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ABRAHAM JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Georgia, Wilkes County

 

 On this 9th day of April 1819, before me the Subscriber one of the Justices (or Judges of

the Inferior) Court for the County of Wilkes personally appeared Abraham Johnson of the State and County aforesaid, aged 63 years and resident in the said State and County seven years immediately preceding the date hereof who being first by me duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the late act of Congress Entitled an Act to provide for Certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war, that he the said Abraham Johnson Enlisted for the term of three years in the month of June in the year 1775 in the State of South Carolina in the Company Commanded by Captain Robert Lile [sic, Robert Lyle ?] of the Regiment Commanded by Colonel William Thompson [sic, William Thomson] in the line of the State of South Carolina

on the Continental Establishment that he continued to serve in the said Corps or in the Service of the United States until some time in the year 1778 when he was discharged from service in the State of South Carolina that he was in the battle at Stono, & at the skirmishes at Bacon's bridge, Talliposee [sic, ?] and other skirmishes during the time of his said enlistment and that he acted and performed his duty faithfully according to orders during his said Enlistment, and that he is in reduced Circumstances and stands in need of the assistance of his Country for support and that he has no other evidence now in his power of his said Services. Sworn to -- and Subscribed

before me this ninth day of April 1819

 

S/ Johnson Wellborn, JIC S/ Abraham Johnson, A his Mark

 

 Georgia, Wilkes County

 

 On this 16th day of July 1819, Before me the Subscriber one of the Judges or Justices of

the Inferior Court for the County of Wilkes personally appeared Abraham Johnson of the State and County aforesaid who after being duly sworn deposeth and saith that he this deponent was whilst he was in Enlisted (Soldier) as stated in the accompanying alphadavit [sic, affidavit] taken prisoner by the Enemies of the United States called Tories and by them carried into the City of Savannah and there detained by the British troops whilst they were in possession of Savannah on board of their prison ship and in the said City for the Time of five months and seven days as nearly as this deponent can recollect and that whilst he was a prisoner in the said City of Savannah he this deponent received a severe wound (by which) he suffered so that his life was greatly despaired of which said Imprisonment this Deponent believes was in the year 1778 and

this deponent further deposeth and verily doth believe that he this deponent was the only enlisted Soldier of the same name in Colonel Thompson's [Thomson’s?] Regiment, and this deponent further saith that as to the precise dates or the time of his Enlistment & discharged -- it may be that some small Inaccuracies may have taken place, but that the whole of this and the accompanying affidavit are substantially true as aforesaid and this deponent further states that years after his discharge from the Service of the United States, he understood that one John Cook half Brother of this deponent undertook without his Knowledge to make some exertions with the war department or authority to obtain for him a pension or some remuneration for his services & Sufferings, whilst he was in the United States Service but as yet, nothing has been received by this deponent nor does he believe that any one has for him before born Sworn to and subscribed

before me this day and date aforesaid

 

 S/ Johnson Wellborn, JIC S/ Abraham Johnson, A his Mark

 

 State of Georgia, Wilkes County: In Wilkes Superior Court, July term 1820

 

 On this 19th day of July 1820 personally appeared in open Court, being a court of record

for the said County & State aforesaid, Abraham Johnson, aged 67 years in March last, resident in this said County & State, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath declare that he served in the Revolutionary war as follows, That he was enlisted as a private in Camden district in the State of South Carolina, and the third Regiment, commanded then by Colonel William Thomson, in a company Commanded by Captain Robert Lyles, which Regiment belonged to the South Carolina line on Continental establishment. That he is now a pensioner under the act of Congress of the 18th day of March 1818. That his original declaration to obtain his pension bears date of the 15th day of June 1818 this pension Certificate is numbered 14,833.

That he served in said Regiment for three years, & for further particulars of his enlistment, service & discharged refers to his original declaration sent to & now in the War Department. Further the deponent's saith "And I do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property,

or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed” -- and I further swear & declare that I have been a shoemaker by trade, but am now too old & feeble to follow my trade so as to make it a means of support. That I live in a house rented of Christopher Rinder [?], have a wife & one child, a daughter, named Frances aged 15, residing with me, my wife is 55 years old -- All which

circumstances I submit to the war department.

 

Sworn to & Declared on the 19th July 1820 before

 

S/ Jno. M. Dooly, JIC S/ Abraham Johnson, A his mark

 

 Schedule annexed to the foregoing declaration

 

 3 dozen avil[?] blades

 

 1 gross shoe tacks

 

 3 shoe Knives

 

 1 pr punchers [?] & sones shoe making lasts

 

 1 shoe making bench

 

 I swear & declared that the foregoing contains all that I own, real or personal [several

indecipherable words], my necessary bedding & clothing only excepted.

 

 S/ Abraham Johnson, A his mark

 

 [facts in file: veteran died December 26, 1826; son, Tyre Johnson was living as of 1854.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Abraham Johnson S38099 fn18SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

John Cook half Brother

Christopher Rinder [?],

 

ELIJAH JOHNSON

 

Elijah Johnson S18060: NC Line applied 1833 Sumter Dist. SC soldier was born 1754 April 13 in NC and was raised in Dobbs Co. NC and lived there until 1816 then moved to Sumter District SC. PG 1844 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ELISHA EDWARD JOHNSON

 

Elisha Edwards Johnson: S38885 SC line applied 1818 June 20, Muary Co. Tn a resident of Giles Co. Tn age 70. Soldier lived in SC until 1800 then moved to NC for 1 year then moved to Tn. PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 To the Honorable the Secretary of War of the United States

 

The Petition of Elisha Edwards Johnson represents that soon after the battle of Sullivan's

Island he enlisted during the revolutionary war as a soldier in the service of the United States under Captain Thomas Jarvey of the fifth South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel Isaac Huger, and was under his command at Savannah when it was taken by the British and was then taken prisoner That he was afterwards in the battle of Ninety Six under General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] in which he received three wounds one in his leg one in his hip and one in his shoulder, which disabled him so much that he was unable to perform duty again during the war and returned to his friends under a permit from General Greene, which was all the discharge he ever received, that this together with all his other papers have been destroyed by fire, so that he has no way of proving the above facts but by his own oath. Your petitioner states that after the fall of Savannah he never received any pay from the United States for his services nor has he

ever received any pension from the United States nor from any of the States, after the conclusion of the war he continued to reside in South Carolina, and about 18 years ago he removed to North Carolina where he resided until about one year ago when he removed to the State of Tennessee where he now resides and is an inhabitant of Giles County. He is about the age of 70 years is poor and in reduced circumstances, having no real estate and very little personal property, and is scarcely able with much difficulty to procure for himself a scanty subsistence by his personal exertions, and stands in need of the assistance of his country. He also releases any claim to a pension from the United States under any previous law to that passed in 1818 He therefore prays to be placed on the pension list agreeably to an act passed at the last Session of the Congress of

the United States

 

State of Tennessee, Maury County to wit.

 

This day personally appeared before me Thomas Stuart one of the Judges of the Circuit courts for the State of Tennessee now presiding in the Circuit Court of Maury County, Elisha Edwards Johnson the above petitioner who being duly sworn states that the facts set forth in the above petition are Just and true.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 20th day of June 1818.

 

S/ Thos. Stuart S/ Elisha Eds Johnson

 

 I do hereby Certify that Isaac Huger was a Colonel in the Regular Service in South Carolina & afterwards made a General & I make no doubt but what this Elisha E. Johnston [sic] has sworn to the truth.

 

 Given under my hand this 18th of June 1818

 

 S/ Richard Winn

 

 Majr General In South Carolina

 

 State of Tennessee, Maury County

 

This day came before me Samuel Witherspoon one of the Justices for said County

Edward Watts of sd. County and nearly 77 years of age who being sworn on the holy evangelist of Almighty God, deposeth that while he served as a regular soldier in the Revolutionary War under the command of Colonel Isaac Huger, he believes that the within named Elisha E. Johnston [sic] served with him as a regular Soldier for the term of 18 months under said Huger, that he believes him Justly entitled to any benevolence for said services from the General Government, that he believes said Service as rendered by said Johnston under Captain Thomas Jarvey.

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me the 19th June 1818

 

S/ Samuel Witherspoon, Justice of the peace S/ Edward Watts

 

 State of Tennessee, Maury County

 

 This day came before me Samuel Witherspoon, one of the Justices for said County Elisha Edwards Johnson aged 70 years who being Sworn on the Holy evangelist of Almighty God, deposeth that he served as a Continental Soldier in the Revolutionary War, for six years, that he enlisted during the War under the command of Colonel Isaac Huger and Served said time faithfully, that when that noted battle took place at Ninety Six South Carolina I was there under the command of General Greene at which place I received three wounds, the marks of which I Carry to my great injury.

 

That he was sent from the service on a permit by General Greene as unable for duty,

which was all the discharge he received, that his papers pertaining to the war with all others he had was destroyed by fire therefore have no way of proving said services but by his oath.

 

 S/ Elisha Eds Johnson

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me the 15 June 1818

 

S/ Samuel Witherspoon, Justice of the peace

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Elisha Edwards Johnson (Johnston) S38885 fn9SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

Isaac Huger

Edward Watts

 

 

ELLIS JOHNSON

 

Ellis Johnson and wife Mary: W7941 BLW #26767-160-55 VA Line: Soldier lived in Mecklenburg CO. VA at enlistment and he lived t here for a time after the Revolution. Then moved to Spartanburg Dist SC and he applied there 1833 Oct 3 age 73. And Soldier married there to Mary Brice 1816 march 1 or 28th at the home of Joseph and Sally McMillen who in 1854 were aged 79 and 74 respectively but no relationship was stated. Soldier died 1840 Sept 12 Spartanburg Dist SC and his widow Mary applied there 1853 July 9 age 78 and she was still there in 1856. In 1853 Howell Johnson of Spartanburg Dist. SC stated he had served with Ellis Johnson but no relationship was stated and in 1855 Holly Johnston widow of Howell Johnstons was referred to. . PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

FRANCIS JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of South Carolina, Abbeville County

 

Personally came before me Margaret Miller late widow of Francis Johnston and made

oath as the law directs and saith that her former husband Francis Johnston was killed in the service of this State and lived three children under 12 years of age and that there is still one of said children under the age of 12 years and that she had no Negroes left to her or the children but a tract of land and that the children still lives with her in the County aforesaid and that they are in a low circumstance (signed) Margaret Miller, X her mark

 

Sworn and subscribed the 27th day of March 1792 before me

 

 (signed) Samuel Watt, JP

 

We do Certify that we knew the above Francis Johnston and that we are acquainted with the above deponent Margaret Miller who was the widow of that said Francis Johnston, and believes the above affidavit is just

 

 S/ Pat: Calhoun, JIC

 

 S/ Jno. D. LaHowe, AL

 

 S/ Adm. Ga Jones, JQ

 

 S/ Hugh Wardlaw

 

 S/ Andrew Hamilton

 

2 years due to 1792 is £4 p. B. W.’s Books bal. £4 [illegible words] due up to 92

 

I do hereby authorized and appoint the bearer Joseph Carmichael by lawful attorney at law all the annuities due to Jennet Johnston child of Francis Johnston deceased who is yet under the age of 12 years given under my hand this 12th of August 1792

 

 S/ Margaret Miller, X her mark

 

Signed in presence of

 

S/ Andrew Hamilton, JC

 

To Benjm. Waring Treasurer at Columbia

 

 Child of Francis Johnston £4 paid by an order on William McKinney 3 June 1795

 

 Treasury office Columbia: I do hereby Certify the foregoing to be a true Copy of the Original and this Office -- witness my hand and seal S/ E. P. Jones

 

 Treas.

 

 Atty: S/ Thomas Freau [?]

 

 Family record:

 

Wilm Miller and Margeret Johnson was married the sixth of July in the year of our Lord 1786

 

Andrew Miller was born in the [year] of our Lord 1787 Octobar 20th

 

Margaret Miller Born April ye 13 1789

 

Rebecca Miller Born October ye 31 17[last two digits are illegible]

 

State of South Carolina, Anderson District

 

 Personally appeared before the undersigned an acting Magistrate in and for said District

Mrs. Margaret Seawright a Citizen of said District, who being duly sworn according to law doth on her oath states that she is now in the 66th year of age, and that she has not in her possession, nor is there any public or private record of the marriage of her mother Margaret Miller deceased with her first husband Francis Johnson who was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War & killed in the same by the enemy, as said mother ever informed this deponent, nor is there any record of the births of said Francis & Margaret Johnson's Children: That never since the deponent's recollection nor before as deponent has been informed were there any public records of births, marriages or deaths in this State, until last year. That deponent was by her said mother informed that she had had a family record of her first marriage to said Francis Johnson & of their children's births which was lost or destroyed soon after death of said husband, & that said

Francis Johnson was killed not many miles below this in what is now Abbeville District

adjoining this District both of which formed a part of what was called "Ninety Six District" in this State: That the Letters of administration granted said mother on her said first husband's estate under date of the 8th of November 1783 preceding which said Francis Johnson was killed, & her said mother's family Record of her second marriage to deponent's father William Miller are both hereunto attached & that said Letters & said family Record were kept by deponent's said mother as long as she live & that her said second husband died in this District on the sixth of August 1832, which date is graven on his tombstone & that her said mother remained a widow & died in the District on the second of August 1842: That her said mother informed this Deponent that her

said first marriage took place before the Commencement of the Revolutionary war: That it is out of this deponent's power to offer more conclusive evidence than what has been submitted & the accompanying of the dates of said mother's first & second marriage of the dates of the death of both her said husbands then as aforesaid. Sworn to & subscribed this 11th day of October 1854.

 

Before me S/ Margaret Seawright

 

S/ James Emerson, M.A.D.

 

State of South Carolina, Anderson District

 

Personally appeared before me the undersigned an acting Magistrate in and for said

District Mrs. Margaret Seawright aged 66 years a respectable & credible lady who being duly sworn according to law on oath says that she is the daughter of William and Margaret Miller deceased who was formally Margaret Johnston widow of Francis Johnson who, as deponent ever learned from Said Mother, was killed in the Revolutionary War: her mother's children by her first marriage aforesaid were Isabella, John S. & Jennet Johnson, and by her last marriage, this Deponent, Rebecca Stephenson & Mary Rutherford, and that from recent information they were all alive except Jennet aforesaid who had married John Dobbins: That John S. Johnson and Mary Rutherford, widow, live in Monroe County Alabama, Isabella now Isabel Black, widow lives in Union County Arkansas, Rebecca Stephenson in Abbeville District in this State a widow, and this Deponent a widow in this (Anderson) District, which five are all of her said mother Margaret Johnson & subsequently Miller's living children: That her father William Miller died in this District in 1832 and her mother aforesaid remained a widow to the date of her death which was on the second day of August 1842. Sworn to and Subscribed the first day of September A.D.

1854 before me

 

S/ M. McGee, M. AD S/

 

State of Alabama, County of Monroe

 

On this 12th day of June A.D. 1854 personally appeared in open Court, before the

undersigned the undersigned Judge of Probate Court of said County and which is a Court of Record, Mr. John S. Johnson a resident of said County & State, aged 74 years, who being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefits of the provisions made by the Act of Congress passed July 4, 1836 and such other acts & resolutions as apply to his case: That he is the son & heir at law of Margaret Miller deceased formerly Margaret Johnston widow of Lieutenant Francis Johnston who was killed in the war of the Revolution, and who entered the service of the United States under the following circumstances & served as herein stated as this Deponent had been informed & verily believes:

 

That at the beginning of said war this deponent 's said father was living in Ninety Six, now Abbeville, District in the State of South Carolina and that he soon responded to the call of his country but whether at first served in the Continental Line for any definite period of enlistment this Deponent is unable to say, but that afterwards he was in the Militia service of said State under Captain Andrew Miller & served under General Andrew Pickens as a Lieutenant of Cavalry, and that he also served for a Considerable length of time under Colonel Anderson deponent believes: That the said service as Lieutenant of horse was in the year 1779 and the following year for three months, and the duty other than this was likely during the year 1780 in which year deponent believes or in the next year thereafter his said father said Francis Johnston Lieutenant was killed by the Tories: That this declarant cannot state the precise length of this last mentioned service, nor can he give all the particulars of his service as to the battles in which he was engaged & the Country through which he passed: That the property of which said father was possessed was taken & destroyed by the enemy and that this Deponent 's grandfather was also destroyed by the Tories. That his said father left said mother a widow and this declarant & his sisters Jennet or Jane and Isabella Johnston. That his said mother then Margaret Johnston widow of said father married William Miller who was also a revolutionary soldier with him she lived as wife till said William Miller's death which took place in Anderson District South Carolina about 22 or three years ago. That their marriage took place about the year 1783 or 1784, and that after his (William Miller's) death, this deponent 's said mother said Margaret Miller formerly Margaret Johnston remained a widow and died in said District of Anderson in said State on the second day of August 1842: That in accordance with the resolution of Legislature of South Carolina passed in 1786, this declarant & his two sisters above named received an annuity from that fostering State until each had attained the age of 12 years at which said annuity was discontinued according to the provisions of said commendable Resolution: That the marriage of said parents said Lieutenant Francis Johnston & said Margaret Johnston was before the said father entered said service: That all these allegations & facts will more fully appear by the proofs (record evidence mostly) here with & hereafter submitted, through which this Declarant most respectfully solicits a reference.

 

Sworn to and subscribed the day & year above written Before me.

 

S/ Ch. Foster, Judge of probate S/ John S. Johnson

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Francis Johnson (Johnston) W21805 Margaret Miller fn62SC

 

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

Margaret JOHNSON Miller

William Miller

Mrs. Margaret Seawright or Margaret MILLER

John Dobbins husband of Jennett Johnson or Jane Johnson

Mary Rutherford or Mary MILLER

Isabel Black or Isabell a Black,  or Isabella JOHNSON widow lives in Union County Arkansas,

Rebecca Stephenson in Abbeville District in this State a widow or Rebecca MILLER

Mr. John S. Johnson a resident of State of Alabama, County of Monroe

 

Children by her first marriage aforesaid were Isabella, John S. & Jennet Johnson

Children by last marriage, this Deponent, Rebecca Stephenson & Mary Rutherford

 

HOWELL JOHNSON

 

Howell Johnson and wife Holly: W4468, BLW #26766-160-55: VA LINE: soldier was born 1762 Jan 18, Chesterfield Co.Va and at an early age was moved to Mecklenburg Co.Va soldier applied 1832 March 7 Spartanburg Dist SC and he died there 1846 Jan 13.  Soldier married Holly Crowder 1796 Oct 23 in NC. Widow applied 1853 July 9 1853 Spartanburg Dist Sc age 73 and in 1868 she was a resident of Spartanburg SC. Soldier and wife had several children but only son William L. Johnson the oldest child who was born 1798 Jan 6 and in 1853 was living in York Dist. SC was named. It was stated another son had moved to NC in 1868 a B.G. and E.R. Johnson were of Spartanburg Co. SC Pg 1846 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JACOB JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

State of Kentucky, Morgan County

 

On this 17th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the

Justices of Morgan County now sitting Jacob Johnston a resident in the County of Morgan and State of Kentucky aged 74 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of an act of Congress passed June 7th 1832 – That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated.

 

He states that he served under General Francis Marion Colonel __Baxter, that Capt.

Goodman Pathrigh [?]1 he served under immediately -- he states that he enlisted for five years at the Eutaw Springs, that he had been about one year in the service before he enlisted under a Draft, that he was in the battle at the Eutaw Springs and the battle at Quinbee [Quinby] about seven or 8 miles from Charleston, That he remained in the regular service two years and six months, that he lived in Morgan County in the State of South Carolina, was born on the eighth of

October 1758 and was born in Rewen [sic, Beaver?] County Pennsylvania, That he knows of no one who can now testify to his service in this Country, that he received a discharge from General Marion which he has lost in has no documentary evidence of his Service, that for a number of years

 

After the close of the war he resided in Morgan County South Carolina, that about 20

years since he removed to the State of Kentucky and is now a citizen of Morgan County in said State –

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State --

 

Questioned by the court:

When and in what year were you born

 

Ans: I was born in the State of Pennsylvania in Beaver [?] County 8th Oct. 1758

 

Q. -- have you any record of your age

 

Ans: No

 

Q. where were you living when you entered the service and where have you lived since

the Revolutionary War

 

Ans: I lived in Morgan County on the Adkin River [Yadkin River] in South Carolina and have lived in South Carolina & Kentucky ever since

 

Q. how were you called into that he Service were you drafted or did you volunteer or

were you a Substitute –

 

Ans: I was drafted when I first entered the service and afterwards enlisted –

 

1 The War Department interpreted this as two men “Captains Goodman and Pathrigh [?]”. I don’t see an “s” at the end of the word “Capt.” nor do I see an “and” or “&” between Goodman and Pathrigh.

 

Q. State the name of some of the Regular officers, who were with the Troops where you

served –

 

Ans: General Marion, Colonel Baxter, Captain Goodman Pathrigh, and Lieutenant Mayams [?]. I do not recollect the names of [indecipherable word] the officers -- I served in and about the Eutaw Springs, in the neighborhood of the Biggin Church and in the neighborhood of Charleston

 

 Q. did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given,

and what has become of it –

 

Ans: I received a discharge from General Marion and have lost it –

 

 Q. State the names of the persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood

& who can testify as to your character for veracity and good behavior, your services as a soldier of the Revolution –

 

Ans: I am known by William Lewis, Esq. -- Thomas Lewis Senior and a number of others -- that he Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ Jacob Johnson, X his mark

 

[William Coffee, a clergyman, and Isaac Nickell gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Jacob Johnson (Johnston) S13579 fn22SC

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

William Lewis, Es

Thomas Lewis Senior

William Coffee

Isaac Nickell

 

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson and Delila Johnson: R5607 NC Line: Soldier was born 1759 May 10: about 8 miles from Murfreeesborough NC near the VA line. And at age 14 he moved to Caswell Co. NC and lived there 3 or 4 years. After the Rev. he then moved to Lawrence SC “laurens” SC for 10 years then to Pendleton CO SC for 9 years. Then to Bunscombe Co. NC for 7 years then he went to Fentress Co. Tn and he applied there 1833 Jan 28. Soldier died 1838 March 30 widow applied 1838 Oct 24 in Roane Co. Tn. Widow was born 1767 July 21 in Bute Co. NC soldier and widow had married about the middle of Jan 1783 in Granville Co. NC and stated she lived near the Granville and Caswell Co. Lines for 6 years prior to her marriage with soldier. Soldier died in Roane Co. Tn: Soldier’s youngest child was James Johnson who made affdt 1838 Oct 24 in Roane Co. Tn aged 29 on 1838 April 4 and stated he had married 1829  April 23 and also was soldiers 9th child. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

The "State Census of NC, 1784-1787," Register, pp. 44-56, Granville Co. shows: "A list of number of Inhabitants in Abraham Plain's District, taken by Samuel Smith, J.P., Aug. 7, 1786." Pg. 1, 05 Jacob MITCHELL; 07 William OWEN, Junr; 12 William ALEN; 16 William FRAISYIER; 17 John RAVEN; 18 James JOHNSON 1-4-4-5-10.

See also Rejected-Suspended Pensions, Section III, which states that the application of Delilah Johnson, widow of James JOHNSON, was rejected as she was not a widow under the Act  http://www.tngenweb.org/revwar/records/j/johnson.html

 

State of Tennessee, Fentress County, on this 28th day of January 1833

 

This day personally appeared before the worshipful Justices of the Court of Pleas and quarter sessions for the County aforesaid now setting, which is a court of record, James Johnson a resident citizen of the County of Fentress in the state of Tennessee aged 73 years agreeable to his record as kept by his parents and himself in his bible, which is now destroyed, and after being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of congress passed the 7th day of June 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States in Caswell County, North Carolina a private to serve a nine month tour, the precise time as to date of entering said service not recollected, but it was the month of May and about 12 or 14 months before the Battle of Stono. Applicant understood that said call of nine-months men were to be balloted for out of the different captains' companies, but when the different companies met at John Hughes in said County of Caswell the field officers nominated and appointed seven men out of the captains' company to which applicant belonged, namely William

White's company, the other six men that were appointed to serve out of Captain White's company were William Allen, George Anderson, James Wadkins, John Wadkins, James Swinee [sic, Sweeney?], Thomas King, and the men that were appointed in the different captains' companies met at the house of William Prowel's in said County of Caswell and there chose Robert More [sic, Moore] captain. There he was put under said captain and Col Arch Little [sic, Archibald Lytle] and Major Dixon, his first name not recollected, and Adjutant Mikel McMullinshehe [sic ?]. They were marched from said Prowel's to Moon's Creek in said County and stationed there four or five weeks and from there to Peytonsburg, Virginia and then stationed there about two or three weeks, and returned to Moon's Creek, joined no other troops and was furloughed until the last day of the next March with an understanding that when we met that the time we had served was not to count as part of the nine months tour, but previous to the time our furlough was to expire, there was a call for militia and a great part of us nine-month men went out on that tour, but this applicant did not; and according to the stipulations of applicant's furlough he met at the house of Col William Moore's in said County of Caswell and was there put under a Major Tatum, his first name not recollected. There was about twenty of us nine months men of Caswell County put under Major Tatum a great part of them being then out on militia tour, applicant marched off under Tatum and joined head quarters at Galphin's in South Carolina and there joined General Lincoln's Army [Benjamin Lincoln] stationed there a few days and marched on through the country to many places under General Lincoln until the expiration of applicants tour. They marched to a place about five miles from Stono, and camped about four weeks at the camp ground before the noted Battle at Stono applicant was in said Battle on the left wing Lieutenant Charleton commanded the platoon that applicant was in when he was marched into battle, said Lieutenant was shot through the belly and died. There was two of the mess of applicant killed in the Battle, to wit: Thomas Searles and Benjamin Haguewood. Applicant was of the third regiment of North Carolina Troops and being of a remnant of the nine-months men was frequently transferred from one captain to another in the regiment to supply the occasional losses that happened in different companies. McCajah [?] Parker was adjutant of the regiment that the applicant served in [one line at top of page is lost] in some .few days after the battle at Stono applicant was marched with the Army on to General Bull's, Staid there about two weeks and then marched to Bacon's Bridge, staid there a few days and thence to Moncks Corner and thence to Charleston and stationed there about one month and we was then marched to Sullivan's Island. Applicant and some few more about forty five in number we was then under Capt Ramsey, staid there about one month, and marched back to Charleston and there staid until we was finally discharged on the last day of November ensuing after the Battle of Stono, the dates not remembered. Applicant received a printed discharge at the Barracks at Charleston expressing that it was for a nine months tour agreeable to an act of assembly. His discharge expressed that he was of the third Regiment and of the north Battalion we of the nine months men were called the new Levees and was not mixed with the militia but served with the regulars and when we nine months new Levees were discharged our sergeant William McCarty called us out from among the regulars and we were discharged accordingly by him for a nine months tour having served two months previous to that last tour for which he had no discharge; being all the service rendered by him in the War of the Revolution against the enemy of his country.

 

Applicant from the information of his parents was born the 10th day of May 1759, about eight miles from Murfreesboro in North Carolina near Virginia line, he is not certain the name of the County. Lived there until 14 years old and then moved to the place where he lived when he entered the service and continued there until three of four years after the end of the Revolution and then moved to Lawrence Co [sic, Laurens] South Carolina, staid there about ten years thence to Pendleton County in said state, there about nine years thence to Buncombe County, North Carolina, staid there near seven

years and thence to where is now Fentress County, Tennessee, where he has lived ever since. Applicant's discharge has been lost a great many years and he knows of no military evidence and knows of no person by whom he can prove his services nor any particular circumstances connected with it, further than is believed from his own tradition, applicant can prove his character as a soldier by William Smith & Daniel Spurlin and others -- they being his neighbors.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present and discloses his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

 

S/ James Johnson, x his mark

Sworn to in open court this 28th day of January 1833

S/ J.H. Richardson, Clk

by his deputy M Huff, D Clk

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of James Johnson R5607

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

eight miles from Murfreesboro in North Carolina near Virginia line

What County is Murfreesboro in in 1759 May 10?

William Smith

Daniel Spurlin

 

 

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson S16891 Va line: Soldier was born in 1759 Louisa Co. Va and was raised in Bedford Co. Va. And he was living with a brother (not named) in Amherst Co. at enlistment and after the Revolution lived in Campbell CO. Va. The part which was formerly a part of Bedford Co. Va. For 2 years. He then moved to SC for 6 years then moved to Sullivan Co. Tn for 33 years. Then moved to Wayne Co. Ky then moved to Washington Co, Mo. He applied there 1833 Feb 5, in 1833 soldiers brother John Johnson was of Washington CO. Mo, and in 1833 a James J. Johnson was a JP from Washington Co. Mo, but no relationship to soldier was stated. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

James Johnson R5628 VA Line applied 1840 Jan 15 Mecklenburg Co. Va aged about 76, Howell Johnson of Spartanburg Dist SC made affdt. 1843 Nov 16 stated he had served with James Johnson (They appear to be brothers) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 Sumter District, State of South Carolina

 

 On this 9th day of November 1853 Before me a Magistrate in and for said district and

State personally appeared John Hodge of said district and State who being sworn according to law maketh oath and says that he has been intimately acquainted with the late James Johnson [sic] Since the termination of the war of independence, when he came to the house of the deponent's father immediately after he was released from captivity by an exchange of prisoners with the enemy under Colonel Tarleton that the said James Johnson married Frances Haley about 12 months after his arrival at the house of deponent's father and afterwards resided a short distance in the immediate neighborhood where he lived upwards of 30 years and had nine children Viz. Peter, Easter, James, William, Haley, John, Francis, Ransome and Lovy of whom Haley Johnson and Mrs. Elizabeth Lowder [?] are the only Surviving children That the said Soldier and his family removed to a distance of 12 or 13 miles nearer to Santee River where the

Soldier died on the 8th day of October 1832 and his widow in about 12 months afterwards; This deponent further swears he was born in the year 1770 and has a perfect recollection of the facts as above set forth that the said Francis Johnson never again married but continued a widow till

death

 

Subscribed and sworn to the year and date first above written. S/ John Hodge

 

S/ JC Blackwell, Magistrate

 

 [fn. p. 4: Thomas Tobias, 79, gave an affidavit similar to that given by Hodge. Ditto Catharine Tobias, 70]

 

State of South Carolina, Sumter district: Court of Common Pleas and Sessions November term

1853

 

On this 11th day of November 1853 before the said court now in session personally

appeared Mrs. Frances Lowder who being duly sworn according to law upon her oath makes the following declaration for the purpose of obtaining for herself and Brother the only Surviving children the pension due to their father James Johnson deceased at the time of his death under the acts of 15 May 1828 and 7th June 1832; viz.:

 

That she is the daughter of the said James Johnson and Frances Johnson whose maiden

name was Frances Haley, also deceased late of Sumter district South Carolina; that her father the said James Johnson was a Revolutionary Soldier -- enlisted in South Carolina was captured at the fall of Charleston having previously served from commencement of the War was carried off by the Enemy under Colonel Tarleton a British officer or exchanged under him in Virginia and on his return went to the House of John Hodge's father in South Carolina with whom he remained until his marriage with Frances Haley in 12 months thereafter; That she has a perfect recollection of seeing recorded in her father and Mother's Bible the name of her brother Haley Johnson being  born 28 November 1792 and her on being 28 March 1798 and her Brothers and Sister Easter,

William, James and Peter having been born before Haley and her Brother John born before the declarant; that said Bible was carried off by declarant’s youngest Brother Ransome when he removed to Alabama about the year 1833 -- directly after his Mother's death; that her said father had his services in the war proved by Peter David a fellow Soldier of his in 1818 or 1819  (1 FPA S39417 )and received a pension during his lifetime and his wife after him, but the declarant’s father's claim was disallowed because he was in circumstances to support himself -- that he had his papers again prepared in 1832 and went to see Colonel McWillie but was taken ill with dropsy and sent the papers by John W. Ridgeway to Colonel Manning both of whom soon afterwards died Since

which the declarant has not since heard what has become of the papers: she further swears her said father died eighth of October 1832 and her Mother on the 20th day of October 1833 from recollection of declarant's son James O. Lowder being born 27 April 1832 as recorded in her Bible and she never received any pension or made any application therefore except the present.

Subscribed and sworn to this 11 March 1853 S/ Frances Lowder

S/ JC Blackwell, Magistrate

S. South Carolina Sumter District

 

Personally appeared before the Subscribing Magistrate in and for said district R. T.

Lowder Esquire of Sumter district who being duly sworn according to law, upon his oath

declares he was well acquainted with Doctor William S. Price formerly of Sumter district but now a resident of one of the Western States: he further swears he has often seen the said Doctor Price frequently write and sign his name and on looking at the within written instructions and presentation and his name signed thereto do solemnly believe the same to be in his hand writing:

He further swears he was present and did see James Johnson within mentioned department his life on 8 October 1832 and attended his funeral.

S/ R T Lowder

Subscribed and sworn to this 12th day of January 1854

S/ A. A. Nettles, Magst.

[fn. p. 20

 

“Mr Jonston will take table spoon full of that in the large bottle with a tea-spoon full of the medicine in the largest phial every 4 hours when the shortness of breath in troublesome; keep the bottle near the fire that it may be warm, heat the vinegar & pour it in a tea or coffee pot & take the spout in his mouth & breathe the Steam, do it frequently, keep the bowels open once a day with the magnesia here sent & some rheubarb if you have it; if he takes coffee let it be one by wasin[?] without milk or Sugar; when the shortness of breath is not very troublesome he will take 20 of the drops in the sallest [? tallest? ] phial 3 times a day; his diet must be light & nournishing & not hot, must not speak much nor loud, his exercise must be very gentle, riding better than walking. The large bottle must be well shaken as it is to be poured out.

 

March 12th 1832 S/ Wm S. Price”

[the file contains several pages of records certified by the SC Comptroller General showing payments to James Johnston/ James Johnson.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of James Johnston S21843 fn39SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/17/08

 

Mrs. Frances Lowder or Frances Johnson daughter of James Johnston born 28 March 1798

John Hodge

Frances Haley

Peter Johnson,

Easter Johnson,

James Johnson,

William Johnson,

Haley Johnson born 28 November 1792,

John Johnson,

Francis Johnson,

Ransome Johnson removed to Alabama about the year 1833

Lovy  Johnson

Haley Johnson and Mrs. Elizabeth Lowder [?] are the only Surviving children

Thomas Tobias

Catharine Tobias

by Peter David

R. T. Lowder

 

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson R5635 Cont. Line (NC) and SC Line. Soldier was born 1763. Soldier lived in Bladen Co. NC during the latter part of the Revolution and afterwards he moved to TN then to KY then to Hamilton CO. Ill. He applied there 1834 Nov 27. Soldier died 1853 July 9. Children were mentioned in 1847 ( No names). An Isaac Johnson of Hamilton Co. Ill. Stated in 1834 that he knew the soldier well and one Jacob Braden of Hamilton CO. Ill in 1854 state he was directly interested in the soldiers claim for pension (no relationship stated) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JONATHAN JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 Georgia, Gwinnett County: Inferior Court adjourned Term October 5th, 1832

 

 Personally appeared in open Court (it being a Court of record) now sitting Jonathan

Johnson Senior a resident of said County of Gwinnett & State of Georgia aged 72 years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to avail himself of the benefits of the late act of Congress passed the 7th June 1832

 

 That he entered the Service of the United States under the following named officers and

Served as herein Stated (To wit) --

 

That he entered the service at 16 years of age in the latter part of the year 1777 as a

militia soldier under Captain Lushington [Richard Lushington] Lieutenants Jacob Reid –Obryan [O’Bryan?] & Cole -- at Charleston in the State of South Carolina -- attached to the Major John Badley’s [probably John Baddeley’s] division of General William Moultrie’s Army -- that he did Garrison duty in Charleston aforesaid until sometime in January 1778 -- when we were ordered out to Sheldon Bull under the officers aforesaid -- in Company with the light Infantry of Charleston -- and took post at Hatcher’s [?] old fields -- at the ferry on the road leading to Port Royal -- from thence marched to Port Royal & took possession of the Town on the sixth of February 1778 [sic, 1779]. On the same day left Port Royal and met the enemy at the 5 mile House -- and had an engagement at which General Moultrie commanded together with Major

Kenlaw [Francis Kinlock?] -- and Major John Lawrence [sic, John Laurens?] with other officers under his command -- Thence we returned to Camps at Hatcher's [?] old fields, aforesaid -- and remained there without doing any other active duty until the Term of our service expired when we returned home to Charleston -- and remained employed in Garrison duty in the City -- during the above expedition he served as Corporal -- after returning to Charleston he joined the German Fusiliers commanded by Captain Shepherd -- volunteers of the first Regiment -- commanded by Colonel Morris Simmons [sic, Maurice Simons?] Major Badley -- Lieutenant Colonel Smith &c -- On the Sunday ensuing before the battle of Stono left Charleston for James Island -- took possession of the same -- attempted to attack the enemy in the rear -- who were in possession of

John's Island -- but failed on account of a storm -- this above expedition was commanded by General Moultrie – after some days returned to Charleston and about the first of September in the year 1779 -- embarked for Savannah in the State of Georgia under the command of the above named officers on board 3 privateers -- landed at Cumbee ferry on Cumbee [Combahee] River -- and marched on foot from thence to Savannah -- was there at the Siege of the same and until the defeat of the US forces by the British at that place -- After the above defeat returned to Charleston on foot -- and again did Garrison duty -- and was engaged in the same and in defending the City while under Siege by the British until the surrender of the same sometime in May 1780 -- was taken prisoner at the surrender of the City -- & remained a prisoner of war in Charleston about one year as he believes when he was exchanged and set at liberty -- that his Term of actual Service continued more than two years & was a prisoner about one year -- that he acted as Sergeant -- after Joining the Fusiliers as above until taken prisoner at the surrender of

Charleston --

 

That he has no documentary evidence at hand whereby he can prove either his Services

or his birth -- that after he was exchanged he went to his uncle's plantation on Santee thence after the declaration of peace he returned to Charleston and lived with his father there -- two or three years -- removed to Lawrence [sic, Laurens] County in the State of South Carolina & remained -- remained there about 41 years -- He then as he believes in the year 1826 -- removed to Gwinnett County in this State of Georgia -- where he now resides

 

 He hereby relinquishes all claim whatever to any pension or annuity except the present

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

Sworn to & subscribed in open Court the day & year aforesaid

 

Attest: S/ Wm Maltbie, Clk S/ Jonan Johnson

 

[John Lawrence and Clifford Woodroof gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 Georgia, Gwinnett County

 

 Personally came before me the undersigned, a Justice of the Peace in & for said County --Jonathan Johnson Senior and being duly sworn deposeth and saith that by reason of old age and the consequent loss of memory -- he cannot swear positively as to the precise length of his Service -- but according to the best of his recollection he served not less than the periods mentioned below – and in the following grades -- For three months I served as a private militia soldier -- for three months I served as a Corporal in that Division of the United States Army under the command of General William Moultrie -- This was in the latter part of the year 1777 & first part of 1778. I then in June 1779 Joined a volunteer Company styled the German Fusiliers -- served in said Company in the Capacity of a private soldier for some short time perhaps one month -- was then promoted to the rank of Sergeant and served as such Sergeant in said volunteer Company 10 months -- was then taken prisoner at the Surrender of Charleston and

remained a prisoner of war Fort about one year -- making in all 17 months in which he was in actual service in about one year he was a prisoner.

 

Deponent further states that his reasons for not having produced the Certificate of a clergyman as required by the War Department are as follows -- He was raised up & educated in the faith and worship of the Church of England there being no denomination professing the tenets of the above named Church He did not think proper to attach themselves to any denomination of Christians -- in this County or State -- and that together with his age & infirmities prevented him from becoming acquainted with any Clergyman of his neighborhood.

 

 To the first question prescribed by the War Department He answers -- I was born

according to the best of my information on the 26th day of October 1761.

 

 To the sixth Question he answers that in consequence of his having been taken prisoner

as before stated -- he received no regular discharge having done no more service after having been exchanged as aforesaid -- He never received a commission -- having been a non-commissioned officer –

 

To the seventh Interrogatory he answers -- That John Lawrence & Clifford Woodroof

who have certified -- and divers others of his neighbors & acquaintances can testify as to his character for veracity and their belief of his having served as he has stated. And for all of such foregoing stated services I claim a pension.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 23rd day of April 1833

 

S/ John Mills, JP S/ Jonan Johnson

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Jonathan Johnson S31779 fn12SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

Captain Lushington [Richard Lushington]

Lieutenants Jacob Reid –

Lieutenant Obryan [O’Bryan?]

Lieutenant Cole

 

 

REUBEN JOHNSON

 

Reuben Johnson and wife Nancy: W10156: NC Line: 1832 Nov 19 applied Anderson Co. SC age 74. He enlisted at Charleston Co. SC. Widow applied 1843 March 29 in Anderson Dist. SC age 72: Soldier married Nancy Greenlee 1788 Nov 20. Soldier died 1833 Jan 26. Widows sister Margaret Burroughs of Anderson Dist. SC made affdt 1843 March 4 and stated widow was 6 years older than she was and that their father was Peter Greenlee who died abt 1803 and he and Soldier both had moved from NC t o SC Widows Mother (not named) died abt 1842 Dec 1: Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 

 

South Carolina, Anderson District

 

 On this 19th day of November 1832 Personally appeared before me one of the Justices of

the peace for the State and district aforesaid Reuben Johnson a resident of South Carolina in the district of Anderson aged 74 years next January, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

That he enlisted in the Army of the United States in the year 1776 with Richard Phillips and served in the 4th Regiment of the North Carolina line or troops under the following named officers –

 

Enlisted in the Spring of the above year, for 2 1/2 years under the command of Joseph Philips Captain, Micajah Lewis 1st Lieutenant, William Hickman 2nd Lieutenant, Poge was my Colonel Thaxton [sic, James Thackston ] 2nd Col. Davison [sic, Davidson] my Major and Nash by General and before the term I enlisted for I enlisted a 2nd time for during the war; and in my first term of time I marched from North Carolina Surry County where I enlisted to Charleston in South Carolina and from thence marched back to Halifax

 

I then enlisted as above and got a furlough to go home I did so and joined the Army at Wilmington and spent the winter there. I marched next to Georgetown on the Potomac [River] and was after that at the battles and in them at Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth, at the Valley Forge I was put into the 1st Regiment under Colonel Clark and Colonel Maburn [sic, Mebane] Majors name not recollected, and at the siege of Charleston South Carolina, was taken a prisoner by the British, Hogan [sic, James Hogun] commanded me at Charleston when taken.

 

 He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or an annuity, except the

present, and he declares his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in the State of South Carolina.

 

Sworn to, and subscribed, the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ Reuben Johnson

 

[Robert King, a clergyman, and Elisha Kelly gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

And the above named applicant Reuben Johnson and on the same day did before me declare on oath that from the bodily infirmities that he was laboring under (viz., the gravel[)] it render him so unhappy that he could not attend a court of the kind required by the War Department unless to his very great inconvenience.

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me. S/ Reuben Johnson

 

S/ Joseph Cox, JP

 

 

[On March 29, 1843, in Anderson District South Carolina, Nancy Johnson, 72, made application for a widow's pension stating that she is the widow of Reuben Johnson, a pensioner under the 1832 act; that she married him November 20, 1788; and that he died January 26 1833.]

 

 

[Margaret Burroughs, sister of Nancy Johnson, gave an affidavit in support of her sisters application stating that her maiden name was Nancy Grunlee; that her sister married Reuben Johnson in the state of North Carolina; that her sister Nancy was 6 years older than herself; that their father, Peter Grunlee, with his family removed from North Carolina to South Carolina and that Reuben Johnson and his wife Nancy lived on the same plantation as Nancy's father; that their father, Peter, died some 40 years previous. Margaret's affidavit was dated March 4, 1843 and was given in Anderson District South Carolina.]

 

 

[fn. 13, marriage bond given by Reuben Johnson and William Johnson for the marriage of Reuben to Nancy Grunlee; given in Wilkes County, NC and dated October 30, 1788.]

 

 

State of North Carolina, Secretary of State's Office

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in and for the State aforesaid, do certify it appears from the muster rolls of the Continental line of this State in the revolutionary war, that Reuben Johnson a private in Captain Phillips’ Company of the 4th Regiment enlisted in 1777 for the war, that a Warrant was issued for his services as a Soldier in November 1795.

 

Given under my hand this 28th day of May 1833.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Reuben Johnson W10156 Nancy fn28NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/25/08

 

Richard Phillips

Joseph Philips Captain,

Micajah Lewis 1st Lieutenant,

William Hickman 2nd Lieutenant

Robert King, a clergyman,

Elisha Kelly

Nancy Johnson, or Nancy Grunlee

Margaret Burroughs or Margaret Grunlee

Father, Peter Grunlee

 

 

ROLAND JOHNSON or ROWLAND JOHNSTON

 

Roland Johnson S21846 VA line: Soldier lived in Lunenburg Co Va at enlistment and in 1783 he moved to Spartanburg Dist. SC and he applied there 1832 Sept. 5 age 74.Soldier was born in Amelia Co. Va. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

SOLOMON JOHNSTON

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Mississippi, County of Jefferson

 

 I Solomon Johnson [sic] aged 65 years, who upon oath testify and declare, that I entered

the service in 1780 for the term of during the war in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Charles Pinckney in the line or State of South Carolina and continued therein until the close of the war in 1783, and was discharged from the Regiment commanded by Colonel __ Mayem or Maim [sic, Hezekiah Maham?] of the line or State of South Carolina. I further declare that I have neither received assigned or transferred my claim in any manner whatever: Therefore, I request the Secretary of War to have the warrant sent to me at Petit Gulf Jefferson County Mississippi State and this shall be his receipt for the same before me the 18th of December 1827.

 

 S/ Solomon Johnson, X his mark

 

S/ Alex Montgomery JP

 

 County of Jefferson

 

On this 12th day of May 1827 Personally appeared in Open Court (being a Court of record for the County aforesaid) Solomon Johnson a resident in said County aged 64 years who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the act of Congress of the 18th of March 1818 and the first of May 1820; that he the said Solomon Johnson enlisted for the term of three years on the __ day of__ in the year 1777 in the State of South Carolina in the company commanded by Captain James Ichburg in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Thomas Sumpter [sic, Thomas Sumter] in the line of the State of South Carolina in the Continental Establishment: he continued to serve in said Corps until the 12th day of May 1780 when he was taken prisoner by the British Army at Fort Moultrie;

 

that he the said Solomon Johnson was discharged on parole by the commanding officer of the British Army, and again enlisted for the term of two years on the 18th day of August 1780 in the State of South Carolina in the Company commanded by Captain Robert McElvy in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Mayham [sic, Hezekiah Maham?] in the line of the State of South Carolina on the Continental establishment; and that he continued to serve in said Corps until the 20th day of August 1782 when he was discharged from the service, in the State of South Carolina: that he hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension except the present; that his name is not on the roll of any State, except South Carolina and that the following are the reasons for not making earlier application for a pension because he was able to support himself and family by his own manual exertions which he is now unable to do by reason of his feebleness.

 

And in pursuance of the act of the first of May 1820, I do solemnly swear that I was

a resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property, or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed to wit six head of cattle of the value of $30

 

That since 18 March 1818 the following changes have been made in my property eight head of [illegible] cattle which have been consumed in sustaining myself and family in 15 head of hogs which have been consumed in like manner.

 

That he The said Solomon further states that he has but two children neither of whom reside with him at this time and that he has always pursued the occupation of a farmer until the weakness of his body compelled him to cease labor.

 

 S/ Solomon Johnson, X his mark

 

 Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Solomon Johnston (Johnson) S34944 fn24SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/17/08

 

Colonel __ Mayem or Maim [sic, Hezekiah Maham?]

Captain James Ichburg

Captain Robert McElvy

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S7088 NC Line applied 1834 March 10 Marlborough District SC, soldier was born 1758 Jan 31. Soldier lived in lived in Wayne Co. NC at enlistment and later moved to Johnston Co. NC and also enlisted there. In 1813 he moved to SC. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of South Carolina, Marlborough District

 

 On this the 13th day of March in the year of our Lord 1834 personally appeared in open

Court, before the Court of Common Pleas and Sessions for the District & State aforesaid, now sitting, William Johnson a resident of the District of Marlborough in State aforesaid aged 75 years on the 31st day of January 1833 who being duly sworn according to Law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

That he was born on the 31st day of January 1758. That he has no documentary evidence

of his Services in the revolutionary war, that he had discharges & written evidence, but from the great lapse of time he has lost & had them destroyed, not having taken particular care of them and that he is therefore unable to be so precise in his statement as to dates as he otherwise would be -- but that early in the year 1776 at which time he resided in Wayne County North Carolina, he volunteered his services and marched under one Captain Williams in a detachment from said Wayne County, to Moore's Creek, within 15 or 20 miles of Wilmington North Carolina where the said detachment was put under the command of Colonel Caswell who had fortifications on the North side of said Creek at the end of the bridge to oppose the passage of a large body of Tories commanded by one Colonel McDonald that a short time after this deponent arrived at the said Bridge the Tories attempted to cross but that Colonel Caswell then ordered the flanks of the

bridge to be taken up & had it so impaired that they could not cross, & that in attempting to do so, several of the Tories were killed by Colonel Caswell's forces. That he this deponent's knows no particulars persons names of the Tories that were killed except a Captain McLeod who was shot at the Bridge. That this deponent & all others who had volunteered for that excursion were then discharged & this deponent returned home. That he was out at that time, about a month, but only qualifies positively to 3 weeks.

 

That afterwards either in the latter part of the winter or early in the spring 1777 -- he was drafted in the said Wayne County North Carolina for the Term of 3 months & went to Wilmington North Carolina with other the Militia of Wayne County & served & served 3 months at Wilmington in the Company of one Captain Jacob Hooks, that he

does not now recollect the names of any others of the officers. That the said service at

Wilmington was in guarding the Town, but that there was no fight or engagement there during the time he was there, & that he afterwards returned home.

 

Said deponent further states that sometime afterwards he removed to Johnson County North Carolina [sic, Johnston County] & that in the latter part of the year 1778 he was drafted in Johnson County for the Term of 5 months and marched under one Captain Goodman with others the militia of Johnson County to Hillsboro in North Carolina & was stationed there a short time & then marched through North Carolina & South Carolina to the Savannah River nearly opposite to the Town of Augusta & was stationed there some time guarding some Hessians who had been captured by the Americans and were confined in strong log buildings. That he then crossed the Savannah River and was associated with other American forces who were stationed at Brier Creek [Briar Creek] in Georgia under the command of General Ash [sic, John Ashe] that a short time after he arrived there they were surprised by the British and driven in great confusion from their Station that a considerable number of the Americans were killed in the flight, & a number drowned in crossing the River.

 

He does not now recollect the names of any other of his officers save Captain Goodman & General Ashe, and that he cannot qualify as to the name of the British commander.

 

That such of the Americans as crossed the River rendezvoused on the North side of the River at Black Swamp & were there stationed some days under General Ashe & at the expiration of the Term, 5 months, for which he had been drafted he this deponent was discharged & that he recollects his discharge was on the 10th day of April 1779 -- & that he then returned home.

 

Said Deponent further states that afterwards in the year 1782 he was drafted again in Johnson County North Carolina for the Term of 3 months & that he then employed a substitute by the name of Uriah Peacock who was excepted as such by one Colonel Smith, & that he gave the said Peacock a mare valued at $100 -- & a young horse at $35 or $40 -- & some cattle for his services that the said Peacock marched off as his substitute but he cannot say under what officers & where he went to & that Peace was not long afterwards declared -- & Peacock returned home before the 3 months expired –

 

said Deponent further states that he afterwards resided in said Johnson County until the year 1813 when he removed to Marlborough District South Carolina -- where he has ever since resided & oath which he is now a citizen & resident.

 

Said deponent states that he served himself 8 months and 3 weeks, as above -- & that he employed a substitute the said Peacock for 3 months as above -- but does not recollect how long the said Peacock actually served -- & that he knows of no one by whom he can prove his service.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present

and declares that his name is not on the pension Roll of the Agency of any State.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year above written.

 

S/ Geo. Bristow,C.C.C.pls. S/ William Johnson, J his mark

 

[Charles Manship, a clergyman and Isaiah Weatherly gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of William Johnson S7088 fn7NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Captain Williams

Captain Jacob Hooks

Captain Goodman

Uriah Peacock

Charles Manship, a clergyman

Isaiah Weatherly

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S10918 SC Line: Soldier was born 1757 Oct 16 on the Tar River in NC he lived in Edgefield Dist SC at enlistment. He applied 1841 July 6 Escambia Co. Fla and in 1841 was living in Perry Co. Ala at which time he reffered to 4 children not living near him and stated he was living with a widowed daughter. Soldiers father in law was Moses Prestoot: Soldiers wife was not in the claim. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

Pension application of William Johnson S10918 fn78SC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

Territory of Florida, Western District, Escambia County

On this sixth day of July A.D. 1841 personally appeared in open court before me Dillon

Jordan, Judge of the Superior Court aforesaid District, William Johnson, a resident of Escambia County in the District aforesaid aged 83 years and nine months who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That in the spring of the year 1778 he volunteered in Edgefield District in the State of

South Carolina, under Captain William Butler (afterwards General William Butler) They joined and served with a Regiment commanded by Leroy Hammond, in the whole was under the command of General Pickens; their operations were principally against the British and Tories; He was in the Battle of the Eutaw Springs under Captain Box [Lewis Box] under whom he served about four months and then returned to Edgefield District and resumed his services under Captain Butler and was soon after in the battle of Turner's defeat, at which the father of Captain Butler was killed him to be in he served as a volunteer three years and eight months, and was afterwards drafted and served under a draft three months. The principal service under the draft was in guarding the Jail at Ninety Six in which the Tories were confined; He never had any formal discharge.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in any State.

Sworn to and subscribed in open Court the day & year aforesaid.

S/ Wm Washington, Deputy Clerk S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

 

1 FPA W20803

 

2 September 8, 1781. http://gaz.jrshelby.com/eutaw.htm

 

3 This engagement is usually referred to as the skirmish at Cloud’s Creek and is thought to have occurred on November 17, 1781. The engagement was between Capt. Sterling Turner and Major William Cunningham.

http://gaz.jrshelby.com/cloudscreek.htm 

4 Both Capt. James Butler, Sr. and his son, Capt. James Butler, Jr., are believed to have been killed by William Cunningham’s forces at Cloud’s Creek. This

5 Probably William Hudgins, FPA R5322

 

William Hudgins being sworn says he is 97 years old since the 17th of March last That

he served in the revolutionary war under General Butler that he knew William Johnson now present and who makes the foregoing declaration in the service at the same time or a part of it. That he knows particularly that said Johnson served one tour of five months as the deponent was in the habit of seeing him continually during that time.

Sworn to and Subscribed before me. S/ William Hudgins

S/ William Jordan

[Joseph Bell and Richard Laremore [?] gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Interrogatories propounded by the Court to the Declarant William Johnson

 

1st Where and in what year were you born?

2nd Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?

3rd Where were you living when called into service: where have you lived since the

Revolutionary War and where do you now live?

4th How were you called into service; were you drafted; did you volunteer or were you a

substitute, and if in substitute, for whom?

5th State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served, such Continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service.

6th Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it?

7th State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and their belief in your services as a soldier in the revolution.

 

 To the interrogatories propounded by the Court the applicant answers –

 

 1st I was born on "Tar" River in the State of North Carolina in the year 1757.

 

 2nd There was a Record of my age, but I do not now know where it is.

 

 3rd South Carolina in Edgefield District. I lived in the Counties of Burke, Emanuel,

Bryant and Liberty in the State of Georgia, and now live in the County of Escambia Territory of Florida.

 

 4th I volunteered -- except for three months when I was drafted to guard 96 jail in South

Carolina.

 

 5th General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] of the regular Army. I volunteered under

Captain William Butler, who was afterwards promoted to General. Commenced services at Augusta, Georgia, marched through different Sections of South Carolina under Captain Butler. I was at the Battle of the Eutaw Springs under the command of Lewis Box. I returned to General Sumter's Army at Orangeburg where I remained four or five months. Afterwards I left Sumter's Army and went to Butler's. I was afterwards at the battle of Turner's defeat, where General Butler's father was killed, and this applicant and one Benjamin Hughes were the only two survivors out of 31 men, the others having been killed in that Battle. After which I continued in the Partisan war pursuing and taking Tories and putting them in 96 jail, and Pickens Blockhouse and at Waters’ block-house until the end of the war.

 

 6th No

 

 7th Benjamin Jernigan, James R. Riley, Allen Blaylock, Richard Larimer, and Joseph Bell.

 

I do hereby certify that the foregoing answers were given upon oath by William Johnson (the applicant) to the interrogatories herewith filed.

 

S/ William Jordan, Judge of the United States for the District of

West Florida

 

[facts in file: in 1848, veteran was living in Perry County, Alabama; refers to having 4 children, one a daughter with whom he lived, she being a widow—no names given for any children; veteran’s father-in-law was Moses Prestcott [sic, Prescott? or Prescoat?], though his wife is not named in the file.]

 

[fn p. 21 affidavit given by the Rev. Ephraim Prescoat, resident of Coffee County, Alabama, that he knew William Johnson during the Revolution; that Johnson served under Capt. William Butler; that he, Prescoat, stayed at Johnson’s house in Edgefield County, SC, during the time Johnson was in the service.]

[fn p. 35]

 

Territory of Florida, Santa Rosa County: In the County Court September Term 1843

 

 I William Johnson an applicant for a pension as a revolutionary soldier being desirous of

furnishings some additional proof of my services and deeming it to be a matter of some

importance to state the names of some of the persons with whom I served in the revolutionary hereby make oath that while I was in the Company of Captain William Butler the following named persons served with me as privates Viz. John Curley, Sherrod Curley, Miallard [?] Smith, John Blann [?], Buddy Escridge, Samuel Etheridge.

 

I was [in] Orangeburg District under Captain Box about seven or eight months having previously served under Captain Butler from about 15 days after he received his commission until I entered Captain Box's Company. At the end of said service with Captain Box I again entered Captain Butler's Company & remained in it until the close of the about three months before the close of the war Captain Butler sent me to Ninety Six to guard some Tories I remained there until Colonel McCoy and Captain Simmons Command took away the last of the Tories and they then told me I could go home I then left for home and as Captain Butler who was my Captain was not present I did not get my discharge.

Sworn to and Subscribed before me

S/ D. J. McArthur, Clerk S/ William Johnson, X his mark

[fn p. 45]

State of Alabama, Perry County

 

6 Bobby Moss lists a Burnett (Buddied) Eskridge who served under Capt. Sterling Turner and was killed at Cloud’s Creek

 

 Be it remembered that William Johnson the undersigned who is a citizen of said County

& State & who now claims and applies for a pension from the United States according to the laws thereof as a soldier of the Revolutionary war personally came this sixth day of July 1848 before me Henry C. Lea an acting Justice of the Peace in & for the County & State aforesaid, who after being duly sworn deposes & states as follows that on the 16th day of October next he will be 91 years of age, he states absolutely, on oath, that he was a soldier of & for the Colonies or States during a large portion of the Revolutionary war.

 

That he did enlist -- with some 12 or 15 others of the company he had previously been with, in South Carolina, in the fall of 1780 or spring of 1781 or, rather volunteer, under General Greene at the place called 96 or 96 miles from Charleston & that he did without a doubt serve nine months under him the time for which he entered the service, he did receive a regular discharge at the end of his time in writing -- But swears positively that he has lost it & does not know when or where.

 

He states positively that he was in the Battle of Eutaw Springs under General Greene (it is impossible, he states, for him to recollect positively all the subaltern officers) and the name of General Greene was that most often & almost entirely repeated over & over among the troops when he had previously been, on account of the word & great expection [expectation] from, what had been heard, that General Greene was coming to command in the South & all of us that went volunteers or otherwise to meet & go under him thought of him or his commanding almost entirely: to the best of my recollection at the time we were received & mustered into Greene's Army at 96 I was placed under a Captain Johnson (a man of my own name) I recollect a Colonel Washington & I think that he was there but I cannot say that I was in his Regiment I can only swear that I recollect his name as if he were there & can mention others inferior in command but will not undertake to swear now as to their exact posts or places --I have seen Colonel Morgan or did before the Eutaw battle as he passed through near Edgefield but he was not at Eutaw that I recollect now. General Marion joined General Greene between the Santee River & Eutaw & is of the belief he was with General Greene I often saw General Marion & his men but I was not under him he was mostly lower down the Country then we were.

 

I state positively that at about the age of 20 or a little upwards I commenced my first

active service as a constant soldier I had been mustered before & held liable, but in 1777 a man named Butler (William Butler, if I am not too forgetful) lived in our neighborhood who was active & brave to command & was prevailed on to take a command of Captain & at his instance, & by our agreement to act as minute men, 17 of us of greed, at one time, to join a company under his command, if he should be elected & commissioned as Captain, which company soon increased to a larger number from 65 to 80 & he was regularly, by the law, elected & commissioned as Captain & we agreed to act as minute men; we selected a place of common & uniform rendezvous: a place called Mount hilling in our District of Edgefield; there we were to be instantly always, either for drills or on alarm from the Tories or British, ready for quick marches in any direction we should be ordered –

 

We fought & skirmished from that point to the distance of sometimes 60 miles around -- We had some times to take refuge into General Sumter's command when we were like to be overpowered; we were frequently in General Sumter's Camp I have seen him & his men often -- Colonel Branham [sic, Thomas Brandon] of Fairforest on Tyger River was a great soldier; our Captain frequently had us under the immediate command of Brandon & so we were marched concentrated with other forces at different times & places in the State of South Carolina during several years, say three or four years: But I cannot, for my life, state now precisely the regular train of orders & changes made with us & about us; But one thing I do know & swear positively to; that is; that I served faithfully & hard & honestly for & during the time of six years either in actual marches, or battles, or liable at every instant of time, to military duty if I never get anything for it: & this is the last application I ever expect or intend to make -- I can state a thousand little occurrences during the war to show anyone of any sense that I was in the war faithfully, as I state but I fear I cannot comply with all the law requires, for I do not know, myself, what it requires, nor do I believe anybody else does near me & I am too old to make many more trials to learn. I will state that I was at the remarkable occurrence which gave the name of murder ground to a place near the line between Edgefield & Orangeburg districts in South Carolina -- we were & had been in pursuit of a Tory commander named Cunningham [William “Bloody Bill” Cunningham] Captain Butler divided his company into two divisions some 35 or 40 in each to take different directions so as to scout the country & to act & meet as was then ordered & agreed upon -- Captain Butler took command of one half & a man named Turner was chosen by a majority to take command of the other; some of the men however believed Turner to be cowardly & it was a fact. But the Father of Captain Butler was a member of his Company & it was arranged so that the Captain's Father was to go in Turner's division & in order that there might be safety & good reliance, as well as satisfaction with Turner & his particular supporters & friends it was agreed that if there should any engagement take place the Father of Captain Butler might act in the emergency as Captain & thus all went satisfied -- while those of us under Turner had stopped to breakfast at the house, the most of the command were at or in a house; myself & a man named Benjamin Hughs were feeding our horses at some distance & Cunningham's command rushed in upon & around the house & by a very quick work, with the loss of some seven or eight men, every one of our men with Turner & Butler the Father were killed & myself & Hughs escaped only by accidentally being off feeding our horses & lay in the woods several days before we got to our main company again -- I could state numerous occurrences favorable & unfavorable during the long service in which I was engaged -- If I do not greatly forget the regular place for Captain Butler's company was in a Colonel Hammond’s command I know he was commanded by him & both Butler & Hammond by General Pickens -- But military dispositions & regulations were not then just as they are or would be now -- when there were such men as Butler; great latitude was given them to go on their own hook was allowed; but always subject to be called & ordered in & about, on emergencies or when the enemy were in large bodies.

 

 Now I state on oath that having served constantly some four or five years as above mostly across up & down through the middle portions of South Carolina I did then as before stated in the fall of 1780 or spring 81 volunteered & go & join General Greene as soon as we heard he was in the South & we could join him; & did serve faithfully under him nine months; Joined him at 96 & was actually engaged in the hard fought shocking battle at Eutaw Springs -- I received no wounds which leaves a mark except that besides my cloths have been cut with balls often a musket ball passed between the top of one of my ears and my head at the Eutaw Springs; but unfortunately (now I suppose) it does not leave any distinct scar though I was stunned by it -- It was not a great while after the Battle of Eutaw Springs I got my discharge from further service under General Greene but what the name of the officer was that signed it or gave it to me I will not undertake to state for I confess I cannot recollect. But after the Battle at the Springs I was with the command who was ordered to guard the Tories & others who were sent to 96. The exact

length of time I remained there I cannot tell but not perhaps more than a month or so. The

prisoners were taken from 96 by Colonel McKoy & Captain Simmons & their men, what they did with them or where they carried them, I do not know.

 

 I have now stated all I suppose that I need to tell unless I were to go over hundreds of

hardships escapes & difficulties in which I was during the long war & I state what I have fully sensible that I am not many years at most to remain upon the earth, If the department will allow me pay I shall be glad, if not though destitute now -- have been in better circumstances & my friends & the few relations I have may perhaps help me out of the world as I have tried to help myself while in it. I have several Brothers & sisters yet living but they were too young to know or recollect my services -- I have as many as four children scattered over the world I have only one daughter who lives near me or rather most of the time, I with her, she herself is old a widow & quite helpless in many respects -- My children who live further off are in some better circumstances --

 

 There is not now living within my knowledge anyone except old Mr. J. F. Hoggle whose evidence I have had taken that can prove my service under General Greene for nine months nor of the other services by -- I give directions for his evidence to be sent with my oath or application -- I found him here in Perry County when I came from Florida & he knew & told me himself where he had seen & knew me -- And this has partly been the means of renewing my hopes that the Government will hear & allow my claim Hoggle lived in an adjoining district to me in South Carolina & though younger than I was with his Father in the war & we saw each other frequently -- though his recollection about some things is more clear than my own.

 

I moved from Carolina to the State of Georgia not far from Savannah about 48 years ago I then moved to Florida where I lived some seven or eight years and about two years ago came up here where I have lived since in or near the town of Marion Perry County.

 

I am confident my name was on the roll at Columbia in South Carolina if it was not it was not my fault for it ought to have been there –

 

I made application while I lived in Florida for a pension; but I then did not know that Mr Hoggle or any other person was living by whom I could prove satisfactorily my services, & except that I, on my former application while I lived in Florida, by one Ephraim Prescoat proved that he knew that I started to go to join General Greene's Army & was gone as much as nine months that time but could not swear that he saw me in the service & besides he was young at the time & I had employed him to stay at my house while I was gone in the Army. This was the objection if any I suppose to my claim -- I will be glad if the department will spare the time to turn to & see the papers in my former applications from Santa Rosa or at Pensacola by & through Judge Wright Prescoat lived in Coffee County Alabama & I came up there & got Mr. Meggs to procure Judge Claxton to take Prescoat’s evidence some three years ago. They all thought there, who knew my application as made, that it would succeed but it seems that it did not: while many many others who did not serve one fifth the time I did have received their pensions in different parts of the Country & I think it hard indeed. John B. Meggs Esquire of Walton County Florida I believe has all the correspondence from the War Department if any or (if not destroyed) which relates to my former application I wish I had it all again & could send it to the Department; but I cannot get it. I know there seemed there to be very little in the way yet I never could get my allowance -- until all seemed to get tired of trying & so it lay -- I have, nor have had, no other motive on earth, in changing the agents or persons I have spoken to to get my pension, then simply because I had moved up here & found the old Mr Hoggle whose evidence I send & I never did rest satisfied with the application lying so without trying to get it honestly & fully before the Department once more. It makes me sorry to know how hard & long I served to see that others have drawn & I am to be thought of as unworthy by their side & I feel deeply that it is not just nor right.

 

 I have to state that if there appears to be anything wrong about my not applying sooner,

or later, or in some different way, I must say that I have done the best I could or knowed how -- I am old & not active to get about I have been afflicted with rheumatism & a touch of palsy for some 17 years, off & on, & it is the good feelings of those gentlemen where I happen to be who have more learning than I, or than my close relations, if present, would have; that enables me to know how to even begin to apply for a pension & if it is not & I did not know it to be honest; I would not have it if given; much less apply for it. I have I hope now stated all that can be thought necessary & have this whole matter in the hands of those agents who have by law then appointed to do justice.

 

Sworn to & subscribed in my presence after being taken down as nearly as convenient in his own words & read slowly & distinctly over to him word for word in my presence this 6th of July

1848. S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

S/ Henry C. Lea, JP

 

[supporting affidavit as to reputation and character given by James H. DeVotie or DeVolie, pastor of the Baptist Church of which Johnson was a member.]

 

 [fn p. 58 SC Comptroller General’s certificates of payments made to a man or men named William Johnson or Johnston for revolutionary services.]

 

 [fn p. 61]

 

State of Alabama, Perry County

 

 Personally appeared John F. Hoggle for me George P. Massey an acting Justice of the

Peace in & for the County & State aforesaid who having been by me first duly sworn deposeth & says that he is personally acquainted with William Johnson who now resides & has resided in said. County some little less than two years where this affiant has resided about nine years, that said Johnson removed from Santa Rosa County in Florida to this State about three years sense as affiant is informed & believes –

 

That this affiant though about the age of 85 years has a distinct recollection of this being the same William Johnson with whom he was acquainted during the revolutionary war & that he saw the said Johnson at Eutaw Springs & to the best of affiant's knowledge recollection & belief said Johnson was in that engagement or battle and was under the command of General Greene -- This affiant was there or nearby though not actually in the

battle being posted at some distance with others as a guard to the baggage & stores of a portion of the Army the Father of this affiant was killed in that. This affiant is certain that this same William Johnson was afterwards with General Pickens -- other forces marched off to a place called 96 and this affiant also saw him occasionally at that place -- There has been a great lapse of time since my first acquaintance with said Johnson and affiant was quite a youth at the time & he will not undertake swear positively as to the exact dates or distances so long ago but he knows & recollects this William Johnson not only by the appearance of his frame & features but from hearing him relate several little things that makes his recollection more distinct in conversation with him some time since & affiant is satisfied from the best recollection he has that said Johnson from the different times, places &c that he saw him in the Army must have been in actual service as a soldier in the revolution eight or nine years -- said Johnson was from Edgefield & this affiant was from Newberry District in South Carolina. This affiant introduced himself to said Johnson on meeting in this County because he thought from his appearance &

hearing his name seeing his age &c that he must be the same William Johnson that he had seen at & since the Eutaw Battle & knew in their young days & is now satisfied that he is the same man & has not the least doubt of it. -- This affiant must state also that he had not seen the said Johnson for some 45 years before he came to this County this affiant moved directly from Newberry to this County -- and the said Johnson as he is informed & believed moved from Edgefield to Georgia near Savannah & thence to Florida & then to this State & County so that we have them long separated, until he is here.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 6th July 1848

 

S/ G. P. Massey, JP S/ John F. Hoggle, X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/20/08

 

Captain William Butler (afterwards General William Butler)

Captain Box [Lewis Box]

William Hudgins

Joseph Bell

Richard Laremore

Benjamin Jernigan,

James R. Riley,

Allen Blaylock,

Richard Larimer,

Veteran’s father-in-law was Moses Prestcott

Rev. Ephraim Prescoat,

John Curley,

Sherrod Curley,

Miallard Smith [?],

John Blann [?],

Buddy Escridge,

Samuel Etheridge

Mount Hilling

Benjamin Hughs

Mr. J. F. Hoggle or John F. Hoggle

Ephraim Prescoat

James H. DeVotie or DeVolie, pastor of the Baptist Church

 

 

 

FREDERICK JOHNSTON

 

Frederick Johnston of Frederick Johnson: wife Eda: W4004: SC Line: soldier applied in 1821 Sept. Rutherford Co. NC age 66 with an old wife age 50 odd years and a little girl aged 13 (unknown relationship not stated) Widow applied 1840 July 16 Rutherford Co. NC age 72. Soldier and widow had married in 1783 and soldier died 1831 May 15. A son Willis Johnston made the avvdt. 1840 July 15 in Rutherford Co. NC: Children were Willis Johnston born 1786 Feb 17: Jason Johnston born 1788 April 29: James Johnston born 1790 March 18: Susan ? not Clear born 1793 Jan 2: Enoch Johnston born 1798 Oct 18: Lese Johnston born 1801 March 27: Mary Johnston born 1809 Aug 6 ( appears to be Mary Mildred Johnston) Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, Rutherford County: Superior Court of Law third Monday after the fourth Monday in September 1821

 

This day came Frederick Johnston aged 66 years old into Open Court being a Court of

record for the County and State aforesaid and States that he is a resident of said County and has been for the term of 31 years last past a resident Citizen of the State & County aforesaid and that he was on the 18th of March AD 1818 and has ever since been a Citizen of the United States in he does further Swear on his Oath taken in open Court according to law that he enlisted in the year 1775 into the Company of Captain William Mason of the Second South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel Commandant Moultrie that he was soon after his enlistment transferred from the said William Mason's Company to Captain John Blake’s Company of the said Regiment in the South Carolina line on the Continental establishment, that his enlistment was for the term of three years which time he served out and was honorably discharged by Colonel Isaac Molt [?] of said Regiment in the year 1778 or 1779 at Charleston South Carolina that he has lost his discharge and that he has no other evidence of his said Service in his power that he was in several skirmishes in the battle of Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island and that he now makes this declaration for the purpose of obtaining a pension from his Government under the Several Acts of Congress passed for the benefit of the persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States during the revolutionary war, and I do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property, or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed that I am by trade a farmer but old and infirm and unable to do much for my livelihood that I have an old wife infirm and almost helpless 50 odd years old with no other person to work for me but a little girl 13 years of age not able to do much for the support of herself and Family my property is as contained in the following Schedule to wit

 

100 Acres of Poor Land worth about $70

 

1 Small horse worth about 25

 

1 Cow & Calf & 2 yearlings worth 20

 

6 Shoats 1 Sow & 2 Borrows 10

 

Some Table furniture 2

 

Kitchen furniture 2

 

Farming tools 3

 

Beds and furniture 15

 

Table and chairs 2

 

1 old chest .25

 

 $154.25

 

 S/ Frederick Johnston, X his mark

 

Sworn to in Open Court this 16th day of October 1821 before me

 

S/ James Morris, Clerk

 

 [On July 16, 1840, Eda Johnson [sic], 72, filed in Rutherford County, NC stating that she is the widow of Fedric [sic] Johnson; that she married him in 1783; that he died May 15th 1831; that she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service.]

 

[fn pp. 19-35

 

Contains a photocopy of many pages from a book or pamphlet entitled Candid Reasons for Renouncing the Principles of Antipaedobaptist by Peter Edwards with a letter from Edwards to his congregation dated Portsea, Jan. 12, 1795. This book or pamphlet contains some illegible family records, presumably of the family of Frederick and Eda Johnston. Why so much of the book is copied in the file, I can only guess that rather than tear out the pages containing the family record, the entire book or pamphlet was submitted in proof of the claim.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Frederick Johnston (Johnson) W4004 Eda fn56SC

 

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/17/08

 

JONAS JOHNSTON

 

Jonas Johnston or Jonas Johnson wife Esther: W21470 NC Line: widow applied 1839 Nov. 23 Edgecombe Co. NC age 89 and soldier had lived there at enlistment. Soldier died 1779 Jul 29 at the home of Thomas Armis on Downing Creek on the SC & NC Line. Soldier and widow had married 1768 Nov 17 at the home of Aquilla Sugg in Edgecombe Co. NC. Widow referred to soldier as Col. Jonas Johnston: Children were Elizabeth Johnston born 1772 Feb 9: Prudence Johnston born 1775 March 15: Mary Johnston born 1776 Dec 30: William Johnston born 1779 Feb and died 1793 Nov 7: Soldiers father Jacob Johnston died 1781 Dec 11: Soldiers father was referred to as husband of Mary Johnston widow died 1841 Jan 19 and Peter Hines of Edgecombe Co. NC was executor of her estate. Widows surviving children in 1847 were Prudence Hines and Mary Ruffin. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ROBERT JOHNSTON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Kentucky, Barren County

 

This day Robert Johnston personally came before me Christopher Tompkins Circuit

Judge for the State & County of aforesaid & made oath That he enlisted in March 1777 as a private soldier in Captain Felix Warley's company in the 3rd Regiment of South Carolina on Continental establishment Commanded by Colonel William Thompson & that he served three years in said Regiment in the Continental line during the revolutionary war with Great Britain.

 

This affiant was discharged in March 1780 by Colonel William Henderson Lieutenant Colonel in said Regiment Colonel Thompson being absent. This affiant has been much in the habit of moving from place to place & not knowing that his discharge would be of service to him has long since lost it or mislaid it in a manner which he cannot state as he has no particular recollection on the subject but supposes his name may be found on the records of the war department of the State of South Carolina or of the United States. This affiant is now a citizen of Allen County Kentucky he has never received a pension on his country for his services. From his reduced circumstances in life stands in need of the assistance of his country for support.

 

 ` S/ Robert Johnston

 

Subscribed & sworn to before me this 28th day of June 1818

 

S/ Christopher Tompkins

 

[Col. Samuel Parker gave a supporting affidavit as to Robert Johnson [sic] being a poor man in need of support.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Robert Johnston (Johnson) S36637 fn9SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/17/08

 

Captain Felix Warley's

Col. Samuel Parker

 

 

ROBERT JOHNSTON

 

Robert Johnston or Robert Johnson: S15482 NC and SC Lines: Soldier lived near Camden SC at first enlistment and he lived in Rowan Co. NC and 2nd enlistment. In 1781 soldier had married and was living on the Catawba River in Burke Co. NC where he also enlisted and in 1783 he moved to KY. Applied 1834 March 10- Nelson Co. KY age 84. Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

State of Kentucky, Nelson County court

Be it remembered that upon this 10th day of March in the year 1834, personally appeared

in open court Robert Johnson aged 84 years a citizen of Nelson County Kentucky and in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress of the United States passed in the year 1832, granting pensions & further benefit of certain officers and soldiers of the Revolution and being sworn upon his oath makes the following declaration.

 

That in the year 1775, he was a citizen of South Carolina and resided near Camden. That in the fall of the year 1775, he cannot state the precise day but believes it was in the month of September and the last of the month he entered the service as a private Militia man for a tour of duty of 3 months in the company commanded by Captain Drakeford and the first Lieutenant was John Landing, our principal commander was Colonel Richardson. The troops were marched up on Reedy River and near a large Cane break on said River we took some Tories prisoners who had joined the King, these Tories were called Scofle Ites. The troops to which he was attached continued their services in different sections of the country in suppressing and dispersing the Tories for the full term of 3 months at the termination of which time this affiant was discharged

 

And he states that although he cannot remember the precise day he entered into the military service of the United States or quit it under this engagement he states positively that he served for the full period for which he entered and that was for 3 months. After this tour the affiant moved to Roan [sic, Rowan] County State of North Carolina and in the year 1776 in the fall of that year and after he had raised his crop, to wit on the first of September as near as he can recollect for he will not be positive as to the precise day, he again entered the public service as a private Militia man in the company commanded by Samuel Young our company was under the command of General Griffin Rutherford [sic, Griffith Rutherford] of said County of Rowan, the troops to which he was attached during this War was stationed upon the Catawba River and remained there some time to guard the frontier against the Indians and we were afterwards marched into the Cherokee Country against the said Cherokee Indians the troops marched as far as the Over-hill towns, we destroyed the corn and other property of the Indians in this tour and

that other places After destroying the Indian towns and property the troops returned and were discharged, this affiant returned to the County of Rowan having faithfully served upon this tour Scofolite, Scoffelites, Scopholites, Scovelites or Coffelites (Joseph Coffell): before period of 3 months as a private in the manner stated.

 

In the year 1781, he was still a resident of North Carolina, he had moved and resided on the Catawba River when he was called upon by his Country again to enter her service and he United himself under the command of Captain Walker, and was marched from his residence in Burke County in Stationed at a Fort situated above the Quaker Meadows near the Blue Ridge.

 

There were 30 men stationed at this Fort as a guard under Walker and this affiant remained in the military service of his country upon this tour for the full period of 3 months, the time for which he entered and was honorably discharged from the service on the termination of each tour but he has lost his discharge having long since lost or mislaid the same, nor has he any written evidence of his service nor does he know that he can prove the fact of his actual service by any living witness.

 

He moved to Kentucky in the fall of 1783 and has resided here ever. He is known personally to many of the citizens of Nelson County to wit the Honorable Benjamin Hardin now a member of Congress C. A. Wickliffe formerly a member of Congress, John Rowan Esquire & others and also to James and William Settles. He states that he served in all 3 tours of duty of 3 months each, and in all 9 months as a private soldier in the militia of the United States. That he is not upon the pension Roll of any State or of the United States and hereby relinquishes all claim to a pension other than the one now claim.

 

 Signed Robert Johnston

 

[Alexander Hunter, James Settle, William Settle, and Stanislaus Hayden gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

[Isaac Taylor at the clergyman, gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Researchers Notes: A name given to white Tories who dressed up like Indians when attacking patriot fortifications in the hope of deflecting their neighbors' animosity away from themselves and onto the Cherokees who constituted a constant threat to the frontier settlers prior to and throughout the period of the Revolutionary War. The name derived from Joseph Scoffel, a Tory, who was active in the loyalist cause from an early period of the war.For an excellent discussion of the "Scoffol Lights," see, Rachel N. Klein, "Frontier Planters and the American Revolution: The South Carolina Backcountry, 17751782,” in Ronald Hoffman, Thad W. Tate and Peter J. Albert, eds., An Uncivil War: The Southern Backcountry During the American Revolution, (Charlottesville: United States Capitol Historical Society by The University Press of Virginia, 1985), 37-

69.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Robert Johnston (Johnson) S15482 fn13NC[SC]

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/30/08

 

Captain Drakeford

First Lieutenant was John Landing

Samuel Young

Captain Walker,

Benjamin Hardin

C. A. Wickliffe

John Rowan

Alexander Hunter,

James Settle,

William Settle,

Stanislaus Hayden

Isaac Taylor a clergyman,

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSTON

 

William Johnston S18062 SC Line: Applied 1835 June 22 Fairfield Dist. SC soldier was born in March 1759 near the Shenandoah River in Va. ( County not remembered) and mentioned his grandfather Wm. Roden. Soldier lived in Fairfield Dist SC on Little Wateree Creek “ The South Prong” Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

Pension application of William Johnston (Johnson) S18062 fn12SC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

South Carolina, District of Fairfield

On this 22nd day of June in the year of our Lord 1835, personally appeared in open

Court, before John R. Buchanan, Judge of the Court of Ordinary in and for Fairfield District and state aforesaid, now sitting, William Johnston a resident of said District of Fairfield, in the State aforesaid, aged 76 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That deponent was born in the State of Virginia, and near the Shenandoah River, but

having left that State when four or five years of age he does not know the name of the County. That deponent was born in the year 1759 and in the month of March. That deponent has now in his possession a Bible which was given to deponent by deponent’s grandfather by the mother, William Roden. That deponent's page is entered in this Bible, and agrees with the age he herein given. The deponent believes the entry was made in the Bible by his said grandfather William Roden.

 

That deponent was living in Fairfield District, in the State of South Carolina, on the

South prong of Little Wateree Creek, when called into service. That deponent has lived in the same place ever since that period, and still lives there.

 

That deponent was attached to Captain Charles Lewis's Company (Militia Infantry)

which company was divided into three equal parts or divisions. That one division only was called out at one time. That deponent always went into service when the division to which he belonged was called on, and considers himself as a drafted whenever in service. Deponent Never received a discharge in writing from any officer or Commander. The troops were always discharged verbally by the Captain when the relief arrived.

 

 That he deponent is well acquainted with Captain John Hollis,William Lewis, Colonel

Austin, F Peay, Joseph Caldwell and John Buchanan, who can testify as to deponent's character for veracity, and their belief of deponent's services as a soldier of the revolution. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named Officers and served as herein stated.

 

1 John Hollis S21827

 

2 http://gaz.jrshelby.com/shirersfy.htm 

 

 First Tour. The first tour performed was under Captain Charles Lewis. He was the

Captain commanding. The Company met in Winnsborough and marched into the Dutch fork in Lexington District, crossing Broad River at Shirey’s ferry [sic, Shirers Ferry2?]. Deponent served this tour a private two months. The expedition was intended to keep the Tories in check. There were no regular or Continental soldiers there. Believes that Colonel John Winn was there, who was the Colonel of the Regiment. John Hollis was first Lieutenant (not in this tour) Charles Pickett was second Lieutenant and out this tour. This tour performed, in the spring and summer of 1775 or it may have been in 1776.

 

Second Tour: Was to Stono near Charleston South Carolina, no continentals they are

accepting a Company of Pulaski's Cavalry. Colonel Richard Winn was present commanding his Regiment. There were more than one Regiment of Militia there. Colonel John Adair was there, commanding one Battalion of Colonel Lacy's [sic, Lacey’s] Regiment. The British and Tories were in a Fort at Stono. There was no battle fought. When Pulaski 's men made an attempt to draw the Garrison out they were fired upon and one killed and one wounded. The deponent served two months as a private this tour. Charles Lewis commanded the Company. This tour in 1779.

 

Third Tour: Was to Coosawatchie [sic, Coosahatchie?]. Captain Charles Lewis

commanded the Company. Colonel John Winn commanded the Regiment and he and Regiment were out. Lay some time at could get Coosahatchie and thence marched to the Three Sisters ferry Savannah River, lay there some time and, served two months as a private this tour. No regular or Continentals seen this tour. This tour in 1779 or 1780.

 

Fourth Tour: Was to Wasmasaw [sic, Waccamaw?] in the lower part of South Carolina.

Captain Charles Lewis commanded the Company and was out. No regular soldiers there. Part of several regiments out. The Regiment made up of parts of different regiments and commanded by Colonel Edward Lacey. Served two months as a private this time about the year 1781 or 1782.

 

Fifth Tour: Was to Saltketcher towards the last of the Revolutionary War about the year

1782 Colonel Richard Winn commanded the Regiment and was out. Was under John Hollis who then had the command of the Company. No regular soldiers there. Served three months as a private this tour.

 

Sixth Tour: Was performed in Fairfield and Chester Districts when General Gates was

defeated near Camden. Was under John Hollis who commanded the Company. Was on this or Fairfield side of the River, and served three months as a private this tour.

 

 That deponent by reason of old age and the consequent loss of memory, cannot

swear positively as to the date of service; nor can he swear positively as to the order in which the different tours were performed, but he is certain he served in all 14 months at least as a private for which deponent claims a pension. That deponent served with an embodied corps in every tour mentioned, and was in the field, and that for the time during which the service was performed he was not employed in any civil pursuit. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State excepting that of South Carolina.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

S/ John Buchanan S/ William Johnston, X his mark

 

 [Thomas Hall, a clergyman, and John Buchanan gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 I John Hollis, residing in the District of Fairfield, in the State aforesaid, hereby Certify that I am well acquainted with William Johnston who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration, that I believe him to be 76 years of age. That I knew him in the revolutionary war. That he served under me in the last two tours mentioned to wit the fifth and sixth. That the facts stated in reference to these tours are correct and true, and that I know said Johnston to be a man of veracity and standing as to truth, in his neighborhood, and that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution and that I knew such to be the truth.

 

Sworn & subscribed the day and year aforesaid. ` S/ John Hollis

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/17/08

 

Grandfather by his mother is William Roden.

South prong of Little Wateree Creek

Captain Charles Lewis's

Captain John Hollis,

William Lewis,

Colonel Austin, F Peay,

Joseph Caldwell

John Buchanan,

John Hollis was first Lieutenant

Charles Pickett was second Lieutenant

Thomas Hall, a clergyman,

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSTON

 

William Johnston S31780 VA Line: soldier was born in Amelia Co. Va he enlisted at Valley Forge. Soldier moved from Amelia Co. Va to Prince Edward Co. Va then to Henrico Co.Va then to NC to SC then returned to NC and lived first in Guilford Co. NC then to Salisbury NC then to Ga and lived in Columbia Co. Ga, Washington Co. Ga, Hancock Co. Ga, Baldwin Co.Ga and Bibb Co Ga. Soldier applied 1835 Feb 9 Bbib Co. Ga. Age 82: Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files