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 ANDREW JOHNSON

 

Andrew Johnson S15905 NJ and PA Lines: also Indian war served of 1791-1797. Soldier lived in Bucks Co. Pa at enlistment and at age of 21 he moved to NJ and in 1791 or 1792 he enlisted at New Brunswick NJ and served abt 6 years against the Indians and immediately after discharge he moved to Preston Co. Va and he married there abt 1797 to Elizabeth daughter of John Green who was murdered by the Indians in Preston Co. Va and said Elizabeth was taken captive and held 11 years. Soldier applied 1834 Jan 13 Preston Co. Va. Soldier died 1846 March 21 leaving children: Rebecca Johnson Castel, Mary Ann Senate, sarah Johnson, Isaac Johnson and Jesse Johnson. Pg 1841 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

BAILEY JOHNSON

 

Bailey Johnson and wife Hannah: W4006 VA Line: Soldier married Hannah Muffett in 1783 Jan or 1784 in Fauquier Co.Va and later moved to PA and soldier died there in 1805 Sept. Widow applied 1838 Oct 15 in Ross CO. Ohio age 73. In 1839 widow stated she and soldier had 12 children of which one died in infancy. Childrens birth were Metildey Johnson born 1781 Dec 19: Adin Johnson born 1783 Nov 7: James Johnson born 1786 Dec 10: Daniel Johnson born 1789 April 20: William Johnson born 1791 July 18: Melinday Johnson born 1793 Jul 11: James Johnson born 1795 Nov 22: Elijah Johnson born 1798 Nov 6, Jesse Johnson born 1799 June 6, Henery Johnson born 1801 May 6 and Bailey Johnson born 1802 Aug 6. The daughter Metildey Johnson married a Mr. Gates and their children shown were Bailey Gates born Aug 1800, Hannah Gates born Sept 25 1801 and in 1838 Jane Johnson of Ross CO. Ohio stated she was at soldiers and widows wedding and in 1843 a James Johnson witnessed widows signature ( relationship unknown)

 

BARNEY JOHNSON

 

DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA, SS.

 

On this twenty sixth day of June, A. D. 1818, before me, Richard Peters, Judge of the

District Court of the United States, in and for th Pennsylvania District, personally appeared Barney Johnson of the City of Philadelphia who being duly sworn deposes and declares, that during the War of the Revolution he served against the common enemy as a Fifer in the army on the Continental Establishment — that on the day of A. D. 1776 at Baltimore in the state of Maryland he enlisted in the third Maryland Regiment, commanded by Colonel Guest [sic: Mordecai Gist], in Captain Armitrangs Company, and in the following year he joined the Army of the United States at White Mains in New Jersey, and he continued in the service of the United States until the peace of Eighty three. The said deponent further says that at the battle of Camden [SC, 16 Aug 1780] he was wounded by a British light horseman in the head and was made a prisoner. After six months he was exchanged, and he joined the same regiment at

Batimore.

 

That by reason of his reduced circumstances in life, he is in need of assistance from his

country for support, that he never has received, or been allowed any Pension by the laws of the United States—that he is a resident citizen of the United States, and that his Discharge he has lost. Barney Johnson

 

District of Pennsylvania SS

 

Dennis Dunning of the District of Southwark in the County of Philadelphia, being sworn

says that he is well acquainted with Barney Johnson, the within named Deponent. The said Barney has been known to the said Dunning since he was fourteen years of age, and he well recollects his having enlisted as a fifer in the third Maryland Regiment, and that he served in the same during the remainder of the war. The Deponent was a Drummer in the first Maryland Regiment. The said Barney Johnson is now in indigent circumstances.

Sworn & Subscribed before me June 26, 1818 Dennis Dunning his X mark

 

Auditors Office Annapolis, March 26, 1819

I hereby certify that it appears from the Muster Rolls remaining in the Auditors office that Barnard Johnson enlisted as a fifer in the third Maryland Reg’t. on the 18 Feb’y 1778 but it does not appear at what time he received his Discharge. Thos. Karney, Audt’r. State Md.

 

Schedule

Eastern District of Pennsylvania SS

 

On this 30th day of June A.D. 1820. personally appeared in open Court in the District

Court of the United States in and for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania (being a Court of record for the said District) Barney Johnson, aged about Fifty years [sic], resident in the County of Philadelphia in the said District, who being first duly sworn according to Law doth on his Oath declare – that he served in the Revolutionary War as follows, to wit in the year 1776 or 1777 he served under General [William] Smallwood in the Maryland Line in the 3d Maryland Regiment, and continued with him about two Campaignes. After that he served (in the same Regiment) under General [Horatio] Gates, and then under general [Nathanael] Greene. – he continued in service till the end of the War and then was discharged. he received a Wound in the Head at Camden. He has received a Pension under the Act of Congress of 18 March 1818 by Certificate No 8931.

 

I the said Barney Johnson do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the United

States on the 18th day of March 1818; and that I have not since that Time by Gift Sale or in any Manner disposed of my Property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it, as to bring myself within the Provisions of an Act of Congress entitled “An Act to provide for certain persons engaged in the Land and Naval Service of the United States in the Revolutionary War” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me, any property or securities, contracts or debts due to me, nor have I any income other than what is contained in the Schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed. Real or Personal Estate – I have none, except a few Articles of Household Furniture not worth more than Ten Dollars. the greater part was seized and sold some time ago for Rent.

 

I have a Wife, but no Children – when I was able I drove Cart, but of late from the effect of the Wound on my head I have been unfit for any work Barney Johnson

 

NOTE: On the pension certificate is the following: Death – AB [Account Book] Nov. 10, 1820.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Barney Johnson: S39783

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

DAVID JOHNSON

 

David Johnson S5641 VA Line: Soldier was born 1763 Sept 17 in Morris Co. NJ and he lived in what became Washington CO. Pa. At enlistment Soldier applied 1833 Feb 12 in Parke Co In in 1845 April Soldier was living with Levi Johnson son in Knox Co. Ohio and in 1845 Sept he was living with a son Amos Johnson in Brooke Co. Va. Pg 1844 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ISAAC JOHNSON

 

Isaac Johnson or Isaac Johnston: S36642 PA and VA Lines: See Isaac Johnson Pg 1862: 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ISAAC JOHNSON

 

Isaac Johnson: PA AND VA Lines: applied 1818 June 1 Bullitt Co. KY, in 1820 soldier was aged 72 with a wife age 66 and referred to a married daughter and his son who was born 1799 Oct 12 (both were still living with soldier but were not named) soldier died 1833 Oct 21: Pg 1847 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JACOB JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

State of Kentucky, Morgan County

 

On this 17th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the

Justices of Morgan County now sitting Jacob Johnston a resident in the County of Morgan and State of Kentucky aged 74 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of an act of Congress passed June 7th 1832 – That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated.

 

He states that he served under General Francis Marion Colonel __Baxter, that Capt.

Goodman Pathrigh [?]1 he served under immediately -- he states that he enlisted for five years at the Eutaw Springs, that he had been about one year in the service before he enlisted under a Draft, that he was in the battle at the Eutaw Springs and the battle at Quinbee [Quinby] about seven or 8 miles from Charleston, That he remained in the regular service two years and six months, that he lived in Morgan County in the State of South Carolina, was born on the eighth of

October 1758 and was born in Rewen [sic, Beaver?] County Pennsylvania, That he knows of no one who can now testify to his service in this Country, that he received a discharge from General Marion which he has lost in has no documentary evidence of his Service, that for a number of years

 

After the close of the war he resided in Morgan County South Carolina, that about 20

years since he removed to the State of Kentucky and is now a citizen of Morgan County in said State –

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State --

 

Questioned by the court:

When and in what year were you born

 

Ans: I was born in the State of Pennsylvania in Beaver [?] County 8th Oct. 1758

 

Q. -- have you any record of your age

 

Ans: No

 

Q. where were you living when you entered the service and where have you lived since

the Revolutionary War

 

Ans: I lived in Morgan County on the Adkin River [Yadkin River] in South Carolina and have lived in South Carolina & Kentucky ever since

 

Q. how were you called into that he Service were you drafted or did you volunteer or

were you a Substitute –

 

Ans: I was drafted when I first entered the service and afterwards enlisted –

 

1 The War Department interpreted this as two men “Captains Goodman and Pathrigh [?]”. I don’t see an “s” at the end of the word “Capt.” nor do I see an “and” or “&” between Goodman and Pathrigh.

 

Q. State the name of some of the Regular officers, who were with the Troops where you

served –

 

Ans: General Marion, Colonel Baxter, Captain Goodman Pathrigh, and Lieutenant Mayams [?]. I do not recollect the names of [indecipherable word] the officers -- I served in and about the Eutaw Springs, in the neighborhood of the Biggin Church and in the neighborhood of Charleston

 

 Q. did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given,

and what has become of it –

 

Ans: I received a discharge from General Marion and have lost it –

 

 Q. State the names of the persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood

& who can testify as to your character for veracity and good behavior, your services as a soldier of the Revolution –

 

Ans: I am known by William Lewis, Esq. -- Thomas Lewis Senior and a number of others -- that he Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ Jacob Johnson, X his mark

 

[William Coffee, a clergyman, and Isaac Nickell gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Jacob Johnson (Johnston) S13579 fn22SC

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

William Lewis, Es

Thomas Lewis Senior

William Coffee

Isaac Nickell

 

 

JAMES JOHNSON OR JAMESTON JOHNSON

 

James Johnson or Jameston and wife Mary: #38096 BLW #1719-100: PA Line soldier applied 1818 May 4 Frederick Co. Va. Aged 83. Soldier had enlisted in York Co. PA. Widow applied 1830 May 5, Winchester Va. Widow stated soldier had no children or other relative living in the US. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson or John Johnston wife Rosannah: W5011 NC Line: Soldier was born 1753 May 12, soldier died 1802 march 13 or 14th in Randolph Co. NC. Soldier married Rosannah Lytle 1783 Feb 8 as stated by widow 1783 Feb 28 as shown in the bible records and she was born 1761 Nov 10 the daughter of Henry Lytle of Randolph Co. NC widow applied 1839 Feb 5 Randolph CO. NC. She was still there in 1846, children were Henry Johnson born 1784 Jan 23 and he married Polly daughter of Edward Thornbrough and Mary who were born and raised in PA. Thomas Johnson born 1785 May 1: Jane Johnson born 1787 July 6: William Johnson born 1790 April 30: Margaret Johnson born 1792 June 29: John Johnson born 1794 May 5: Elizabeth Johnson born 1795 Feb 9: Mary or Polly Johnson born 1797 March 1: Hezekiah Johnson born 1799 May 17: Clemons Johnson or Clemmons Johnson born 1801 Nov 28: a grandson D.W.C. Johnson was of La Grange NC in 1844 and in 1848 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ROBERT JOHNSON

 

Robert Johnson or Robert Johnston wife Elizabeth: W371: NC Line: Widow applied 1844 Feb 2, Knox Co. Tn age 69. Soldier and widow married 1791 April 1 and soldier died 1840 April 20. Soldier had applied 1834 Sept 6 Hawkins Co. Tn age 74 he lived in Randolph Co NC at enlistment. Soldier was born in 1760 PA. Widow was born 1775 April 19, children shown were Mary Johnson born 1792 March, Sarah Johnson born 1794 July 17, Jane Johnson born 1796 June 5. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

On this 6th day of September 1834 personally appeared before Shadrach Epperson an

acting Justice of the peace for said County Robert Johnson resident of Hawkins County and State of Tennessee aged 74 years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States in the year 1780 as a volunteer under the

command of Colonel Collier Major Sharp and Captain Johnson I was then living in Randolph County State of North Carolina. I entered the service the first of October 1780 and marched on to Salisbury and lay there some time from there we marched. On crossing the Yadkin River at the Shallow Ford from there we went on through Salem and from there we joined General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] at the high rock Ford we lay there until Greene collected all his forces and then marched on towards Guilford Courthouse we were met by the British under the Command of Cornwallis and a severe battle took place sometime in March 1781. From there Greene and his men marched on to South Carolina I went on and stayed with General Greene until I was discharged at Rugeley's mill by Colonel Collier and returned home in my own County of Randolph, about the first of May as well as I now recollect being gone 8 months. After I

arrived at home the Tories were so troublesome it was dangerous for a Whig to stay at home.

 

The first of June 1781 I volunteered myself again under the same officers for to go against the Tories that were collected in different parts of the country doing mischief we marched against one Fannin [sic, David Fanning] a Tory Officer and his men at Linsey’s [Lindley’s] Mill we defeated them killing 36 of his men and wounded Fanning but he escaped. We were always scouting about from place to place against the Tories we came up with Fanning at another place at one Needams [sic, Needham’s?], in the night and fired on Fanning and his men and they fled and Fanning escaped again we were Continual against the Tories that were doing mischief in the Country they burned Colonel Collier's house in the time we came upon them while the house was burning but they escaped -- we had various skirmishes with them during the summer and fall

of 1781. The Tories being rousted out of that part of the Country in a great measure we had some stiller times and I was dismissed and returned home being in actual service 6 months.

 

When I entered the service this time it was in Randolph County North Carolina. I was dismissed the first of December as well as I now recollect.

 

 This declarant further states that Colonel Collier called out men after this declarant

returned home different times as occasion would require against the outlying Tories and he always volunteered himself when required and went various trips against the Tories but of short duration that he cannot now recall as to the precise length of each trip but is satisfied so served not less than 2 months actual service in short trips during the winter of 1781 in the spring of 1782. This Declarant declares he was in actual service the time he states above and always was ready and willing at any call always volunteered himself and was called out by competent authority. That he was either in the field or in Garrison and for the time during which the service was performed he was not employed in any civil pursuit. This Declarant says he knows of no one and who he can prove his service by he has no documentary evidence of his service he hereby relinquishes every Claim to a pension or annuity whatever except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed the day and year last above mentioned before me.

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

 State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

 On this 6th day of September 1834 personally appeared Robert Johnson before Shadrach

Epperson an acting Justice of the peace for said County and made Oath that he is not sufficiently acquainted with any clergyman that he can procure one to sign his declaration as he does not go about any of consequence in the neighborhood.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed the day and year above mentioned before me.

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

 Questions proposed to Robert Johnson applicant for a pension by the war department

 

1st Question

 

Ans: I was born in the year 17_0 in the State of Pennsylvania

 

2nd Question

 

Ans: I have not that I know of

 

3rd Question

 

Ans: I was living in the State of North Carolina Randolph County from North Carolina I moved into the State of Tennessee Hawkins County where I now live

 

4th Question

 

Ans: I volunteered myself every time

 

5th Question

 

Ans: Colonel Collier, Major Sharp, General Greene, Captain Sharp

 

6th Question

 

Ans: I received one from Colonel Collier which I have lost

 

7th Question

 

Ans: Thomas Epperson, Shadrach Epperson, Valentine Wolf, Captain John Wolf

 

[William Walker and Major Charles Wolf gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 

Amendment to the foregoing Declaration of Robert Johnson on the 28th of September 1834 personally appeared Robert Johnson before Shadrach Epperson one of the acting Justices of the peace for Hawkins County and after being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following amendment to the foregoing Declaration.

 

He entered the service of the United States first of October 1780 and served as he before

stated. I did not join General Greene at the high rock Ford until some time in the winter after I went out. The cause of my serving as long at one trip before I returned home was as follows: I always volunteered myself and when my tour of service expired I was importuned by my officers to remain in service That if we all would go home it would greatly weaken the forces and in all probability I would be killed by the Tories at home and if I would remain I could be dismissed whenever I chose. There were some went home when their term of service was out and some remained I being a young man and had not much to look after at home I chose to remain in

service --

 

 I knew if I went home I would have to be on my guard for fear of the Tories and I

contented myself to remain in service. This Applicant further states it was the same in relation to his service in 1781. Immediately on his return from his first trip he could not remained in safety at home the cry was Whig and Tory all round him Tories would hate the Whig whip him or hang him the same by the Whig find the men at home and he was accused of being a Tory even if he was a Whig and he was a [indecipherable word] a man it appeared was not safe in his own house and this was the cause I remained in service. I could have returned home at the end of my service but we kept embodied -- our own safety and in order to check the Tories this applicant further states if he had come home he would have been in more danger than he was, he could continually hear of the Tories making mischief either by stealing, murdering, burning [indecipherable word] and the like and he was [indecipherable word] generally searching from place to place when circumstances would require. This applicant solemnly states he was

engaged in actual service the time he before stated to the best of his knowledge and to save more or less he cannot give the never gets [indecipherable word or words].

 

Sworn to and subscribed this 26 September 1834 before me

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

 Amendment to the declaration of Robert Johnson

 

State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

 On this 6th day of December 1834 Personally appeared Robert Johnson resident of the

County of Hawkins and State of Tennessee before Shadrach Epperson one of the Justices of the peace for said County and after being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following amendment to the foregoing declaration.

 

 After mature consideration I recollect after the battle at Guilford Courthouse we marched

on to some Iron works where we encamped and from there we marched on to South Carolina some time towards the latter end of April we were attacked by the British near a town called Camden we were forced to give ground. We retreated to a place called Rugeley's Mills where we encamped -- at which place I was discharged and arrived home the first; or near the first of May being gone 8 months –

 

From the time I first entered the service in Randolph County North Carolina and took up a line of March I cannot recollect the names of the counties I went through and there being no particular occurrence took place until we joined General Greene I was always subject to military duty -- while I was gone and cooperated with the rules and regulations of the Army -- the same as any soldier in camp and thought myself bound so to do.

 

When I returned home in May Colonel Collier raised man either by draft or volunteers as men chose (whether he had any authority to do so I am not able to say but expect he had) I volunteered myself under Captain Johnson a second time and entered the service but for me to recall every little circumstance after the lapse of so many years I cannot. I do not recollect every place we camped or was stationed neither do I remember the particular direction we marched. I know we were often upon the scout after Tories and outliers that were doing mischief in the country and at different times we were stationed for a while in the country but the names of the places we were stationed at or whether they bore any particular name I am unable to say. When I say we were always scouting about I do not mean I was continually night and day But going but as circumstances would require I recollect of an attack we had with Colonel Fanning a Tory and his men at Linneys [Lindley’s] Mill and defeated him at another time we marched upon the same

Colonel at one Needham’s, and fired on him and his men and continued from place to place through the country until my time Expired. And as respects my last term of service or during my last trips of service in small scouts I cannot recollect them precisely as they occurred.

 

But I know that several times in the winter 1781 and spring 1782 Captain Collier called men by draft or volunteer in go through the country after Tories and I always went as a volunteer whenever there was need of men in the country and I am certain my last trips under Captain Johnson as well as I can now recollect was 2 months -- Sworn to and subscribed this 6th day of December 1834 before me.

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

 On this 6th day of December 1834 personally appeared Robert Johnson before Shadrach

Epperson one of the acting Justices for said County and after being duly sworn according to law deposeth and saith that owing to old age and the consequent loss of memory he cannot swear positively as to the precise length of his service but according to the best of his recollection he served not less than the periods mentioned below and the following grades, for 8 months I served as a private under Captain Johnson in 1780 in 1781 for 6 months I served under Captain Johnson a 2nd time in the summer and fall of 1781 for 2 months I served under Captain Johnson a third time in the winter 81 and spring 82 for which service I claim a pension sworn to before me the day above written.

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

 [On February 2, 1844, in Knox County Tennessee, Mrs. Elizabeth Johnston, 69, filed for a widows pension stating that she was the widow of Robert Johnson, a pensioner of the United States at the rate of $40 per annum; that she married him April 1, 1791; and that he died April 20 1840.]

 

 [Bible record

 

Robert Johnson was born the __ Day of __ in the of our Lord __

 

Elizabeth Johnson was born the 19th Day of April in the your of our Lord 1775

 

Mary Johnson was born the 19th of March in the year of our Lord 1792

 

Sarah Johnson was born the 17th Day of July in the year of our Lord 1794

 

Jane Johnson Johnson was born the 5th Day of June in the year of our Lord 1796]

 

 [facts in file: Elizabeth’s maiden name was Sumner; son, John R. Johnson, 38, on June 27, 1844, gave an affidavit in support of his mother’s claim in Knox County, Tenn.; ditto, Robert Johnson,

37.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Robert Johnson (Johnston) W371 Elizabeth fn48NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/26/08

 

Captain Johnson of Randolph Co NC

Captain Sharp of Randolph Co NC

Thomas Epperson,

Shadrach Epperson,

Valentine Wolf,

Captain John Wolf

William Walker

Major Charles Wolf

Captain Collier of Randolph Co NC

Mrs. Elizabeth Johnston, 69 born 1775 ? or Elizabeth Sumner

 

SAMUEL JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Kentucky, Daviess County

 

 On this 8th day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court before Alney McLean Esquire sole Judge of the circuit court of Daviess County now sitting Samuel Johnson Senior a resident of said County and State aforesaid aged 88 years in December ensuing who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

 That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers, and

served as herein stated. That he was drafted and entered the service under Colonel William Giles Major Richard Jones Captain William Finney Lieutenant John Walthal Ensign's name not recollected in May (date not recollected) 1779 -- served one month marched from Amelia [county, Virginia] (the place of residence) to Portsmouth, or nearly [indecipherable word] that place was the point to which the troops were ordered the British having left, he returned.

 

That he was drafted in December 1779 entered the service under Captain Bennett Pullum Lieutenant Howel Rose remained in service for 2 weeks and then substituted French Frank to serve out the balance of the term to wit 2 months and a half the tour being for 3 months having previously moved from Amelia Virginia to Granville North Carolina.

 

February 1781 was drafted, entered the service under General Butler Colonel Joseph

Taylor Major Anthony Sharp Captain Richard Harrison Lieutenant James Ellison Ensign Ben Hester marched from Granville old Court house, to Guilford Court house fought the British on a March 1781 -- General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] Commanding. Served 3 months discharged 11th May 1781 at Wake Court-house now Raleigh (North Carolina).

 

Sometime in September following drafted and entered the service under Captain Charles Yancy marched from Granville County North Carolina to the high Hills of Santee (General Greene’s head quarters) guarding of public wagons tour 3 months.

 

 That he has no documentary evidence by which to prove his services.

 

 Interrogatories propounded by the Court

 

1st When and in what year were you born?

 

Ans: Bucks County Pennsylvania and in the year 1744

 

2nd Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?

 

Ans: I have none now there was one, but brother John carried it to South Carolina, it was they are destroyed by the Tories.

 

3rd Where were you living when called into service: where have you lived since the

Revolutionary War and where do you now live?

 

Ans: In Virginia and North Carolina since the revolutionary war in North Carolina and Kentucky and now lives in Kentucky

 

4th How were you called into service; were you drafted; did you volunteer or were you a

substitute, and if in substitute, for whom?

 

Ans: By order of the States, to wit of Virginia and North Carolina as I understood -- I was drafted.

 

5th State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served, such Continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service.

 

Ans: General N. Greene commanded at Guilford, Colonel Washington of the horse; I knew the Regiments in which I served the names of the commanders of which is brought to view in the preceding part of this declaration there was a Regiment from the lower part of the State (North Carolina) commanded by Colonel Eaton who I believe was taken prisoner at Augusta and then killed for an answer to the last clause of the inquiry, reference is made to the body of this declaration.

 

6th Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it?

 

Ans: I received one from James Ellison (Captain) but it has been mislaid or lost long since.

 

7th State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and their belief in your services as a soldier in the revolution.

 

Ans: Captain Benjamin Field and Benjamin Newton

 

 He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State that he knows of.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed, the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ Samuel Johnson Same year

 

[Benjamin Field & Benjamin Newton gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Samuel Johnson S16430 fn43NC [sic VA.]

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/26/08

 

Captain William Finney

Lieutenant John Walthal

Captain Bennett Pullum

Lieutenant Howel Rose

French Frank

Captain Richard Harrison

Lieutenant James Ellison

Ensign Ben Heste

Captain Charles Yancy

James Ellison (Captain)

Captain Benjamin Field

Benjamin Newton

 

 

 

THOMAS JOHNSON

 

Thomas Johnson S3882 PA Line: applied 1818 April 21 Jefferson Co.Va aged 66, he had enlisted a Philadelphia Pa. In 1820 soldier had a wife aged 60 and her 3 children the oldest of which was aged about 9 years Pg 1858  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson S30510: Va line: applied 1834 June 6: Woodford Co. KY age 73. Soldier lived in Loudon at enlistment. Soldier was born in 1761 Bucks Co. PA. In 1790 Soldier moved from Loudon Co Va to Woodford Co KY and soldier died there 1841 Feb 17 leaving no widow or children. A Robert Johnson was administrator of Soldiers estate in 1844. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ZOPHER JOHNSON

 

Zopher Johnson: S1840: VA Line 1832 Oct 24 applied Greene CO. Tn age 70. Soldier was born at the forks of the Delaware River in PA. He lived in Frederick Co. Va. At enlistment and abt 1792 he moved to Greene CO. Tn Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOSEPH JOHNSTON or JOSEPH JOHNSON

 

Joseph Johnston or Joseph Johnson wife nancy: W5033 NC Line: Soldier applied 1832 Nov 6 Randolph Co. NC. Soldier was born 1753 May 5 in Lancaster Co. Pa. and in 1772 moved to Guilford Co. NC the part now being Randolph CO. NC and he lived there at enlistment. Soldier mentioned the Tories killing his brother Henry Johnston. A son Joseph Johnston made affdt 1844 May 7 in Randolph Co. NC age 45 and state soldier died 1838 Nov 16 leavinf a widow Nancy who died 1843 march 14, leaving children Sara or Sarah Johnston who married David Brown: Sytle Johnston, Robert Johnston and Joseph Johnston. Soldier and widow married in 1786. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

State of North Carolina, Randolph County: Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions November Term A.D.

 

On this 6th day of November A.D. 1832, personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions now sitting, Joseph Johnston, a resident of the County of Randolph, State of North Carolina aged seventy nine years May 5th last; who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named Officers & served as herein stated, viz.:

 

He states that he was born in Paxton Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania May 5th, 1753. [He] Has a record of his age. In the year 1772 he removed to North Carolina & settled in Randolph County (then a part of Guilford [County]) where he resided at the time he entered the Service of the United States. He states in the early part of the year 1779 perhaps the month of January, he volunteered for three months under Col Collier & Col Balfour. From the perilous condition of the Country, it was deemed expedient to raise some troopers; & he, with John Graham, who served with him through the whole of his revolutionary Service, agreed to arm & equip themselves as troopers, being informed by their commanding officers, that if they would do so, two months service as a

trooper, would be equivalent to three months service on foot. We were then placed under the command of Captain Thomas Dougan who commanded a troop of light horse. Our first service consisted in bringing in some drafted militia from the lower part of Randolph County, who were suspected of being inclined to join the Tories. We were employed in keeping down the Tories in the County of Randolph & in adjacent Counties; & our service was particularly dangerous & arduous being subject to being dispatched at the shortest notice on Tory expeditions in the most inclement weather & at all hours of the night. We however were not in any battle with the Tories previous to Gates' defeat [Horatio Gates' defeat at the battle of Camden]. After that disastrous defeat of the American Army at Camden, Young Davie [William Richardson Davie], then Colonel of the Cavalry & afterwards General also General Locke [Francis Locke] & General Davidson [William Lee Davidson], apprehensive of the ruinous consequences of that defeat, & the subsequent approach of Lord Cornwallis to North Carolina, thought

it best to raise as large a body of Cavalry as possible in this State; to which end they sent requisitions to Col Collier of Randolph (among others) to send a quota of Troopers. Whereupon Captain Dougan was ordered to joined Col Davie with his troop, which he did at or near General Locke's in Rowan County.

 

We then immediately marched to meet the invading army under Cornwallis; we met it at Charlotte where we had an engagement principally with the Cavalry, in which the brave & promising son of Genl Locke was killed by my side. We were compelled to retreat, being overpowered by numbers; our object being principally to harass & impede their march. We retreated to the neighborhood of Salisbury and the Phifer settlement. From this place we were marched under Davie to Rocky River in Mecklenburg County, the British being still in Charlotte. This engagement at Charlotte was about the

latter part of summer or first of the fall of 1780. We lay at Rocky River until the battle of King's Mountain, I think October 7th when Cornwallis retreated to South Carolina for reinforcements, & was pursued by Col Davie as far as the Catawba; & I was sent over the River with a reconnoitering party, & returning the same night found John Graham standing sentry. Colonel Davie thence marched us back to Mecklenburg, & finding his troop a good deal fatigued & exhausted with their active service, he thought as Cornwallis had left North Carolina, he would give us some respite. He accordingly gave us permission to quarter about in the neighborhood for a few days, with directions to assemble with energy & promptness. We did so, & he then marched us into South Carolina, near the Waxhaw (1 NPA S6936 ) Settlement, where we continued until we were dismissed. While there, we (Graham & myself) were sent out with a reconnoitering party, with direction to quarter with Mrs. Doby, a Whig lady, & to get what information we could respecting the movements of the enemy. When we returned to Camp we

found Genl Morgan [Daniel Morgan], Colonel (William Augustine) Washington of the Cavalry, & Colonel Howard [John Eager Howard] with his infantry who had joined Col Davie in our absence. At this place we were discharged, some time in the month of December 1781 [sic, 1780], so well as we can recollect for before our discharge Genl Morgan, with Col Washington & Col Howard, had left us & gone South & after our discharge some few weeks the battle of the Cowpens was fought.

 

We received no written discharge, for that was considered not so much a final discharge as a respite until again called on: for being troopers we held ourselves always ready. Up to this time we (Graham & myself) had served at the least nine months. Shortly after this I went with others to guard the property of many of the citizens across the Roanoke, & upon my return, it being understood by the Tories that Graham & myself had returned home, they came down upon us and made us prisoners & we were detained by them two days & nights: when by the generosity of Colonel Fields (a Tory Colonel) a quality very rare among them, we were discharged on parole: & thus saved in all probability from the halter or the dungeon. All of this occurred some short time before the battle of Guilford. Graham & myself were also in some other excursions after Tories, who had on one occasion inhumanely murdered my brother Henry; & one Tucker, but these excursions did not amount to much length of time, say one month although there was a considerable amount of danger in them.

 

I have resided since the revolution in this County & now reside in it. I have no documentary evidence of my service but expect to be able to prove some portions of it by Dan Merrell2 & can prove the whole of it by John Graham, who was my brother in arms throughout the whole of it. I can establish my reputation for revolutionary service by Genl George Hoover & Genl Alexander Gray & John Elder. I hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present & declare that my name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

S/ Joseph Johnston

 

We Dan Merrell & John Graham residing in Randolph County, State of North Carolina, hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Joseph Johnston who has subscribed & sworn to the preceding declaration; that we believe him to be 79 years of age: Dan Merrell certifies that he saw said Johnston on several occasion serving as a trooper before he was ordered South, saw him on his way South in Salisbury & also on his return after his discharge passing through Salisbury where he was stationed. John Graham certifies that Johnston served with him as he has stated in his declaration.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid.

 

S/ Dan Merrell

 

S/ John Graham

2 NPA S7222

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Joseph Johnston (Johnson) W5033

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

 

Captain Thomas Dougan

Brother Henry Johnson murdered by Tories

Dan Merrell

John Graham

Notes: 1751 Era: Just when the first Friends came to this “majestic wilderness” is unknown, but certainly there were a few here by 1751. That year Friends at Cane Creek in present Alamance County, comprising the first permanent meeting settled by the Pennsylvania Friends in North Carolina, requested a monthly meeting from the Perquimans and Little River meetings in eastern Carolina. Their petition stated: “There is Thirty Families and upwards of Friends settled in them Parts and Desire still in behalf of themselves and their Friends to have a Monthly Meeting settled amongst them.” Not surprisingly, the first piece of business to come before Cane Creek Monthly Meeting (October 7, 1751) was a request from Friends of New Garden for permission to hold a meeting for worship.

Notes: John Graham was born in Paxtung Township in Lancaster County, state of Pennsylvania on 1st November 1761, and has a record of his age. That he removed to Randolph County (then Guilford) in the year 1775. He also  served with Joseph Johnson in the Rev. War.
Notes: Constructed History Of Colonel Thomas Dougan
JOHN DOUGAN-“I entered the service…in the year 1778, the day and month I do not  recollect, in Randolph County, North Carolina, as a volunteer private, in a  volunteer company of horse militia commanded by Captain THOMAS DOUGAN, and served in said company to the best of my recollection, one year, during which time we were stationed at Bells Mill in said county of Randolph, as a public store of provisions, said BELL then being a Commissary to furnish provisions for the Army of the Revolution. During said service, I found my own horse, 
saddle, and bridle and guns.”
“Our company was raised for the purpose of guarding said public store, and suppressing the Tories and disaffected, with whom that county was then largely infected. During the year service aforesaid, we were employed in guarding said 
public store, and in detached companies in guarding provision wagons conveying provisions to said store, and in traversing the country looking out for Tories and protecting the country from their incursions.”
“At the end of the said year of service, said Captain DOUGAN was advanced to the rank of Major and WILLIAM GRAY, the ensign of said company was advanced to the rank of Captain of said company and took the command thereof. During said year service, the inferior officers commanding in said company under the said Captain DOUGAN, were Lieutenant WILLIAM CLARK and Ensign WILLIAM GRAY, above named. The said WILLIAM CLARK at the expiration of said year service, to the best of my recollection, resigned his post as lieutenant. One NEWLAND was commissioned Lieutenant in his stead, whose given name I do not recollect, and one JOSEPH CLARK was commissioned ensign in said company. I continued in said company under Captain GRAY, Lieutenant NEWLAND and Ensign CLARK, and served as 
a private until the termination of the war, during which time we were stationed at Bells Mill, when not engaged in active service, until the latter part of 1782, to the best of my recollection. After that time until the close of the war, we were stationed when not engaged in active service, at the home of Colonel EDWARD SHARP, in County of Randolph, during all of which time I found my own horse, saddle and bridle, and arms. 
“The first active service during said latter period of my service was a short time after Captain GRAY took the command of said company. We were ordered out under the command of Colonel JOHN COLLIER and Lieutenant ANDREW BALFOUR of County of Randolph, with a number of volunteers, in all about sixty men. We marched about twenty-five miles towards the east end of said named county to oppose a company of Tories under the command of one Colonel FANNEN [FANNING], a Tory Colonel who was embodying a Tory force in the county adjoining below ours. 
The second night after leaving our station, we encamped at the house of one JOHN NEEDHAM. During the night, we were attacked by Colonel FANNING and his Tory force. After a short conflict, we repulsed them with two of their men 
killed and four or five wounded. The next morning we pursued Colonel FANNING and two days after the conflict, we came upon one Captain MICHAEL ROBBINS, a Tory captain with ten or twelve Tories under his command. We dispersed them 
with three of their men killed. We then returned to our station at Bells Mill.”
                    “The next active service we were engaged in was three or four months after the last named expedition, we were ordered out in the fall, I think in September [the year I cannot recollect], against the Highland Scotch of North 
Carolina, who were embodying a Tory force sixty or seventy miles from our station in the highlands of said state. We were joined by one Colonel SAUNDERS of Wake County, North Carolina, with a body of over one hundred men. Said 
Colonel SAUNDERS took the command of the whole, and marched us into the highlands and across Cape Fear River. We stole a march on the Tories by marching all night one night, and took fourteen prisoners. Our company was 
ordered to guard and did guard the prisoners to Hillsborough in Orange County, North Carolina, the District jail. We lodged the prisoners in jail and returned to our station.”
“Another piece of service we rendered occurred a few weeks previous to the last named expedition (I did not think of it when I related the last named expedition), was in defending the public store at our station. The store was 
attacked by one Captain EDWARD FRANKLIN (a Tory captain commissioned by Lord CORNWALLIS) and his company about fifteen in number. We repulsed them and the next day we pursued them, overtook them, and killed FRANKLIN (the captain) and one of his men, and dispersed the company.”
“The next active service that I now recollected that we were engaged in, I think occurred in March 1782 (the spring after Lord CORNWALLIS surrendered). Captain FANNING and his company consisting of forty or fifty Tories came into 
our county and ravaged the country and killed Lieutenant Colonel BALFOUR and Captain JOHN BRYAN in their own houses and burned my mothers house and barn (she being a widow), Colonel COLLIERs and Esquire MILLIGANs houses. We pursued them and overtook them and put them to flight, but the day being wet, 
our guns missed fire, so that we only wounded two men.”
                    “The next piece of active service and the last service I did during the war occurred as follows: Colonel ELROD, Captain MICHAEL ROBBINS and Captain SAMUEL STILL, Tory officers, were passing through said county of Randolph. They killed one young man and wounded another. We pursued them several days and our 
company separated into two parties. One part of the company overtook them, and killed Colonel ELROD and Captain STILL. The part of the company I was in was not present when they were killed. We marched over one hundred miles over the Blue Ridge, from thence we returned to the station at Colonel SHARPs, and 
shortly afterwards were disbanded.”
                    “I cannot now state positively whether I received a discharge from my captain. But I do recollect that vouchers for my services were placed in the hands of my older brother, THOMAS DOUGAN, who took them to Hillsborough, North Carolina and purchased land for me with them. To the best of my recollection, 
the rate of pay that I received was twelve dollars per month for my services…
etc.”
EDWARD BEESON-“He entered the service as a volunteer from the state of North Carolina, Guilford County, now Randolph. It was the spring of the year 1778, as he believes. DAVID BROWER was his captain, JAMES WOODS-Lieutenant, this deponent ensign. ROBERT MCLEAN was their major, THOMAS DOUGAN, colonel, BUTLER- 
general. Their object was the destruction of the Tories. Next day, after they left Johnsonville, their place of rendezvous, their captain and three men were killed by the Tories who waylaid them (the Tories were commanded by Major 
RAINS) and fired on them from a steep hill on the side of Brush Creek.”
“After BROWER was killed, WOODS became captain and this deponent Lieutenant. They pursued the Tories about forty miles to Fork? Creek, and there besieged them in a house belonging to one JOHN NEEDHAM. In the morning before they got to NEEDHAMs, their colonel (DOUGAN) joined them. This deponent was then ordered with half of his company to the back of the house under a concealment of an orchard, while the rest were to attack in front. This deponents company were the first who took possession of the same, those in front having feigned a retreat to draw out the Tories, which accordingly succeeded. Twenty-one were killed, seven at the house and fourteen at the place where they kept the 
horses, the Tories having fled there, to where they were concealed on the bank of Deep River. And where Colonel DOUGAN himself had gone with a detachment to surprise them if they should be driven from the house.”
“They then marched down to Cape Fear (or Fair)Town and from there to the Brown Marsh near Wilmington, where they again had to battle with the Tories on open ground. They there (again) defeated the Tories who being reinforced by the 
British from their shipping at Fort Johnson, they returned and defeated us in turn. From thence they (the Americans) returned by Cape Fear to Guilford (now Randolph). At this time they were out three months and were discharged.”
“His next term of service was again as a volunteer. This he believes was the next year. At this time they were roused by the Tories who came and burned Colonel DOUGANs house, and Colonel BALFOURs house, at the same time killing 
Colonel BALFOUR. They also killed JOHN BROWN and burned his house. Also MILLICANs and COLLIERs houses were burned. They pursued them under the command of Colonel BLETCHER (or BLEECHER) [Brashear?], this deponent being still captain and remaining so until the close of the war, the same lieutenant and ensign were with him at this time as at the last.”
                    DAVID EIRWIN-      “That in the summer of the year succeeding the Battle of Camden, the declarant again volunteered into the company commanded by Captain YORK, while residing in the place aforesaid, for three months, to serve as a private in the light horse. The principle object or rather cause of raising this company was to watch a body of disaffected, or Tories, commanded by one Colonel FANNING, and to which a brother of this declarant belonged, by the name of JOHN ERWIN, some years older than declarant and who resided about 20 miles from his fathers residence. The company assembled at Captain YORKs. He does not recollect any other officer, except one Colonel DOUGAN was occasionally with the company. They were constantly engaged in their scouts or marches. The declarant with the company went down Deep River, up and down Tar River and Cane Creek in pursuit of FANNING. Near the close of the campaign, they came down on one side of Deep River and discovered FANNINGs forces on the 
opposite bank. There were shots exchanged from each side of the two forces, but owing to the width of the river at that place, no harm or injury resulted to either party. At the close of the expedition, he received a discharge from 
Captain YORK, which he has lost, certifying his faithful service for three months in this last campaign.”
 
WILBOURNE GIBSON-“I was drafted into the service of the United States in Randolph County, North Carolina in the spring of 1781. The precise month and day I do not recollect, and served for and during the term of three months. The 
captain of the company in which I served was John KNIGHT, Colonel [THOMAS] DOUGAN, Major [JAMES] DOUGAN, brothers. Names of the sergeants and corporals not now remembered. When my term of service was ended, I received from Captain JOHN KNIGHT, a regular discharge and considering it as no value or importance whatever, and being totally unlearned, it has long ago been lost and destroyed.”
“Under the command of the aforesaid officers, I was out on scouting expedition most of the time in and through the counties of Randolph, Rockingham, Stokes and Guilford, and was in several skirmishes with the Tories, but no general 
engagement. Colonel FANNING, as he was called, was the Tory that we were after most of the time, as he was constantly destroying of property, burning of houses, etc.”
“I recollect on one evening we were in a little town called Hillsborough, and were compelled to leave it for the want of provision, and on that very night, this Tory, FANNING took the town and all the inhabitants were made prisoners, 
and one genl, General TYRON, among the rest, and on that same night our company formed behind a fence along the road to take them by surprise, but we were afraid to fire for fear of killing our own friends who were prisoners, and 
so we mounted our horses which had been hitched back in the edge of the woods and retreated, and on the next day we had a skirmish at Mendenhalls Mill, in which we were defeated, but Colonel FANNING got his arm broke, etc…”
“The houses of John KNIGHT and Col. and Major DOUGAN, and many? other houses 
were destroyed by this same FANNING.”
 
JOHN GRAHAM-“He states that he entered the service of the United States with JOSEPH JOHNSTON, at the same time and under the same officers (to wit), he volunteered for three months under Captain THOMAS DOUGAN, Colonel BALFOUR and Colonel COLLIER, and armed and equipped himself for the light horse service, and joined the troop which the said Captain DOUGAN commanded. He states that this was early in the year 1779, and that the circumstances of his service so far as he can recollect them, are accurately detailed in the declaration of the said JOSEPH JOHNSTON, to which he begs leave to refer, and to adopt so far as these are concerned, as his own, deeming it unnecessary here to recapitulate them. He declares that his service amounted in all, to the best of his recollection to ten months; and that neither he nor JOHNSTON was in any important service in which both were not engaged.”
JOHN MERRILL-“That in the year 1781, he volunteered at the courthouse in Randolph County in the light horse under the command of Captain THOMAS DOUGAN, Major JAMES DOUGAN, and Colonel JOHN COLLIER. That they ranged about the country. That at that time the company with whom he served had a rencounter with Tories in the County of Guilford on the 15th day of April 1781, where he received a severe wound with a sword on his head, the marks of which are now to be seen. His brothers [BENJAMIN MERRILL] horse was shot under him, and his captain, then JOHN KNIGHT, received two balls in his head. About the 30th of July, 1781, he received his discharge as may appear by the discharge herewith filed, marked B.”
                    “After that time, he never was regularly in the service, tho scouting parties and some rencounters with the Tories…I know no one who can testify to my services but my brother BENJAMIN MERRILL, who was with me on my tours, but he is now sick and unable to come here.”
 
SAMUEL JACKSON, -lived in Guilford County at enlistment, served under Col. DOUGAN, Capt. JAMES BELL, Capt. COLLIER. Widow was able to provide few details. Was in the Battle of Guilford, and was a guard protecting the baggage wagon.
 
ROBERT MOORE-[This is probably not the same Thomas Dougan. No one else has mentioned this tour, and it may overlap some of the previously described periods of time.] “In the month of September 1780, I went out as a substitute 
for MALICA DICKERSON, who was drafted for the term of three months (the said DICKERSON having hired me to perform the tour for him), so I again entered the service of the United States as a substitute some time in the month of 
September 1780 in Randolph County, state of North Carolina, for the term of three months under Captain THOMAS DOUGAN. The company marched from Randolph to Salisbury and there joined Colonel DAVIEs regiment. Then they marched to Charlotte and was there when CORNWALLIS entered that place. When there was a slight skirmish, CORNWALLIS retreated to Camden. We went in pursuit. On the route, I took the smallpox. The rest of the companys time was out and discharged before my recovery. He therefore got no discharge.”
                    “After the Battle of Guilford when CORNWALLIS retreated through Virginia, I joined a light horse company in Randolph County, North Carolina under Captain THOMAS DOUGAN and Colonel EDWARD SHARPE, for the purpose of keeping down the Tories who would, every chance, rise up against the interest of the United States. In this capacity, I served from time to time as my services may be called for until the end of the war."
 
 
Additional Comments:
Constructed History is my term for a soldier who did not file for a pension himself, but about whom there is enough evidence from other soldiers to form an equivalent to a pension application. Most of the testimony comes from other men 
mentioning the officer or non-comm. officer, but in some cases, the actual soldier himself testified on behalf of other men, thus revealing his own history.
File at: http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/nc/guilford/military/revwar/pensions/dougan313gmt 

 

 

ROBERT JOHNSTON

 

Robert Johnston: S38872 Cont Line PA: applied 1818 June 29 Frederick Co. Va age 65 however on 1820 Aug 14 he gave his age as 68 and stated he had no family and he had enlisted at Lancaster Co. PA soldier died 1832 Dec 10: Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files