennett Pullum

Lieutenant Howel Rose

French Frank

Captain Richard Harrison

Lieutenant James Ellison

Ensign Ben Heste

Captain Charles Yancy

James Ellison (Captain)

Captain Benjamin Field

Benjamin Newton

Brother John Johnson in SC

 

SAMUEL JOHNSON

 

Samuel Johnson, Patsy Johnson: W7939: VA Line: Soldier enlisted in Essex Co. Va and applied there 1818 May 13 aged 59. Soldier and widow had married 1780 Feb 5 and she was born 1764 Jan 13. Soldier died 1830 Feb 11. Widow applied 1837 June 14 in Essex County Va. She died 1850 June 30 or 27 ( both dates shown) Children shown in 1823: Phillip Johnson age 27, Lawson Johnson age 2, daughters not named. In 1837 the only surving child was Lawson Johnson, grandchildren mentioned were Robert Johnson and Isablla Johnson and a great granddaughter Catharine Carter. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Pg 1857 Abstracts of Rev.War Pension Files.

 

SILAS JOHNSON

 

Silas Johnson BLW #12277-100: 1793 assignee of John Spencer served as a Pvt in the Va Line Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Pg 1857 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

SILAS JOHNSON

 

Silas Johnson: S41705: Va Line: applied 1818 June 16, Muskingum Ohio, in 1820 soldier was aged 59 with a wife Sarah aged 49 and children Silas Johnson 17, Tunis Johnson 14, Henry Johnson 11 and Peter Johnson aged 6. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Pg 1857 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

SOLOMON JOHNSON

 

Solomon Johnson Rejected: NC Line soldier lived in Caswell Co NC at enlistment he applied 1832 Sept 3 Smith Co. TN age 74, it was stated soldier lived in VA but enlisted in NC soldier was still living in 1843 April 15. Pg 1857 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Tennessee, Smith County

 

 On this 3rd day of September 1832 personally appeared before the County Court of the

Smith County Solomon Johnson a resident of Tennessee Smith County aged 75 years, who being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the act of Congress passed June 7 1832.

 

That he enlisted in the Army of the United States in the year 1777 with Captain Hogg and served in the 9th Regiment of the North Carolina line under the following officers General Lea Colonel Minor and Major Hardiman, that he entered the service in the County of Caswell North Carolina and was a resident of said County and State, was in the Battle of Guilford marched through Virginia to Norfolk.

 

 I hereby relinquish every claim whatever to a pension or an annuity except the present,

and declare that my name is not on the pension Roll of any agency of any State.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid

 

 S/ Solomon Johnson, X his mark

 

 State of North Carolina, Secretary of State's Office

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in and for the State aforesaid, do certify, that it appears from the muster rolls of the Continental line of this State in the revolutionary war that Solomon Johnson a private Soldier and hogs Company of 10th Regiment enlisted __ for __ “Dead 15th Sept. 1778.”

 

 That they Warrant for his services was issued to his Ayers on the 22nd May 1820.

 

Given under my hand this 23rd day of April 1833.

 

 S/ Wm Hill

 

 State of Tennessee, Madison County

 

 On this 7th day of November 1842, personally appeared in open Court before the Court

of the County of Madison & State aforesaid, Solomon Johnson, a resident of said County & State, who being first duly sworn, according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed 7th June 1832: That he enlisted in the Army of the United States in the Spring of the year 1777 or thereabout -- with Captain Hogg & served in the 9th Regiment commanded by Colonel Moore -- under the following named officers viz. Bartlett Collins, Lieutenant: Captain Hogg: Major Hardeman & said Colonel Moore: Said Solomon Johnson further states upon his oath, that he was born in Spotsylvania County in the State of Virginia – that his father kept a Register of the

ages of his Children, but the same is lost -- that he was born in the year 1757 -- that he ran away from his Father at about the age of 20 years & enlisted as above said under Captain Hogg by one of his recruiting officers, named Achilles Mashman or Marshman, at Caswell, now Person Court house in the State of North Carolina:

 

That since the Revolutionary War, he lived in Halifax County Virginia -- thence he removed to Smith County in Tennessee where he resided till the year 1833 -- when he removed to Madison County aforesaid where he has resided ever since:

 

That he received a written discharge from the Regular Army by the hand of Major Hardeman -- and that the said discharge was destroyed by being wetted in swimming across the Rappahannock River -- so that the Ink with which the same was written being bad, spread in such manner as to render the same illegible.

 

He further states on oath that the discharge stated, to the best of his recollection, that he has served for the space of 3 years, 6 months & 11 days as a private Soldier, and was dated about the fall of the year 1781:

 

He further states upon his oath, that he was in the battle of Guilford -- being the only battle he was in -- that he was employed during the Siege of York on the Gloucester side of James River in making bastions or Hampors [sic?] made of willows for the use of the American Army then defending themselves against the British:

 

He further states on his oath, that 8 or 9 years ago he made proof of his identity & Revolutionary services by the oath of one Robert Tucker about the year 1833 before Samuel Givens a Justice of the Peace at that time, for this County of Madison -- said Givens now resides in the State of Mississippi: --

 

That said proof thus made was placed in the hands of one George Hainsy, who had undertaken to procure a pension for him the said Johnson -- but who has lost or mislaid the same so that he the said Johnson could never get possession of the same -- That shortly afterwards the said Tucker died -- and that he the said Johnson was advised, as his witness who alone could prove his personal identity & services, was deceased, that he could not procure his pension, & therefore made no further attempt, until now and that he has never received a pension of his services in the Revolutionary war & that his name has never been enrolled in the pension list of any agency of any State –

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year before named. S/ Solomon Johnson, X his mark

 

[Attested: S/ James D. McClellan, Clerk]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Solomon Johnson R[NC11] fn17NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/26/08

 

Captain Hogg

Bartlett Collins, Lieutenant:

Achilles Mashman or Marshman,

Robert Tucker

George Hainsy

 

 

SOLOMON JOHNSON

 

Solomon Johnson R5664: VA Line soldier was born in 1759 in Accomac Co. Va and he lived there at enlistment and there for some time after the revolution, and about 1814 he moved to Seveir Co. Tn. He applied there 1844 May 6. Pg 1857 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

THOMAS JOHNSON

 

Thomas Johnson S3882 PA Line: applied 1818 April 21 Jefferson Co.Va aged 66, he had enlisted a Philadelphia Pa. In 1820 soldier had a wife aged 60 and her 3 children the oldest of which was aged about 9 years Pg 1858  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

THOMAS JOHNSON

 

Thomas Johnson: S31177 VA Line: Soldier was born 1764 Feb 28 in Almbemarle CO Va, he was living in Amherst CO Va at enlistment and later moved to Lincoln Co Va (Now in KY). And also enlisted there afterwards moved to Knox Co. KY then to Caldwell CO KY and lived there when he applied 1834 July 9 in Rockcastle KY Pg 1858 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

THOMAS JOHNSON

 

Thomas Johnson: S38100 VA Line: Applied1818 Sept 18 Albemarle Co.Va and he lived there at enlistment in 1820 soldier was aged 62 with a wife Nancy aged 48 and a son William D. Johnson aged 6. Pg 1858 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

1776-1783 ERA: William Johnson S2661: NC Line and Va Line Soldier was born 1761 Nov 4 in Chesterfield Co Va and he lived in Brunswick Co Va at enlistment and also served as a substitute for his father (not named) and in 1781 he moved to Montgomery Co. NC and also enlisted  there. He applied 1832 Oct 14 at Sneedsborugh in Anson Co. NC

 

 

 

William Johnson: S7095 NC Line: 1832 Oct 31 applied in Wilkes Co. NC. Soldier was born 1754 July 28 in Amelia Co. Va and moved with his father to Johnston Co. NC the part that is now Wake Co.NC. When he was very small & at age 17 he moved with his father to Rowan CO.NC (now Surry Co.NC) he lived there at enlistment and after the revolution he moved to Wilkes CO. NC. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, County of Wilkes

 

 On this 31st day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the Court of

Pleas & Quarter Sessions of the County of Wilkes & State of North Carolina now sitting, William Johnson Esquire a resident of the County of Wilkes & State of North Carolina, aged 78 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

That he was born on the 28th day of July 1754 in the County of Amelia & State of

Virginia, (the record of which is entered in his family Bible) where he lived until his father removed to Johnston County (now Wake) North Carolina, at which time he was very small. He lived in said County until he was about 17 years of age, when he removed with his father to the County of Rowan (now Surry) in the same State, where he lived until he entered the service of the United States as a volunteer in the month of February 1776 in a company of volunteers commanded by Captain Hamblin, and marched forthwith to Cross Creek or Fayetteville, with a view of suppressing the Scotch Tories who were at that time committing great depredations in that section of the Country -- before how were they reached the scene of their expected operations, an engagement had been fought between the Tories, under command of General McDonald, and the Americans under General Moore, Colonel Caswell & Colonel Lillington at a

bridge on Moore's Creek, in which the former were defeated & taken prisoners. After the

engagement was over the prisoners were brought to Fayetteville where this deponent was

stationed as one of the guard for a considerable time and until the prisoners were sent off -- this deponent was one of 12 persons detailed from Captain Hamblin's Company to form part of the guard to convey the prisoners to Halifax, but for some reason unknown to this deponent they did not go, and after being detained there some time after the principal part of the troops were discharged, they were also discharged and returned home, which place this deponent reached some time in the month of April, having been in service about 2 months and a half –

 

In the month of July or August following the deponent again volunteered himself as an

Ensign in the company of Captain Samuel Mosby, under a commission given him by Governor Caswell, and rendezvoused near old Richmond in the said County of Surry, where they remained about a week, making preparations for their intended expedition, and thence marched across the Blue Ridge to Fort Chissel near the Lead mines in Virginia, where they remained a few days and thence marched direct to the Long Islands of Holstein [sic, Holston River] where they joined the Virginia troops under ColonelChristie or Christian, and after remaining there about 2 weeks,

they marched as direct as they could to the Cherokee Nation -- upon arriving at the Cherokee Towns they found that most of the Indians had fled and abandoned the Towns; & after destroying their towns, corn and such other property as they could find, they marched back as far as the Tennessee River where they were halted until they received their rations to carry them home, and then set out for home which place this deponent reached about 19 November -- having been in service during this tour from 3 to 4 months

 

-- From the time that this deponent returned from the Indian nation until the Spring of the year 1780, (at which time this deponent removed into Wilkes County) he performed several tours of duty against the Tories in various parts of the County but the length of each and the particular circumstances connected therewith, he cannot now after a lapse of so many years pretend to recollect --

 

In the month of March 1781 directly after the battle of Guilford, this deponent was drafted for a short tour, to oppose Lord Cornwallis who was supposed intended to return to South Carolina, and rendezvoused at Hamblin’s old store where he joined the company of Captain John Cleveland (son of Colonel Cleveland) and marched direct to the old trading Ford on the Yadkin [River] near Salisbury, with a view of opposing the passage of Lord Cornwallis -- and after being stationed there for a short time, it was ascertained that Lord Cornwallis had marched for Wilmington, when there being no longer any necessity for their services, they were discharged and returned home, having been in service during this expedition about 3 weeks --

 

This deponent has resided in the County of Wilkes ever since the revolutionary war, and

resides there at this time –

 

He has no documentary evidence to prove his services, the commission given him as Ensign by Governor Caswell having been lost or mislaid for many years –

 

He has no discharges, nor has he any recollection of ever having received any -- nor does he know of any person living whose testimony he can procure, who could testify to his service, but refers to Colonel William P. Waugh and Samuel F. Patterson as persons to whom he is well-known and who can testify as to his character for veracity and their belief of his services as a soldier of the revolution --

 

 He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid

 

S/ R. Martin, Clk S/ William Johnson Senior

 

[Wm P. Waugh and Saml. F. Patterson gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of William Johnson S7095 fn12NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Captain Hamblin

Captain Samuel Mosby,

Hamblin’s old store

Captain John Cleveland

Colonel William P. Waugh

Samuel F. Patterson

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

1779 May: William Johnson enlisted in the Rev. War in Brunswick Co
1761 Nov 5: William Johnson Born
Sir:


I have to advise you from the papers in the Revolutionary War pension claim S. 2661, it appears that William Johnson was born November 5, 1761 in Chesterfield County, Virginia.

While a resident of Brunswick County, Virginia, he served from May 1779 (as substitute for his father, whose name is not stated), seven weeks as a private in Captain Thomas Claiborn's Company, Colonel Judkins' Virginia Regiment; he enlisted in January 1781 and served three months as Second Sergeant in Captain William Macklin's Company, Colonel Watson's Virginia Regiment; and served six weeks as Orderly Sergeant in Captain Peter Jones' Company, Colonel St. George Tucker's Virginia Regiment, and was at the battle of Jamestown, and was  discharged July 10, 1781.

Shortly after this he moved to Montgomery County, North Carolina, and served one month as a Lieutenant in Captain John Randle's Company,
Colonel Thomas Wade's North Carolina Regiment, as was in an engagement with the Tories, September 1, 1781; and was Adjutant to Colonel William Lofton's Regiment until the last of December.
He was allowed pension on his application executed October 14, 1832, while a resident of Sneedsborough, Anson County, North Carolina.

There is no data on file as to wife and children.

Respectfully,

Winfield Scott
Commissioner

Heritage Quest Online Series: M805; Roll: 476Image: 767; File: S2661 [Following record contained in pension record] June 9, 1927 Lodowick J. Hill, Sr. Atlanta, GA

William Johnson: S2661: NC Line: Soldier was born 1761 Nov 5 in Chesterfield CO. Va and he lived in Brunswick Co. Va at enlistment and also served as a sub for his father (not named) and in 1781 he moved to Montgomery CO NC and also enlisted there. He applied 1832 Oct 14 at Sneedsborough in Anson CO. NC.  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

Captain Thomas Claiborn's Company

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson wife Elizabeth W7932 Cont and Va Lines: Soldier enlisted in Charlotte Co. Va he applied 1832 Aug 20 Goochland Co. Va age 76 and soldier married there Elizabeth Woodson on 1784 Dec 25 and she was born 1758 June 4. Soldier died 3 or 9 June 1833. Widow Applied 1839 Aug 19 Goochland Co. Va Pg 1859 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S2661: NC Line: Soldier was born 1761 Nov 5 in Chesterfield CO. Va and he lived in Brunswick Co. Va at enlistment and also served as a sub for his father (not named) and in 1781 he moved to Montgomery CO NC and also enlisted there. He applied 1832 Oct 14 at Sneedsborough in Anson CO. NC.  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson S1226 Va line: Applied appl 24 Sept 1832 Wayne Co. KY aged 75 on 1832 Aug 2: Soldier lived in Bedford Co Va .when he enlisted in Amherst Co. VA. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

State of Kentucky, Wayne County

 

On this 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared before the Court of the County of Wayne, William Johnson a Resident of Wayne County and State aforesaid age 75 years old on the second day of August 1832, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832.

 

That he enlisted in the Army of the United States in the year he thinks of 1776 in the fall or summer thereof with Captain James Franklin & was appointed and acted as a Sergeant & served in the 10th Virginia Regiment of the line under the following named Officers, my Captain was James Franklin, 1st Lieutenant Cluff Shelton, 2nd Lieutenant James Dillard, Colonel Edward Stephens [?], was first Colonel who being promoted our Regiment was commanded by Colonel __ [blank in original] Green at Brandywine Battle.

 

General Weeden commanded the Brigade, I lived at the time of my enlistment in Bedford County in the State of Virginia, but enlisted in Amherst County Virginia for three years and served the full time & was regularly discharged at Petersburg in Virginia, at the expiration of my enlistment in writing but have lost the discharge, the particular time when discharged not recollected. I was at the Battle of Brandywine, at the Battle of Germantown, at the Battle of Monmouth during my three years of enlistment & in some other small engagements. After the Battle of Brandywine, my Captain James Franklin resigned and our company was commanded by Cluff Shelton. After I was enlisted, I was marched to Baltimore & was there inoculated for the smallpox & then was marched northerly & was at said Battles. I volunteered a was [sic] enlisted for six months in 1775 (in the year before my said enlistment for three years) under Captain James Buford in Bedford County in the State of Virginia & acted as a Sergeant by appointment we marched to Williamsburg Virginia, and the company was soon marched Back to the frontiers under the Command of Colonel William Christie and Burnt several Indian towns, on the Tennessee River & was discharged.

 

After my Enlistment for three years I served one term of three months as a Sergeant in the militia under Captain Jeremiah Pate of Bedford County Virginia & was at the Battle or siege of Ninety Six, returned home & was regularly discharged.

 

I again served a small tour under Captain Charles Christian of Amherst County in the State of Virginia as a Substitute for Ballenger Wade as a Sergeant.

 

In all of which tours I was regularly discharged in writing as a Sergeant But in the great length of time past have lost them, & now have no documentary evidence of my services & know of no person in this Country by whom I can prove my services.

 

I the said William Johnson hereby relinquish every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declare that my name is not on the Pension roll of the Agency of any State. I claim for compensation for two years as a Sergeant.

 

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

S/ William Johnson

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of William Johnson S1226 fn12Va.

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

Captain James Franklin

1st Lieutenant Cluff Shelton,

2nd Lieutenant James Dillard

Captain James Buford

Captain Jeremiah Pate

Captain Charles Christian

Ballenger Wade

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S13583 VA line: Soldier lived in Fairfax Co. Va at enlistment 1832 Sept 17 applied in Pendleton Co. KY age 74. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S46050 VA line: Soldier applied 1833 Feb 9: Grant Co. KY age 75 in March 1832: Soldier lived in Westmoreland Co. Va at enlistment and in 1797 he moved to KY. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson and Nancy Johnson W24: Va Line: Soldier enlisted in Caroline Co. Va, he applied 1818 May 27 Hawkins Co. Tn: Soldier married 1790 or 1791 Sept 30 or Oct 1 to Nancy Briant in Northampton Co. NC and soldier died 1833 Nov 16 or 17 in Grainger Co. Tn. His widow applied there 1844 Sept 27 age 71 in 1848. She was living in Campbell CO. Tn and in 1856 she was living in Union Co. Tn Widow died 1862 April 22 or 14: Children shown were Patsy Johnson, first child was age 55 in 1845 married Daniel Widows and in 1820 was living in NC: William Johnson no data: James Johnson age about 67 in 1869 a resident of Union Co. Tn, : Ann Johnson the youngest child was aged 17 in 1820 and she married Wm Daughtry and they were living in Grainger Co Tn in 1845 and they had married in Hawkins Co. TN soon after 1820. And in 1845 the said Wm Daughtry were living in Grainger Co. Tn in 1845. And they had the son James Johnson lived in Union Co. Tn in 1875 and stated he was soldiers only surviving child a grandson (not named) was mentioned in 1856. In 869 one Jesse Daughtery was of Union Co. Tn and in 1844 James Johnson was of Grainger Co. Tn. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

Pension application of William Johnson W24 Nancy fn106Va.

 

Hawkins County, The state of Tennessee: May Sessions 1818

 

On this 27th [?] day of May before me the Subscriber Chairman of the said County Court and one of the Justices of the Quorum of said Court, personally appeared in said court William Johnson aged 56 years resident in the County of Hawkins aforesaid who being by me duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following Declaration, in order to obtain the provision made by the act of Congress entitled “An act to provide for certain persons Engaged in the land & naval Service of the United States in the Revolutionary War.”

 

That he the said William Johnson enlisted in the County of Caroline State of Virginia in the company commanded by Captain Samuel Seldon [Selden?] of the 2nd Regiment commanded by Colonel Samuel Hawes commanded by General Greene and as near as this Deponent now recollects in the year 1779 for the term of 18 months, that he continued to serve in said Corps in the United States Service until some time in the year 1781 or thereabouts that he was discharged in Caroline County aforesaid by Colonel Hawes but that said discharge which was an honorable one, is not in his possession nor has he any other Evidence in his power to furnish by reason of the long space of time, that has elapsed. That said Deponent was in the battles of Guilford County House [sic, Guilford Court House], Camden, at the Siege of Ninety Six, and at the battle of the Eutaw Springs, where he was wounded by a sword on the top of the head, was bayoneted on the left arm, was shot in the knee, hip & leg Severely by the Enemy at which battle General Greene Commanded. That he is not only in very reduced circumstances but is almost totally unable to support himself by reason of the hardship he has underwent, and the wounds he has received in the Service of his Native Country the United States and that he greatly stands in need of the assistance and support of his Country though he has no other Evidence than this declaration to offer in support of his Services and that all the time he served in the United States Service was at least twenty one months.

 

Sworn to and declared before George Maxwell one of the Justices of the Quorum and Chairman of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions for said County in open Court on this the 27th [?] day of May

1818. S/ George Maxwell

 

State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

On this 29th day of August 1820 first appeared in open Court, being a Court of Record for said County, William Johnson aged about 59 years Resident in said County who being first duly Sworn according to law, doth on his oath, declare that he served in the Revolutionary War as follows: Enlisted in Captain Samuel Seldon's Company who was succeeded by Captain Campbell of the 2nd Regiment, Virginia Line for 18 months that he has Received a Pension certificate number 12,140 that my first Declaration was made out on or about the 27th day of May 1818 and the County Court aforesaid.

 

And I do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property, or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any

income or personal or real estate belonging to me except the clothes on my back, nor have I any wife or children but a daughter who does not live with me who is about 16 or 17 years old: that I am extremely week & debilitated & unable to support myself by my own occupation which is that of a daily labor & Stand in abstract need of the assistance of my Country for Support. Sworn to & subscribed in open

 

Court. S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

State of Tennessee, County of Grainger

 

On this 27th day of September 1844 personally appeared before me William Colvin a justice of the peace in and for said County and State aforesaid Nancy Johnson a resident in and of the said County and State aged 70 or 71 years old; who being first duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed July 7th 1838 entitled an act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows; That she is the widow of William Johnson who was a private in the Army of the revolution and served in all the southern division of the Army under Generals Greene and Morgan was in the battles of the Cowpens, Guilford, Eutaw Springs and several other engagements as she has been informed and believes: and received several wounds in various parts of his body the scars of which I have many times seen: with a cutlass or sword on his head and his arm with a bayonet; and in his knee and hip with bullets and was a cripple until the day of his death which took place in Grainger County on the 16th day of November 1833 being three or four days after the great falling of the Stars or Meteoric Light which took place on the 13th of that month in the same year;

 

 I am unable to give a detailed or particular account of his services but he was I believe pensioned under one of the first pension laws were for Revolutionary Soldiers when we resided in Hawkins County in this States; as an invalid pensioner and drew his pension for many years before his death in Knoxville of Robert King who was then the Agent for paying pensions and was on his Roll when he died at a full pension of $96 a year and after his death I drew the arrearage of pension being some $18 or $19 the exact amount not recollected and then surrendered of his certificate and receipted for the same all of which I suppose will be found on the files of the war department in the pension office or treasury office in as before stated she supposes that the proof of his said husband's services on which he was pensioned will be as she supposes all sufficient to entitle her to the amount of pension that her husband was entitled to draw under the law above referred to; She states that she was married to her said husband about the last day of September or first day of October 1790 in Northampton County on Maheren [sic, Meherrin] River in the State of North Carolina by one James Vincent a Baptist preacher of the Gospel by a certificate or license from publication in the Church my name before my marriage was Nancy Briant being then the law of the land; she states that she is unable to produce any record evidence of her marriage or over documentary evidence from church Books or records as they have been long since gone to destruction or lost in the lapse of so many years and she has no family record of the ages of her children or marriage her said husband never having one; he being no scholar and was careless about such matters;

but will be able to prove the positive and lawful solemnization of her marriage to her late husband William Johnson who was a pensioner referred to in the first part of this declaration by the evidence contained in the deposition of James Johnson which is hereto affixed who is a man of respectable standing in society and of good moral character which will be fully sustained; she would state that her oldest child is 52 or three years old according to her best recollection.

 

She further declares that she was married to the said William Johnson on the last day of

September or first day of October in the year 1790 and that her said husband the aforesaid William Johnson did died on the 17th day of November 1833 that she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service but the marriage took place previous to the first of January 1790 viz. At the time above stated. Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written before me.

S/ Wm Colvin, JP S/ Nancy Johnson, X her mark

 

[On September 17, 1844, in Grainger County, Tenn., James Johnson (relationship, if any, not stated), 73, gave an affidavit supporting Nancy Johnson's claim.]

 

State of Tennessee, Grainger County

 

Personally appeared before me Elijah Evans one of the Justices of the peace in and for said County Nancy Johnson widow and relic of William Johnson deceased who was a pensioner of the United States and in order to amend her former declaration which is now on file with the department of war; of the United States Amends her said declaration so far to explain a statement of her said husband in the year 1820; in relation to his “family and property” She states that it was true her said husband had at the date of his statements in 1820 no property in his own right at all; and it was also true that all his children was then married or dead except a daughter his youngest which then and for two years

resided with her sister a married lady in North Carolina but returned soon after the date of the above statement and married and now resides in this neighborhood to one William Daughtry And the testimony of both son in law and daughter will accompany this declaration; which Testimony she is in hopes will fully explain the discrepancy of her late husband's statements in her own:

 

She further states that at or about the time of the statement he was in the habit of continual drinking –and drunkness and that on those occasions she sometimes left home and staid or resided with some one of the children until he would get over his fit of drinking; and at the time referred to by the Commissioner of pensions in 1820 she was staying with one Daniel Widows who married Julia Johnson who was our fourth child and who is now about 50 years old after this he built a house in 1827 or 1828 in this County and we then resided together, until his death and all other matters are referred to in my former Declaration except that she is informed and believes that no record of the license or bond or church record can be found in North Hampton [sic, Northampton County] North Carolina having made proper search and many of the records have been destroyed in the lapse of years and by [indecipherable word] and carelessness of the Clerks &c cannot be found;

 

but the Testimony of James Johnson who was present at their wedding whose character stands as far as any man in the community and other collateral testimony taken in connection with his testimony will place the date of her marriage beyond controversy and that it took place at the time and place stated in her first declaration that she was married lawfully in Northampton County in North Carolina by one James Vincent a preacher well-known in that Country she avers most positively; and the positive testimony of James Johnson ought to be sufficient She has no family record as stated in her former declaration but by the testimony of accompanying this amended declaration will prove the ages of the children of William Johnson by his then lawful wife and now this lawful widow of the late William Johnson a pension or referred to in my former declaration and now the applicant to be placed on the pension list; in right of the Services of her said husband referred to in her formal declaration in in this my amended declaration to wit William Johnson who died about the 16th of November 1833. Sworn and Subscribed to before me this 17th day

of October 1845. S/ Nancy Johnson, X her mark

S/ Elijah Evans, JP

 

[On October 17, 1845 in Hawkins County, Tenn., William Daughtry, husband of Ann Johnson, daughter of William and Nancy Johnson, gave an affidavit supportive of Nancy Johnson's claim. In his affidavit, he lists the children of William and Nancy Johnson as follows:

Patsy “will be fifty six year old last June;

Betsy was about two years younger

Reuben Johnson first son was two years younger than Betsey and Ann my present wife who is a bout forty two years old or about that age.”

Daughtry states that he William and Nancy Johnson were married “last of October or first of November at 1790 or 1791.”] 17th of October 1845

 

Ann Daughtry who was Ann Johnson being duly sworn and cautioned by me deposeth and saith as follows that she is aged 42 years old and that in 1820 my father William Johnson who was the pensioner referred to in the declaration of Nancy Johnson my mother was the lawful husband of my mother and in the year 1818 or near two years before 1820 I resided in North Carolina with a married sister of mine and soon after that time or the latter end of that year I returned to the State of Tennessee in Hawkins County and was then married to my present husband William Daughtry

 

I also know when I came home my Father was in the habit of drinking too much and it must have been in his drinking frolics that he made the Statement referred to by the Commissioners of Pensions that he had no wife for I know the present applicant Nancy Johnson was his lawful wife as I have always understood and never heard the lawfulness of their marriage disputed I was acquainted with them from my birth until my father's death and with Nancy Johnson my mother from that time to the present and knows she is the identical person she represents herself to be and that she was his lawful wife as I have always understood and never heard it disputed.

 

Question 1st Mrs. Daughtry please state if you know the names of your elder sisters and Brother the children of William Johnson by his wife Nancy Johnson the present applicant for a pension in right of the services of her husband William Johnson your Father.

 

Answer: The names of the Children was

Patsy,

Betsy,

Reuben,

Julia,

William,

James,

Ann the last named being myself the present deponent and being now 42 or three years old at this time in my oldest sister as I have always understood was 14 or 15 years older than myself my father never kept any family register as far as I know and if any it was lost or destroyed before my time.

 

Question 2nd Please state if Nancy Johnson is a widow still of your father William Johnson the deceased pensioner referred to in Nancy Johnson's declaration and so often named by yourself.

 

Answer: She is a widow still and has remained a widow from my father's death until the present time and further this deponent saith not. Sworn and subscribed to on this 17th day of October 1845

before me. S Ann Daughty, X her mark

S/ Elijah Evans, JP

 

Researchers  Notes:

 

[Nancy Johnson survived the Civil War and filed for the reinstatement of her benefits.]

 

1 Probably the Battle of Hobkirk's Hill (a/k/a the Second Battle of Camden) based on the other battles in which he says he fought.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

Captain Samuel Seldon [Selden?]

Captain Campbell

James Vincent a Baptist preacher in Northampton Co NC

Nancy Briant or Nancy Bryant

James Johnson Grainger County, Tenn., in 1790 was in Northampton Co NC

William Daughtry son in law to Nancy Briant Johnson

Daniel Widows who married Julia Johnson son in law to Nancy Briant Johnson

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

 

Pension application of William Johnston (Johnson) S18062 fn12SC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

South Carolina, District of Fairfield

On this 22nd day of June in the year of our Lord 1835, personally appeared in open

Court, before John R. Buchanan, Judge of the Court of Ordinary in and for Fairfield District and state aforesaid, now sitting, William Johnston a resident of said District of Fairfield, in the State aforesaid, aged 76 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That deponent was born in the State of Virginia, and near the Shenandoah River, but

having left that State when four or five years of age he does not know the name of the County. That deponent was born in the year 1759 and in the month of March. That deponent has now in his possession a Bible which was given to deponent by deponent’s grandfather by the mother, William Roden. That deponent's page is entered in this Bible, and agrees with the age he herein given. The deponent believes the entry was made in the Bible by his said grandfather William Roden.

 

That deponent was living in Fairfield District, in the State of South Carolina, on the

South prong of Little Wateree Creek, when called into service. That deponent has lived in the same place ever since that period, and still lives there.

 

That deponent was attached to Captain Charles Lewis's Company (Militia Infantry)

which company was divided into three equal parts or divisions. That one division only was called out at one time. That deponent always went into service when the division to which he belonged was called on, and considers himself as a drafted whenever in service. Deponent Never received a discharge in writing from any officer or Commander. The troops were always discharged verbally by the Captain when the relief arrived.

 

 That he deponent is well acquainted with Captain John Hollis,William Lewis, Colonel

Austin, F Peay, Joseph Caldwell and John Buchanan, who can testify as to deponent's character for veracity, and their belief of deponent's services as a soldier of the revolution. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named Officers and served as herein stated.

 

1 John Hollis S21827

 

2 http://gaz.jrshelby.com/shirersfy.htm 

 

 First Tour. The first tour performed was under Captain Charles Lewis. He was the

Captain commanding. The Company met in Winnsborough and marched into the Dutch fork in Lexington District, crossing Broad River at Shirey’s ferry [sic, Shirers Ferry2?]. Deponent served this tour a private two months. The expedition was intended to keep the Tories in check. There were no regular or Continental soldiers there. Believes that Colonel John Winn was there, who was the Colonel of the Regiment. John Hollis was first Lieutenant (not in this tour) Charles Pickett was second Lieutenant and out this tour. This tour performed, in the spring and summer of 1775 or it may have been in 1776.

 

Second Tour: Was to Stono near Charleston South Carolina, no continentals they are

accepting a Company of Pulaski's Cavalry. Colonel Richard Winn was present commanding his Regiment. There were more than one Regiment of Militia there. Colonel John Adair was there, commanding one Battalion of Colonel Lacy's [sic, Lacey’s] Regiment. The British and Tories were in a Fort at Stono. There was no battle fought. When Pulaski 's men made an attempt to draw the Garrison out they were fired upon and one killed and one wounded. The deponent served two months as a private this tour. Charles Lewis commanded the Company. This tour in 1779.

 

Third Tour: Was to Coosawatchie [sic, Coosahatchie?]. Captain Charles Lewis

commanded the Company. Colonel John Winn commanded the Regiment and he and Regiment were out. Lay some time at could get Coosahatchie and thence marched to the Three Sisters ferry Savannah River, lay there some time and, served two months as a private this tour. No regular or Continentals seen this tour. This tour in 1779 or 1780.

 

Fourth Tour: Was to Wasmasaw [sic, Waccamaw?] in the lower part of South Carolina.

Captain Charles Lewis commanded the Company and was out. No regular soldiers there. Part of several regiments out. The Regiment made up of parts of different regiments and commanded by Colonel Edward Lacey. Served two months as a private this time about the year 1781 or 1782.

 

Fifth Tour: Was to Saltketcher towards the last of the Revolutionary War about the year

1782 Colonel Richard Winn commanded the Regiment and was out. Was under John Hollis who then had the command of the Company. No regular soldiers there. Served three months as a private this tour.

 

Sixth Tour: Was performed in Fairfield and Chester Districts when General Gates was

defeated near Camden. Was under John Hollis who commanded the Company. Was on this or Fairfield side of the River, and served three months as a private this tour.

 

 That deponent by reason of old age and the consequent loss of memory, cannot

swear positively as to the date of service; nor can he swear positively as to the order in which the different tours were performed, but he is certain he served in all 14 months at least as a private for which deponent claims a pension. That deponent served with an embodied corps in every tour mentioned, and was in the field, and that for the time during which the service was performed he was not employed in any civil pursuit. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State excepting that of South Carolina.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

S/ John Buchanan S/ William Johnston, X his mark

 

 [Thomas Hall, a clergyman, and John Buchanan gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 I John Hollis, residing in the District of Fairfield, in the State aforesaid, hereby Certify that I am well acquainted with William Johnston who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that I believe him to be 76 years of age. That I knew him in the revolutionary war. That he served under me in the last two tours mentioned to wit the fifth and sixth. That the facts stated in reference to these tours are correct and true, and that I know said Johnston to be a man of veracity and standing as to truth, in his neighborhood, and that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution and that I knew such to be the truth.

 

Sworn & subscribed the day and year aforesaid. ` S/ John Hollis

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/17/08

 

Grandfather by his mother is William Roden.

South prong of Little Wateree Creek

Captain Charles Lewis's

Captain John Hollis,

William Lewis,

Colonel Austin, F Peay,

Joseph Caldwell

John Buchanan,

John Hollis was first Lieutenant

Charles Pickett was second Lieutenant

Thomas Hall, a clergyman,

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson, Margetta Johnson: W1051 VA Line soldier was born in 1762 in Fairfax Co. Va and he lived there at enlistment and in 1783 he moved to KY where he lived in different counties but most of the time in Harrison Co. KY and in 1829 he moved to Marion Co. Mo. He applied 1832 Nov 13 and he was referred to as William Johnson Sr. Soldier married Margeretta daughter of Peter Tittle at whose home they were married in Bourbon Co. The part that became Harrison CO. Ky. Soldier died 1838 June 19 in Marion Co. Mo. Widow applied 1843 Oct 2 Lewis Co. Mo. Age 73, was living with a son John C. Johnson and she was still there in 1848 she died prior to 1855. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson wife nancy or Alsey: R5650: VA Line: Soldier lived in Albemarle CO. Va at enlistment and afterwards he moved to Madison Co. KY and in 1832 he moved to Estill Co. Ky. He applied there 1832 Aug. 20 Soldier was born 1759 Oct. Soldier was married twice but only the wife Nancy of Alcey was named. Son In Law of soldier and widow was Micager Pittman of Owsley Co. KY in 1855. In 1833 a Matthews Johnson was of Madison Co. Ky. Pg 1861 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson R5672 VA Line: applied 1836 Monroe Co. Va age 76. Soldier lived in Prince William Co. Va at enlistment and he married there in spring of 1780 he moved to the Falls of the Ohio on the side that is now in KY (near Louisville now stands) and he also enlisted there. Pg 18611855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: R5673 Va Line: Soldier enlisted in King William Co. Va. Soldier died 1827 Feb 20 leaving a widow who died in 1837, leaving children: Benjamin S. Johnson, Colin Johnson, Judith J. Hopkins, Ann W. Johnson who married William Ellis, Wm. F. Johnson, Seymour Johnson, Robert D. Johnson and Owen D. Johnson. It was state Owen D. Johnson was agent for Robert D. Johnson who was in Tx. In 1837. Soldier was reffered to as Late of Goochland CO. Va the son of Colin Johnson made affdt 1837 Nov 13 in Albemarle Co. Va, soldiers brother was Phillip Johnson age 69 in 1834 a resident of Goochland Co. Va. Pg 1861:1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson S8764: NC Line soldier was born 1761 April 6 in Faquier Co. Va and he lived in Wilkes Co NC at enlistment and he applied there 1832 Oct 31 a brother not named was wounded in the battle of Kings Mountain. Pg 1860 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

State of North Carolina, County of Wilkes

 

On this 31st day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions of the County of Wilkes and State of North Carolina, now sitting, William Johnson a resident of the County of Wilkes & State of North Carolina aged Eighty one years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to attain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

That he was born in the County of Fauquier in the State of Virginia on the 6th day of April 1751 (the record of which was entered in his Bible by direction of his father) where he continued to reside until he was about 15 or 16 years of age, when he removed with his father to the County of Loudoun in the same State – where he lived about two years, when he again removed with his father to Rowan (now Wilkes) County in North Carolina.

 

In the spring of the year 1776, the Cherokee Indians were very troublesome on the Western side of the Blue Ridge [Mountains] in that part of the Country particularly now embraced in the limits of Ashe County N. C. and a requisition was made upon the militia of Wilkes County for a company to guard the frontier settlements on the Western side of the ridge from there depredations.

 

This deponent among others volunteered himself in the latter part of May in the year 1776 in the said County of Wilkes, and joined the company of volunteers commanded by Captain Joseph Herndon, and marched directly across the Blue Ridge near to where Ashe Court House now stands, where they found a number of the frontier inhabitants engaged in the erection of a fort – upon reaching that place, Captain Herndon endeavored to prevail upon the inhabitants to abandon the Country and remove to the Eastern

side of the mountains, but this they declined to do – and after remaining there for some time in scouring the surrounding country, they returned home and was discharged. In this expedition this deponent believes he served about two weeks.

 

About the first of August following, this deponent again volunteered himself and joined Captain Benjamin Cleveland's company and rendezvoused near where Wilkes C.H. now stands, and as soon as the company could be properly organized, and the necessary arrangements made, they marched to the Pleasant Gardens in the County of Burke, where they joined the troops under General Rutherford [Griffith Rutherford]. In a few days after joining General Rutherford they marched direct to the Cherokee Towns of Cowee, Watauga, Oconoluflee [?] and some others not particularly recollected – at what was called the Middle Towns, (the troops being a good deal sickly from eating roasting ears &

fresh beef) a proposition was made by General Rutherford for a thousand volunteers of the ablest and stoutest man to turn out and march to the Valley Towns – this deponent was one of the number, and as soon as the requisite number was made up they marched immediately to the Valley Towns, a distance of about sixty miles – upon their arrival, they found a few straggling Indians (the balance having fled) whom they captured and kept prisoners – after burning the Towns and destroying their corn and all the

property they could find, they returned again to the middle Towns, where they rejoined that portion of the Army they had left –

 

After remaining a few days at the Middle Town until they rested and recruited, they set out upon their return to North Carolina, and after reaching the County of Wilkes, Captain Cleveland discharged his company & this deponent returned home, which place he reached about the last of October, having been gone about three months. From the time that the deponent returned from the Cherokee Nation until about the month of

 

August 1780 embracing a period of nearly four years this deponent performed sundry short tours of duty against the Tories (who at that time were very troublesome) two of which were performed under Captain William Lenoir on the North Western side of the Blue Ridge – in these two tours this deponent believes he served about a month – and the particular periods of the other tours performed against the Tories cannot now be recollected – About the latter part of August 1780 information was received by Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, that Major Ferguson [Patrick Ferguson] of the British Army was supposed to be approaching North Carolina from the South with a large number of British and Tories – upon which Col. Cleveland issued orders immediately for all the militia in the County of Wilkes to rendezvous at the Court House – this deponent immediately repaired thither and joined the company commanded by Captain William Lenoir

 

– after remaining at Wilkes C. H. for some time until the troops could be organized, they set out upon their march to oppose Major Ferguson – upon the way they were joined by Colonel Campbell [William Campbell], with a Regiment from Virginia, as also by other troops from North Carolina – when they had advanced perhaps to the Cherokee ford on Broad River it was ascertained that Major Ferguson was endeavoring to post himself on King's Mountain – upon which it was proposed that all those who had horses or who could procure them, should proceed with all possible dispatch to engage with him – this

deponent having no horse, and not being able to procure one was necessarily left behind with the foot men, and did not reach the battle ground – the battle having been fought – and the Americans being on their return with their prisoners a short distance, when the foot men rejoined them – after rejoining the Army, this deponent was detailed by Colonel Cleveland with others to take charge of the wounded (among whom was a brother of this deponent) and after making what preparations they could, and administering to their wants as much as possible, they set out in advance of the Army and proceeded on

until they reached Wilkes C H when Col. Cleveland directed this deponent to convey his brother home, as he was in a very helpless condition, and to remain with him until he should recover – which this deponent accordingly did –

 

In this expedition, this deponent believes he was absent nearly 3 months, from the time that he rendezvoused at Wilkes C. H. until his return to that place – not counting the time that he remained with his brother after their return – though it was counted to him for a three months tour, and he drew pay for that length of time. –

 

In the spring of the year 1781 when Lord Cornwallis was marching through North Carolina, this deponent again volunteered himself and joined a company commanded by Captain Nathaniel Gordon -- the company to which this deponent belonged endeavored to form a Junction with General Greene's Army, which was supposed to be at that time somewhere on the waters of Dan River in the borders of Virginia – but before they had reached the Shallow Ford of the Yadkin, it was ascertained that Lord Cornwallis was ahead of them, and that he kept scouting and foraging parties constantly scouring the country so that they found it would be impossible to reach General Greene without running a great risk of falling into the hands of the enemy – they accordingly took post at a place in the County of Surry where the village of Jonesville now stands – and where they remained until they were discharged. -- In this expedition this deponent believes he served about two weeks.

 

This deponent has resided in Wilkes County ever since the revolutionary War, and resides there at this time – He never received any written discharge from the service, nor has he any documentary evidence to prove it – but refers to Mr. Elijah Vickes2 who served with him most of the time, whose affidavit is hereto annexed, as a witness who can testify to his service.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid.

S/ R. Martin C.W.C.C. S/ William Johnson

 

On the day and year aforesaid, personally appeared in open Court before the Court aforesaid, Elijah Vickes who being first duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith, that he served with William Johnson the above applicant during the following tours of service – to wit: first under Captain Joseph Herndon to the Western side of the Blue Ridge against the Cherokee Indians – secondly, under General Rutherford to the Cherokee Nation, and thirdly, under Colonel Cleveland to King's Mountain and further, that the said three several tours of duty as set forth and specified in the foregoing declaration as having been performed by the said William Johnson, were performed by him – and that the remaining tour of duty set forth in the said declaration, he believes (from his knowledge of the character of said William Johnson) was performed by him.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

S/ R. Martin C. W. C. C. S/ Elijah Vickes, X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of William Johnson S8764

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

Researchers Notes: 1 It is probable that Johnson's brother was Lt. Samuel Johnson (Johnston) FPA W5012 whose wife and son sought a pension. Moss states that Lt. Johnson was wounded in the abdomen during the battle at King's Mountain. Moss, Kings

 

Mtn. Patriots, p. 137.

2 NPA W4368

 

Captain Joseph Herndon

Captain Benjamin Cleveland's

Captain William Lenoir

Captain Nathaniel Gordon

Elijah Vickes

 

 

My notes he is son of Jeffery Johnson born Prince William Co. Va and died in Wilkes Co. Va, brother mentioned is Capt. Samuel Johnson

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson S2661: NC Line and Va Line Soldier was born 1761 Nov 4 in Chesterfield Co Va and he lived in Brunswick Co Va at enlistment and also served as a substitute for his father ( not named) and in 1781 he moved to Montgomery Co. NC and also enlisted  there. He applied 1832 Oct 14 at Sneedsborugh in Anson Co. NC

 

WILLIAM E. JOHNSON

 

William E. Johnson R49 also Va ½ pay (see N.A. account #837 VA State Navy YS file ½ pay) Va. Sea Service vet. Had no children of his own but left his estate to a niece who married Mr. Tompkins one of whom married a Mr. Tabb of Gloucester CO. Va who had a son John L. Tabb who was the father of Nathaniel Mitchell’s wife (an only child) the Nathaniel Mitchell made inquiry at New Lisbon Ohio 1853 Sept. 6: Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ZACHARIAH JOHNSON

 

Zachariah Johnson: S32344 NC Line: 1836 May 18 applied Randolph Co. Ind. age 79.Soldier lived in Northampton Co. NC at enlistment and later moved to Loudon Co. Va and also enlisted there. Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

Pension application of Zachariah Johnson S32344 fn11NC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Indianna [sic, Indiana], County of Randolph

 

On this 18th day of May 1836 personally appeared Zachariah Johnson before the Circuit

Court for Randolph County in the State of Indiana [spelled Indianna throughout] in open court now sitting the said that Zachariah Johnson being a Resident of the County of Randolph & State of Indiana aged 79 years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Provision made by the act of Congress passed the 7th of June 1832 that he served as a substitute for Elijah Pope 18 months in the 2nd Carolina Regiment of infantry regulars that Major __ Murphy commanded the Regiment __ Stuart was his Captain __ thence was his Ensign and that the names of his other officers he does not recollect that he was a Private and served his Tower [sic tour] out and was Honorably Discharged by his Captain __ Stuart in Halifax North Carolina on the __ day of __ 1777 and the

said that Zachariah Johnson further declares that after the above services he again Enlisted as a Private in the company of Independent French Corps of Dragoons under General Arnold that his Captain was __ Bedkins his 1st Lieut. __ Head his 2nd Lieut. __ Verdieu that he served more than 18 months in said Company meaning this last Corps that he Enlisted for the term of 3 years and served to the End of the war and was discharged at Little York Honorably by his Captain __ Bedkin and states that he was in the Battle of Monmouth while in the 2nd Carolina Regiment and that during his 2nd Enlistment or Service in the Independent French Corps of Dragoons that he was in the Battle of Stony Point under General Wayne and that his Services was rendered in Pennsylvania and New Jersey North Carolina and to the North Both of which services or Enlistments was in the Army of the United States and that when he first Entered the service of the United States he lived in the County of Northampton in the State of North Carolina and that when he Entered the service of the last time in the company of Independent French Corps of Dragoons he resided in the County of Loudoun in the State of Virginia & marched through the country to the places above stated & many others.

 

 And said Johnson further states that he the first term Entered the Service on the __ day

of__ 1776 & was discharged on the __ day of __ 1777 & that he Entered the Service the last time on the __ day of 1780 and was discharged on the __ day of 1781 as well as his memory serves him being old and Infirm he states that many Partickulars has escaped his recollection he the said Zachariah Johnson relinquishes Every Claim whatever to a Pension or an annuity Except the present and he declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of any agency of any State and that he has Lost or destroyed Both his Discharges not supposing that they would Ever be of Service to him again.

 

Sworn to and Subscribed the day & year aforesaid in open court.

 

 S/ Zachariah Johnson, x his mark

 

that [Abraham Vandle & David Nugent of Fayette County Virginia gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Elijah Pope

Stuart was his Captain

Captain was __ Bedkins

his 1st Lieut. __ Head

his 2nd Lieut. __ Verdieu

Abraham Vandle of Fayette County Virginia

David Nugent of Fayette County Virginia

 

 

 

ZOPHER JOHNSON

 

Zopher Johnson: S1840: VA Line 1832 Oct 24 applied Greene CO. Tn age 70. Soldier was born at the forks of the Delaware River in PA. He lived in Frederick Co. Va. At enlistment and abt 1792 he moved to Greene CO. Tn Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ANDREW JOHNSTON

 

Andrew Johnston: S668 NJ Line: applied 1832 Aug 27 age 73 in Sussex Co. Va. And soldier had lived there at enlistment Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ANDREW JOHNSTON

 

Archibald Johnston: S38092 VA Line: Soldier was born 1750 or 1751 Jan 17 in Frederick Co. Va and he lived in Loudon Co. VA at enlistment and later moved to Fairfax CO. Va and also enlisted there in 1781 and in 1815 he moved to Shelby CO. KY and he applied there 1834 April 17. Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

GEORGE JOHNSTON

 

George Johnston: S38088 VA Line: Applied 1818 Jefferson Co. Va age 78. Soldier enlisted at Martinsburg Va. Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

GIDEON JOHNSTON OR GIDEON JOHNSON

 

Gideon Johnson or Gideon Johnston: S38089 also see N.A. account #874 #050093 ½ pay Va. Line:  applied 1818 April 16 in Fauquier Co. age 69. In 1820 soldier was living with a daughter Elizabeth the wife of William Thompson and he also referred to a son William Johnston. Soldier died 1825 Dec 6. In 1850 a grandson William H. Jennings was a resident of Fauquier Co. Va and was administrator of soldiers estate in 1850. Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

Fauquier County State and District of Virginia

 

On this 16th day of April 1818 before me the subscriber presiding and the Judges of the

Superior Court of law of Fauquier County State and District of Virginia personally appeared Gideon Johnston of the County and State aforesaid aged sixty nine years and resident in the said County who being by me first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the provision made by the late act of Congress entitled an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war– that in the year 1775 or 1776 he enlisted as a private soldier in the company commanded by Richard K Meade deceased of the 2nd Virginia Regiment on continental establishment that when this and the first Virginia Regiment on continental establishment were complete, a company of Artillery commanded by Captain Arundel who was killed at Gwyns Island, Virginia [sic: Gwynn Island, probably 8 - 10 July 1776], was chosen from them and that he

the said Gideon Johnston was selected as one of the company that he served in this company until a Regiment of Artillery on continental establishment commanded by Col Charles Harrison and Lieut. Col. Edward Carrington, both of whom are deceased, was raised which he was attached That sometime after he had been attached to this Regiment, he was appointed as Lieutenant in it. that he served three years in the above mentioned companies and Regiment either as a soldier or Lieutenant.

 

That at the end of this time a Regiment of Artillery commanded by Col. Thomas Marshall and Lieut. Col. Elias Edmonds of Fauquier County and State of Virginia was raised, in which Regiment he shortly, being a Lieut when he entered it received the commission of a Captain and served in it until Gates’ Defeat [Battle of Camden SC where Gen. Horatio Gates was defeated, 16 Aug 1780]. That in addition to the commission of a Captain he received the appointment of Brigade Quarter Master, the duties of which he also performed until the same period. that in Gates Defeat he lost his Trunk containing his commission and all his papers proving this grade and station in the Army. that at this defeat he and many other officers became supernumeraries, that although he had no actual command he attended the American Army at York, Virginia, and did not consider himself discharged until the surrender of Cornwallis [19 Oct 1781] when he and all who had no actual command were discharged verbally. That he was in the Battle which terminated in the defeat of General Gates and witnessed the more memorable surrender of Cornwallis, that he is in reduced circumstances and stands in need of his country for support, and that he has no evidence of his said services none in his power except the annexed affidavit of Nelson C. Selden, Thaddeus Norris, William Horner and John Kemper

 

Fauquier County State and District of Virginia

 

On this 29th August 1820 personally appeared in open Court being a Court of Record so

made by the Laws of Virginia invested with Jurisdiction unlimited in point of amount and with the power of fine and imprisonment and keeping a record of its proceedings for the County of Fauquier in the State of Virginia Gideon Johnston aged seventy one years resident in the said County who being first duly sworn according to Law doth on his oath declare that he served in the revolutionary war with Great Brittain first as a volunteer under Capt Richard K Meade of Virginia that soon after the second Virginia Regiment on continental establishment was raised in which he enlisted as a regular soldier under Capt Richard K Mead the officer first named that he was afterwards transfered to a Company of Artillery commanded by Capt Arundel who was killed on Gwinn Island in York River Virginia that thence a Regiment of Artillery was raised by order of Congress to which the company he belonged was attached that this Regiment was commanded by Col Charles Harrison that he received the Commission of Lieut. in this Reg’t. and served as such at Norfolk and Portsmouth two or three years and was there employed in the erection of forts and other military works that he then received the Commission of a Captain in

a Reg’t. of Artillery commanded by Col Thomas Marshall and Lieut Col Elias Edmonds and was employed in active service untill Gates defeat that upon the reduction of this Regiment he as a Junior Captain became a supernumerary that he remained with the Army untill the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at York Town Virginia that in the siege of York Town he lost his house by the Batteries of the enemy and the American army it being exposed to both and that all his other property was destroyed by the enemy, that the loss of his house is proved by the annexed affidavit of Corbin Griffin and Louis Gibbons that the said Gideon Johnston has he thinks received a pension under the Act of Congress of the 18th March 1818 that the annexed is his certificate of pension numbered 232 that the date of his original declaration he can only ascertain by a reference to the pension office in Washington the Judge the Hon Robert White or the Clerk of his Court having preserved no record of the declaration with the affidavits thereto annexed and the proceeding held there on –

 

I Gideon Johnston do solemnly swear that I was a resident citizen of the united States on the 18th march 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift sale or in any manner disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provisions of an Act of Congress entitled an Act to

provide for certain persons engaged in the Land and naval service of the united States in the Revolutionary war passed on the 18th march 1818 and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property or securities contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed that is to say one negro woman age eighty three years two walnut tables one walnut side board and Bureau one Domestic Carpet one flax wheel one cotton wheel one Pine table one spade one shovel and a few old tubs and barrels and sundry small articles in his shop that the debts due from me exceed the debts due to me that the former consists of unsatisfied Judgements and Bonds the latter with the exception of a small sum of open accounts of which I have no evidence but my own personal knowledge that I have two children Elizabeth and William that the latter lives in a store and by that means supports himself that the former is married is the wife of William Thompson in whose House I board he being keeper of a public House that I am by trade a Tailor that from defect of his sight the consequences of age I am unable to pursue it that I am supported partly by the business of a Huxter – that without the pension which I have received for two years past the profits of my business would be inadequate to my support

 

Gideon Johnson

 

NOTE: On the pension certificate is a note that Gideon Johnston died 6 Dec 1825.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Gideon Johnston (Johnson): S38089

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

ISAAC JOHNSTON or ISAAC JOHNSON

 

Isaac Johnson or Isaac Johnston: S36642 PA and VA Lines: See Isaac Johnson Pg 1862: 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSTON

 

James Johnston: S1225 BLW #34964-160-55 VA Line: Soldier was born in 1764 Culpepper CO Va and he lived there at enlistment: and he applied 1833 Aug 22 Henry Co. KY. He had lived in KY since 1792 and he applied there BLW 1855 July 15. In 1833 Jack Johnston was of Henry Co. KY and in 1855 a Reuben Johnston was a witness for Soldier. Pg 1862: 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSTON or JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson: S5640 VA Line: 1832 Aug 27 Applied Giles Co. Va age 76. In 1832 He said he enlisted in Culpepper CO. Va. Pg 1862: 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

State of Virginia Giles County Ss

 

On this 27th day of August 1832 personally appeared before the Justice of the County

Court of Giles County being a Court of record James Johnston Sen’r a resident of the County of Giles and State of Virginia aged Seventy Seven in January next who being first duly sworn according to Law doth on his Oath make the following declaration in Order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. – That he enlisted in the Army of the United States in January 1776 and the term of his enlistment was for the term of two years and that he served in the 8th Virginia Regiment that he enlisted in the County of Culpepper [sic: Culpeper] and State of Virginia with Lieutenant Henry Fields and belonged to the Company Commanded by Capt George Slaughter that the Company marched to the town of Suffolk in the County of — he was there attached to the Battallion Commanded by Maj’r Peter Helverson and the Regiment commanded by Col Mulenburg [sic: Peter Muhlenberg] at which place he with The Regiment remained for some weeks. from thence they marched to Charleston

in South Carolina [arriving 18 June 1776]. from Charleston they were conveyed to Hattens point [probably Haddrell Point] opposite Fort Sullivan – and at the time and on the day the attack was made on Fort Sullivan [28 - 29 June 1776] – he was marched to the lower point [see note below] of Sullivans island. he together with the detachment then commanded by Maj’r Helverson threw up small breast works for the purpose of preventing the British from Landing at that point. a small skirmish then ensued between us and we prevented the greater part of the British from Landing some of them However, succeeded but were soon driven back to their boats – And after lying several days on the lower end of Sullivans island we returned to Hattens point and joined the remainder of our Regiment which we had left at the place. We then crossed back to Charleston and stayed some days in Charleston, at which place Maj’r Helverson left on

detachment. We were then march to Savanna in Georgia where we halted a short time, and was then marched to Sunsberry [sic: Sunbury] and remained sometime at that place, and then returned to Savannah and halted there till about the 6th of December. About the time Col Mulenburg was promoted to the command of General, and we were then Commanded by Col Boman We were then march back to Fredericksburg in Virginia and stayed there a few days then marched to Winchester in Virginia. from Winchester we were marched to Philadelphia (and a part of the detachment who was inoculated for the small pox remained there till sometime in May) We were then marched to Bonbrook [sic: Boundbrook] or Middlebrook not recollected which in New Jersey and was attached to Gen’. Scotts [Charles Scott’s] brigade, and continued with the Main Army commanded by Gen’l Washington for some time. I was then attached to a Company

of Light infantry and sent to the Iron hills near the head of Elk [now Elkton MD] under the Command of Genl. [John] Sullivan we had a small skirmish with the British. We then returned to the main army and I joined my own regiment on the Evening before the battle of Brandywine. I fought in the battle of Brandywine which took place some time in September [11 Sep 1777] – We were then marched to Philadelphia and stayed there about two days – then marched to Riding [Reading?] furnace in Pennsylvania and was continued marching in different directions through the country near Philadelphia til about the first of October. We were then marched to Germantown and I fought in the battle of German town [4 Oct 1777]. We were then marched in different directions through the country near Germantown and Philadelphia watching the movements of the enemy til sometime about the last of November or first of Dec’r and then took up our Winter quarters at the Vally forge [Valley Forge] in the state of Pennsylvania until I was

discharged by Brigadier Gen’l Scott about the Latter part of January or first of February 1778. having served a few days more that two years – He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or an annuity except the present and he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of an agency of any state James Johnston

 

NOTE: By the “lower point” of Sullivans Island Johnston apparently meant the northeastern end at Breech Inlet, where the British intended to land soldiers to flank Fort Sullivan during the naval bombardment.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of James Johnston: S5640

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

Lieutenant Henry Fields

 

 

JAMES JOHNSTON or JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson or James Johnston wife Joice: W7945: BLW #12271-100 & BLW #121-60-55 VA Line: soldier received a pension under act of 1828 May 15 at $15.00 per month, Soldier married Joice or Joyce Wells 189 April 23 or 1790 Aug 24 in Henry Co. Va and he died there 1841 April 30 or 1842 ( all dates shown) widow applied 1845 Feb 7 Henry Co. Va age 77 and she applied for BLW in 1855 Pg 1862: 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

Declaration

In order to obtain the benefits of the act of congress of the 3rd of March 1843 granting pensions for one year to certain widows who received pensions under the act of July 7th 1838 State of Virginia S.S.

 

On this seventh day of February one thousand eight hundred and forty five, personally

appeared before me Jabez Gravely a Justice of the peace for the county of Henry, Joice Johnston a resident of Turkey Cock in the county of Henry and State of Virginia aged seventy seven years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefits of the provisions made by the act of Congress passed on the 3rd day of March 1843. granting pensions to widows of persons who served during the Revolutionary war. That she is the widow of James Johnston, who was a Sergeant of Dragoons in the Virginia line of the army of the Revolution, who was a pensioner of the United States, and received a pension as Sergeant of Dragoons at the rates of fifteen Dollars per month. She further declares that she was married to the said James Johnston on the 23rd day of April one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine, That her husband the said James Johnston died on the thirteenth day of April eighteen hundred and forty one, That she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service, but the marriage took place previous to the first day of January seventeen hundred and ninety four, viz. at the time above stated, and she further declares that she is still a widow

 

Joice Johnston her X mark

 

NOTES:

 

The file includes a document from the Treasury Department dated 4 Dec 1828 showing

that James Johnston was entitled to the pay of a Sergeant of Dragoons in the Continental Line.

 

On 13 April 1855 Joice Johnston, 87, applied for bounty land stating that as Joice Wells

she was married to James Johnston by Carter Torrance, a Baptist minister, in Henry County on 23 April 1789, and that her husband died at home 30 April 1842.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of James Johnston: W7945

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

: James Johnson or James Johnston wife Joice: W7945: BLW #12271-100 & BLW #121-60-55 VA Line: soldier received a pension under act of 1828 May 15 at $15.00 per month, Soldier married Joice or Joyce Wells 189 April 23 or 1790 Aug 24 in Henry Co. Va and he died there 1841 April 30 or 1842 ( all dates shown) widow applied 1845 Feb 7 Henry Co. Va age 77 and she applied for BLW in 1855 Pg 1862: 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 Revolutionary War Pension Documents: James Johnston

(Puncuation has been modified to make it easier to read.)

A petition from James Johnston an old revolutionary soldier now a citizen of Henry County, Va to the Hon Representatives of both Houses in the Va. Legislature now in session praying they may grant to him a pension which you will see is justly due to him ever sence the surrender of Cornwallis, Yorktown, Virginia by the evidence of Geo Hannah an old brother soldier that was present with me at the time when I was wounded & also another certificate from Doctor Robertson, who knew me ever since that time & before. 

I shall be but short as I am well known by the Virginians that I have been a cripple ever since that time.  I have often been invited by several of the leading carracters of my state to call on the Legislature of Va. for a pension as all other wounded men had done.  My reply was that I strove as hard as any man in America to support our freedom and independence & that it appears that my country was always behind tax on tax & direct tax to support government, tho now my country appears to be much better of[f] at this time & I am got very old & quite past traveling, I think my country men will not think hard of doing something for me now, for if Col. Sam Venable, formly of Prince Edwards County Va. was alive he would say that it was the opinion of the greatest part of the officers at that place that I was princable cause of the down fall of Cornwallis at the Battle of Guilford Court House in N. Carolina, for he stated it in the presence of a number of gentlemen only a few months before he died that I was the cause of fixing the Va. Militia so that they fought as great a battle as any regular troops ever did in America, for he stated what few regulars General Green had left was so disincor [sic]  that they was offen heard to say that Gen'l. Green had better give up for if they was to come in to an action with the British that the militia would all run and leave them to be cut to peaces as they always had done. 

I shall say no more, only that I served that tower [tour] in N. Carolina & at Yourktown, VA. about five months as a voulunteer without one cent of pay, for my country was not able to pay there inlisted soldiers.  My petition & papers that was presented winter before last by James Boulden is now in the hands of the Clerk of the Legislature which will have a small sketch of my travil when a regular soldier in the Continental Army.  I remain your humble petitioner.

James Johnston

October 23, 1826

 

                This petition was accompanied by a letter from George Hannah:

By request in a letter received from James Johnston an old revolutionary soldier & now a citizen of Henry County, Va. I do make the following statement.  I certify that in the Revolution was the said Johnston & my self both served a tower [tour] the greatest part of the time in General Washington's Life Guards & my self  in the 7th Va. Regiment of Infantry . . [His account verifies that of James below, then continues] . . . the next day when all the wounded was about to be sent to the hospital Johnston stated to the officers that he was a free and volunteer man at that place & that he would rather die than goe in that nasty lousy hospital so they agreed that he should stay where he pleased & he called for me as a favorite friend to wait on him & I did so and the army was in a few days after that disbanded from that place & we stayed about ten days when the said Johnston told me if we continued there any longer we should perish for we was without money or provisions & he told me to goe & make him an easy pair of crutches & he thought he could travel a little & I did so & we set out & I suppose we got between 4 and 5 miles a day & after so long a time we got to Richmond & thare his father met him with a carriage & took him in.  It might be travling made it worse for every morning it apeard to be a gill [sic] of matter in the bandage on his knee.  I heard several doctors say if he got well he would have to be shore to cary a stiff knee to his grave & I suppose it was so, for when I saw him last he travled in a very hobbling manner, tho I have seen him but seldom since for we went to different parts of the country to live.  Given under my hand this 3 day of August 1826.

George Hannah

 

And by one from John Robertson:

 

I do certify that I was requested as a physician to examine an old wound in the knee of James Johnston, an old revolutionary soldier now citizen of Henry County Virginia & to make a true report of his present situation.  It is my opinion and I think would be the opinion of 9 of every ten men in Virginia to say that he ought to of had a pension ever since the Revolution War because he states to me that he got the wound at the surrender of Cornwallis' York Town, VA, which I do suppose to be the truth for I see the said Johnston on his way to that place & he told me he was then set out as a volunteer to assist the Americans to ketch Cornwallis & he was a sound well man & I well remember he had traveled in a very halting situation ever since that time.  By the appearance of his knee at this time there is no person but what would think it was impossible for any man to travel or to get his living by his labour as he always has been oblige to do . . . Given under my hand and seal this 27 day of December 1826.

John Robertson

And one from Edward Eanes:

 

I do certify that in the Revolutionary War I was called out on a tour of duty with the Virginia Militia to the assistance of Gen'l. Green when he was drove by the British from the south to North Carolina & I was attached to Col. Cook's Regiment of Virginia Militia when I became well acquainted with the same James Johnston that is now a citizen of Henry County, Va. who had joined the said Cook's Regiment as a volunteer and continued until he received an appointment as an adjutant to Col. Mumford's Regiment of Va. Militia & there he continued till after the Battle of Guilford Court House, N. Carolina.  Then Cornwallis run away and left us all to shift for ourselves.  Then we all returnd back to Virginia.  I do not recall how long we was all out on that tour.  Given under my hand this 26th day of December 1826.

 

This was apparently not signed, but that Edward Eanes made oath to the above was attested to by Jabez Smith, Justice of the Peace, Pittsylvania County. 

The pension was not granted, and therefore a second petition was made in 1835:

 

I do inform the Honorable Legislature of Virginia that I have a just claim as a revolutionary character & I do expect Va. is where I am to make application because I am a Virginian born & raised.  Shortly after the R.W. ended it was put in the public for all the soldiers belonging to the United States to apply to the Auditor of their own state & he would issue to them a warrant agreeable to their services to bare interest at 6 percent till paid. 

 

Now I must step back a little ways to inform your Honors how I came to fail giting of mine.  It would take abundance of time & paper to inform you of every circumstance, therefore I shall be as short as possible.  The third day of May 1777 when Gen'l. Washington's Head Quarters was at Middle Brook in New Jersey I was attached from the 14 [th] Va. Regiment to Gen'l. Washington's Life Guards where I continued as a three year soldier in that Guard out 77, 78 & 79.  I do inform you that your great friend Gen'l. Fayette & my self both came in to the family of Gen'l. Washington in one week. 

 

It is well known that Gen'l. Washington's Life Guards was never exposed in no battle except it was their wish to volunteer & joine sum other troops.  My self and 65 others of the guards volunteered the morning of the day of the battle of Brandaywine & joined the troops that Fayette had that day to command and Fayette got wounded – and the next day Gen'l. Washington sent me with Fayette to a little Dutch town called Bethleham 55 miles from Philadelphia & there I stayed with him till he said he was well & we returned to Gen'l. Washington's H. Quarters at Valley Forge. 

 

Then a mediatly Fayette asked Gen'l. Washington for 7 or 8 hundred volunteers to goe out a reconiting [reconnoitering] on the enemy's lines – the British then in Philadelphia and Jermantown.  Myself & 60 odd of the Guards joined the command & Fayette & he marched us across the Skuylkill River & went to a place cald Barronhill & that night the Tories informed the British where we was & the British got within three quarters of a mile before we found it out and we made the greatest retreat that ever man made in America.  We only lost 5 waiters & one negro & theire  horses.  When the British left Philadelphia Gen'l. Washington ordered old Morgain to call out for volunteers to joine his rifle men & push on after them & trye to harras them & keep them from travling fast as Gen'l. W. could over take them.  Myself & 75 others of the Guards joined Morgain.  I was 17 days & nights then that my cartridge box was never off my neck.  Then we fought the Monmouth Battle. 

 

Then there was nothing of consequence turned up till my three years was ended.  Then there was an officer by the name of Colefax that had been a bout 2 years in the Foot Guards with me that was a bout to take the command of Gen'l. Washington's Horse Guards.  It had been formly commanded by Capt. Lewis, a nephew of Gen'l. Washington.  He told me if I would inlist with him for the war he would give me a certificate that I should be returned in the Virginia Line of Cavalry as a Sergeant.  Also for my 80 dollars bounty & my land bounty I also inlisted & rec. my certificate.  Also I had the promis of a furlough for 2 months when I cald for it & never could till the year 1781.

 

I informed you that I never cald for my furlough till the year 81 and it was a lucky circumstance for America I did not, for it is well known by all the old people that all the best troops belonging to America was then at that time in the hands of the British as prisoners of war.  When I got as far as Prince Edward court house - was on my way on furlough from the north there

 

I heard that Gen'l. Green was drove by Cornwallis through all the southern states in to Virginia.  Then in stead of going & staying two months with my father & mother that I had not seen since the 15 day of November 1776 I turned out & recruited as volunteers 12 old Continental soldiers that had served as three year soldiers to the north under the eye of Gen'l. Washington that was well trained to the military duty & we a mediately marched right off to the assistance of Gen'l. Green. 

And as soon as I got there I went my self to Gen'l. Green & informed him that the militia had been cald out so offin and always conducted by nothing but raw undecipled [sic] officers that new nothing of the military duty & as soon as they see the Red Coats they was all off and sum times never fire a gun.  I told Green that I had prepaired as many old veterans that was well acquainted with the subordination of war that would supply the place of every Virginia regiment as an adjutant & we would shoe him that we would do as great things as any Continental troops.  It was so pleasing to Green that in two howers we all new our post.  I my self took the charge as an adjutant of Col. Mumford's Regiment from Virginia, the two majors was Skipwith and Hubbard. 

 

That night at roll call Green issued the most butiful orders I ever heard from the mouth of a man, stating to the militia that it was absolutely necessary to be taught the military duty that he had prepaired men for that purpose & he hoped thay would not think hard to be cald out three or four times a day – tho we had very liddle time to spare to be taugh for Green was obliged to fight or run for in a very liddle time we should all perish for there was nothing to be got to live on.  Now we will soon shoe you what good I done at the battle of Guilford.  The North Carolina militia was fixed in front of the Virginia militia and commanded by nothing but raw militia officers & as soon as they see the Red Coats they were all off & it was said many of them never fired a gun. 

Then the next line was Va. militia & it is well known they stood the fire as well as any Continental troop, for it is well known that the rifle men & the Va. militia & cavalry was chiefly all that was engaged that day and Cornwallice confessed he never was so doubed [sic] in America.  As soon as Corwallice found out that Green's regular troops was all fresh & several regiments had never fired a gun he took to his scrapers [sic] a bout midnight & got over Deep River before we could overtake him.  O what glorious news had happened by the project of one old soldier.  Only a few days agoe poore Green was running before Cornwallice & now Cornwallice is running before Green.  Col. Shipwith was heird to say that if Johnston had not come to the Battle of Guilford with his old Continental soldiers there would have been an other Gatses [probably referring to the disastrous loss at Camden, SC] defeat because Green's regular troop could not be prevailed on to fight thay was so disincouraged by being defeated so often.  Now as soon as [Corn] Wallice was gone Green was obliged to discharge us or else we should all perish for a number of soldiers would faint and fall on the road for want of provision. 

 

Then I returned back to stay a few days with my father & mother, then in Charlotte County Virginia.  Now I shall turn over & shoe you how I lost my papers.

 

As soon as I returned from the Guilford battle & rested a few days with my father & mother I heard of the distress of Fayette in Virginia.  Arnold & Phillips was a raising him at a sad rate & destroying & doing great damage in Va. 

 

I took right of[f] to Fayette ['s] assistance & as soon as Cornwallice came to Virginia & fixed him self in Yorktown we strove hard to keep him there till Gen'l. Washington come & when the Gen'l. come I could see by Gen'l. Washington's looks that he was uneasy.  Gen'l. Washington well knew that if Clinton was to come round from the north with his big fleight [fleet] he would soon let Cornwallice out of his pen.  There was a flag soon sent to know wheather Cornwallice would surrender.  The word came back no.  Then Gen'l Washington determining that night to take two of their nearest redouts by storm, Fayette & Hambleton was to command the Americans & the French to storm the other, and I never failed putting my self by the side of Fayette in time of danger & before I got to the redout a bullet took me in the joint of my left knee, which has ever prevented me from doing military duty from that day till this day. 

 

Then thay cramed me in a nasty place they cald an hospital where I was much confined & not able to help my self & sum Roge stold my knapsack that contained my three years discharge & also my certificate shoeing the terms of inlisting for the war.  It was very hard for me to louse my just reward be cause my papers was lost.  All others of my brother soldiers that had there papers got there interest warrant & also came on the pension when I did in the year 82. 

 

It is well known by men that is yet a live that I strove as hard to save your freedom & independence as any other soldier in America.  My 80 dollars bounty for the war & U. States bounty land I have never yet got.  I am told there was 8 or 9 James Johnson belonged to the armies from Va. in the Revolution War.  I believe there was one besides me belonged to the Va. Cavalry.  I shall just submit to your Honors to use your own pleasures.

I am very respectfully your obedient Servant

James Johnston

Henry County, Virg.

For the year 1835

 

 

                "Drew pay until his death under Revolutionary Claims No. 787"

            James apparently also rec'd a bounty warrant before his death for __60 acres.  [National Genealogical Society Index, from original W7945, BL Wt 121-60-55 and 12271-100]

1790 Aug 23 James Johnson ( 1790 Tithable List Henry Co. ) is married to Joyce Wells: A James Johnson is found on Turkey Cocke Creek and owns land on Bantree of Chestnut Creek and on Leatherwood Creek )

Notes: Joice Wells

We have been talking, and there is some question as to whether Samuel Johnston was actually the brother of James Johnston, the info looks tantalizing but none of it is imperical proof the two are connected, so far I find nothing that actually ties James Johnston to anyone specificially. so to resolve this we are looking to find the a living decendant of James Johnson to see if we can get them involved in the DNA study to see if it matches her line.

 

The good news is tonight I spoke by phone with someone who is a sister to the one who now lives on blue knob road, and hit the jack pot, got the name of who has the family history and other facts including the name of Harry Johnston who's letter is found as one of the pages of James Johnstons pension file.

 

Here is the info, 

 

The person I Spoke with was Brenda Deal nee Johnston, Michael David Johnson who now is located on blue knob road where the Johnston cemetery is the son of Robert Justice Johnston. and Aileen Bryant,

 

Robert Justuce Johnston(12 may 1923-30 Sep 1999) is he son of  William T Johnston and Mattie Johnston,  William T Johnston died when Robert Johnston was about 5 years old according to Brenda Deal, this is indicated as well on 1930 census as Mattie Johnston is shown on census on same page as George W Johnston another and other Johnston all owners, the page indicates "road leading to county line", and intersects with mingo road, 2 pages before its "road leading from leatherwood to leading to martinsville", which is consistant with the 1911 map of blue knob road. In he 1920 census William T Johnston and Mattie are found as neighbors to Hatcher, with a Benjamin F Johnston on same page, George W Johnston on previous page, the current living johnston on blue knob road just a block away from Hatcher farm road, the location of the residences are completely consistant with the houses marked on the 1925 USGS topo map.

 

George W Johnston and William T Johnston are both decendants of David Johniie Johnston the son of James Johnston and Joice Wells.

 

as of tonight, I have found that many decendants of David Johnnie Johnston (my line) the son of James Johnston and Joice wells are alive a well and living in the area, this is great. Because it should be easier to get one of them to join the dna study. michelle@maedata.net michelle@maedata.net

 

I am back from by trip, I met with Pat Johnson and some of the kin, wow! I have never seen such good research, pat has marriage certificates, and all, and these kin are well connected in the area to each other, I learned a lot about the line from info that was passed down, and this line has a lot of living relatives who still live in the area. So there is more than 1 potential dna candidate.

 

Pat is the one to work with the familys to get some into the study. She does not use internet/email but does have a computer, so calling her or writing is the way to contact them. I dont have her number and address handy but will send in another email. You might want ask pat if there is a relative who would want to be put on the johnston emailing mailing list,

 

I also have the James Johnston location, blue knob turns out is from a decendant, the james johnston the patriot burial location is actually on the land of 9641 Chatham Road, which is owned by George Wayne Johnston, James was given 100 acres for his service and purchased another 320 acres. From some of the material I got he had a will and so did his wife.  Turns out david was never mentioned in either, but david johnston was documented as the informant who turned in Joice Johnston nee Wells (James's wife) death when she died, and it says "son".

 

The original head stone the government gave the james johnston over the years degraded and became unreadable over the years and was eventually stolen by vandals, the johnstons got together and place a new stone in its place.

 

The burial place of James also has Minter, and gravelys near by, as well as a gravely cemetery, both surnames are involved in the intermarriages, so it appears most of the kin of the johnston intermarriages hold some of thier original land just like is the case with these johnstons.

 

I found nothing so far that imperically ties Samual to James as a brother, but I could only see a fraction of what she had (I would take me weeks full time just to review it all). WoW.

 

You need to add another location reference to your files. "Mountain Valley",  its the james Johnston location, and is about 5 miles from leatherwood which is consistant with the obit for james which states he died about 5 miles from the leatherwood store. In james Johnstons time Leatherwood would have been the PO, mountain valley appears to have been the name the area where he lived and died but this occured later on. Back then Leatherwood was the center of the community that covered that area, and thats what we see in old records.

 

It is my opinion that this line is probably the best documented of the johnston line, and is thriving and still living and hold some of the original land in the area.

 

Also you might want to consider something else, if your planning a johnston reunion, you might want to consider consolidating it with craddock reunion being planned by lowell woodworth as many of these johnston's would be attending, and have already done so in the past.

The only thing this johnston line did not have is info on what happened to thier ancestor kin who moved to West Virginia, and thats where I come in. From: michelle@maedata.net

 

 

 

Notes: Hatcher Farms

Which off spring line of William Hatcher b 1613 a land owner on Appottomax River, Bermuda Hundred and Swift Creek is this

Notes: Surname Justice

The Justice surname is associated with Joseph Johnson and his brother Isaac Johnson in Lunenburg Co. Va

Blue knob road

Mountain Valley

 Turkey Cocke Creek

See Report on Johnson and Allied Familes of Turkey Cocke Creek

Col. Sam Venable, formly of Prince Edwards County Va.

John Robertson:

George Hannah

Edward Eanes

Carter Torrance,

 

RESEARCHERS TO CONTACT ON THIS JAMES JOHNSON

 

Michelle Erbeck michelle@maedata.net

Nancy Breidenthal: briedenthal@mchsi.com

 

 

JOHN JOHNSTON or JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson S1958 VA Line soldier was born 1752 Aug 30. He lived in Cumberland Co. Va at enlistment applied 1832 Aug 28 in Smith Co. Tn. In 1836 his address was Dixon Springs in Sumner Co. Tn. Soldiers nephew H.H. Johnston was also of Dixon Springs in 1836 signed (H.H. Johnson) Soldier died 1837 Feb 15. Pg 1863: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSTON

 

 

 

State of North Carolina} 31 of March 1819 Buncombe County}

 

On this day came before me the Subscriber One of the Judges of

the Superior Court of Law and Court of Equity in & for the said state Personally Appeared James Johnston aged fifty nine years Resident in the County of Buncombe who being by me first duly Sworn according to Law doth on his Oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the late act of Congress entitled an Act to Provide for Certain Persons Engaged in the Land & Navel Servis of the United States in the revolutionary War that he the said James Johnston enlisted in the 2nd Redg’t of Virginia Troops in the Company Commanded by capt Pollard of the said 2n’d Redg’t for the term of eighteen months that he continued to serve in the said Corps untill the Battle at the Eutaw Springs in the State of South Carolina [8 Sep 1781] where he was taken a Prisoner by the British Troops & was put on board a prison ship where he remained for the space of thirteen months when he was exchanged for when peace was

concluded between the United States & Great Brittain. that during the time of his service

aforesaid & before he was taken prisoner he was in the Battle of Guilford [Guilford Courthouse NC, 15 Mar 1781] and in the Battle at Camden [probably Battle of Hobkirk’s Hill near Camden SC,25 Apr 1781, but possibly Battle of Camden, 16 Aug 1780] where he received a wound by a Musket Ball through the thigh that by being exposed to heats & Colds he measurably lost his hearing during the said service that he never has received any Compensation to that ever from the Government or otherwise for the said service that he is in Reduced Circumstances & stands in need of the Assistance of his Country for Support & that he has no other evidence now in his power of said services

 

Sworn to and declared before me the day & year aforesaid

 

James Johnston his X mark

 

NOTE: On 29 Dec 1852 in Henderson County NC Ann Johnston, 79, applied for a pension stating that she married James Johnston on 22 July 1791, and he died 2 July 1852. In the file is a copy of a family register stating that

James Johnston was born 16 Jan 1761,

Ann Cole Johnston was born 5 Jan 1772,

and listing the names and dates of birth of their children.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of James Johnston: W7935

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

2nd Redg’t of Virginia Troops in the Company Commanded by Capt Pollard

 

 

JOHN JOHNSTON or JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnston or John Johnson:  S8763 VA Line: Soldier was born 1732 in Ireland and he lived in Berkley Co. Va the part that became Morgan Co.Va at enlistment and he applied there 1833 April 26 aged 100 years. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSTON or JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnston or John Johnson: S31168: VA Line: soldier was born in 1757 Culpepper CO. Va and he lived there at enlistment applied 1832 July 31 Henry Co. KY Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOSEPH JOHNSTON

 

Joseph Johnston: S36654 VA Line: applied 1819 May 13 Henry Co. KY soldier died 1820 march 17. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

LEWIS JOHNSTON

 

Lewis Johnston R5642 VA Line: A daughter Lucy J. Burruss of Louisa Co. Va. Applied 1854 Oct 24 and stated her father Lewis Johnston enlisted in Essex Co. Va and he died about 1819 March leaving a widow (not named) who died abt 1822 leaving children Lucy J. Burruss, Mary Johnston who died leaving one child Elizabeth Goodwin in 1854 and Matilda Johnston who died leaving 2 children Lewis and Lucy Miller in 1854. Pg 1863:  Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

MARTIN JOHNSTON

 

Martin Johnston or Martin Johnson: wife Nancy: W436 Va Line: Soldier was a son of William Johnston and wife Sarah he was born 1758 Feb 1 in Va. Soldier lived in Culpepper CO Va at enlistment and soldier married there to Nancy Wright on 1779 March 1. She was born 1762 March 27. Soldier applied 1818 June 20 Clark Co. Ky and he died there 1820 July 2 and his widow applied there 1839 Nov 25.Soldier and wife had 3 children;

(1)William Johnston born 1780 Sept 11 and he married 1800 Dec 22 to Elizabeth Laurence who was born 1781 Oct 2 and in 1840 they lived in Clark Co. KY: Soldier’s widow had lived with them since 1820 and they William and Elizabeth Johnston had soldiers grandchildren towit: Matilda Johnston born 1801 Oct 2: Martin Johnston born 1803 June 2 and he married Lucy Sanders 1822 March 28: Henry Johnston born 1805 March 9: Nancy Johnston born 1806 May 29: Betsey Johnston born 1808 Feb 28, William Johnston born 1810 March 11: Frances Johnston born 1812 Feb 17:

(2) Frances “Fanny” Johnston born 1783 June 3 and she married  1802 Feb to John Johnson who was born 1774 Dec 25 and died prior to 1840

(3) George W. Johnston born 1793 July 31 and he married 1820 Sept 5 to Murtilla Murphey and in 1840 they lived in Tn.

Also shown were Laurence Johnston born 1821 Oct 7, Cornelius Spry born 1801 Jan 6: Asa S. Wright married Martilda Johnston 1819 Sept. 9: Soldiers brother George Johnston was age 84 in 1840 when he made affdt in Muary Co. Tn and it was stated in 1840 that widows brother William Wright was deceased. Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

PETER JOHNSTON

 

Peter Johnston or Peter Johnson: wife Anne B: W27629 BLW  #1171-200 1789 Sept 9 to Henry Lee executor of the will of assignee Alexander Skinner Cont Line Va: Widow applied 1853 April 5 at Richmond Va. Soldier had recorded a pension under the act of may 15 1828. Soldier and widow had married 1828 Dec 13 and soldier died Dec 8 1831. Widow applied for BLW 1855 May 5 and referred to soldier as late of Abington Va. Soldier’s son Peter C. Johnston of Washington DC made affdt 1853 May 25 and stated he was of age 60 and was the son od soldiers first wife ( not named) and he state his father married Miss Ann Bernard daughter of John Bernard Esq. formerly of Buckingham Co. Va and her (Ann’s) mother was Henningham Carrington sister of Judge Paul Carrington Sr. who formerly served on the Court of Appeals and he sated his father and step mother were married at the home of Charles Copeland Esq. in Richmond Va. Soldier died at the son Peter C. Johnston’s home in Washington Co. Va on Jan 28 1869 at Richmond Va. One J.W. Willis Jr stated he was the only heir of deceased widow who died 1865 June 29. Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

RICHARD JOHNSTON

 

Richard Johnston S5639 Cont and VA Lines: Soldier lived in Caroline Co. Va at enlistment and he applied 1832 Aug 9 at Frederickburg Va age 74 and soldier died 1834 Oct 29. In 1832 a son Fayette Johnston mentioned soldiers brother Larkin Johnston who served in Revolution, the said Richard Johnston had served as a Sgt under Capt. James Johnston in Col. Phillip Johnston’s Regiment but their relationship to the soldier Richard Johnston was not stated. Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

RICHARD JOHNSTON

 

Richard Johnston S38873 VA LINE: applied 1818 May 27 Mongalia Co. Va age 56, in 1820 soldier had no family living with him and he was living in Preston Co.Va. Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ROBERT JOHNSTON

 

Robert Johnston: S38872 Cont Line PA: applied 1818 June 29 Frederick Co. Va age 65 however on 1820 Aug 14 he gave his age as 68 and stated he had no family and he had enlisted at Lancaster Co. PA soldier died 1832 Dec 10: Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

SAMUEL JOHNSTON

 

Samuel Johnston S18066 VA Line: applied 1832 Oct 23 Washington Co.Va age 74. He enlisted at Fredericksburg Va where he was serving an apprenticeship.Soldier was born 1758 Oct in King George Co. Va and after his service he returned there then moved to Westmoreland Co. Va and then to Washington Co. Va. Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

State of Virginia } Sc. Washington County }

 

On this 23d day of October 1832 personally appeared in open court, before the justices

of the court of the said county and state now sitting, Samuel Johnston a resident of the county and state aforesaid, aged seventy four years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States, under the following named officers, and served as herein stated, to wit. In the month of September 1780, he was drafted or detailed for twelve months service, at Fredericksburg, in the county of Spottsylvania [sic: Spotsylvania] and state of Virginia, and directed to rendezvous at Chesterfield courthouse which he accordingly did, and was there placed under the command of Captain Samuel Selden, and marched from thence to Suffolk, under the command of General Muhlenburg [sic: Peter Muhlenberg], with the expectation of meeting the enemy, but on reaching there found they had embarked – thence marched to Petersburg – from thence marched in the regiment under the command of Colonel John Green, and Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Haws [sic: Samuel Hawes], to Cheraw hills [Cheraw Hills SC, site of winter encampment, 26 Dec 1780 - 28 Jan 1781], where he joined the army under General Green [sic: Nathanael Greene]. thence marched to Guilford courthouse – thence to Halifax old courthouse [probably in VA], and was in the battle [Battle of Guilford Courthouse NC, 15 Mar 1781] – then marched in pursuit of Cornwallis to Ramseys mill [in Chatham County NC] where he was placed under the command of Captain [Thomas] Barbee, and marched from thence to Camden, where he was in the battle [Battle of Hobkirk Hill, 25 Apr 1781] & wounded in the left shoulder. thence to Fort Friday on the Congaree [Fort Granby near Friday’s Ferry] – thence to ninety six and remained there during the seige [Siege of Ninety-Six SC, 22 May - 19 Jun 1781]. he was here taken sick and placed in the hospital, where he remained for about six weeks, and again joined the army at the High Hills of Santee, to which place it had marched whilst he was sick. thence marched to Eutaw Springs and was in the battle [8 Sep 1781].

 

Shortly before this battle he was placed under the command of Captain Wirey, who was

exchanged about this time, and being older than Barbee, took command of his company. Barbee returning home. From Eutaw Springs followed the enemy near to Monks Corner [sic: Moncks Corner SC] and returned to the High Hills in the month of September 1781, where he was discharged by Major [Smith] Snead, having served out his term of twelve months. The said Samuel Johnston further states, that he sent his discharge to Richmond by Younger Johnston, a deputy Sheriff of King George County and has never seen it since.

 

The said Samuel Johnston further states, that he was born as he understood by his

parents, in King George County Virginia, in the month of October 1758, where he resided until he was twenty one years of age, and where he learned the trade of Saddler – shortly after he was out of his apprenticeship, he went to Fredericksburg, where he was drafted or detailed for service. – having served out his term, he returned to King George County, where he remained sometime, and removed to Westmoreland County, and from thence to this county, where he has resided for the last twenty six years.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim, whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and declares that his name is not on the pension list roll of the Agency of any state. Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid. [signed] Samuel Johnston

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Samuel Johnston S18066

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

Captain Samuel Selden,

 

STEPHEN JOHNSTON

 

Stephen Johnston BLW #12279-1000 1793 May 11: Assignee John Stockale or Stockdale or Stockdell served in Va line Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

THOMAS JOHNSTON or THOMAS JOHNSON

 

Thomas Johnston or Thomas Johnson wife Rachel: W254: VA Line: Soldier lived in Pittsylvania Co. Va at enlistment. Applied 1832 Sept 20 St. Clair Ala. age 73 and he died there 1832 Dec 29. Soldier had married Rachel Mullen in 1785 April in Washington Co. Va and widow applied 1845 June 2 McMinn Co. Tn age 75 and she was still there in 1849. In 1846 a Thomas Johnston of St. Clair Co. Ala was aged 45 but his relationship to soldier wasn’t stated. Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSTON

 

William Johnston S31780 VA Line: soldier was born in Amelia Co. Va he enlisted at Valley Forge. Soldier moved from Amelia Co. Va to Prince Edward Co. Va then to Henrico Co.Va then to NC to SC then returned to NC and lived first in Guilford Co. NC then to Salisbury NC then to Ga and lived in Columbia Co. Ga, Washington Co. Ga, Hancock Co. Ga, Baldwin Co.Ga and Bibb Co Ga. Soldier applied 1835 Feb 9 Bbib Co. Ga. Age 82: Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSTON

 

William Johnston BLW #1166-300 1700 July 5: Assignee James Taylor served as a Capt. In VA Line, no papers: Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files