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ABEL JOHNSON

 

Abel Johnson wife Ann R5600 NC Line: A Son Henry Johnson applied 1845 May 28 Johnston Co. NC and stated he was born 1779 June 6 and stated soldier died abt 1821 age 61 and widow died 1838 April 9: that his parents married in Cumberland CO NC in 1777. Widow died leaving children: Henry Johnson, Amos Johnson and Nancy Johnson who married Jessy Wellons. Soldier and widow had 1 child 13 months older than Henry Johnson but that child died ( no name given) One david Dupree age 38 made affdt 1846  Aug 31 in Wake Co NC that his mother Sally Johnson Dupree was soldiers daughter and her husband was Peter Dupree. Soldiers daughter Sally Johnson was born 1782 or 1783 Aug 11, and he stated she had 3 brothers older then her towit Jonathan Johnson, Henry Johnson, and Samuel Johnson and their were 4 younger children Amos Johnson, Nancy Johnson, Elizabeth Johnson and Edith Johnson, one Wm Coats was administrator of the widow’s estate 1856 July 26. Pg 1840 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, Johnston County

 

 This day personally appeared before me the undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for

said County Henry Johnson a resident of said County and made oath in due form of law that he was born on the 6th day of June 1779 agreeable to the family record of his Father Abel Johnson and that the Testament sent to the pension office of J H Kirkham does contain his age so by that age he has mustered work on the road and paid taxes -- but that the Testament does not contain his Father's family record but that his age was taken from his Father's record and wrote by his Brother in law in said testament by his request many years ago -- and that his said Father’s old family record has been lost and not seen or heard of and 10 or 12 years and he further saith on his oath that he has no way of proving the marriage of his said Father and Mother that this and the other proof he has already sent to the pension office sworn to and subscribed before this 30th of October 1845.

 

Attest: N. Bryan, JP S/ Henry Johnson, X his mark

 

State of North Carolina, Johnston County

 

 On this the 28 day of May 1845 personally appeared in open Court Henry Johnson a

resident of the County and State aforesaid and maketh the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed July 4 1836 And being first duly Sworn according to law doth declare on his said oath that he will be 66 years old the 6th day of this coming June (next month) that he is the son of Ann Johnson who was the widow of Abel Johnson who was a Soldier in the Revolution War in the Militia Service in the State of North Carolina for 2 years as he has often heard him say a great many times and he further saith that his said father has often told him and others of the soldiers in service with him to wit Barney Johnson Jacob Mathews Hardy Matthews or Mathis and he further states that he has heard him speak of his Captain by the name of Eben Folsum of being under his Command and that his father Abel Johnson has been dead about 24 years and was at the time of his death about 64 years old and

 

Further states that his said Father and Mother was married in Cumberland County in said State as he has always understood in the year 1777 And Distinctly Recollects of hearing his father speak of being in the Revolutionary Service at the close of the war and under the said Captain Isrel Folsum or Eben Folsom And he further Declares that his said Mother Ann Johnson Remained a widow from the day of her said Husbands death up to the time of her death which occurred on the 9 day of April 1838 and that she was at the time of her death -- 79 years old and that she married after the death of her said Husband Abel Johnson but died the widow of the said Abel Johnson in said County And he further declares on his said oath that his said mother Ann Johnson never made application for a pension During her life and that his mother's maiden name before she was married to her said Husband was a Miss Ann Johnson and declares that the following named children are all that survived his said mother Ann Johnson the widow of the said Abel Johnson Deceased their names to wit myself Henry Johnson Amos Johnson and Nancy Johnson who married Jessy Wellons and further he saith on his said oath that his said Father had by his mother one child older than himself by 13 months as he has always understood by his father and mother which died and he further saith that he was never apprised of the fact that he was entitled to a pension or pay extending to him for his father's services in the Revolution War until very Recently also nor never knew until recently that his said mother would have been entitled to pay for her said Husband's services in the Revolution War and he further states his place of Residence was in Johnson County [sic, Johnston County] said State where he lived, and died in further states that the family Record has been lost or mislaid for many years past. And that he is now in right of himself and Brothers and sister Relinquishes every claim to a pension except the present

Sworn and subscribed in open Court the day and year above written before me in said Court.

Test: S/ Thos. Bagley, Clk S/ Henry Johnson, X his mark

 

State of North Carolina, Johnson County [sic, Johnston County] May 30 1845

This day personally appeared before me R. H. Stevens [?], one of the Justices of the

peace in and for the County and State aforesaid Mr Rubin Barber a Soldier of the Revolutionary War and a resident of the County and State of North Carolina and first being duly sworn according to law deposeth and saith that he is in his 83[rd] year of his age and a soldier of the Revolutionary War under the following captains William Hunter Captain Hardy Bryant and Robert Hy and was very intimately acquainted with Abel Johnson in the Revolutionary war and was late soldier in the said War with him in Cumberland County And further states that he saw him this side of Cape Fear [River] and also on the other side of Cape Fear River in service in the

said war of the American Revolutionary War and left him in Service And further states that he was very intimately acquainted with his wife before he married her who was a Miss Ann Johnson and was also acquainted with the said Abel Johnson before he married the said Miss Ann Johnson but did not see them married, and from his earliest Recollection they lived as man and wife and never in his life heard it disputed but what they were legally married, and was intimately acquainted with their first child -- and those 3 now living which are the only surviving children of their Father & mother Abel Johnson and his widow Ann Johnson who are both dead leaving only surviving them Henry Johnson Amos Johnson Nancy Johnson who married one Jessy Wellons -- the deponent further affirms in Cumberland County in said State was where he

saw the said Abel Johnson in service in the Revolutionary war and the 3 children above named are all that survived and Johnson aforesaid.

Further the deponent saith not. Sworn to and subscribed before me the day and year first

above written.

 

S/ R. W. Stevens, JP S/ Reuben Barber1

 

1 Will Graves could not find a pensioner by this name (or any similar name) who claimed to have service in NC during the Revolution.

 

State of North Carolina, Johnston County this 6th day of September 1845 personally appeared before me R W Stevens one of the acting Justices of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Session for said County Mr. Rubin Barber a Soldier of the Revolutionary War who being first duly sworn according to law deposeth and say on his said oath that he is in his 83 [rd] year of his age & he was very intimately acquainted with Abel Johnson and his wife before their marriage -- and after their marriage and before the Revolutionary War & [indecipherable word] he was and saw him and was with him the said Johnson in the War.

Question was this said Johnson and Ann Johnson of father and mother of those children making application for a pension, they are their Identical children what are their names Henry Johnson Amos Johnson and Nancy Wellons.

 

Was the said Henry Johnson Born before you and his father Abel Johnson was in service in the War together. He was what time was it that you were in service with his father in the year 1781 & 1782 why do you know so well the time.

 

Ans [answer] I am very positive it was after Lord Corn Wallice [sic Cornwallis] passed through Fayetteville in NC on his way to North.

 

Then you are positive that the said Abel Johnson and his wife who was Miss Ann Johnson were married and had children before you and him were in service together,

 

ans [answer] I am very positive as to that fact. I was living in the immediate neighborhood when they were married, and I saw their children before we went into Service.

 

Where was it you were in service with the said Abel Johnson,

 

in Cumberland County NC on this side of Cape Fear River & on the other side of the River, we separated or parted and I saw the said Abel Johnson no more until after the war, and further this deponent saith not. -- Sworn to and subscribed before me the day & year first above written.

 

S/ R. W. Stevens, JP S/ Reuben Barber

 

 State of North Carolina, Johnston County October 1st 1849

 

 This day personally appeared before me the Undersigned an acting Justice of the Court of Pleas and quarter Sessions for said County & State aforesaid old Mr. Wiley Johnson aged 85 years of age, who being first duly sworn according to law depose as follows That he is informed that the pension department require proof of Service and marriage of Abel Johnson & his wife and Johnson this is to inform Said department that he the deponent Wiley Johnson is the Brother of said Abel Johnson and recollects distinctly that his said Brother was a married man and had 2 children at the time of the Battle of Guilford Court house in the State of North Carolina during the Revolutionary War and that his said Brother was at said battle at Guilford Court house & was at the close of the war & served 2 years.

 

This deponent states that he is the younger brother of his father & mother & Amos Johnson who had 3 sons older than himself and that his said Brother Abel Johnson was about 7 years older than himself who died about 29 years ago and that his wife died about the date 1838 and that Henry Johnson made application for a pension a few years ago is the son of Abel Johnson & Anne his wife and that also Nancy Wellons & Amos Johnson are also their lawful children all 3 of whom survived their mother

 

Deponent further states that he knew his said brother's Abel Johnson's wife before he married her who was a Miss Ann Johnson & did serve after their marriage his 2 years. Sworn to & subscribed before me.

 

S/ H. H. Finch, JP S/ Wiley Johnson, X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Abel Johnson R5600 Ann fn74NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/19/08

 

1777: married Abel Johnson wife Ann R5600 NC Line: A Son Henry Johnson applied 1845 May 28 Johnston Co. NC and stated he was born 1779 June 6 and stated soldier died abt 1821 age 61 and widow died 1838 April 9: that his parents married in Cumberland CO NC in 1777. Widow died leaving children: Henry Johnson, Amos Johnson and Nancy Johnson who married Jessy Wellons. Soldier and widow had 1 child 13 months older than Henry Johnson but that child died (no name given)

Barney Johnson

Jacob Mathews

Hardy Matthews or Mathis

Jessy Wellons

Mr. Rubin Barber

Mr. Wiley Johnson

 

ABNER JOHNSON

 

Abner Johnson and wife Nancy R5649 NC Line: Soldier applied 1832 Sept 22: Muary Co. Tn age 73, he lived in Guilford Co NC at enlistment. Widow applied 1852 Oct 11 Maury Co. Tn. Soldier and widow had married 1783 March 14 and soldier died 1850 Oct 22: One Sarah Johnson widow of William Johnson a brother of Abner Johnson was of Maury Co. Tn age 77 in 1832 Pg 1840 . Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 [Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Tennessee, Maury County: Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions September Term 1832

 

 On this 22nd day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions for Maury County Tennessee now sitting Abner Johnson a resident of said County of Maury and State of Tennessee, Aged 73 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

 He entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated -- In the year 1777 (and as well as he can remember in the month of October of that year) he volunteered in Guilford County North Carolina under Captain John Nelson who was a militia Captain in his neighborhood, -- and when the men were called for all who did not volunteer to make up the number wanted were to be drafted, -- this deponent volunteered -- and as did all the rest, except one who was drafted -- the name of the Lieutenant was Charles Hughes & the name of the Ensign was George Parks, -- and this deponent & one Allen Walker were sergeants of the company; -- his company belonged to Colonel Paisley's Regiment -- which together with Colonel Saunders’ Regiment from Granville County NC were under the command of General Rutherford. The place of rendezvous was Guilford Court House, and after Colonel

Saunders’ Regiment got to that place -- they all marched to South Carolina, -- and on the March they passed through the towns of Salisbury & Charlotte (as he supposes) N.C. and Camden in S.C. to a place called Smokey Camp near a little village called Purrysburg on Savannah River, from which after some time, they were marched to a place called the black swamp and then to a place called the Two Sisters [ferry] -- and several times changed this camp. Whilst he was out on this campaign General Lincoln commanded the Regulars in that part of the Country. During the same campaign General Ashe was defeated at Briar Creek; -- during the time he was out they were a part of the time in the country between Augusta & Savannah on the Savannah River, -- and were occasionally on the Georgia side; he was in no regular battle, -- but there were some

little skirmishes with the British & Tories. The length of this service he cannot state with

positive certainty, -- he knows it was more than 5 months, -- and he thinks he was absent from home more than 6 months, -- he knows that after he volunteered in October -- they were marched a few days after the 7th of November, he thinks about the 10th of November; he remembers a particular circumstance that took place on the 7th and he knows it was 2 or 3 days afterwards that the troops were rendezvoused. And his time was out either on the 10th of April or the 10th of May following & he cannot after so great a lapse of time be positively certain which. When the time was out the troops were discharged and he came home with his Captain who was Captain

John Nelson and who lived in the same neighborhood with him, -- and whether he ever received a written discharge or not he cannot now remember. He knows he served out the time and was dismissed with the other troops, and if he received a written discharge he does not know what has become of it. --

 

After this campaign was over, but the precise date or year he cannot remember with

certainty, -- he was again engaged in the public service as follows; -- he lived in the same County (Guilford County NC) with Governor Martin who was then Governor of the State. -- There was a call for men to guard the Governor against the Tories and British, from his residence to a place called Nutbush where the assembly was to meet, and this service was to stand as a 3 months tour of duty as he now believes; This deponent volunteered in this service -- as they were requested to do by the Governor, and went with him to the place where the assembly was to meet, where they

remained some time, but in consequence of the times being troublesome a sufficient number of members did not meet to make an assembly -- when they were dismissed & returned home.

 

After this term was over he again volunteered & went with the Governor to a place called the Moravian Town or Salem where the assembly was to meet, -- and after getting there waiting some time a sufficient number of members failed to attend to make a house. They were again dismissed & sent home. This last tour was also to stand as another tour of duty of 3 months, -- as the Governor told them. These were the only regular tours of duty which he performed during the revolutionary war; -- except in scouting parties in several of which he was engaged against the Tories.

 

 He states that he has no documentary written evidence of his services; and that he knows

of no other person whose testimony he can procure, except that of David Dobbins,1 Gideon Johnson 2 & Sarah Johnston whose testimony of companies this declaration.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid.

S/ Thos. J. Porter, Clerk S/ Abner Johnson

 

[Robert Mack and William Pillow gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

State of Tennessee, Maury County: Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions September Term 1832 This day personally appeared in open court David Dobbins who made oath that he was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary war -- that he is well acquainted with Abner Johnston [sic] the present applicant -- that he has had much conversation with him upon the subject of his services in the revolutionary war -- that from many circumstances spoken of by him as having happened & occurred during the war & he entertains no doubt but that he was in the revolutionary war. He is well acquainted with him & would place full & entire confidence in his statements upon his oath. He thinks he served a tour in which he himself was & that this tour was 6 months long.

Sworn to September 1832 in open Court. S/ David Dobbins

S/ Thos. J. Porter, Clk

State of Tennessee, Maury County: Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions Term 1832

 

1 FPA S1805

 

2 Gideon Johnson S4456

 

 This day personally appeared in open Court Gideon Johnston [sic] a resident of

Williamson County who made oath that he was in the Revolutionary War with Abner Johnston [sic] the above applicant -- that he knows the fact that the said Abner was also a Soldier of the revolution -- that Affiant entertains no doubt but that Abner Johnston served as a Soldier in the revolutionary war at the least is long as he and his declaration has stated. This affiant was with the said Abner in the tour with the Governor to Nutbush. He has heard the above declaration of

 

Abner Johnston read & believes it to be substantially true. He is well acquainted with said Abner & knows that he has always been reputed to have been a soldier of the Revolution where he lived. This Affiant is now in his 78th year.

 

 Sworn to in open court September 22, 1832.

 

S/ Thos. J. Porter, Clk S/ Gideon Johnson

 

 State of Tennessee, Maury County

 

 Came personally before me, Alexander Johnson, a Justice of the peace in and for said

County Sarah Johnson, widow of William Johnson, now in the 77th year of her age, & infirm, too much so to attend to Court with convenience; who being by me Examined touching her Recollection of Abner Johnson's Serving as a Soldier in the Revolutionary war, in Substance deposeth and saith -- that the said Abner Johnson, a brother of her deceased husband, William Johnson, was a single man, and living immediately in the neighborhood of deponent & her husband, on Dan River, Rockingham County (then Guilford County) North Carolina, was much, & often at the house of Deponent, during the Revolutionary war; that she distinctly Recollects that the said Abner Johnson was absent, & said to be, & she has no doubt was in the Service of his Country. She never then, nor since, has ever heard it called in Question but that the same Abner Johnson, took an active part in defense of his Country; during that war; but cannot recollect how many tours, nor how long he served. Further deponent saith that she having long

been acquainted with said Abner Johnson, unhesitatingly can say, that his general character is, and has been, that of a man of undoubted truth. Further this deponent saith not.

 

[September 17, 1832] S/ Sarah Johnson

 

S/ Alex: Johnson, JP

 

 

 

[On October 11, 1852 in Maury County, Tennessee, Nancy Johnson, widow of Abner, filed for a widow’s pension stating that her husband was a pensioner of the United States for his revolutionary services; that she married him on March 14, 1783; that he died October 22, 1850 and that she has remained a widow ever since]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Abner Johnson R5649A Nancy fn27NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08

 

David Dobbins,

Gideon Johnson

Sarah Johnston

William Pillow

Abner Johnson

1776-1793 ERA SAMUEL CARUTHERS-“That he entered the service in the County of Guilford  and state of North Carolina wherein he then resided, as a volunteer in the  militia service under Captain JOHN NELSON, Lieutenant CHARLES HUGHES and Ensign 
LOVETT REED and attached to Colonel WILLIAM? [probably supposed to be John] PAISLEYs regiment for five months. He cannot recollect the date but is very certain that it was the same year that the battle was fought at Stono [per Heitman, 1779], that from Guilford Courthouse he marched under the before mentioned officers to Salisbury, from thence to Charlotte Courthouse, where he joined General RUTHERFORDs brigade, & Colonel ___ LOCK. From Charlotte, we 
marched on to Purysburg in South Carolina. We joined General LINCOLN on the Savannah River, that he was stationed at Purysburg for ___ weeks.”
“That his lieutenant CHARLES HUGHES beat up for volunteers & that he turned out under the said lieutenant & crossed the Savannah River & went over in the state of Georgia & joined Colonel LYTLE and General ASHE & just got there in time & had a battle with the British & Tories at a place known by the name of Briar Creek, in Georgia [per Heitman, March 3, 1779]. And after the Battle at Briar Creek he returned under the said Lieutenant HUGHES and joined General 
RUTHERFORDs army, & then was marched to a place called Sisters Ferry on the  same river in South Carolina, & from there he marched under his said Captain NELSON back to North Carolina & County of Guilford. That he well knows that he was called out in the month of October & did not return until some time in April thereafter, making six months. That he was discharged by his officers, but did not take a written discharge owing to the fact that his officers lived in the same neighborhood with himself.”
 
ABNER JOHNSON-“In the year 1777 (and as well as he can remember) in the month of October of that year, volunteered in Guilford County, North Carolina under Captain JOHN NELSON, who was a captain in his neighborhood, and when the men were called for, all who did not volunteer to make up the number wanted were to be drafted, this deponent volunteered, and so did all the rest, except one who was drafted. The name of the lieutenant was CHARLES HUGHES and the name of the ensign was GEORGE PARKS, and this deponent and one ALLEN WALKER were sergeants of the company. His company belonged to Colonel PAISLEYs regiment, which 
together with Colonel SAUNDERS regiment from Granville County, NC were under the command of General RUTHERFORD.”
“The place of rendezvous was Guilford Courthouse, and after Colonel SAUNDERS regiment got to that place, they all marched to South Carolina, and on the march they passed through the towns of Salisbury and Charlotte in NC (as he 
supposes) and Camden in SC to a place called Smokey Camp, near a little village called Purysburg (as deponent recalls), from which, after some time, they were marched to a place called the Black Swamp, and then to a place called the Two 
Sisters and several times changed this camp.”
“Whilst he was out on this campaign, General LINCOLN commanded the regulars in that part of the country. During the same campaign General ASHE was defeated at Briar Creek [per Heitman, March 3, 1779]. During the time he was out, they were a part of the time in the country between Augusta and Savannah on the Savannah River and served occasionally on the Georgia side. He was in no battle, but there were some little skirmishes with the British and Tories. The length of this service, he cannot state with positive certainty. He knows it was more than five months and he thinks he was absent from home more than six months.”
“He knows that after he volunteered in October, they were marched a few days after the 7th of November. He remembers a particular circumstance that took place on the 7th and he knows it was two or three days afterwards that the 
troops were under way, and that their time was out either on the 10th of April or the 10th of May following. He cannot after as great a lapse of time be positively certain which. When the time was out, the troops were discharged and he came home with his captain, who was Captain JOHN NELSON, and who lived in the same neighborhood with him, and whether he received a written discharge or not he cannot now remember. He knows he served out the time and was dismissed 
with the other troops…”
 
LOVETT REED-““He was drafted for five months and entered the service in the militia in Guilford County, North Carolina in the company commanded by Captain ___ NELSON, Lieutenant CHARLES HUGHES and ensign ___ MCBRIDE (he thinks JAMES). He was marched from Guilford County to Salisbury where he thinks he fell in with General RUTHERFORD. He at all events, was under the command of General RUTHERFORD during all this time of service and was in the regiment commanded by Colonel PAISLEY. Colonel LOCKE was along but declarant thinks he was under 
Colonel PAISLEYs command.”
                    “From Salisbury he was marched to Camden, SC, from there across Santee River passing by a place called Bacons Bridge and to the Savannah River where the British had possession on the Georgia side. This was just above a little town called Purysburg and near a place called the Two Sisters. General ASHE was also on this expedition. He crossed the Savannah River with his forces and had a battle with the British at the mouth of Briar Creek  [per Heitman, June 20, 1779] on the Georgia side of the Savannah in which he was defeated.”
“Declarant served out his term, being some times at one place and sometime at another along the river, which was for five months, and was discharged by Captain NELSON at Camp Turkey Hill on the 16th of March. He cannot remember the year in which he performed in this term of service, but refers to Ashes Defeat at Briar Creek to fix the date, as his defeat then happened during this time of declarants service. Declarant was a sergeant in Captain NELSONs company for part of the time during the foregoing tour but cannot remember how long. He claims nothing additional on account of it.”
 
Additional Comments:
Constructed History is my term for a soldier who did not file for a pension himself, but about whom there is enough evidence from other soldiers to form an equivalent to a pension application. Most of the testimony comes from other men mentioning the officer or non-comm. officer, but in some cases, the actual soldier himself testified on behalf of other men, thus revealing his own history.
 

File at: http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/nc/guilford/military/revwar/pensions/hughes331gmt

Notes: lieutenant  CHARLES HUGHES

Notes: LOVETT REED

Notes: GEORGE PARKS

Notes: Allen Walker
 

 

ABRAM JOHNSON

 

Abram Johnson S8770 NC Line: Soldier was born 1761 Sept 30 in Martin Co. NC he lived there at enlistment and he applied there 1832 Oct 12. Pg 1840 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 Abram Johnston [sic] of the County of Martin & State of North Carolina being sworn on the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God deposeth & saith as follows.

 

 I was born in the County of Martin & have resided in said County ever since -- According to the record of my parents on the 30th September 1761 -- I performed service in the Revolutionary War a little more than 6 months the exact time I will not state with certainty. I volunteered under Colonel Kenneth McKensie to the best of my knowledge about 1st April 1780. I was marched out of the County under the command of Captain Francis Ward but at Tarborough in this State he resigned & left us & our company was attached to an Edgecombe Company & we

were commanded by Captain Exum Phillips. The Regiment by Colonel Benjamin Exum -- And the whole under General Caswell. I cannot exactly recollect where we joined the Main Army but when we arrived the whole Army was under the command of General Gates. We were marched about considerable until finally we encamped at Col. Rugeley's Mill. We arrived here about the middle of the afternoon preceding the battle of Camden. From this place we were marched soon after dark with orders to preserve perfect silence in the battle commenced before day. After a sharp conflict the militia to which I was attached was routed & I in company with 2 or 3 acquaintances now no more retreated & made the best of our way to join the Army in our rear.

We succeeded in reaching it on Haw River & encamped at Ramsay's Mills. Here I was taken sick and was among the number that was left at this place when the Army left it. From this place the sick was conveyed to Chatham Court House and our remained here until I was discharged.

The original discharge that I received at this place from Colonel Scurlock is hereunto annexed --

 

 I know of no other persons by whom I can prove my service to the affidavits of those

annexed -- whose testimony I can procure with convenience. I have never received a pension from any government & I hereby relinquish my right to any except under the provisions of this

Act of Congress of some of June 1832.

 

 I refer to the annexed affidavit for evidence of my character for veracity.

 

 Sworn to & subscribed before me in open Court at the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions

held for the County of Martin at the Court House in Williamson the 12th day of October 1832.

 

S/ Laurence Cherry, Chairman S/ Abram Johnson

 

[Joseph Biggs Senior, a clergyman, and Matthew Griffin gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 

 

“I have inspected Abram Johnson & found him incapible [sic] of doing the duty of a soldier [one or more indecipherable words] by various infirmities,

 

10 Oct 1780 S/ Jas. [? Could be Jos.] Worth, Senr.

 

In Consequence of D. Worths opinion Abram Johnson is discharged by order of the Board of war, S/ [illegible word]* Scurlock, Lt. Col.

 

 S/ Turner Mason, Lieut.”

 

* looks like “Meal”

 


 

State of North Carolina, Martin County

 

 Matthew Griffin personally appeared in open Court & being sworn deposeth & saith that

he served 3 months during the Revolutionary War. He distinctly recollects that Abram Johnson served the tour preceding his & that he joined the Army when this Deponent was at Ramsay's Mills. When this Deponent was marched from this place Abram Johnson was left there sick.

 

Sworn to & subscribed in open Court that the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions at Williamson the 12th of October 1832. S/ Matthew Griffin

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Abram Johnson S8770 fn17NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08

 

Joseph Biggs Senior

Matthew Griffin

Matthew Griffin
 

ALEXANDER JOHNSON

 

Alexander Johnson wife Jane: R5631 Va Line: Widow applied 1838 Oct 15 Ross Co. Ohio age 81: Soldier had enlisted in Fauquier Co. Va and he married there to Jane (?) 1779 Jan 21 soldier died 1819 July 4 Ross Co. Ohio, a Son Simon Johnson aged 54 and a daughter Susannah Minney aged 60 both of Ross CO. Ohio made joint affdt 1852 July 5 and stated they were 2 of soldiers and widows children and Stated Soldier died at age 64 widow died 1843 Oct 31 at the home of her son Simon Johnson leaving children: Simon Johnson, John Johnson who had moved West abt 1832 and was supposed to have died. They gave childrens birth as Sarah Johnson born 1787 died in 1852, Catharine Johnson born 1790 decd in 1852, Susannah Johnson born 1792 widow of Barney Minney in 1852, John Johnson born 1795 supposedly decd in 1852, Simon Johnson born 1798 March 23, Thornton Johnson and Delphenn Johnson both decd. After the Revolution Soldier and family moved to NC for 3 years then to KY for 9 years then to Ross CO. Ohio. Pg 1841 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files
 
ALEXANDER JOHNSON 
 
Alexander Johnson wife Franky: R15508 NC Line widow applied 1854 Sept 9 Ashe Co. NC widow was daughter of John Gambill and was born 1772 Jan 8 in Va and her father moved to Wilkes Co NC during the Revolutionary War and she was married there to soldier on 1790 Sept 15. Their first child Elizabeth Johnson was born 1791 Oct 29. Soldier lived in Wiles Co NC at enlistment and served under Capt. Martin Gambill (relationship to widow not stated) Soldier died 1844 March 21 Ashe Co. NC. Pg 1840 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files
 
 [Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.] 
 
 State of North Carolina, County of Ashe 
 
 On this 9th day of September A.D. 1854 personally appeared before me James Gambill a Justice of the peace within and for the County and State aforesaid Mrs. Franky Johnson, a respectable resident of the County and State aforesaid -- who after being duly sworn according to law, declares. That she is the Daughter of one John Gambill Deceased. That she was born in the State of Virginia -- Culpeper County. That she has no record of her age – but that according to 
what her parents always told her she was born on the 8th Day of January A.D. 1772. -- her said Father moved out to the State of North Carolina and settled in the County of Wilkes NC some time during the War of the Revolution, and before the battle of King's Mountain. That she well remembers said removal, and said battle and many of the incidents of said war -- she further 
states that she is the widow of one Alexander Johnson Deceased. That she was married to the said Alexander Johnson in the County of Wilkes, State of North Carolina on the 15th day of September A.D. 1790 by one William Hammons a Baptist Minister. She states that the banns of matrimony had been a regularly published -- as he was informed by her said Father. That she herself did not go to Church at the time of the publishing, but was afterward married at her 
Father's House, as above stated. She states that she does not know -- or think that there was any license -- for her said marriage – obtained as it was common at that date and time for people to be married by publishing such intention. She further states that her first child was born on the 29th day of October A.D. 1791. That her name was Elizabeth Johnson and is now dead. She further states that her said husband the said Alexander Johnson was a Soldier of the War of the Revolution. That he belonged to the militia. That he lived during the said war in the County of Wilkes, State of North Carolina. That he served under Captain William Nall and Captain Martin Gambill under the Command of Colonel Benjamin Cleveland. She states that she had no acquaintance with her said husband the said Alexander Johnson until after the Close of the said 
war -- as he did not live very near to her -- in the time of said war -- he living on one side of the Blue Ridge and her with her father on the other -- and that her said husband was much older than herself -- and consequently can state nothing of his Services in said War of her own personal knowledge -- but she states that her said husband -- always did state -- as did many others -- who 
were also soldiers in said war -- And others that did know the facts -- that he the said Alexander Johnson did serve in said war -- under the aforesaid officers -- And that from what her husband and many others always said -- that she fully believes that her husband must have served in said War -- a larger portion of said War. She thinks and has no doubt -- that he must have served 
several years -- At the least 2 or 3 years of said -- she states that she cannot particularize much of his said service -- but that she has heard her husband speak of many skirmishes with the Tories -- having been some time stationed at a Fort -- at the mouth of Cranby [?] on New River -- Now in 
Ashe County NC and speak of much time occupied by guarding the frontier Country -- against the Tories, robbers and outliers -- with which the Country was much -- infested -- That she has heard him often speak of being in the expeditions against the Tories -- That [indecipherable word] Captain William Nall and also one Morris Baker. That they had battles with said Tories 
killed some and hanged others of them. That he served in some of these expeditions into the State of Virginia and that generally she believes from all the sources of her information so derived that her said husband -- served a large portion of the time of said war -- and continued to serve until the close of said war. She has also heard her said husband the said Alexander Johnson, speak of often during the said war of being sent on express from one post to another -- 
and between one division of troops and another -- and as being often engaged as a kind of foraging master -- and generally served in any capacity or under any circumstances or condition called for. -- She further states that her said husband the said Alexander Johnson, died at his residence in the County of Ashe State of North Carolina on the 21st day of March A.D. 1844. -- 
She states that she has no record of the date of his death except that the date of his death being was at the time carried on the back of an [indecipherable word] at the grave by one John Richardson of said County -- and that said letter and figures are still plain and distinct -- and that she herself well recollects the date of his death -- And she further states that she was the lawful wife of the said identical Alexander Johnson -- by whom she had 12 children, of which she raised 
ten to be grown -- And that she has remained a widow ever since the death of her said Husband and is now a widow -- and makes this application for the purpose of obtaining whatever may be due her on account of the Revolutionary Service of her said Husband the said Alexander Johnson. -- She states that her said Husband never drew any pension for said service in his lifetime -- nor did he make any application or the same -- she states that he was very old -- and 
went from house very little for many years -- before his death -- lived in a remote part of the County -- and was ignorant of his rights -- And that she herself knew nothing of her own rights as a widow until very lately. 
S/ Franky Johnson, X her mark 
State of North Carolina, County of Ashe 
 
 On this 30th day of August A.D. 1854 personally appeared before me James Gambill, a Justice of the peace within and for the County and State aforesaid Mrs. Nancy Gambill widow of the late Captain Martin Gambill,1 a resident of the County and State aforesaid, who after being duly sworn according to law declares that she will be 95 years of age the 15th day of November 
next -- she states that she resided in the County of Wilkes, State of North Carolina in the time of the War of the Revolution -- She states that she was well acquainted with one Alexander Johnson of the County of Wilkes State aforesaid -- during the said War and ever afterward up to the time of his death which took place in the County of Ashe State of NC -- about ten years ago to the 
best of her recollection -- That he the said Alexander Johnson lived a neighbor to her at the time of his death -- as he has always done from her first acquaintance with him -- she states that the said Alexander Johnson, was a Soldier in the War of the Revolution. That he served under her Father Captain William Nall and also under her husband the late Captain Martin Gambill. That she was well acquainted with the said Alexander Johnson and time of his said Service. She states that he was in much of the war against the Tories -- in guarding the frontiers -- County – that she thinks and believes that he served great part of said war. She thinks and believes that he must have served at least several years -- of said War & that he was always standing ready for Service 
& a minute man -- ready to be called into service at a minutes warning -- She knows that he frequently went on expeditions against the Tories -- and other enemies as minute man or light 
 
1 Martin Gambrill W7504 
 

 
Horse as they were then called -- as she believes he served at least 3 years or upwards of said War. That she knows of her own knowledge that he did serve as stated -- she further states -- that sometime after the close of the said war that the said Alexander Johnson was married to one Franky Gambill, a Daughter of John Gambill of Wilkes County, State of NC & she states that she 
was not present at the marriage but that she heard of said marriage at the time -- and no doubt ever was entertained but that they were lawfully married -- she states that the said Franky Gambill, as above -- was a niece of her husband the said Captain Martin Gambill -- and was always well known to her -- from the time she was a small child. -- She states that she cannot state the precise date of the marriage of the said Alexander Johnson & the said Franky Gambill -- but that she well recollects that it was before the birth of her 5th child --Thursa -- who was born on the 16th day of September 1792 -- and that she thinks it was one or 2 years before the birth of said child -- and daughter Thursa of this fact she knows she is not mistaken, she states that the said Alexander Johnson & his wife the said Franky lived together and raised a large family of children and that the said Franky Johnson now lives a neighbor to her -- that she has always done 
-- and that she is the identical woman -- and widow of the said Alexander Johnson aforesaid -- that she has remained a widow ever since the death of her husband -- and that she is still a widow. 
 
 S/ Nancy Gambill, X her mark 
 
 [John Loliren? Aged 91 or 92 gave a supporting affidavit as to the reputation of Alexander Johnson as a soldier of the revolution and the marriage of Alexander to Franky.] 
Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements 
 
Pension application of Alexander Johnson R15508 Franky fn29NC 
 
 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08
 
James Gambill
Father John Gambill Deceased
Franky Gambill Johnson, a Daughter of John Gambill
Mrs. Nancy  NALL Gambill widow of the late Captain Martin Gambill,
Her Father Captain William Nall
Her husband the late Captain Martin Gambill
 
ALEXANDER JOHNSON
Alexander Johnson wife Esther or Easter: W5034: NC Line: soldier was born 1760 June in Johnston Co. NC and he lived in Cumberland Co. NC and he applied there 1832 Sept 3. Soldier died there 1841 march 28. Soldier and widow had married 1783 Aug 10. Widow applied 1844 Feb 26 Cumberland Co. NC age 90 years and upwards, Children were J__?__ a Daughter born 1785 Oct 7: Alexander Johnson born 1789 Feb 26: Patsey Johnson born 1791 Feb 14: John Johnson born 1793 April 3: Amos Johnson born 1795 April 23: In 1845 one Jacob Matthews aged 77 stated soldiers widow was his aunt, in 1844 one Duncan McLean aged 36 stated he married a granddaughter (not named) of soldier’s widow. Pg 1840 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files
 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, Cumberland County: Court of Pleas & Quarter Solutions September

Term 1832

 

 On this 3rd day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the court

aforesaid now sitting Alexander Johnson a resident of said County aged about 72 years who being first duly sworn according to Law doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated: He first entered the service as a substitute for one William Avery in a Company of Militia commanded by Captain Samuel Gilmore who was attached to Colonel Caswell's Regiment of North Carolina Militia. The Regiment rendezvoused at Cross Creek now Fayetteville marched thence south crossing Drowning Creek at Coles Bridge thence to the Pedee River which they crossed at Haley's ferry took the road for Charleston when in about 30 miles of Charleston heard that that city had capitulated our troops then retreated back into North Carolina & on the expiration of his term of service he was discharged this tour was for four months after his discharge he was drafted into a Company commanded back Captain James Love which was attached to Colonel Dickson's [sic, Henry or Hal Dixon?] Regiment that he was marched from

Cross Creek to Haley's ferry on the Pedee River to Camden South Carolina where he joined the Army of General Gates was in the Battle of Camden after the Defeat of the American Troops he retreated back in North Carolina where the troops assembled & he served out his service which was 3 months when he was discharged these 2 tours were performed about the year 1780, as he believes. He again entered the service & performed a tour of 3 months service as a volunteer he entered this time and to a Company commanded by Captain Hadley during this service he was transferred from Captain Hadley's Company to a Company commanded by Captain McKethan

[McKeithen?] in which Company he performed the tour of 3 months out this Company was attached to the troops Commanded by General Bullar [sic, Butler?] While in service this time he was never marched out of the State of North Carolina after the full term of his service he was discharged.

 

 I was born in the County of Johnston North Carolina in the month of June 1760

 

 I have no record of my age

 

 I lived in the County of Cumberland North Carolina when I entered the service & have

continued to reside there ever since except four months & still reside there

 

 The first term I entered as a Substitute -- the 2nd I was drafted and the last I was a

volunteer.

 

 I do not recollect the names of any other officers than those named already; I have also

given as circumstantial account as my memory serves.

 

 I received from all my captains except Captain Love but have lost them.

 

 I would refer to Alexander McLeod, Richard Huckabee Esquire who all present in court I could also refer to others if necessary, to prove my character.

 

 He hereby relinquishes every claim to a Pension or Annuity except the present and

declares that his name is not on the Pension roll of any State.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid

 

 S/ Alexander Johnson, R his mark

 

[Alexander McLeod & Richard Huckabee Dave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 

[fn p. 11 Bible record]

 

[illegible first name] Johnson daughter of Alexander Johnson and Easter his wife was born

 

Alexander Johnson was born the 26th day of February the year 1789

 

[illegible first name] Johnson was born the 14th [?] 1791

 

John Johnson was born the 3rd day of April 1793

 

Amos Johnson was born 23rd day of April in the year 1795

 

[On August 6, 1844, Ester [Esther, Easter] Johnson, 90, filed in Cumberland County, NC for a widow’s pension stating that she is the widow of Alexander Johnson, a pensioner of the United States for his services in the revolutionary war; that she married him on August 10, 1783 and that he died March 28 1841; she says the family record [give him above] is from the family Bible in the hand writing of Matthew Morgan [relationship, if any, not stated]; and that as a result of her being blind she can say that it is her family record only from handling it.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Alexander Johnson W5034 Esther (Easter) fn35NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08

 

ANDREW JOHNSON

 

Andrew Johnson R5599 NC Line: Soldier was born 1761 March in Rockingham Co. Va and soldier moved with his father to Guilford Co. NC and he lived there at enlistment and afterwards Soldier moved to KY and then to Franklin Co. Ill. He applied there 1834 Oct. 7 Pg 1841 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

Pension Application Of Andrew Johnson, Natl Archives Series M804, Roll 1441, 
Application #R5599
 
State of Illinois, Franklin County}
               On this 7th day of October, 1834, personally appeared in open court before the county commissioners being judges of the county court, Andrew Johnson, a resident of Franklin County, state of Illinois, of the age of 73 years next March, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration…:
               That he entered the service of the United states in the year 1782 and served as herein stated under the following named officers; This declarant was born in Rockingham County, Virginia in the year 1761. From therewith he removed to Guilford County, state of North Carolina where he resided when he was drafted into the service of the united States. He entered the service as a private militiaman in the spring of 1782. When drafted, he went under the command of Captain Gilford or Guilford from his residence to Hillsborough, North Carolina, where he was mustered and inspected into the service of the United States for 18 months, which term he surely served out before he was discharged.  The country through which he marched as well as he now recollects, was from his residence to Hillsborough to Salisbury, to Camden, to Eutaw Springs, thence to Ashley Hills, where he joined the main army under the command of General Greene. 
 
He served under the command of Captain Guilford for a term of two months and then was transferred to a company commanded by Captain Brevard. This term of service was taken up principally  to join headquarters of the army, and nothing transpired of note. He then served a term of two months more under Captain Brevard, and he under Colonel Lytle, and he under Brigadier General Greene, during which term of service he remained stationary and transpired worthy of note, except some little skirmishes with foraging parties of the British and Americans, Charleston then being under the possession of the British under the command of General Leslie, as he thinks and understood, in some of which skirmishing, Colonel Laurens was killed. 
 
He was then transferred to Captain Rodes [Rhodes] or Captain Rhodes succeeded Captain Brevard, under whom he served another term of eight months, in which last term of service nothing transpired of much note, except the evacuation of Charleston by the British. The army was then marched down to James Island near Charleston, where they took up winter quarters and where they remained until his last mentioned term of service expired. 
 
This declarant was engaged in no battle during his service. He declares that he served his whole term of eighteen months for which he was drafted, but in consequence of old age and loss of memory, he is unable to state the particulars with any certainty more than the above 12 months of which he has a living witness, William McElyea, who can testify of his own personal knowledge 
as to the service. He was discharged at a place called Waxhaw settlement where he received a written discharge from Captain Lytle, which has been lost or destroyed. This discharge was given in the fall of 1783 when peace was proclaimed and put an end to the war and the American army disbanded.
 
He has a record of his age but was destroyed by fire when his fathers house was burned down on the south branch of the Potomac. He removed from North Carolina where he was drafted to the south branch of the Potomac, from thence to Kentucky, thence to Franklin County, state of Illinois, where he now resides. He has no evidence by which he can establish his service except 
William McElyea, who can testify to 12 months. He then states that from his short residence in this county he knows no preacher who can certify as to his belief in his services…etc. Sworn to and subscribed, date and year above mentioned. Andrew Johnson, his mark.
 
Franklin County, Illinois}
Be it remembered, that on the 7th day of October, 1834, personally appeared in open court, William McElyea, a resident of said county, and made oath in due form of law. That he is now, and was during the Revolutionary War, personally acquainted with Andrew Johnson, who has made the foregoing declaration to obtain a pension, and that he knows of his own personal 
knowledge  that the said Andrew Johnson did serve as a private militiaman in the Revolutionary War a term of 12 months. From old age and consequent loss of memory, this deponent cannot state positively to the date of his service, but does recollect distinctly that the declarant as well as this deponent was both discharged from the service of the United States in the time of the Revolution in the fall of 1783, when peace was proclaimed, by one Captain Lytle at a place  called Waxhaw settlement. He also recollects that the declarant served under Captains Guilford, Brevard, and Rhodes under Colonel Lytle and Brigadier General Greene, the several terms of service he therein states, making a term of 12 months, and further the deponent saith not. Sworn to and subscribed this day and date above mentioned, William McElyea, his mark.
 

File at: http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/nc/guilford/military/revwar/pensions/johnson507gmt

Notes Capt. Brevard

? ADAM BREAVERD HUDSON is there a relationship as I think this is the Hudson Families married into my Johnson families of Humphreys Co. Tn off John B. Patrick married to Mary Hudson

Notes: William McElyea

This William McELyea is the brother of Patrick Henry McElyea and the Uncle of Hiram McElyea of Humphreys Co. Tn who I descend from Patrick Henry McElyea is the brother of This William McElyea

Notes: Where did our Great Grand Mother Tennessee McELyea Johnson’s Family move to from Humphreys Co. Tn She is in the home of Hiram McElyea and I she was a granddaughter of Hiram McElyea and Matilda no proof of this at this time. She married John S.T. Johnson the son of Joel Johnson going back to Hudson Johnson and wife Agness

 

BARNABAS JOHNSON

 

Barnabas Johnson S4448 NC Line: Soldier was born in 1753 Edgecombe Va ( This I believe would be in NC) Soldier lived there in Cumberland Co. NC at enlistment and he lived there a few years after the Revolution and then moved to Johnston Co. NC for several years then returned to  Cumberland CO NC and in 1827 he moved to Tn and he applied 1832 Oct 8 in Warren Co. Tn. PG 1841 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Tennessee, County of Warren

 

 On this the 11th day of October 1833 personally appeared in open court before the Court

of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for the County of Warren the same being now in session present the Worshipful William McGregor Samuel Durby & Aaron Higginbotham Esquire residing Justices of said Court Barnabass Johnson a resident in the County of Warren and State of Tennessee, aged about 80 years who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his Oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress, passed June 7th, 1832.

 

 That he entered the service of the United States under the following named Officers, and

served as herein stated.

That in the early part of the year 1776, the Militia of North Carolina were called out and

into the service to defend Wilmington against the attack of the British commanded by General Clinton. Applicant then lived in Cumberland County in said State (North Carolina) when he about the first of May in the year 1776 volunteered into the service for the space of 3 months, he joined a Company commanded by a Captain Guess he does not recollect his given name, he joined the Company and Rendezvoused at a place on the Neuse River in Johnson County [sic, Johnston County] State of North Carolina called Smithfield, he does not recollect the name of the Ensign or Lieutenant of the company, various other companies rendezvoused at the same place he recollects one of them was commanded by Captain of the name of Bryant. At the place of Rendezvous the American flag was suspended from a pole. From Smithfield he was marched to Wilmington North Carolina crossing the Cape fear River, passing through Fayetteville, he also crossed [word obliterated] Creek and a little River of the same name: At Fayetteville his company was attached to a Regiment commanded by Colonel Armstrong does not recollect his given name nor does he recollect the names of the Majors of the Regiment or of any of the other officers commanding it than Colonel Armstrong nor does he recollect his given name: from Fayetteville he was marched to Wilmington NC he thinks it took them 10 or 12 days to perform the route they crossed the Cape fear River at a ferry near Fayetteville. After his arrival at Wilmington, there was an officer attached to his Regiment by the name of Fulsome or some such name he thinks he was a Colonel though he may have been a Major he thinks there was a General in command in Wilmington by the name of Brown. Also thinks General Lee was there a part of the time he was in Wilmington, he does not recollect of seeing him, when he arrived at Wilmington there was a British ship of war in the Cape fear River below Wilmington, he also understood that the whole British fleet sailed to the Cape during the time he was there and shortly after sailed for Charleston South Carolina; he remained in Wilmington until some time in the first part of the month of August in 1776 when after having served out his Tour of 3 months he was discharged in writing by his Captain Guess in Wilmington in the State of North Carolina, during his stay there he was frequently exercised and sometimes stood Sentry whilst there the intelligence of the declaration of Independence was received in that City it was greeted by the fire of 13 Cannon. He served in this Tour at least 3 months.

 

 From Wilmington he returned to his residence in Cumberland County North Carolina.

After he had been home about 6 months perhaps a few months longer he was again in

Cumberland County State of North Carolina drafted into the service for 3 months and

commanded to rendezvous at Fayetteville in the same County, which he did he thinks it was in moderate whether perhaps the spring season indeed he feels satisfied that it was late in the spring from the circumstance that during the service of this Tour one of his Company who had ate a watermelon was afterwards shot, and a watermelon seed came out at the bullet hole.

Applicant therefore states that late in the spring season of the year of 1777 he entered the service he was attached to a company of infantry commanded by a Captain Armstrong does not recollect his given name a son of the Colonel who commanded his Regiment at Wilmington, he does not recollect the Lieutenant or Ensign of the Company. His company as applicant understood was by the order of Colonel Armstrong to range through the Country in pursuit of Tories and to keep them in proper subjection. What Regiment if any it belonged to applicant does not know as it was not attached to any during his service he does not recollect the day or month when he entered the service: Shortly after he joined his company they marched to Drounding Creek [sic, Drowning Creek?]. From there to the little Pedee River. There they received information of a company of Tories being on the Cape fear River, wherefore they immediately marched back to that River upon their arrival at which they ascertained that they had been there but a few days previous and had killed a man by the name of Guess [?] and fled in the direction of the big or Great Pedee [River] to which place they immediately pursued them, upon their reaching the latter place they found that their object had fled down that River causing them to be beyond the reach of a successful pursuit. Applicant and his company were marched back to Fayetteville for the purpose of refreshing and resting -- themselves and horses here applicant remained for some time does not recollect how long. From there they marched to a place known by the name of the Bare Swamp [Bear Swamp?] which place was frequently resorted to by the Tories, finding none there they were marched to a place called the Ash pole Swamp [Ashpole Swamp?], not finding any Tories at either of these places they marched back to Fayetteville and after having been there a few days they marched to Guesses Ford on the Cape Fear River, there they found a large Company of Tories commanded by one Fannon [sic, David Fanning], they attacked them and had a pretty sharp skirmish with them. The Tories retreated and were not pursued being as was believed superior in number to applicant’s Company. In this skirmish they killed 4 Tories and had 3 of their Company killed and one by the name of Young Birt [?] badly wounded, after this applicant and his Company scoured about in the neighborhood of that place for a few days and then returned to Fayetteville where they remained a few days when his Tour expired where and when he was in the latter part of the summer or first of the fall in the year of 1777 in Fayetteville in Cumberland County State of North Carolina discharged in writing by his Captain Armstrong.

Applicant understood that his Company was retained in the neighborhood of Fayetteville by the direction of Colonel Armstrong, from there he went to his residence in Cumberland County in the State aforesaid where he remained until about 2 or 3 months before the siege of Little York when he was again drafted into the service after which he had a rising to come on his body being so much troubled by that as to make the service uncomfortable to him and at the same time it not being a sufficient inability to extricate him from the service he hired one Hogwood does not recollect his given name to serve his Tour as a substitute which he did for which Applicant paid him $52. This was the termination of applicant’s military service in the last Tour under Captain Armstrong he served at least 3 months, in all he served at least 6 months for which he claims  compensation.

 

He has no documentary evidence of his services, nor does he know of any person living

whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his services.

 

1st . He was born in Edgecomb County in the State of Virginia in the year of 1753 as he believes from the information of his parents.1

 

2nd . He has not nor never did have any record of his age.

 

3rd . When called into the service he lived in Cumberland County North Carolina. Since the Revolutionary War he lived a few years in Cumberland County North Carolina, he then moved to Johnson [sic, Johnston] County in the same State lived there several years, then he moved back to Cumberland and remained there until about 6 years ago, when he moved to this Warren County in the State of Tennessee where he now live and has ever since he moved to it.

 

4th . The first Tour of 3 weeks he served he volunteered into the service. The 2nd Tour of 3 months he served he was drafted into the service. 5th . When he served in Wilmington he understood that there was Regular Officers and

Continental regiments there, if so he does not if he ever knew at this time recollect any of their names or Nos., nor does he State anything more about Militia Regiments than he has [stated] in the body of this declaration, he was an ignorant back woodsman, and had not either the means or inclination to make any inquiries upon the subject & if he had he does not suppose that after the lapse of 57 years with a naturally weak mind and that too enfeebled by old age that he could recollect them, his mind is now quite feeble as well as his body, he is very poor, to his weakness of memory he attributes his not recollecting more of the field officers of his Regiment.

 

6th . For each of the Tours he served he received written discharges from the service, the first one was given to him by his Captain Guess, the 2nd by his Captain Armstrong, they have been lost or destroyed many years ago when how and where he does not recollect.

 

7th He is known to Joseph Banks, Sampson Bethell and some others all of whom live in his present neighborhood and can testify as to his character for veracity and of their belief of his services as a Soldier of the Revolution.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a Pension or annuity except the present,

and declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of the Agency of any State.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

S/ Joseph Colville, Clerk S/ Barnabass Johnson, X his mark

By S/ L. Colville, DC

[Joseph Blanks, a clergyman, and Sampson Bethel gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

1 No such County existed or exists in Virginia. There is an Edgecombe County in North Carolina.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Barnabass [Barnabas] Johnson S4448 fn18NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08

 

BENJAMIN JOHNSON

 

Benjamin Johnson or Benjamin Johnston wife Charity: W13: BLW #44545-160-55 NC Line: Soldier applied 1818 Sept 19 Overton Co. Tn age 58 and Charity applied there 1842 Jan 7 aged 78. Soldier and widow had married 1779 Feb 12 and soldier died 1821 June 28 soldier had lived in Granville Co NC at enlistment. Widow applied for BLW 1855 May 8.

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Tennessee, Overton County: September 19th, 1818

 

 This day before me Parry W. Humphreys one of the Judges of the Circuit Courts in & for

the State aforesaid came Benjamin Johnson in the 58th year of his age Residing in the said County of Overton who being by me first duly sworn the truth to declare & speak touching his service in the Army of the United States in the revolutionary War with a view to obtain the benefit of the provisions of the Act of Congress passed on the last Session entitled, an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land & Naval Service of the United States in the revolutionary war Declares & says, that on the 9th of May in the year 1776 at Granville Court house in the State of North Carolina he enlisted for the term of 2 years & a half with Lieutenant C. Parker and William Glover's company in the 6th Regiment of infantry upon Continental establishment & North Carolina line, which Regiment was commanded by Colonel William Taylor Marched from the place of his enlistment to Wilmington & from thence he was marched to & Joined General Washington's Army at King's ferry on the North River in the State of New

York just after the battle of the White Plains he served out his time of 2 1/2 years

 received his discharge which was given to him in the State of New York by Colonel Nash & Colonel Howe returned home & remained about 4 or 5 months reenlisted with Captain Long in Colonel Hogans [sic, James Hogun's] Regiment for the term of 18 months served out his time & was discharged by then Colonel Long at Halifax town in North Carolina his discharges were considered of no value have been long since destroyed. The principal battles in which he was worthy Battle of Monmouth & Gates Defeat was in frequent skirmishes, he has no other evidence now in his power to produce but he supposes his name is to be found in the records or muster rolls in the secretary's office of North Carolina & perhaps copies may be at Nashville, he further says that he is very poor has no land & but very small quantity of personal property has no means of

subsistence but by his labor & is by reason of bad health age & affliction unable to perform much labor having nearly lost the use of one of his legs & is in such reduced circumstances in life as to require assistance from his Country for support.

 

Sworn & subscribed this day and Date first above written before me.

 

S/ Parry W. Humphreys S/ Benjamin Johnson, X his mark

 

[On June 7, 1842, Charity Johnston,78, filed in Overton County, Tenn., for a widow’s pension stating that her husband died June 28, 1821 of the "gravel or inflimation of his kidnies [sic]”; that she married him in Granville County North Carolina on February 1, 1779; that she has no record of her marriage but recollects that they were married by Samuel Fuller, JP][In a filing dated in 1855, she states they were married February 1, 1780; that her maiden name was Charity Bobbitt; that her husband served under Col. Litell [Lytle]; that her husband enlisted in Granville County,

NC]

 

 

State of North Carolina, Secretary's Office 12th May 1819

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in & for the State aforesaid, do hereby certify that it appears from the muster roll of the North Carolina Continental line in the Revolutionary War, that Benjamin Johnson a private in Captain Williams’ Company of the 6th Regiment was in the service on the 9th May 1776 for 2 1/2 years, and was discharged on the 10th day of November

1778. Given under my hand the date above.

 

 S/ Wm Hill

 

[Oct. 8, 1842, in Overton County, Tenn., Isham Johnston, 57, filed an affidavit in support of the claim of his mother for a widow’s pension; he states that he found the following family record on a small piece of paper among his father’s papers:

 

“James Johnston was born the ?th day of November 17781 [sic, 1781?]

 

darean Johnston was born the 3 day of May 17783 [sic]

 

turney Johnston was the 13 day of June 17785 [sic]

 

the sunes [sic, sons] of Benjamin Johnson 19 day August 9

 

Suger Johnston was born the first day July 17787 [sic]

 

tutley Johnston was born on 22 day of da....”]

 

 

CRAWFORD JOHNSON

 

Crawford Johnston and Sally: W21486 BLW #1284-100 NC Line: Soldier married Sally Weathers 177 Feb 14 in Bute Co. NC and a West Harriss signed marriage bond with soldier. Soldier applied 1820 Aug 20 Warren Co. NC age 70. Widow applied 1843 May 17 in Halifax Co. NC age 85, soldier died 1831 Aug 23.  Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina Warren County

 

 On this first day of March 1820, before me the subscriber one of the Judges of the

Supreme Court of the State aforesaid personally appeared Crawford Johnson aged about 61 years resident in the County and State aforesaid who being by me first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to attain the provision made by the late act of Congress entitled "an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war" That he the said Johnson enlisted in the County of Edgecombe in the State of North Carolina in the company commanded by Captain William T. Cole [sic, William Temple Coles]. That said Company was attached to the Regiment commanded by Colonel Sexton, that said Regiment was attached to the North Carolina line, on the continental establishment, he enlisted as aforesaid in the month of April 1776 during the war. That he served the war out and was on furlough at the expiration of the war, which furlough was given him at Charleston where he had been taken presenor [sic, prisoner], that he was in the battles of Germantown, Whiteplanes [sic, White Plains], Monmouth, Eutaw Springs, Brandy wine [sic, Brandywine], Blueford Bridge [sic, Beaufort Bridge ?], & Guilford Court House, That he was wounded in the side back & head. That he [is] in reduced circumstances, and stands in need of the assistance of his Country for support, That he has no other evidence in his power of his said services except the annexed certificate.

 

 S/ Crawford Johnson, X his mark

 

State of North Carolina, Secretary's Office 14th of February 1820

 

 I William Hill Secretary of State in & for the State aforesaid do hereby certify that it

appears from the musterrolls of the Continental line of this State in the revolutionary war, that Crawford Johnston [sic] was mustered as a private in Captain Coles’ Company of the 4th Regiment on the 11th of April 1776 for the war -- There is no remarks opposite his name, I cannot therefore say any thing as to the length of time he served –

 

 Given under my hand the date above.

 

 S/ Wm Hill

 

 State of North Carolina, Warren County: Court of Pleas of and quarter Sessions August Term

1820

 

 On this 28th day of August 1820 personally appeared in open Court, it being a Court of

record; for said County expressly made so by the laws of the State Crawford Johnson [sic] aged 70 years resident in said County, who being duly sworn, according to law, doth on his oath declare that he served in the revolutionary war as follows, to wit, in Captain Clem Hall's [Clement Hall’s] Company of 2nd Regiment commanded by General Thomas Clark of North Carolina line on Continental establishment -- that he served in this Regiment 2 years and several other regiments many years as will appear by his original declaration now on file in the Pension office -- That he has received Pension Certificate Number 16,630, dated the first of April 1820 --

 

 And I do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property, or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed, To wit --

 

 He has no property whatever except his wearing apparel -- That he is unable to support

himself by his own labor -- having received several wounds while in the service aforesaid -- the effects of which he sensibly feels at times -- That one of his arms is broke -- and that he is supported by the charity of a neighbor.

 

 S/ Crawford Johnston, X his mark

 

[attested by Caswell Drake, Clerk]

 

 [On May 17, 1843, in Halifax County, NC, Sally Johnston [sic], 85, filed for a widows pension stating that she is the widow of the late Crawford Johnston of Warren County North Carolina, a pensioner of the United States at the rate of $96 per annum for his revolutionary services; that she married him on February 14, 1777; and that he died August 23, 1831.]

 

[fn. p. 11 is a copy of the marriage bond dated February 13, 1777, given by Crawford Johnston and West Harriss of Bute County for the marriage of Johnston to Sally Weathers.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Crawford Johnston W21486 Sally fn32NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/28/08

 

DAVID JOHNSTON

 

David Johnson or David Johnston: S13587 NC Line: Solder served in the Mecklenburg CO. NC Militia and lost his left arm in the battle of Tiger River in SC in 1780 and he received a disability pension 1789 March 4 at which time he lived in Ashe Co. NC and in May 1829 he was living in Franklin Co. Tn. Soldier died 1829 Feb 18. Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, Hilsbouro [Hillsboro] District

 

Believe the Commissioners appointed by an act of the General assembly Do Certify that

David Johnston a Soldier in the Militia of the United States who lost his left arm in an action with the Enemy in the year 1780 on Tiger River [sic, Tyger River] in South Carolina as appears by a certificate dated November 14th 1788 By Robert Irwin Colo. 1st Batn MM and Thomas Polk is intitled [entitled] to an annual allowance of Twenty four pounds.

 

Given under our hands the 16th day of March 1789

 

Ledg’d in Comptrollers office S/ J. Estes

 

March 16th 1789 S/ John Taylor

 

Williamson Courtney [?]

 

MM Macklinburg militia [sic, Mecklenburg militia?]

 

State of Tennessee, Williamson County: I Joshua Farrington one of the acting Justices of the peace for the County & State aforesaid do certify that the above is a true coppy [copy] of a Certificate this Day produced by David Johnston & Examined by me

Given under my hand & Seal at office this 7th day of Janr [?] 1822

 

S/ J. Farrington

State of Tennessee, Williamson County

 

 I Joshua Farrington one of the acting Justices of the peace for the County & State

aforesaid do hereby certify that David Johnston named in the above copy of a certificate

personally appeared before me this 7th day of Janr 1822 and made oath the [sic, that] he never received any other certificate from any office raletive [relative] to his wound than that which the within is a true and that he has never received a pension Certificate from the Secretary of War.

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 7th day of Janr 1822.

 

 S/ David Johnston

 

S/ J. Farrington, JP

 

[fact in file: veteran died February 18, 1829.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of David Johnston (Johnson) S13587 fn15NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/28/08

 

ELIJAH JOHNSON

 

Elijah Johnson S18060: NC Line applied 1833 Sumter Dist. SC soldier was born 1754 April 13 in NC and was raised in Dobbs Co. NC and lived there until 1816 then moved to Sumter District SC. PG 1844 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 South Carolina, Sumter District & County of Salem

 

On the 4th day of November Personally appeared in open Court before Richard Gantt one

of the Judges of the Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions for Sumter District now sitting Elijah Johnson Senior a resident of Salem County in Sumter District South Carolina aged 79 years who being first duly sworn according to law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated; This deponent saith that he entered the service of the United States in the latter part of the year 1777 or in the early part of the year 1778 (that he cannot pretend to say positively which) as a volunteer he was at that time a resident of Dobbs County North Carolina and served under the

command of General Caswell Colonel Abram Sheppard commanded the Regiment in Captain Benjamin Sheppard the Company to which he was attached; our Army embodied at Boss Ferry on Neuse River marched thence to Moore's Creek by the way of Elizabeth Town, at Moore's Creek we had a severe engagement with a large body of the Tories whom we defeated with great slaughter; The engagement took place from opposite sides of the Creek and was brought on by an attempt on the part of the Tories to cross a Bridge in front of which we had erected strong Breastworks having previously taken up the planks from that half of the bridge nearest to us. I never knew accurately the number of forces engaged on either side but as near as I can conjecture the Whigs amounted to 4 or 500 The Tories were thought to have been much more numerous; Having performed the service for which we had volunteered, we were discharged after a term of 3 weeks Service then deponent further saith that he Volunteered a 2nd time on the 10th of November 1778 for the term of 5 months under the command of General Ash [sic, John Ashe] who had been appointed to act against the British who were over running Georgia Lieutenant General Bryant was 2nd in command in this expedition Colonel William Caswell commanded the Regiment in Captain McInvane [?] the Company to which I belonged our troops embodied at Kinston Dobbs County North Carolina we marched thence through the lower part of South Carolina drew our arms near Charleston proceeded to the Savannah River crossed it two miles below Augusta followed the British down the Savannah had an engagement with them at Brier Creek [Briar Creek], were surprised and defeated; our forces in this engagement amounted to 1500 Militia and volunteers about 250 Continentals & 200 French; I was not acquainted with the names of any of the Officers who commanded the latter; as we were not permitted to mingle

in consequence of a jealousy & rivalry that existed between the volunteers and Continentals and which frequently lead to blows & riot having performed my 5 months term of service I was again discharged; In the year 1781 he was called out under the command of Colonel Sheppard & Captain Gailard to prevent the Town of Newbern [New Bern] from falling into the hands of the British in which service he continued for the space of 10 days. In the 2 first terms of service above alluded to I served as a Volunteer and Sergeant & both times received a discharge which he destroyed a few years ago under the impression that they would never be of any Service to him.

This deponent further saith that he has a record of his age in his own possession that he was born in the State of North Carolina April 13th, 1754 was raised in Dobbs County of that State and continued to reside there until 1816 when he removed to Sumter District Salem County South Carolina where he remained &'s; This deponent further saith that Thomas Roe, John Wilson and John Kinder all persons to whom I am well known in my present neighborhood and who can testify to my character for veracity & their belief that I was a Soldier of the revolution.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present &

declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid in open Court before

S/ Richard Gantt, Presiding Judge S/ Elijah Johnson

Georgia, Washington County

 

 Personally appeared in the Inferior Court then sitting in on for the said County Augustin

Wilson 1 who being duly sworn saith upon oath that the deponent was personally acquainted with Elijah Johnson while living in Dobbs County North Carolina and for some time before the Revolutionary War commenced and though deponent cannot distinctly recollect for what term of service he the said Johnson may have volunteered or enlisted -- yet deponent is convinced that he the said Johnson and this deponent were fellow soldiers for at least 6 months and deponent saith that further that the said Johnson was with him in the Battle of Briar Creek in this State and knows further that said Johnson conducted himself in a patriotic and soldier like manner during

his term of service which term began as deponent believes in the year 1778 under the command of General Caswell -- this deponent saith that said Johnson may have been in the 23rd year of his  age.

Sworn to in open Court this 10th May 1833.

S/ Silas Floyd, JIC S/ Augustin Wilson

S/ James Boatright, JIC

S/ Samuel Robison, JIC

 

1 FPA S7920

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Elijah Johnson S18060 fn20NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08

 

Augustin Wilson

Thomas Roe,

John Wilson

John Kinder

 

 

 

 

 

ELISHA EDWARD JOHNSON

 

Elisha Edwards Johnson: S38885 SC line applied 1818 June 20, Muary Co. Tn a resident of Giles Co. Tn age 70. Soldier lived in SC until 1800 then moved to NC for 1 year then moved to Tn. PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 To the Honorable the Secretary of War of the United States

 

The Petition of Elisha Edwards Johnson represents that soon after the battle of Sullivan's

Island he enlisted during the revolutionary war as a soldier in the service of the United States under Captain Thomas Jarvey of the fifth South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel Isaac Huger, and was under his command at Savannah when it was taken by the British and was then taken prisoner That he was afterwards in the battle of Ninety Six under General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] in which he received three wounds one in his leg one in his hip and one in his shoulder, which disabled him so much that he was unable to perform duty again during the war and returned to his friends under a permit from General Greene, which was all the discharge he ever received, that this together with all his other papers have been destroyed by fire, so that he has no way of proving the above facts but by his own oath. Your petitioner states that after the fall of Savannah he never received any pay from the United States for his services nor has he

ever received any pension from the United States nor from any of the States, after the conclusion of the war he continued to reside in South Carolina, and about 18 years ago he removed to North Carolina where he resided until about one year ago when he removed to the State of Tennessee where he now resides and is an inhabitant of Giles County. He is about the age of 70 years is poor and in reduced circumstances, having no real estate and very little personal property, and is scarcely able with much difficulty to procure for himself a scanty subsistence by his personal exertions, and stands in need of the assistance of his country. He also releases any claim to a pension from the United States under any previous law to that passed in 1818 He therefore prays to be placed on the pension list agreeably to an act passed at the last Session of the Congress of

the United States

 

State of Tennessee, Maury County to wit.

 

This day personally appeared before me Thomas Stuart one of the Judges of the Circuit courts for the State of Tennessee now presiding in the Circuit Court of Maury County, Elisha Edwards Johnson the above petitioner who being duly sworn states that the facts set forth in the above petition are Just and true.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 20th day of June 1818.

 

S/ Thos. Stuart S/ Elisha Eds Johnson

 

 I do hereby Certify that Isaac Huger was a Colonel in the Regular Service in South Carolina & afterwards made a General & I make no doubt but what this Elisha E. Johnston [sic] has sworn to the truth.

 

 Given under my hand this 18th of June 1818

 

 S/ Richard Winn

 

 Majr General In South Carolina

 

 State of Tennessee, Maury County

 

This day came before me Samuel Witherspoon one of the Justices for said County

Edward Watts of sd. County and nearly 77 years of age who being sworn on the holy evangelist of Almighty God, deposeth that while he served as a regular soldier in the Revolutionary War under the command of Colonel Isaac Huger, he believes that the within named Elisha E. Johnston [sic] served with him as a regular Soldier for the term of 18 months under said Huger, that he believes him Justly entitled to any benevolence for said services from the General Government, that he believes said Service as rendered by said Johnston under Captain Thomas Jarvey.

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me the 19th June 1818

 

S/ Samuel Witherspoon, Justice of the peace S/ Edward Watts

 

 State of Tennessee, Maury County

 

 This day came before me Samuel Witherspoon, one of the Justices for said County Elisha Edwards Johnson aged 70 years who being Sworn on the Holy evangelist of Almighty God, deposeth that he served as a Continental Soldier in the Revolutionary War, for six years, that he enlisted during the War under the command of Colonel Isaac Huger and Served said time faithfully, that when that noted battle took place at Ninety Six South Carolina I was there under the command of General Greene at which place I received three wounds, the marks of which I Carry to my great injury.

 

That he was sent from the service on a permit by General Greene as unable for duty,

which was all the discharge he received, that his papers pertaining to the war with all others he had was destroyed by fire therefore have no way of proving said services but by his oath.

 

 S/ Elisha Eds Johnson

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me the 15 June 1818

 

S/ Samuel Witherspoon, Justice of the peace

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Elisha Edwards Johnson (Johnston) S38885 fn9SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

Isaac Huger

Edward Watts

 

 

GEORGE JOHNSON

 

George Johnson S7096: NC AND VA LINES: Soldier was born 1749 Nov 25 Fauquier Co Va and he lived there at enlistment and in 1781 soldier moved to Wilkes Co. NC and he applied there 1832 Nov 14. . PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, Wilkes County: October Term Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions

 

 Personally appeared in open Court George Johnson Senior a Resident of said State and

County aged 83 years who being duly Sworn according to law Doth on his oath make the

following Declaration that he believes he was born in Faulkquier [sic, Fauquier] County and State of Virginia but this deponent believes then was called Prince Williams [County] when this affiant States that when he was about 30 years old he was drafted for 6 months and marched under the command of Colonel John Churchwill [John Churchwell?] William Edmunds Lieutenant Colonel and Daniel Fluary [could be Tluary] Captain. This was in the year 1778 or 1779. This affiant states that they crossed the Potomac River into Maryland to a town then called Menacacy [Monocacy?] and by some Leesburg. This affiant understood that they or that the Regiment was to march to a place called Bunkershill but this affiant believes they for some cause not now remembered by him returned home. Somewhere high up upon the Potomac while on the march this affiant was taken Sick & his Colonel Churchwoll Sent this affiant home this deponent went home in wagon as he was unable to walk this affiant in a short time there was a call to Supply the place of the men that marched when I did. Colonel Churchwell interposed and said this affiant had served his 6 months tower [tour].

 

 This affiant then moved into the State aforesaid in the County of Wilkes about the year

1781 this affiant further State that Shortly after he settled in the County of aforesaid, he was again drafted to serve some time, but how long he cannot now recollect, he marched under Joseph Herndon who was then a Captain Round the frontiers in pursuit of Tories Deserters and Indians, his Captain and all those who marched with him is since Dead or Removed out of the County this affiant is very hard of hearing otherwise infirm his recollection almost gone. That he has no Documentary Evidence to prove his services & he knows of no person now living by which he can prove Service.

 

Sworn to in open Court. S/ George Johnson

 

S/ R. Martin, C.W.C. C.

This affiant Relinquishes Every Claim whatever to any Pension or annuity Except the present and further declares that his name was not on the Pension Roll of the agency of any State. Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid

 

sworn to in open Court.

 

Sworn to in open Court. S/ George Johnson

 

S/ R. Martin, C. W.C. C.

 

 [Thomas Fletcher, a clergyman, and George Wheatley gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Where was you born this affiant was born in Faulhquer County & State Virginia

 

Have you any The record of your age and if so where is it this affiant has a Record of his age at home I was born 25th Novmber 1749

 

Where were you living when called into Service where have you lived Since the Revolutionary War and where do you now live this affiant lived in the State of Virginia Faulkquer County when he was first drafted, he then moved to Wilkes County North Carolina where he was again drafted and where he has they have ever since till the present Date

 

 How were you called into Service were you Drafted or did you volunteer or were you a

Substitute and for whom -- this affiant was always drafted

 

 Did you ever receive a discharge from the Service and if so by whom was it signed and what has become of it this affiant Received 2 discharges one from Colonel Churchwell & one from Captain or Colonel Joseph Herndon but they long since lost

 

 State the names of Persons to whom you are known in your Present neighborhood & who can Testify to your Character for veracity and their belief in your Services as a soldier of the The revolution George Wheatley & Thomas Fletcher, clergyman

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of George Johnson S7096 fn20NC/Va.

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08

 

George Wheatley

Thomas Fletcher

 

GIDEON JOHNSON

 

Gideon Johnson S4456: NC Line Soldier was born 1754 Nov 7, he lived in Guilford Co. NC at enlistement and after the revolution he lived there in the part that became Rockingham Co. NC and in 1819 he moved to Davidson Co Tn and in 1826 he moved to Williamson Co. Tn and he applied there 1832 Oct 2 and in 1840 had returned to Davidson Co. Tn in 1832 an Abner Johnson age 74 a resident of Maury Co. Tn had served with Gideon Johnson and in 1833 a William Johnson was JP for Williamson Co. Tn but their relationship to soldier was not stated. . PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

My Notes Abner Johnson is the Brother of Gideon Johnson as is Jessee Johnson and Ashley Johnson of Amelia Co. Va where they were born. See Amelia Co. Va Files for families travel patterns.

 

State of Tennessee, Williamson County

 

On this 2nd day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the Worshipful Wright Stanley Joseph Crockett and Jabez Owen and George Shannon Esquires composing the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of Williamson County now sitting at Franklin, Tennessee, Giddeon [sic] Johnson aged seventy eight years 7th November 1832 who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of an Act of Congress passed

June 7th, 1832.

 

That I enlisted in the army of the United States some time in the last of the month of July 1776 for the term of twelve months under Capt. John Armstrong from Surry County, Lieutenant Joseph Tate from Guilford County in North Carolina. I resided in Guilford County N.C. at that time and joined the army in the County at a place called Spring Garden. Capt. Armstrong’s company joined the Second Regiment of the Continental line at Salisbury shortly after my enlistment, as well as I can recollect, which regiment was commanded by Col. Alexander Martin. We lay at Salisbury about three months

when we marched thence to a place near Hollisworth [sic, Hollingsworth?] mills on Duncan’s Creek which I think is a branch of the Catawba River. Receiving information that there was a body of Tories collected either on Rabin's Creek or Duncan’s Creek about fifteen miles distant. We were marched thither in the night and surrounded them near day break when we were fired on by their sentinels and our men closed in upon them and took, as was reported, 100 prisoners whom we marked to headquarters on Duncan’s Creek where we guarded them two days when they were sent to Charlestown

[sic, Charleston], South Carolina. Shortly after that we rendezvoused at Salisbury, I going by home by furlow [sic, furlough] whence I, in the company of Capt. Samuel Martin who had recruited a company of 50 men with some delinquents, marched to Charleston, S.C., where we joined the main army the latter part of the summer 1777. I in the meantime having been employed in assisting Capt. Samuel Martin in recruiting men, he being a recruiting officer of the U.S. army, and in scouting after the Tories

in N.C. On account of the sickness of the troops in Charleston we left that place, where I took sick, and was hauled to Campden [sic, Camden] in a wagon, where we lay 8 or 10 days. From that place the army marched towards Salisbury, N.C., and I being too sick to travel further was left at the Widow Sutton’s on Seven Mile Creek under the care of Sergeant Reuben Curtis. At the end of ten days I went to Charlotte, N.C., where I met with Capt. Samuel Martin with whom I traveled to Salisbury where I arrived about the last of October 1777 where I think I received a discharge signed by Col. Alexander

Martin, which I have lost not thinking it would ever be important to me.

Some years after this when Col. Alexander Martin was chosen Governor of North Carolina, the year I cannot recollect, it being necessary for him to have a life guard, I was chosen by him as one of his life guard and became such in Guilford County and marched with him thence to a place called Nutbush in Granville County where we, after remaining some time, were dismissed and returned home after an absence of about four weeks. Captain Josiah Gates commanded this company of Life Guards. It was represented to us when acting as his guard that that tour should answer as a three months’ tour but

whether I got a discharge for the same I do not now recollect.

 

In Dec. 1778 or winter of 1779, I carried an express from Col. James Martin of the County of Guilford to the western part of the state into Birk [sic, Burke], Burkum [sic, Buncombe], and Wilks [sic, Wilkes] counties and delivered the same to Col. and Maj. Ervin, Col. and Maj. McDowell and to Mr. Greenlea of Buncombe County. In this expedition I underwent much hardship on account of inclement weather and high waters and returned home after having been absent about four weeks.

 

I was born, as I have been informed by my father, in Amelia County, Virginia, on the 7th day of November 1754. I have a record of my age now with me which I got from my father and in his own handwriting. I lived in Guilford County, North Carolina, when I was called into service. Sometime after the Revolutionary War the County of Rockingham was taken off the north part of Guilford, in Rockingham I resided until 1819, when I removed to Davidson County, Tennessee, where I resided till

the year 1826 when I removed to Williamson County, where I have ever since resided.

 

I know of no person, except Abner Johnson and John W. Crunk, by whom I can prove my services personally, all my other companions in arms whom I have known in this country having departed this life. Neither have I any documentary evidence by which I can prove any said services.

 

I hereby relinquish every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declare that my name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

 

S/ Gideon Johnson

Sworn to in open Court 2nd October 1832

S/ Thos. Hardeman, Clk.

State of Tennessee, Williamson County: Circuit Court January Term 1840

 

On this twenty second day of January 1840 personally appeared in open Court before the

Circuit Court of Davidson County now sitting, Gideon Johnson a resident of Davidson County and State of Tennessee; aged eighty six years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the Act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers; and served as herein stated.

 

He entered the service in the month of June 1775, he thinks in the 7th Regiment of the

Continental line of North Carolina as a regular soldier under the command of Colonel Alexander Martin, in which there were four companies;

 

First company commanded by Captain John Davidson of Rowan County,

 

Second company and to which defendant belonged, commanded by Captain John Armstrong of Surry County,

 

Third company commanded by Captain __ [blank in original] Picket of Anson County,

Fourth company commanded by Captain John Bell of Guilford County, which four companies composed said Regiment.

 

Defendant states that he first turned out as a volunteer under Lieutenant Joseph Tate; who was Lieutenant under his Captain, John Armstrong, at Spring Garden, Guilford County, North Carolina, for a term of (he thinks) twelve months; rendezvoused in the latter end of the same month at Salisbury and (he thinks) left Salisbury in September following. While at Salisbury a dissatisfaction arose amongst the troops and a second enlistment became necessary and was proposed by Colonel Alexander Martin for a term of eighteen months for which time said defendant volunteered, he thinks about the last of July or first of August 1775.

 

The troops when leaving Salisbury were ordered south; kept headquarters at Hollingsworth’s Mills on Enoree River about four weeks after which the troops were ordered south on a meandering route to the Hickory Camps, he thinks, near the borders of South Carolina. From thence he thinks in the month of January following; they were informed there was a company of Tories collected on Duncan’s Creek, to which place the troops were ordered and marched under the guidance of our informants. On

our arrival at said Duncan’s Creek we had a small skirmish with the Tories – they fled, save 300 prisoners we took and marched back to Hickory Camp, guarded them there two days and nights, thence they were sent to Charleston, South Carolina, under a guard of militia. From Hickory Camp we marched south in the direction of Ninety Six through the country watered by Tiger [sic, Tyger] river, Congaree, Wateree [River] &c, falling down below Ninety Six. There we bent towards Bell’s Mills on Deep river in the direction of Fayetteville in North Carolina; thence we returned to Salisbury where we

stayed five or six weeks, and where many of the troops were furloughed for a small space of time.

 

We were from there marched to Charleston, through the swamps of Santee River, and arrived at Charleston some time in August just in time to see the British embark, when they evacuated Charleston or Sullivan’s Island, near Charleston, where we continued until (I think) the latter end of October following, occupying the old British Barracks, from which place we were then ordered to march in consequence of the bad health of the troops, of whom many had died. On our first or second days marched at night going towards Camden on Goose Creek, deponent for the first time was taken sick

and put in a waggon, he thinks, about twenty miles from Charleston; and hauled from there to Camden, he thinks, 130 or 140 miles – there in consequence of sickness of the troops we lay about three weeks, some two or three men died there. From there we marched to Seven Mile Creek at Widow Suttle’s. Deponent was given out for dead and left in the care of Sergeant Reuben Curtis for an attendant. Deponent thinks he lay here about three weeks, from whence defendant started alone, leaving his gun,

shot bag, and belt, not being able to carry them, has never heard of them since. He pursued the army alone (having left Sergeant Curtis sick) to Charlotte in North Carolina; where he stayed with Samuel Martin, about two weeks. From thence by the assistance of the said Samuel Martin, he went to Salisbury, where he joined the remaining fragment of his Regiment, he thinks, some time in the month of November 1776. After remaining at Salisbury a short time defendant, by permission of Colonel Alexander Martin, left for his home in Guilford County, being very weak; arrived there he thinks in November; near the latter end. He afterward saw Colonel Martin who gave him a discharge, his term of

eighteen months being ended.

 

Some time in the month of January or February in the year 1777 or 1778 declarant was engaged by Colonel James Martin of the Militia of the County of Guilford to bear some expresses, he thinks to Joseph and Charles McDowell living in Wilkes County, North Carolina, both bearing commissions in the United States service, and to Major Alexander Erwin and Major Green Lee living he thinks in Burke County and state aforesaid, for which service Colonel James Martin gave him a discharge for a

term of three months served as a militiaman.

Deponent thinks in the month of May, June, or July 1779 he again volunteered as a life guard to Colonel Alexander Martin, to guard and convey him to Wilmington, he being appointed Governor of the State of North Carolina to fill the place of __ [blank in original] Governor3 who was taken prisoner by the British; in consequence of some express which Col. A. Martin met, we did not escort him quite to Wilmington. Josiah Gates being Captain we marched back to Guilford, for which service declarant

got from (he thinks) Colonel Martin a certificate for a three month term of service as a militiaman.

 

Deponent further states that he was at home plowing in his field, when he heard the firing of the cannon and plattoons at the battle of Guilford on the 15th of March, he thinks, 1781 or 1782. He immediately took out his horses, seized his gun and hastened hither, though not at that time in service himself he had a substitute (Elise Curray). He met the baggage waggons near Guilford making their way to a safe place out on Dan River. He turned around and led them on till he knew they could not mistake the way. He then hastened to the place of action and joined his country men in that engagement. It having nearly ended, reconnoitered and assisted in burying &c for about nine days. This

service was voluntary for which deponent has no receipt; nor did he expect, demand or wish any.

Deponent had been previous to this summoned as a guard to the Legislature at Salem in North Carolina in which service he was engaged about three or four weeks. The receipt from Colonel James Martin and the lost receipt from Colonel A. Martin making in all a term of two years service. He viewed said documents as being of entirely useless to him and he thinks he destroyed the same in the year 1819 when he left Carolina to remove to Tennessee in Davidson County where he now lives and has lived ever since.

 

Deponent further states that his name is already on a pension roll of the agency of the State of Tennessee, was placed there on the 20th day of August 1833 and receives a pension of fifty dollars payable semiannually; that said pension is not proportionate to his term of Revolutionary services for the want of living testimony to the facts herein before stated. That he has since making application before found living witnesses of whom he did not know, which accompanies this declaration. Many

things have also come to his own recollection since, which are true and not named in his former declaration.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and he declares that his name is listed on the pension roll of an agency of the state of Tennessee in the amount

stated above. S/ Gideon Johnson

State of Tennessee, Rutherford County: September 13, 1832

 

This day came John W. Crunk before me one of the acting justices of the above mentioned County and made oath that in the year of 1776 he was intimately acquainted with Gideon Johnson in the Continental Army and further saith that he knew him to be a regular soldier in the revolutionary war in the second Regiment of the North Carolina troops commanded by Colonel Alexander Martin in Captain John Armstrong's company and he further saith that he (Crunk) and the said Johnson both belonged to the same company at the same time and he further saith that in consequence of sickness

that he (Crunk) was separated from the Regiment and sent home and that he never returned to the Regiment again, the time for which he enlisted having expired recovered from his sickness. But that said Johnson continued in the Army for a long time and returned home to Guilford County honorably discharged. The time for which he enlisted being 18 months. He further adds that they were both on and raised in the same neighborhood.

 

Sworn to and subscribed to before me the day and date above written.

S/ Joseph Mason, JP S/ John W. Crunk

State of Tennessee, Maury County

 

This day personally appeared before me James Walker an acting Justice of the peace in & for said County Abner Johnston who after being duly sworn according to law says that he is now in his 74th year – that he cannot from infirmity & great inconvenience attend the courts of Williamson County. That he was himself a soldier of the Revolutionary War – that he served one tour as a Guard for the Governor of North Carolina to t Nutbush with Gideon Johnston [sic] that he knows the fact that the said

Gideon Johnston [sic] was a soldier of the Revolution – that he is well acquainted with Gideon Johnston [sic] & knows that he has always been reputed to be a soldier of the Revolutionary War and is of undoubted veracity. He has reason to believe that the said Gideon Johnston [sic] served at least 12 months as regular or Continental soldier in South Carolina.

 

And sworn to before me this 22nd of September 1832. S/ Abner Johnson

 

S/ James Walker, JP

 

State of Tennessee, Williamson County

 

On this 29th day of January A.D. 1840 Personally appeared before me Gilbert Marshall one of the acting Justices of the Peace for the County of Williamson in the State of Tennessee aforesaid Richard Vernon aged about 86 years and made oath in due form that he has been acquainted with Gideon Johnson for upwards of 70 years, first in the State of North Carolina & then in this State – that he was present when said Johnson enlisted into the Regular Army or Continental service with Lieutenant Joseph Tate of Captain John Armstrong's company, Colonel Alexander Martin's Regiment,

that the troops to which he belonged marched to the South as he then understood, that about the time his enlistment expired he returned to his father's house where deponent visited him and found him reduced almost to a skeleton of sickness, that said enlistment was for 12 or 18 months – that he knows Colonel James Martin sent expresses to some persons in Wilkes County North Carolina but does not recollect who was the bearer of them – he knows also that Colonel Alexander Martin when he was appointed Governor of North Carolina had a Guard to escort him on his way to Wilmington & that

Isaiah Gates was Captain of that Guard but he does not recollect who composed the guard & that said Johnson served as one of the guard to the Legislature at Salem. Said deponent also states that he was personally acquainted with Colonel Alexander Martin, Col. James Martin, Captain John Armstrong, Lieutenant Joseph Tate & Joseph & Charles McDowell. He also states that during the revolutionary War & afterwards said Johnson was considered a good Whig and a true friend to his Country & was frequently engaged in active service during the War. He also further states that he was acquainted with

Walt Crunk and would believe him on his oath, and that he would believe what said Johnson would state on oath, and further this deponent saith not. S/ Rich. Vernon

S/ Gilbert Marshall, JP

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Gideon Johnson S4456 fn48NC

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

He had a substitute (Elise Curray).

John W. Crunk

Richard Vernon

 

HARDY JOHNSON

 

Hardy Johnson S16428 NC Line: Soldier was born in 1757 or 1758 in Cumberland Co. NC and he lived in Wake Co. NC at enlistment and shortly after his service he moved to Ga, applied 1823 April 24 Houston Co. Ga. PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

HARDY JOHNSON

 

Hardy Johnson R5616 VA Line (?) Inquirey was made 1835 March 2 and it was stated soldier moved from VA to NC about 1805 and had lived in Cumberland Co. NC since that time, papers were removed and never returned. PG 1846 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

HOWELL JOHNSON

 

Howell Johnson and wife Holly: W4468, BLW #26766-160-55: VA LINE: soldier was born 1762 Jan 18, Chesterfield Co.Va and at an early age was moved to Mecklenburg Co.Va soldier applied 1832 March 7 Spartanburg Dist SC and he died there 1846 Jan 13.  Soldier married Holly Crowder 1796 Oct 23 in NC. Widow applied 1853 July 9 1853 Spartanburg Dist Sc age 73 and in 1868 she was a resident of Spartanburg SC. Soldier and wife had several children but only son William L. Johnson the oldest child who was born 1798 Jan 6 and in 1853 was living in York Dist. SC was named. It was stated another son had moved to NC in 1868 a B.G. and E.R. Johnson were of Spartanburg Co. SC Pg 1846 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ISAAC JOHNSON

 

Isaac Johnson S5645: NC Line and Privateer Service: Soldier was born 1761 April 14 in Craven Co. NC soldier lived in Onslow Co NC at enlistment and in 1800 moved to Davidson Co. Tn and he applied there 1832 Oct 25, in 1832 soldier mentioned a brother Charles Johnson who lived in Onslow Co. NC and in 1832 soldier’s sisters Rachel Johnson age abt 76 and Hannah Roach age about 80 lived in Davidson Co. Tn. Pg 1847 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ISAAC JOHNSON

 

Isaac Johnson: S21326 VA LINE: Soldier was born in Charles City Co. Va and he moved with his father to Northampton Co. NC for 1 year then moved to Brunswick Co Va and he lived there at enlistment . He lived there 13 to 14 years after the Revolution and moved to Montgomery CO NC for 30 years then in 1826 Dec. he moved to Carroll Co. Tn and he applied there 1833 April 19 age abt 70 Pg 1847 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JACOB JOHNSON

 

Jacob Johnson or Jacob Johnston wife Nancy: R5622 NC Line: soldier was born in Johnston Co. NC and while an infant his parents moved to Cumberland Co. NC and he lived there at enlistment and he applied there 1834 Dec 1 age 75. Soldier married Nancy (?) 1830 April 18 both were of Cumberland Co NC. Soldier died 1847 March 6 and in 1852 widow Nancy was age 55 a resident of Cumberland Co. NC. In 1832 soldiers brother Alexander Johnson was of Cumberland Co. NC PG 1847 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

Cumberland County, State of North Carolina: Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions December Term 1834

 

 On this first day of December 1834 personally appeared in open Court before the Court

of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for the County and State aforesaid now sitting Jacob Johnson a resident of said County -- aged 75 years -- who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832

 

That he was drafted into the service of the United States -- and served in a company

commanded by Captain John Fletcher of Cross Creek (now Fayetteville) Cumberland County -- but being very illiterate and of frail memory -- does not recollect the year, was detached with others of his Company to procure provisions -- in collecting cattle -- butchering and salting them, in conveying the provisions thus procured to the depot at Cross Creek for the service of the Army -- he thinks this service was performed about 18 months or 2 years before the battle of Guilford -- and believes himself to have been then 17 years of age -- he received a written discharge from his Captain which has been lost, he was acquainted with no higher Officer he served this tour until the expiration of his draft 3 months.

 

Six months subsequently to this as well as he recollects -- he was again drafted and

placed under the Command of Captain Archibald Smith of Cumberland -- he was detailed with others of his Company in guarding and herding the Cattle purchased and collected for the service of the United States, which duty he performed -- being absent from home 3 months -- when he was regularly discharged -- this certificate is lost -- A short time before or after the battle of Guilford -- he was called out by the authorities of Cumberland County with the other friendly population -- to suppress an insurrection of the Tories consequent upon the retreat of this US Army -- the Whig militia assembled near Cross Creek to the number of 500 -- the only officer of note he recollects was Colonel Hardy Sanders of Wake the troop remained embodied until the defeat of the Tory chief Hector McNeil at Lindley's Mills in Moore County by one Colonel Butler the Whigs commander not now recollected. The Tories after this defeat being unable again to make head the troops were permitted to return home -- no discharge being given -- he was at this time out about 20 days.

 

 This Declarant further states that he was born in Johnson County [sic, Johnston County], State of North Carolina day and date unknown to him having no record of his age and being unable to read it if he had won, that his parents removed into Cumberland when he was an infant that he has since and now resides in that County -- that he was drafted twice as above stated -- was never in service with Continental troops – any [one or more and indecipherable words] procuring provisions for their use -- that he does not recollect the Colonel of the Regiment to which his Company belonged - never being embodied -- when he was with it, that he received 2 written discharges which are lost, has no documentary evidence of his services -- but his brother Alexander Johnson 11

-- who served in Gates Army will testify to his services -- that there is no

clergyman residing in his neighborhood -- --

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatsoever to a pension or annuity except the present

and declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of the agency of any state.

Sworn and subscribed to the day and date above written.

S/ Jacob Johnson, JT his mark

 

The following answers were given to the interrogatories propounded by the Court

1st I was born in Johnston County day and date unknown

2nd I have no record of my age nor am I aware that one ever existed.

3rd I was removed to Cumberland County when an infant and have resided in the latter County ever since.

4th I was drafted twice -- volunteered about one month.

5th I recollect no regular Officers -- nor the names of regiments my services not having brought me into contact with the Continental troops.

6th I received 2 written discharges -- at the expiration of the terms of service -- from my

commanders -- which have been lost.

7th That Alexander Johnson will testify to the fact of my services and __ to my character for veracity and the reputation of my revolutionary services in the neighborhood.

Alexander Johnson maketh oath that the statements in the above declaration are true to the best of his knowledge and belief -- he having personal knowledge of most of them.

 

Sworn and subscribed. S/ Alexander Johnson, M his mark

 

[Facts in file: This applicant's claim was not allowed the calls the nature of his services during the war was not covered by the pension acts. The applicant died March 6, 1847; he married April 18, 1830 Nancy __, in Cumberland County North Carolina; in 1852 Nancy Johnson gave her age as 55 years.]

 

Alexander Johnson W5034

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Jacob Johnson (Johnston) R5622 Nancy fn28NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson and Delila Johnson: R5607 NC Line: Soldier was born 1759 May 10: about 8 miles from Murfreeesborough NC near the VA line. And at age 14 he moved to Caswell Co. NC and lived there 3 or 4 years. After the Rev. he then moved to Lawrence SC “laurens” SC for 10 years then to Pendleton CO SC for 9 years. Then to Bunscombe Co. NC for 7 years then he went to Fentress Co. Tn and he applied there 1833 Jan 28. Soldier died 1838 March 30 widow applied 1838 Oct 24 in Roane Co. Tn. Widow was born 1767 July 21 in Bute Co. NC soldier and widow had married about the middle of Jan 1783 in Granville Co. NC and stated she lived near the Granville and Caswell Co. Lines for 6 years prior to her marriage with soldier. Soldier died in Roane Co. Tn: Soldier’s youngest child was James Johnson who made affdt 1838 Oct 24 in Roane Co. Tn aged 29 on 1838 April 4 and stated he had married 1829  April 23 and also was soldiers 9th child. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

The "State Census of NC, 1784-1787," Register, pp. 44-56, Granville Co. shows: "A list of number of Inhabitants in Abraham Plain's District, taken by Samuel Smith, J.P., Aug. 7, 1786." Pg. 1, 05 Jacob MITCHELL; 07 William OWEN, Junr; 12 William ALEN; 16 William FRAISYIER; 17 John RAVEN; 18 James JOHNSON 1-4-4-5-10.

See also Rejected-Suspended Pensions, Section III, which states that the application of Delilah Johnson, widow of James JOHNSON, was rejected as she was not a widow under the Act  http://www.tngenweb.org/revwar/records/j/johnson.html

 

State of Tennessee, Fentress County, on this 28th day of January 1833

 

This day personally appeared before the worshipful Justices of the Court of Pleas and quarter sessions for the County aforesaid now setting, which is a court of record, James Johnson a resident citizen of the County of Fentress in the state of Tennessee aged 73 years agreeable to his record as kept by his parents and himself in his bible, which is now destroyed, and after being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of congress passed the 7th day of June 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States in Caswell County, North Carolina a private to serve a nine month tour, the precise time as to date of entering said service not recollected, but it was the month of May and about 12 or 14 months before the Battle of Stono. Applicant understood that said call of nine-months men were to be balloted for out of the different captains' companies, but when the different companies met at John Hughes in said County of Caswell the field officers nominated and appointed seven men out of the captains' company to which applicant belonged, namely William

White's company, the other six men that were appointed to serve out of Captain White's company were William Allen, George Anderson, James Wadkins, John Wadkins, James Swinee [sic, Sweeney?], Thomas King, and the men that were appointed in the different captains' companies met at the house of William Prowel's in said County of Caswell and there chose Robert More [sic, Moore] captain. There he was put under said captain and Col Arch Little [sic, Archibald Lytle] and Major Dixon, his first name not recollected, and Adjutant Mikel McMullinshehe [sic ?]. They were marched from said Prowel's to Moon's Creek in said County and stationed there four or five weeks and from there to Peytonsburg, Virginia and then stationed there about two or three weeks, and returned to Moon's Creek, joined no other troops and was furloughed until the last day of the next March with an understanding that when we met that the time we had served was not to count as part of the nine months tour, but previous to the time our furlough was to expire, there was a call for militia and a great part of us nine-month men went out on that tour, but this applicant did not; and according to the stipulations of applicant's furlough he met at the house of Col William Moore's in said County of Caswell and was there put under a Major Tatum, his first name not recollected. There was about twenty of us nine months men of Caswell County put under Major Tatum a great part of them being then out on militia tour, applicant marched off under Tatum and joined head quarters at Galphin's in South Carolina and there joined General Lincoln's Army [Benjamin Lincoln] stationed there a few days and marched on through the country to many places under General Lincoln until the expiration of applicants tour. They marched to a place about five miles from Stono, and camped about four weeks at the camp ground before the noted Battle at Stono applicant was in said Battle on the left wing Lieutenant Charleton commanded the platoon that applicant was in when he was marched into battle, said Lieutenant was shot through the belly and died. There was two of the mess of applicant killed in the Battle, to wit: Thomas Searles and Benjamin Haguewood. Applicant was of the third regiment of North Carolina Troops and being of a remnant of the nine-months men was frequently transferred from one captain to another in the regiment to supply the occasional losses that happened in different companies. McCajah [?] Parker was adjutant of the regiment that the applicant served in [one line at top of page is lost] in some .few days after the battle at Stono applicant was marched with the Army on to General Bull's, Staid there about two weeks and then marched to Bacon's Bridge, staid there a few days and thence to Moncks Corner and thence to Charleston and stationed there about one month and we was then marched to Sullivan's Island. Applicant and some few more about forty five in number we was then under Capt Ramsey, staid there about one month, and marched back to Charleston and there staid until we was finally discharged on the last day of November ensuing after the Battle of Stono, the dates not remembered. Applicant received a printed discharge at the Barracks at Charleston expressing that it was for a nine months tour agreeable to an act of assembly. His discharge expressed that he was of the third Regiment and of the north Battalion we of the nine months men were called the new Levees and was not mixed with the militia but served with the regulars and when we nine months new Levees were discharged our sergeant William McCarty called us out from among the regulars and we were discharged accordingly by him for a nine months tour having served two months previous to that last tour for which he had no discharge; being all the service rendered by him in the War of the Revolution against the enemy of his country.

 

Applicant from the information of his parents was born the 10th day of May 1759, about eight miles from Murfreesboro in North Carolina near Virginia line, he is not certain the name of the County. Lived there until 14 years old and then moved to the place where he lived when he entered the service and continued there until three of four years after the end of the Revolution and then moved to Lawrence Co [sic, Laurens] South Carolina, staid there about ten years thence to Pendleton County in said state, there about nine years thence to Buncombe County, North Carolina, staid there near seven

years and thence to where is now Fentress County, Tennessee, where he has lived ever since. Applicant's discharge has been lost a great many years and he knows of no military evidence and knows of no person by whom he can prove his services nor any particular circumstances connected with it, further than is believed from his own tradition, applicant can prove his character as a soldier by William Smith & Daniel Spurlin and others -- they being his neighbors.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present and discloses his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

 

S/ James Johnson, x his mark

Sworn to in open court this 28th day of January 1833

S/ J.H. Richardson, Clk

by his deputy M Huff, D Clk

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of James Johnson R5607

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

eight miles from Murfreesboro in North Carolina near Virginia line

What County is Murfreesboro in in 1759 May 10?

William Smith

Daniel Spurlin

 

 

 

JESSEE JOHNSON

 

Jesse Johnson: S38884: Cont. and NC Line: 1824 March 26: Wilson Co. Tn: aged 61 and referred to wife age 55 and children at home to witt: Rebecca Johnson age 27, William Johnson age 18: John Johnson age 15: Jonathan Johnson age 13: Soldier died 1834 Aug 22. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for

ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original

scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 

 

District of West Tennessee

 

Be it remembered that on the 21st day of March in the year of our Lord 1824 personally came into open court and the court of pleas & quarter Sessions of Wilson County the same being

a court of record Jesse Johnson aged 61 years & a resident in said County of Wilson who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the acts of Congress of the 18th of March 1818 & of the first of may 1820. That he the said Jesse Johnson enlisted for 12 months in the year 1781 and the company commanded by Captain Donoho [Thomas Donoho] in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Dixon [Hal or Henry Dixon] in the North Carolina line on theContinental establishment that he continued to serve in that Corps between 2 & 3 months when he was transferred to the

company commanded by Captain Michael Rodolph [Rudolph?], in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Lee where he continued to serve until the expiration of his term of service when he was discharged on the Ashley River in South Carolina -- He was in the battle of the Eutaws [Eutaw Springs] & engaged in many skirmishes He has lost his discharge & has no evidence of his services except during the affidavits marked A, accompanying this declaration

 

And in pursuance of the act of the first of May 1820, I do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the

revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property, or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income

other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed

 

 Schedule of property belonging to Jesse Johnson

 

 One mare

 

 1 Pot

 

 1 Oven

 

 1 Sett of knives & forks

 

 3 Plates & 1 Dish

 

 1 Coffee Pot

 

 1 Bread Basket

 

 1 Sugar Box 6 Tin Cups $94.50

 

 1 Sow & pigs

 

 3 Beds

 

 1 Horse [?home] cast

 

 S/ Jesse Johnson, X his mark

 

The said Jesse Johnson is a farmer by occupation & in consequence of his age & the dislocation of one arm he cannot prosecute his business so effectually as to ensure a necessary maintenance.

He has a wife aged 55 years & 4 children living with him, to wit Rebecca Johnson aged 27 years,

William aged 18 years, John Johnson aged 15 years

Jonathan aged 13 years -- John is sickly & unable to support himself & none of said children are more than to support themselves.

Sworn to in open court S/ Jesse Johnson, X his mark

Test: S/ John Allcorn, Clk

[veteran died August 22, 1834]

State of North Carolina, Secretary's Office

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in & for the State aforesaid, do certify that it appears from the muster rolls of the Continental line of this State in the revolutionary War, that Jesse Johnston a private in Captain Donoho's company of the 10th Regiment was mustered on 14 June 1781 for the term of 12 months and that he left the service on the 14 June 1782.

Given under my hand at office this 23rd July A.D. 1824.

S/ Wm Hill

State of Tennessee, Wilson County

 

On this 17th day of April 1824 personally appeared before me Brittain Drake and acting Justice of the peace for the County of Wilson Thomas White, and made oath that he has long been acquainted with Jesse Johnson who has applied for a pension, and that he knew him in the

Revolutionary war and that he served in the said war as a Soldier on the Continental establishment for 12 months together, and that he believes that he was honorably discharged.

Sworn and subscribed to before me this 17th day of April 1824.

S/ Brittain Drake, JP S/ Thomas White

State of Tennessee, Wilson County

 

1 FPA W1521

2 Will Graves could not find any application filed by this man, either as Daniel Johnson or Daniel Johnston.

 

 On this 17th day of April 1824 personally came before me Brittain Drake an in the acting Justice of the peace for the County of Wilson Daniel Johnson and made oath that he has long been acquainted with Jesse Johnson who has applied for a pension, and that he knew him in the Revolutionary war and that he served in the said war as a Soldier of the Continental establishment for 12 months together and he believes he was honorably discharged.

Sworn to and subscribed to before made this 17th day of April 1824.

S/ Brittain Drake, JP S/ Daniel Johnson, X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Jesse Johnson S38884 fn34NC

 

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/22/08

 

Jesse Johnston a private in Captain Donoho's company of the 10th Regiment

Thomas White

 

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson R5635 Cont. Line (NC) and SC Line. Soldier was born 1763. Soldier lived in Bladen Co. NC during the latter part of the Revolution and afterwards he moved to TN then to KY then to Hamilton CO. Ill. He applied there 1834 Nov 27. Soldier died 1853 July 9. Children were mentioned in 1847 ( No names). An Isaac Johnson of Hamilton Co. Ill. Stated in 1834 that he knew the soldier well and one Jacob Braden of Hamilton CO. Ill in 1854 state he was directly interested in the soldiers claim for pension (no relationship stated) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

State of Illinois, Hambleton [Hamilton] County

 

 On this 27th day of November, 1834, personage appeared in open court before

William Allen, a member of the County Commission in and of in and the county and

state aforesaid John Johnson, a resident of the county and state aforesaid, aged 71 years,

who being just duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following

declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th,1832.

 

 That he entered the service of the United States under the following named

officers, and served as hear in stated-in the year 1781 or 1782 he was drafted for six

months butt from his advanced age and the consequences of loss of memory, declares he

does not remember his captain’s name but recollects he was commanded by Col. William

Washington for the first three months and that he was at Rugeley's Mill at the time the

British surrendered and after serving three months under Washington, he was then

transferred to the Brigade of and under the command of Genl. Marion [Francis Marion],

and that he was employed in ranging and scouting after the British and Tories in the State

of South Carolina until he fully completed another three months tour of duty; he hereby

relinquishes every claim what was to a pension or annuity except to the present and he

declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in any state. Sworn to me

subscribed to this day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ John Johnson, X his mark

 

We William Henson & Isaac Johnson residing in the County of Hamilton, State of

Illinois hereby certify that we are well acquainted with John Johnson who has subscribed

and Sworn to the above declaration that we believe him to be Seventy one years of age

and that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a

soldier of the Revolution and that we concur in that opinion. Sworn to and Subscribed the

day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ William Henson, X his mark

 

 S/ Isaac Johnson, X his mark

 

Where and what year were you born? Answer: 1763.

 

 Have you any record of your age? Answer: No.

 

 Where were you living when you came into the service? Answer: North Carolina, Bladen County.

 

 How were you called into service? Answer: I was drafted.

 

 Where have you lived since the Revolutionary War[?] [Answer] From North Carolina I

moved to the State of Tennessee, from there to the State of Kentucky, from there to the State of Illinois, Hambleton [Hamilton], where I now live.

 

 In testimony whereof I have hereto set my hand &c.

 

 S/ John Johnson, X his mark

 

 State of Illinois, County of Gallatin

 

Before me the undersigned a justice of the peace in and for the said County

personally appeared Isaac Johnson and made oath that John Johnson who he stated was

an applicant for a pension to the General Government did actually serve as a militia man

in the revolutionary war as stated in his petition for and during the term of 6 months, the

said Isaac further states that he has some 40 years since seen the said John Johnson’s

discharge for said service, but which is lost as he is informed and believes, and further

this deponent saith not.

 

 S/ Isaac Johnson, C his mark

[attested by Moses Thompson, JP]

 

 [The file contains a power of attorney dated May 23, 1854, from Jacob Braden of

Hamilton County, Ill., appointing Charles C. Tucker of Washington City his attorney to

prosecute the claim of John Johnson under the 1818 act or any other act. There is no

indication in the file what relationship, if any, Braden had to Johnson.]

 

[Facts in the file: veteran died July 9, 1853; in a filing dated 1847, there is a reference to

children of John Johnson but none are named and there is no reference to his having a

wife.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of John Johnson R5635 fn35NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves rev’d 10/22/08

 

William Henson

Isaac Johnson

Col. William Washington

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson S30512 NC Line soldier was born in 1760, he lived in Burke CO NC at enlistment. He applied 1834 June 2 in Pike Co. KY having moved there from Tn. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

[The handwriting of the scribe is very challenging—use this transcript with great care and

circumspection. The handwriting got worse the more the scribe wrote. THIS IS A VERY

POOR TRANSCRIPTION, LARGELY DUE TO THE EXTREME DIFFICULTY OF

DECIPHERING THE HANDWRITING OF THE SCRIBE.]

 

 State of Kentucky, County of Pike

 

 On this 2nd day of June 1834 personally appeared before the County Court of Pike

County, John Johnson, a resident of Pike County and State of Kentucky, aged 74 years who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

 That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and

served as herein stated.

 

 He was drafted for 6 months in the State of North Carolina in the year 1777 under

Captain Samuel Henry, Colonel John Sevier in Burke County North Carolina he was the first Sergeant in his Company -- he marched over to the Cherokee Nation, crossing French Broad [River], he was marched down to the South West Point, commonly called “Sow West Pint” he was in no battles during this 6 months, after arriving at “Sow Wes Pint” he used to scout, as did many, from the block houses, he states that many scalps were taken, and he was in several brushes, himself went out a scouting. The country through which he marched was all then North Carolina, and Tennessee being formed out of the same. He states that he was in no battles, only in skirmishes, There was no Continental regiments that served with him during the period aforesaid. McDowell's Regiment came from Quaker Meadows, he states he was at Big Pigeon

[River], this was shortly after Christy [sic, William Christian’s] & Pickens [Andrew Pickens’] Campaign. He knew Colonel Cocke [could be Locke], Captain Jamieson, Lieutenant Caleb Wallace and many other militia officers that was out.

 

 And the next spring 1788 [sic, 1778], he entered for a 6 months Tour as a volunteer and

served out his tour under Colonel Cocke, Captain Samuels, and this was also in Burke County North Carolina, he thinks it was April, about the 10th of that month, and he was marched down to the Tennessee [River] after crossing the mountains [indecipherable word, looks like ‘drunding’] the Tennessee waters from Catabee [Catawba] River. The Indians had killed several families and they [the?] State of North Carolina had to Kich futs [keep forts?] all along on the Catawba during the summer season of that year [indecipherable word or words] fort at this place as the head of the same he remained during the summer of 1778. He states that the scouts from the Fort killed several Indians in the period of his last engagement. He does not know certainly that he ever did kill any Indians, The Tories had approached before this to the same place and the Whigs had burnt it up in August 1778 there were several families killed and they were chiefly all

women and children. In October the Indians most all left the County for the Indian Nation the country through which he marched was then North Carolina the Cherokee Indians had made peace before but there was one [indecipherable word] there who did not like the old Chiefs and could not be prevented [?] from plundering and burning. He served with no Continental officers and he never did as he did. Joe White from Rowan [County] was killed up on the Catawba [River] [indecipherable word]. This year he knew Colonel Cleveland, Myer Jones [Major Jones?], Capt. John Harris Captain Black, Captain Fisher and many officers during his last service. He believes Colonel McDowell was a regular officer. He served out his term of 6 months in the left the service.

 

 He served another tour of 6 months as substitute for one John Clarke in the year 1780 on the 15th day of March under Colonel Ware [? War Dept. interpreted this as Wau], Captain Blair and served with [one or more indecipherable words] November [one or more indecipherable words] at 9 miles [one or more indecipherable words] at the station down the French Broad, he served there till April, and [indecipherable word] scouting and protecting the North Carolina frontier during the whole of that summer, but [several indecipherable words] was done during that year's service and no battles were fought he scouted from the 1st of May (the bushes in that County about that time were all full-grown until the fall, each day no Indian disturbance worth a mention occurred during that year and he does not believe the Indians done anything but steal horses, but few men could be spared out of Rowan whilst the frontier and the forts on French Broad and Catawba [Rivers] had to be kept up. He marched directly to the Fort and there

remained until he was discharged in September or about the first of October 1780. He left the service for each of the tours of service aforesaid he received a written discharge. He knew Colonel Ollaw [?], Major Harrow, Capt. Speight, Lieut. Privel [?could be Privet], but he served: as an Indian scout and was not after the British or Tories, and he states he has always lived in the mountains and never saw a Continental Regiments, he knows of no particular circumstances to mention unless it is to name the persons who was killed by the Indians, which he can do, he states he can establish this claim by living witnesses. He was very young when he entered the service and it being so long since he cannot remember all-- as to what has become of his discharges, he has no idea and therefore can only say they have been long since lost in fact he never took any care of them. He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State, Sworn to

and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ John Johnson, X his mark

 

[William Tackitt, a clergyman, and Thomas May gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 His answers to the Questions –

 

1. He was born [indecipherable word] in the year 1760.

 

2. He has it only by the count of the family.

 

3. In Burke County North Carolina and then moved to Tennessee and then to this state.

 

4th He was drafted for 6 months in North Carolina Burke County for 6 months, the 2nd tour was as a volunteer for 6 months -- the 3rd tour for 6 months as a substitute.

 

5th He knew but few officers -- Captain Blair Colonel McDowell Captain William Nelson, A. Lofton Captain, Colonel Ware & Colonel Sevier and Colonel Otlaw [Outlaw?] who lived at the end of French Broad for many years afterwards -- he states that he served 3 tours of 6 months each against the Cherokee Indians during which time many were killed, and some few whites were massacred by the Indians, he was never in any battles of any particular. The hardest fighting was some way the year of our first served.

 

6. He received his discharges & they were all given by his Captain As he now remembers, but what has become of them nobody knows and they are all not among his papers.

 

7. There is Thomas May Esquire, General Ratliffe, Rev.d James Roberts, Rev’d William Tuckitt, Samuel Hall, George Tuckitt, Henry Newson and Hart Newson.

 

 [Thus ends the horrible handwriting—hallelujah!]

 

 [In a letter dated July 9, 1935, the War Dept. personnel interpreted some of the names in the application as follows: Captain Samuel Henry, Colonel John Sevier, Captain Samuel; Colonel Cocke, Captain Blair and Colonel Wau (?).]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of John Johnson S30512 fn24NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/23/08

 

William Tackitt, a clergyman,

Thomas May

General Ratliffe,

Rev.d James Roberts

Samuel Hall,

George Tuckitt,

Henry Newson 

Hart Newson

Substitute for one John Clarke

 

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson NC Line and no # given on jacket but the #30782 was on the card. He applied 1836 April 27 Pickens CO. Ala. aged 74. Soldier lived in Rowan Co. NC at enlistment and later moved to Rutherford Co. Tn about 1811 then moved to Lauderdale CO. Ala and about 1830 he moved to Pickens CO. Ala. Soldier was born 1762 Jan 2 in Halifax Co. NC. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

State of Alabama, Pickins [Pickens] County

 

 On this 27th day of April in the year of our Lord 1836 -- personally appeared before

Samuel Bolton (Judge of the County Court) but at the applicant's own house John Johnson aged about 74 years, a resident of the County of Pickens and State of Alabama, who being first duly sworn, according to law, doth on his oath take the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he was drafted for the term of 12 months, He was drafted in February 1782, as well as he now recollects, by the State of North Carolina as State Troops where he was raised. He does not now recollect who was the

drafting officer. In March following he went into service. He joined the troops in Salisbury Rowan County. The troops were commanded by Major Joel Lewis. He does not recollect the Adjutant; his Captain was named Charles Gordon: does not recollect the lieutenants. His first Sergeant was James Haskin. When the troops first met at Salisbury, there was but one Company. Lewis marched this Company to widows Rees’ where it was joined with some other Companies.

 

He does not know how many; but he recollects some of the captains names. They were Captain Trouton, Captain Christmas. He does not recollect any other officers of these troops. The troops stayed at Salisbury until about June before they marched to the widow Rees’. He was furloughed while there 4 or 5 days, was taken sick with the mumps, and did not join his company until they arrived at the widow Rees’. He was about 6 days going from Salisbury to the widow Rees’: who live somewhere in the Sand Hills, in Chatham or more County. They marched from widow Rees’ through widow Dawes’ Thence they marched to Hillsboro. They remained there one day, and were furloughed for 5 days. They returned back to Salisbury and were discharged by order from the Governor of North Carolina. He does not recollect the Country through which

he marched. It was mostly in the Sand Hills. He recollects of being at Chatham Courthouse & at Hillsboro. He was discharged in March, 12 months from the time he went into active service. He was in no battles. Had some inconsiderable skirmishes with the Tories, which mostly consisted in taking them prisoners.

 

Previous to his enlistment he served about 3 months in the militia. Though of this service he has no proof that he knows of, except his own declaration. In this service he volunteered for 3 months at Wilkes Court-house. His Colonel here was Benjamin Cleveland. His Captain was Abram De Moss, Garrett Smithey was his Lieutenant; His head commander was Campbell. In this 3 months tour, he marched from Wilkes to King's Mountain, on the top of which they fought a battle with the British & Tories, who were commanded by Forgusson [Ferguson]. Ferguson was killed. He was not in the battle himself: but was 20 miles from the place guarding the sic, of which there were about 20. The sick were left on the other side of Broad River. Before the battle came on an order was sent to this guard, of which he was one, to join the other troops, leaving a few to guard the sick. The sick guard immediately marched off towards the mountain, but met the flag of victory on the part of the patriots, not far from the Cherokee Ford on Broad River. The guard then went on and met the American Army about 10 miles from the Mountain. They were then marched back to Wilkes Court house; thence they were marched to Moravian Town, in Surry [County] he believes, and there they were relieved by other troops, and discharged: having been in actual service 3 months lacking 19 days.

 

 He applied once before for a pension, but stated in his declaration that the 12 months

service was in the militia; this he did, not knowing the difference between the State troops & Militia. He sends also here with annexed the testimony of Andrew Carnahan, with whom he was acquainted in the revolutionary war. He first became acquainted with him at Salisbury, about the month of March 1782. He was in the same company with declarant, until sometime in July, when the Captain was arrested, and Carnahan went off as guard with him to be Governor, and declarant saw no more of him until about 25 years since, when he became acquainted with him again, in Rutherford County Tennessee; where said Carnahan now lives, and is drawing a pension from the government, for his revolutionary services. Declarant moved into Rutherford County about 25 years since, where he lived about 15 years; since which time (about 10 years) he has been living in this County.

 

1 FPA W8577

2 FPA W25689

 

 He has no papers, commissions, or discharges, by which he can prove his services. He

obtained discharges both times, but has lost them. He knows of no other witness, besides

Carnahan, by whom he can prove his services -- except it may be one John McCrory, who lives somewhere in Tennessee, he knows not where, and who was in the same company with him.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension, or annuity, except the present,

and he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any State or Territory.

Sworn to, and subscribed the day & year aforesaid –

S/ John Johnson, X his mark

[attested by Sam B. Moore, Judge]

 

[William Harris, a clergyman, and Josiah Carver gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

To the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, & 7th Interrogatories propounded by the foregoing Judge of the County Court to the applicant he answers in substance that he was born in Halifax County North Carolina A.D. 1762 on the 2nd day of January: That he has a record of his age in his house, taken from some old entries in an old family Prayer book. That he was living in Rowan County North Carolina when called into Service. That since the Revolutionary war he has lived in Rutherford County Tennessee, Lauderdale County Alabama & now in this (Pickens) County where he has lived for the last 4 or 5 years: That he was drafted in the State Troops as already mentioned for the term of 12 months: and one tour volunteered for 3 months; does not recollect the name of any of the regular officers, or of any of the Continental or militia regiments. That he received a written discharge from Captain Gordon for the 12 months Tour, and for the 3 months Tour he got a written discharge from Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, both of which have been long since lost:

 

That he never received any commission: He states that the Reverend William Harris and Josiah Carver are well acquainted with him and can testify to his character for truth & veracity & also to the reputation of his having been a soldier of the Revolution.

Sworn to & subscribed before me 27 April 1836. S/ John Johnson, X his mark

S/ Sam B. Moore, Judge State of North Carolina, Secretary of State's Office

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in and for the State aforesaid, do certify, that it appears from the muster rolls of the Continental line of this State in the revolutionary war, that John Johnston a private in Captain Mills’ Company of the 10th Regiment, entered the service on 1 January 1782 for the term of 12 months, that nothing more is said of him on said rolls.

 

 Given under my hand this 28th May 1836.

 

 S/ Wm Hill

 

 State of Tennessee -- Rutherford County

 

 This day personally came before me John W. Conly an acting justice of the peace for the

County & State aforesaid Andrew Carnahan at his own house, aged 76 years who is infirm, but of sound mind, and who being sworn upon the holy evangelist of Almighty God the truth to speak, and nothing but the truth touching the revolutionary services of John Johnson and being by me thereupon question answers as follows;

 

 Question 1st : Are you acquainted with John Johnson, if so, state when you became

acquainted with him, and what you know, if anything, of his military services during the

revolutionary War.

 

 Answer I am acquainted with John Johnson I became acquainted with him in the year

1782 at Salisbury in the State of North Carolina in the County of Rowan he joined the State Troops at Salisbury sometime in the spring of 1782 and remained there until sometime in the summer of the same year.

 

State the officers he served under Joel Lewis was Major that John Johnson served under Charles Gordon was the Captain over the Company that I am John Johnson served in, and further this deponent saith not this 21st of November 1835.

 

S/ John W. Conly, JP S/ Andrew Carnahan

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of John Johnson BLANK (NC10 assigned by me) fn27NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/22/08

 

Captain was named Charles Gordon

First Sergeant was James Haskin

Captain was Abram De Moss,

Garrett Smithey was his Lieutenant

Andrew Carnahan

John McCrory,

William Harris, a clergyman,

Josiah Carver

Andrew Carnahan

 

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson or John Johnston wife Rosannah: W5011 NC Line: Soldier was born 1753 May 12, soldier died 1802 march 13 or 14th in Randolph Co. NC. Soldier married Rosannah Lytle 1783 Feb 8 as stated by widow 1783 Feb 28 as shown in the bible records and she was born 1761 Nov 10 the daughter of Henry Lytle of Randolph Co. NC widow applied 1839 Feb 5 Randolph CO. NC. She was still there in 1846, children were Henry Johnson born 1784 Jan 23 and he married Polly daughter of Edward Thornbrough and Mary who were born and raised in PA. Thomas Johnson born 1785 May 1: Jane Johnson born 1787 July 6: William Johnson born 1790 April 30: Margaret Johnson born 1792 June 29: John Johnson born 1794 May 5: Elizabeth Johnson born 1795 Feb 9: Mary or Polly Johnson born 1797 March 1: Hezekiah Johnson born 1799 May 17: Clemons Johnson or Clemmons Johnson born 1801 Nov 28: a grandson D.W.C. Johnson was of La Grange NC in 1844 and in 1848 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN M. JOHNSON

 

John M Johnston or Moses Johnson wife Tabitha: R5666 NC Line: Soldier died 1848 Feb 8: widow applied 1856 Dec 30 Hancock Co. Ala. age abt 88: Soldier enlisted in Greene Co. NC: Soldier married Tabitha Massey 178 Jan in Lincoln Co. NC. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 The State of Alabama, County of Hancock

 

 On this 30th day of December in the year of our Lord 1856, personally appeared in open

court before the Court of Probate of Hancock County in the State of Alabama now sitting, Tabitha Johnson, a resident of said County of Hancock in said State of Alabama, aged about 88 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Acts of Congress passed 7th of June 1832, the 7th day of July 1838, the 30th day of March 1843, the 17th day of June 1844, & the 29th day of July 1848.

 

That she is the widow of John M. Johnson deceased, (otherwise sometimes called Moses

Johnson), that said John M. Johnson was some time a private soldier in the War of the

Revolution and served in the State Troops & Militia of the State of North Carolina for 2 years and upwards in tours in different directions -- that he served at one time in the Company commanded by Captain Wilson (whose given name is not now certainly recollected, but believed to be William) -- that, he also served under Colonel Sevier (whose given name is not remembered, but the same that Commanded at Ferguson's defeat at King's Mountain) and also that he served under or with Colonel Ben Cleveland, but affiant cannot more particularly specify the service that the said John M. Johnson entered the service as a volunteer in the County of Greene in the State of North Carolina sometime early in the War of the Revolution and continued in actual service until the end or about the end of the War; for a period of 2 years & more -- that she does not certainly know where her said husband resided when he entered the service, but

supposes it was in said County of Greene in the State of North Carolina where he entered the service and was discharged; that her said husband had a discharge which was long since lost in the burning of his mother's house; and she has now no documentary evidence of the same or of his service and knows of no person whose testimony she can procure who can testify to his service -- that she has often heard him say that he had served under or with Colonel Sevier, Colonel Ben Cleveland, & Colonel Campbell, who fought at Ferguson's defeat at King's mountain.

 

 That she was married to said John M. Johnson deceased (otherwise sometimes

called Moses Johnson) in the month of January about the year A.D. 1786 by Justice of the Peace in the County of Lincoln in the State of North Carolina; that the name of said Justice is not now remembered; that she knows of no record or documentary evidence of said marriage, nor of any one now living by whom she could prove that the same took place, otherwise than by reputation, that her name before her said marriage was Tabitha Massey, that her said husband (said John M. Johnson) died in Hancock County in the State of Alabama on or about the 8th day of February 1848; & that she is now a widow & has remained unmarried since the death of her said Husband. That this application is made for the purpose of obtaining arrears of Pension due said John M. Johnson and to affiant as his widow under the provisions of the several acts aforesaid.

 

 S/ Tabitha Johnson, X her mark

 

Sworn & subscribed to in open Court

 

S/ Orrin Davis, J. Probate H.C.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of John M. Johnson R5666 Tabitha fn11NC

 

 (a/ka/ Moses Johnson)

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/23/08

 

Company commanded by Captain Wilson

Tabitha Massey

 

 

JOSEPH JOHNSON

 

Joseph Johnson S7085: NC Line Soldier was born in 1763 in Bute Co. NC now Warren Co. NC and he lived there at enlistment and he applied there 1833 Aug 29, but was of Halifax Co. NC Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

State of No. Carolina} Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions Aug. Co. AD. 1833

Warren County}

 

On this 29th day of August A.D. 1833 personally appeared before the Justices of the

Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions for the County & State aforesaid now sitting – Joseph Johnson of the County of Halifax No. Carolina, aged Sixty nine years who being first duly sworn according to Law, makes on his oath the following amended declaration (the one heretofore made having been returned for informably[?]) in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832 –

 

Declarant states that he was born in the County of Bute (now Warren) in the year 1763 as he believes altho’ he has no means of ascertaining the fact save by reference to a record of his sister’s age. He was drafted in the militia service on the 10th day of Feb’y 1781 on a Tour of Three months – as to the time he was drafted he states it to the best of his belief – but he has no doubt it is accurate because it is confirmed to the very day by Frank Riggan [pension application S9054] whose affidavit is hereunto annexed – and who together with Frederick Shearin [S7495] whose affidavit is also annexed – was drafted and served out their Tours with this Declarant. We marched first to Harrisburg Granville Co. N.C. thence by Oxford to Hillsboro [sic: Hillsborough] – thence to the High Rock Ford [in Rockingham County] on Haw River – Thence to Guilford C. House N.C. where we met the enemy and an engagement ensued [Battle of Guilford Courthouse,

15 March 1781].

 

His officers names as well as recollected – following. Capt. Jordan Harris – Col.

Herbert Haines and Gen’l. Thomas Eaton. After the Battle of Guilford we were ordered to rendezvous at the [Troublesome] Iron Works from which place we marched to Ramsey’s Mills [in Chatham County] on Deep River. The enemy had some time before passed over on a temporary bridge made of rails or riders From Ramseys mills we were marched to a place called Abernathy, near Wake C. House near Raleigh. here we were discharged on the 10th May 1781 – our Three months having expired.

 

Within a few days after his return from the service as above he volunteered on a Tour of three months under one Capt. John Colclough[?] of Warren Co.John Benton Lieut. & James Powell Ensign. he was marched to Halifax N.Ca and was kept there guarding the Magazine until his time expired. he went to Halifax in July 1781 & was disch’d in October of that year.

 

As soon as he was discharged he immediately volunteered on another Tour of Three months. this was in Octo’r 1781 under one Capt. Joel Sherwood of No Hampton Co. [sic: Northampton County] N.C. Under Capt. Sherwood he was first marched to Tarboro NC. from thence to Johnson [sic: Johnston] C. House N.C. – thence to Fayetteville – then called Cross Creek – thence to Wilmington where we joined the forces of Gen’l. [Griffith] Rutherford & Gen’l. [John] Butler. Cornwallis was taken at York sometime before this [Yorktown VA, 19 Oct 1781] – but the enemy still infested this part of N.C. & the Tories were very troublesome. he was disch’d early in Jan’y

1782 at Buford’s Bridge near Wilmington – peace being made & his time having expired. Thus making in all Three Tours of Three months each. He knows of no person by whom he can prove these last Tours & his discharges have been lost. In all his Tours he served as a private soldier.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a Pension or annuity except the present and he declares that his name is not on the Pension list in any State or Agency whatever.

Sworn & subscribed in open Court. Joseph Johnson his X mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Joseph Johnson: S7085

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

Frank Riggan

Frederick Shearin

Capt. Jordan Harris

Capt. John Colclough[?]

John Benton Lieut. &

James Powell Ensign.

Capt. Joel Sherwood of No Hampton Co

 

 

JOSEPH JOHNSON

 

Joseph Johnson S7093 NC Line: Soldier applied 1818 May 9 in Chatham Co. NC age 63, soldier married Mary Cummings in 1801 both were of Chatham NC ( she was his 2nd wife, 1st not named) soldier died 1841 may 23 in Troup Co. Ga. Having moved there in 1839: Widow died 1841 Sept 27, In 1820 soldier reffered to children: Hannah Johnson 17, Joseph Johnson 15: Caswell Johnson 12, Daniel Johnson 1o, Morgan Johnson 6 or 7L Jackson Johnson 4, and Jasper aged 2: IN 1843 surviving children were Hannah widow of Arris Sorrell, Joseph Johnson, Daniel Johnson, Morgan Johnson, Andrew I. or J. Johnson, Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 District of North Carolina

 

 On this 9th day of May 1818, before the Subscriber, one of the Judges of the United

States for the District aforesaid personally appeared Joseph Johnson, age 63 years, resident in Chatham County in the said District, who being by me first duly sworn, according to law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the provision made by the late act of Congress, entitled "An Act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land & naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war:" That he the said Joseph Johnson, in the year 1776, obtained a commission of Ensign, in the State of North Carolina, in a company commanded by Captain Matthew Ramsay of the 9th Regiment, of the North Carolina line, on the Continental

establishment, in the war of the Revolution; that he continued to serve under said commission for some months, when, in the year 1777, he received a commission of Lieutenant, under the same Captain, and served as such, and the said service of the United States, in said Regiment & in the 6th Regiment, to which he was transferred, until the end of the war, when his service ended of course, in the State of North Carolina -- that he was in the battles of Gates defeat, Stono, & Guilford, and that he is in reduced circumstances, & stands in need of the assistance of his country for support -- and that he has no other evidence now in his power, of his said services, except the papers now exhibited.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me, the day & year aforesaid. S/ J. Johnson

 

S/ H. Potter, DJUSNC

 

 State of North Carolina, Chatham County: Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions begun & held on Monday, 14 August 1820

 

 On this day of August 14, 1820 personally appeared in open Court being a Court of

record for the County and State aforesaid Joseph Johnson aged about 66 years resident in the County of Chatham and State of North Carolina who being first duly sworn upon the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God according to law, doth on his oath declare that he served in the Revolutionary War that the said Joseph Johnston was appointed an Ensign in the year 1776 in the Company commanded by Captain Matthew Ramsey in the Regiment commanded by Colonel John Williams in the Line of the State of North Carolina in the Continental establishment; that he continued to Serve in said Corps until about the year 1778; and the said Joseph Johnson still continued to serve in the Continental Army of the United States under the said Captain Matthew Ramsey & commanded as well as I can remember by Colonel Thomas Armstrong until the peace

between this Country & Great Britain in 1781 at which time the said Joseph Johnson was held as a prisoner in Wilmington North Carolina. That he was engaged in the Battles of Stono, Cambden [sic, Camden], in Guilford besides many other skirmishes with the Enemy and that he has no further evidence of his services save that which was exhibited before his Palmer Henry Potter at Raleigh Judge of the District Court North Carolina in the year 1818 and thence returned to the War Department at Washington City on which a pension was granted to the said Joseph Johnson commencing with the date of the aforesaid declaration before his honor Judge Potter and that he has regularly received his pension down to the 4th of March last 1820 commencing as well as I

can State about May 1818.

 

And I the said Joseph Johnson do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the

United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property, or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed--

 

Here follows a List of my property, I owned no real estate to wit of personal one small heifer; a small Hogs; 3 grown Hogs; 5 small pigs, one pine chest, one pine Table; 3 old chairs; one Pot, one Dutch oven; some small articles of pewter & earthen Ware about the value of $5, one weeding hoe, one grubbing hoe, 2 old plow hoes, I have been in the habit of cultivating the Earth; but have been for some years unable to pursue it; That for some 2 or 3 years I have been in the habit of earning as far as I was able for my support the business of shoemaking; but now from a loss of my eyesight am unable to do but very little at that business –

I have a wife aged about 45 years,

a daughter Hannah aged about 17 years;

a son Joseph aged about 15 years,

a son Caswell aged about 12,

Daniel about 10 years,

Morgan about 7 or 6 years,

Jackson about 4,

Jasper about 2 years old –

I have a charitable neighbor who allows me to live on a small piece of Land –

 

 S/ Joseph Johnson

 

 Sworn to and declared on the 14th day of August 1820 before

 

 S/ N. Stedman

 

 S/ Thomas Parish

 

 S/ Thos. Clegg

 

 

State of North Carolina Secretary's Office 25th of December 1818

 

I do hereby Certify that it appears from the muster roll of the North Carolina Continental line that Joseph Johnston a Lieutenant was in the service of the United States on the 28th of November 1776 and served until the 15th of May 1782 in the 9th Regiment in Captain Ramsey's Company.

 

Given under my hand the date above

 

 S/ Wm Hill, Secretary of State

 

 [On November 15, 1843, Hannah Sorrell, 41, daughter of Joseph Johnson, filed in Chatham County filed seeking the ‘more liberal’ pension due her father under the 1832 Act versus the 1818 Act under which he was pensioned. She states she has heard her father speak of serving under Capt. Ramsey, Col. Williams, Genl. Caswell, Genl. Gates & others. She files on behalf of herself and all the surviving children of Joseph Johnson, to wit:

herself,

Joseph,

Daniel,

Morgan,

Andrew J., and

Benjamin J. Johnson, all of lawful age;

she states that her father married a ‘second time’ to their mother, Mary Cumming, in 1801; that Mary died in 1841; the court found that Lieutenant Joseph Johnson was pensioned under the 1818 act; that he settle in Troupe County, Ga., in 1839 and died there May 23rd 1841.] Georgia, Muscogee County

 

 Personally came before me Daniel Higdon who being duly sworn deposeth and saith that Lieutenant Joseph Johnston volunteered in the revolutionary war in the year 1774 or 5 and continued until the end of the war and the witness further deposeth and saith that the said Lieutenant Joseph Johnston was married in the year 1801 or thereabouts to Mary Cummings both of Chatham County North Carolina and continued there until the said Joseph Johnston removed to Georgia I saw him in Troupe County Georgia in 1839.

Sworn to and subscribed before me in office this August 18, 1843.

 

S/ Daniel Higdon, X his mark

[facts in file: Mary the widow died September 27, 1841; Hannah Johnson, daughter of the

veteran, married Arris Sorrell.]

 

1 Daniel Higdon W25769

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Joseph Johnson S7093 fn44NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/23/08

 

Captain Matthew Ramsay of the 9th Regiment

Hannah Sorrell, 41,

Arris Sorrell

Daniel Higdon,

Mary Cummings married 1801

daughter Hannah Johnson aged about 17 years; born ABT 1803

son Joseph Johnson aged about 15 years, born  abt 1805

son Caswell Johnson aged about 12, born abt 1808

son Daniel Johnson about 10 years, born abt 1810

son Morgan Johnson about 7 or 6 years, born abt 1814

son Jackson Johnson about 4,  born abt 1816

son Jasper Johnson about 2 born years old abt 1818

son Andrew J. Johnson,

 son Benjamin J. Johnson

 

 

MOSES JOHNSON

 

Moses Johnson and wife Nancy: W153 NC Line: Soldier lived in Surry Co. NC at enlistment. Soldier married there to Nancy (?) in 1779 at the home of John Branden  ( relationship not stated) and soon after the Revolution he moved to Tn and he applied 1833 Sept 5 in Hawkins Co. Tn and he died there 1834 April 9. Widow applied 1842 March 11 Hawkins CO. Tn aged 84 however in Feb 1839 she gave her age as 92, a daughter Judith Liford or Lefor was aged 52 and referred to an older sister ( not named) In 1839 Judith lived in Hawkins CO. Tn and a Jacob Liford or Leford also lived there at that time. An Elizabeth Belcher of Hawkins CO. Tn in 1841 and in 1841 a Sarah Stapleton aged 79 of same County made afdts but their relationship to soldier family was not stated. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

 Personally appeared on the 5th day of September 1833 before me William Babb one of

the Justices of the Court of Pleas and quarter Sessions for said County & State Moses Johnson a resident of said County aged 93 years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated --

 

That this declarant sometime in the month of August in the year 1776, while living in

Surry County North Carolina, joined the troops under the command of Colonel Williams of North Carolina as a volunteer under Captain Garvis [sic, Jarvis?], and marched to the Long Island of Holston River, (in Tennessee,) and at which place they formed a Junction with the Virginians under Colonel Christian, from the Long Island they were marched to the Cherokee Towns -- crossing the Holston River at the Great Island, and after remaining some days at the ample Springs on Lick Creek, they were joined by other troops from Watauga -- they afterwards crossed the French Broad River, on to the Tennessee River, then to Tamotbe [?] which they took possession of (an Indian town) from thence to the Great Island Town, and remained there about 20 days -- and then to [indecipherable name], Tellico, Chilhowee [?], which they burnt, also TusKegee [?] -- then they were marched to Chota, from thence returned to the settlements on the

Holston -- having continued in service 6 months, not being discharged until sometime in

February 1777 -- but whether he received a verbal or written discharge he cannot now remember.

 

That in the year 1780 sometime in the month of March he again volunteered for 9

months, in said County of Surry North Carolina, under a Captain Humphreys in the Regiment of militia commanded by Colonel Martin, as well as he now remembers, in the United States Service, and from Surry was marched to within a short distance of Camden South Carolina and during the battle, that took place about the middle of August -- this declarant was left guarding the baggage, -- after the defeat of General Gates this declarant was marched back to North Carolina and discharged -- in the month of December, but he does not now remember at what place -- but this he does remember that he served out his 9 months --

 

That again in the month of January 1781 he again entered the service of his country under

Captain Patrick, as a volunteer, and was marched to the Catawba River, where he came under the command of General Davidson, who was killed (in attempting to cross a ford on that River) by the troops under Lord Cornwallis, from thence he with the troops marched to Guilford Court House -- and this declarant states that he was in the battle of Guilford, where General Greene was obliged to retreat, from Lord Cornwallis, and from the Guilford this declarant was finally marched to Ramsey's Mills and from thence he with part of his company was marched home, in Surry, which place the troops did not reach until the month of July, but the exact time he does not recollect, having served 6 months that tour. He states furthermore that he was acquainted with General Rutherford of North Carolina while in service and with Generals Butler & Eaton -- and was General Greene who commanded at the battle of Guilford and many other officers both regular & militia whom he has now forgotten. He knows of no person, by whom he can prove his Services excepting Henry Blevins & John Dodson

 

On this night day of September 1833 Personally appeared before me Richard Mitchell --

a Justice of the peace in and for said County John Dodson a citizen of to Hawkins County, who being duly sworn according to law states that he is now a pensioner of the United States his name being on the Jonesborough Agency in East Tennessee. He states furthermore that he is well acquainted with Moses Johnson, whose declaration is hereto annexed, made out before of Hawkins County whose certificates he will obtain, should they be living. He has no documentary proof having lost all his discharges,

one sense -- He has no record of his age. He has been living in Tennessee, almost ever since the close of the revolutionary war, and still lives in said State as before stated.

 

There is no clergyman residing in his neighborhood. He is acquainted with James Long, Milam Davis & Jacob Lifer his neighbors who have testified to his reputation. He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

Sworn to and subscribed the day & year aforesaid.

S/ William Babb, JP S/ Moses Johnson, X his mark

 

[James Long, Milam Davis & Jacob Lifer gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 

[On March 11, 1842 in Hawkins County Tennessee, Nancy Johnson, 84, applied for a widow's pension stating that she was the widow of Moses Johnson a pensioner of the United States for his revolutionary services ; that she married him in 1779 and that he died April 9 1834 in Hawkins County [in 1839, she said she was then 92]; in 1841, Judith Liford or Leford, 52, daughter of Moses and Nancy Johnson, filed a supporting affidavit in which she states she had an unnamed older sister. In a filing dated February 12, 1841 in Hawkins County, Nancy Johnson, 83, states she married her husband in Surry County, NC in October 1769, that Sarah Stapelton now residing in Kentucky was her attendant and that her husband died May 9, 1834]

State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

1 Henry Blevins (Blevens) W1703

2 FPA S2518

 

William Babb Esquire -- that said Johnson served as he states in his declaration, 6 months against the Indians under Captain Garvis -- this affiant was with said Johnson on the same campaign in 1776 & 1777. He furthermore states that he has understood that said Johnson served over periods during the revolutionary war, and that seems to be the opinion of all said Johnson's acquaintances and this affiant concurs in that opinion, and he has the fullest reliance on the Statement made by said Moses Johnston and the declaration hereto annexed. Sworn to and subscribed before me the date above.

 

S/ Richard Mitchell, JP S/ John Dodson, X his mark

 

State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

Personally appeared before me Richard Mitchell a Justice of the peace in and aforesaid

County Henry Blevins a citizen of Hawkins County and a Pensioner of the United States of the agency of Jonesborough who being first duly sworn states that he was acquainted with a certain Moses Johnston in a campaign against the Indians in 1776 and 1777 when the troops marched from Holston to the Indian Towns, mentioned in the said Johnson declaration hereto annexed, and he believes that the said Moses Johnson now an applicant for a pension is the same person who served in that campaign -- and from that he high standing the said Johnson has for truth and integrity this affiant would place the utmost confidence in any statement he would make & further saith not.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before made this night day of September 1833

 

S/ Richard Mitchell, JP S/ Henry Blevins, X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Moses Johnson W153 Nancy fn55NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/24/08

 

Captain Garvis [sic, Jarvis?],

Captain Humphreys

Captain Patrick,

Henry Blevins

John Dodson

James Long, his neighbors

Milam Davis his neighbors

Jacob Lifer his neighbors

Nancy Johnson, 84, widow of Moses Johnson

Judith Liford or Leford, 52, daughter of Moses and Nancy Johnson

Sarah Stapelton of Kentucky

William Babb Esquire

 

 

MOSES JOHNSON

 

Moses Johnson and wife Rebecca: W5654 NC Line: Widow applied 1845 Nov 24 Johnston Co. NC age 85 soldier was married to Rebecca Whetton 1792 Feb 25 in Johnston Co. NC and soldier died in 1808 at age 56. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

State of North Carolina, Johnston County

 

 Be it known that on this 24th day of November 1845 personally appeared before the

undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for the County aforesaid Mrs. Rebeccah Johnson a resident of said County aged 85 years and being first duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the acts of Congress passed on the 7th of July 1838 and the 3rd of March 1843.

 

 That she is the widow of Moses Johnson who was a private soldier of the war of the

Revolution in the militia of North Carolina and that a part of the time he served under one

Captain Smith at length of time her said husband served under Captain Smith she cannot say on account of the loss of memory -- and the balance of the time he served under Captain McCullers as he often told her and that the whole time of his service was better than 3 years as she has heard him say divers times -- and that when her said Husband Moses Johnson entered the Army he was a resident of the County of Johnston and the said State -- and she heard him often speak of being in the battle of Camdin [sic, Camden] in South Carolina in the battle of brier creek [sic, Briar Creek] also and several others which she cannot now recollect and she further saith that she was married to her said Husband Moses Johnson on the 25th of February 1791 in Johnston County in said State by one Hardy Bryan Esquire and she further saith that her said Husband

Moses Johnson died in the year 1808 leaving her a widow and that she has remained a widow from that time up to the present time and is still the widow of her said Husband Moses Johnson -- and she further saith that her said Husband was at the time of his death about 56 years old -- and she further saith that her maiden name was Rebecca Whittenton -- and that the reason she has never made application for a pension was she did not know she was entitled until very recently and that she has now made application for a pension for the services of her deceased Husband Moses Johnson -- and that she is unable to go to Court and has called to her house a Justice of the peace before whom she has made her application -- and she further saith that she has no family Bible or other documentary evidence setting forth the age of her children all the time of her marriage and she does hereby now relinquish all claim to a pension except the present sworn to and subscribed before me the day & year first above written.

 

S/ Pa Sanders [Baldy Sanders], JP S/ Rebeccah Johnson, X her mark

 

 

[John Messer, 70, gave a supporting affidavit as to what he recalls Moses Johnson telling him of being at the Battle of Briar Creek and serving a little over 2 years in the Revolution; and of the marriage of Rebecca Whitenton to Moses Johnson.]

 

[William Honeycutt, 60, of Johnston County gave a supporting affidavit in which he stated that he is the son of jewelry Honeycutt, a soldier of the revolution; that he recalls his father and Moses Johnson discussing this service in the revolution.]

 

[Henry Johnson, 67, of Johnston County gave an affidavit that he remembers hearing Moses Johnson speak of his services in the revolutionary war.]

 

[John Avera, 80, a resident of Johnston County gave an affidavit regarding his recollections of conversations with Moses Johnson about his services in the revolutionary war and the marriage of Moses and Rebecca.]

 

[Benjamin Carrell, 68, a resident of Johnston County gave an affidavit regarding his recollections of conversations with Moses Johnson about his services in the revolutionary war and the marriage of Moses and Rebecca.]

 

[Reuben Barber, 82, a resident of Johnston County gave an affidavit regarding his recollections of conversations with Moses Johnson about his services in the revolutionary war and the marriage of Moses and Rebecca.]

 

[Phereby Flowers, 67, a resident of Johnston County gave an affidavit regarding being present at the marriage of Rebecca and Moses Johnson.]

 

[Jacob Flowers, 68, a resident of Johnston County gave an affidavit regarding his recollections of conversations with Moses Johnson about his services in the revolutionary war and the marriage of Moses and Rebecca.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Moses Johnson R5654 Rebecca fn49NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/23/08

 

Captain Smith

Captain McCullers

Hardy Bryan Esquire

Maiden name was Rebecca Whittenton

John Messer, 70

William Honeycutt, 60

Henry Johnson, 67

John Avera, 80

Benjamin Carrell, 68

Reuben Barber, 82

Phereby Flowers, 67

Jacob Flowers, 68

 

 

NATHANIEL JOHNSON

 

Nathaniel Johnson or Nathaniel Johnston: S1841: NC Line applied 1832 Aug 10 Bedford Co. Tn soldier was born in 1756 in Rowan Co. NC and in 1823 he moved to Bedford Co. Tn. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

Pension application of Nathaniel Johnson (Johnston) S1841 fn17NC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

State of Tennessee, Bedford County

 

 On this 10th day of August 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before Samuel

Philips, John B. Armstrong and John L. Neill, Justices of the Quorum, appointed to hold the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for Bedford County State of Tennessee for the year 1832 -- and now sitting, Nathaniel Johnston a resident of Bedford County & State of Tennessee aforesaid aged 76 or 77 years -- who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7, 1832.

 

That he entered the Service of the United States under the following named officers, and served as herein after stated viz. -- He was born in Roan [sic, Rowan] County North Carolina in the year 1756 as he has been informed and believes -- in which County & State he resided until the year 1823 when he removed to the County of Bedford in the State of Tennessee where he has ever since and now resides. He first entered the Service of the United States in an expedition against the Cherokee Indians, under Captain Brandon, the expedition was commanded as he believes by General Rutherford, whether Rutherford was at the time of this expedition a Colonel or General he does not recollect. He entered the Service as a volunteer & served a 5 months Tour. They traversed that part of North Carolina now called East Tennessee, particularly the Country lying

on Little Tennessee also the northern part of Georgia, through the Country lying on Tugaloo River -- burnt and destroyed the Indian towns & settlements on Little Tennessee & Tugaloo rivers -- had many Skirmishes with the Indians, but no general Battle or engagement, took many prisoners & killed many of the Indians. This expedition commenced in the early part of June and ended about the first of November. He cannot say what year, he is confident it was before the Battle at Camden called Gates defeat.

 

He recollects, the names of Colonel or General Rutherford, Colonel Brandon, Major Smith & knows that they were in this expedition as officers bearing the above or foregoing titles, many others probably not recollected & many Captains --

Captain Brandon commanded the Company to which deponent belonged. Sometime after he was discharged from the Indian expedition he again volunteered in the service of the United States under Captain Brandon against an Army of Tories, who were embodied in Lincoln County North Carolina. This expedition was Commanded by Colonel Lock [sic, Francis Locke] & Major Rutherford, we met with the Tories at a place called Ramsour's Mills, in Lincoln County where we had a battle, in which the Tories were defeated. The Whig party lost in this battle about 20 killed & several wounded. Among our killed were Captains Falls, Armstrong and Patton. I served in this expedition as well as I can recollect from one to 2 months. After the battle at Ramsour's above noticed, a call was made for volunteers to go in pursuit of Colonel Bryan who had collected a body of Tories & was marching to join the British at or near Camden South Carolina. This expedition was commanded by Generals Davidson & Locke. I volunteered &

went under them in this expedition. I do not now recollect the name of my Captain. I [believe?] it was Captain Brandon. We rendezvoused at Salisbury North Carolina -- & pursued Colonel Bryan through Montgomery and Anson Counties to the Cheraw Hills in South Carolina where we gave over the pursuit & returned home. We were in the service I think about 2 months in this trip.

 

I next volunteered in the Light horse Company, at the time the British came up to Charlotte from South Carolina, this was under Captain Brandon, and a call was made to raise men to check the British in their March through the upper parts of North Carolina as deponent understood. This expedition lasted about 2 months as well as deponent recollects, & was commanded by Colonel Davie & Major Graham the principal officers -- All the above mentioned expeditions & tours was performed & completed previous to the Battle of Camden, better known as Gates defeat -- but the precise time when they were performed I cannot state, nor do I know of any person by whom I can prove it. He states further that he afterwards volunteered under Captain Huggins in a Tour of 3 months -- which he served, General Rutherford was the Chief Commander -- At the Commencement of this Term of service -- The Army Commanded by General Rutherford rendezvoused at Salisbury from thence we marched towards Camden & formed a Junction with General Gates Army not very far from the Cheraw Hills we then marched

with the Main Army to where the battle was fought, I was in the Battle at Camden called Gates defeat. He further states that he knew General Gates who commanded at this battle -- also General Rutherford, General Butler & General Caswell, Colonels Ledbetter, White, Majors Allcorn, White, Captains Huggins, Wilson.

 

He states further, he volunteered in the service of his Country, after the battle of Gates defeat as aforesaid, & served one or 2 months as Ensign & commanding the Company the Captain & Lieutenant both being absent. This Company or army of volunteers was raised at the time Lord Cornwallis crossed the Catawba River. He was in a little skirmish on the Catawba, at a place called Cowan's Ford, between the Whigs & the British. At which place General Davidson was killed. The principal officers who commanded this expedition were Generals Davidson & Davie. The length of this Tour was about one month as he believes. He further states that he did at several times after this period, entered the Army at the call of his Country, and some of which he served a longer & in some a shorter period of time. He cannot pretend to say what would be the

time he subsequently served -- but supposes it would not exceed 4 months -- He believes he served his Country during the Revolutionary war in the whole a period of not less than 18 months & probably not much more, but of the precise time he cannot undertake to state. He states further, that at the end of every Term of service as aforesaid, he obtained a discharge for the same as he believes, but he did not know they were then or ever would be useful to him, he states he has no knowledge of the manner in which he has lost them but has no hesitation in saying they are now lost or mislaid or destroyed so that he cannot now produce them as evidence in this case. He has no documentary evidence in his possession of the facts spoken of & detailed in the foregoing declaration -- nor does he know of any person by whom he can prove the services aforesaid.

 

 He does further hereby relinquish all and every claim or claims whatever to a pension or

annuity except the present -- and declares his that his name is not on the pension roll of the Agency of any State in the United States.

 

Sworn to in open Court 10 August 1832. S/ Nathaniel Johnston

 

S/ James McKisick, Clk

 

Whereupon the Court consisting of the Members first above mentioned, propounded the

following interrogatories to said Nathaniel Johnston in open Court the 10th day of August 1832

viz.

 

1st When and in what year were you born?

 

Answer I was born in Rowan County State of North Carolina in the year 1755 or 1756, as I informed & believes --

 

2nd Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?

 

Answer -- I have not, --

 

3rd Where were you living when called into service: where have you lived since the

Revolutionary War and where do you now live?

 

Answer; I was living in Rowan County North Carolina when I was first called into service of my Country; I continued to live in said County & State during the Revolutionary war and ever since, until the year 1823 -- at which time I moved to Bedford County in the State of Tennessee, in which last County & State I have lived ever since, and am now living in the same:

 

4th How were you called into service; were you drafted; did you volunteer or were you a

substitute, and if in substitute, for whom?

 

Answer -- I was a volunteer in all the tours above mentioned -- one instance not mentioned in my foregoing declaration I would wish now to mention viz. We were all classed into classes of 7 or 8 persons each of which classes had to furnish a man as called for -- one out of the class to which I belonged was called for, I proposed to the others to go if they would give me a certain sum, this they agreed to; and whilst I was preparing to start, a young man proposed to take my place for much less, I accordingly substituted him. I have been advised I cannot claim any benefit for his service although he served. Unless this transaction might be considered as a substitute business [?] & which is not mentioned in my previous declaration, and to which I would be entitled for

pay -- I have in all the cases been a volunteer. This term was for 12 months --

 

5th State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served, such Continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service.

 

Answer --

 

The Continental & regular officers which I now recollect were, General Gates, & General

Caswell I think, General Caswell was a regular, but am not certain. The militia officers were Generals Rutherford, Butler, Davidson and Locke, & Colonel Davie I probably could recollect more but have not at this time any recollection of them -- I have no recollection of the names or numbers of the Continental & Militia Regiments -- The General Circumstances have all been detailed in my declaration heretofore stated

 

6th Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it?

 

Answer I did receive discharges for every Tour of Service I rendered, who gave them I cannot now say, nor do I know what has become of them, they are lost & cannot now procure them -- I recollect that it was a general practice for the captains of our companies to give the discharges -- I believe Captain Brandon gave me several as I served under him more than one Tour but I could not state the above fact on oath at this time

 

7th State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and their belief in your services as a soldier in the revolution.

 

Answer I know a great many persons who can state about my character, in the neighborhood of Shelbyville Bedford County Tennessee where I now live there are not many living in my immediate neighborhood who knew me in other States or had much acquaintance with me there, I know of Robert Morgan, Isaac Anderson & James Graham who have known me for many years.

 

Sworn to & subscribed in open court 10 August 1832.

 

S/ James McKisick, Clk S/ Nathaniel Johnston

 

[Robert Morgan & James Graham gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 State of Tennessee, Bedford County

 

 Personally appeared before me the undersigned an acting Justices of the peace for said

County Samuel Johnson, who being sworn according to law deposeth and saith that by reason of old age and the consequent loss of memory he cannot swear positively as to the precise periods of the War of the Revolution and he served; but according to the best of his recollection,

his first tour of duty was in the year 1776 it commenced he thinks about the first of June in that year;

 in his 2nd tour was he thinks in the year 1777 about Harvest he recollects the wheat was ripe

his 3rd tour was in May in the year 1780 and

his 4th tour of duty was at Gates defeat on the 16th of August 1780 in his

5th tour was in the year 1781, and the balance of his Service he is not able to say what years it was then --

 

 Subscribed in Sworn to before me this 28 December 1832.

 

S/ [illegible signature of a justice of the peace] S/ Nathaniel Johnston

 

[George Newton, a clergyman, gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/24/08

 

Robert Morgan,

Isaac Anderson

James Graham

Captain Brandon

Captain Falls,

Captain Armstrong

Captain Patton.

Captain Huggins

 

 

REUBEN JOHNSON

 

Reuben Johnson and wife Nancy: W10156: NC Line: 1832 Nov 19 applied Anderson Co. SC age 74. He enlisted at Charleston Co. SC. Widow applied 1843 March 29 in Anderson Dist. SC age 72: Soldier married Nancy Greenlee 1788 Nov 20. Soldier died 1833 Jan 26. Widows sister Margaret Burroughs of Anderson Dist. SC made affdt 1843 March 4 and stated widow was 6 years older than she was and that their father was Peter Greenlee who died abt 1803 and he and Soldier both had moved from NC t o SC Widows Mother (not named) died abt 1842 Dec 1: Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 

South Carolina, Anderson District

 

 On this 19th day of November 1832 Personally appeared before me one of the Justices of

the peace for the State and district aforesaid Reuben Johnson a resident of South Carolina in the district of Anderson aged 74 years next January, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

That he enlisted in the Army of the United States in the year 1776 with Richard Phillips and served in the 4th Regiment of the North Carolina line or troops under the following named officers –

 

Enlisted in the Spring of the above year, for 2 1/2 years under the command of Joseph Philips Captain, Micajah Lewis 1st Lieutenant, William Hickman 2nd Lieutenant, Poge was my Colonel Thaxton [sic, James Thackston ] 2nd Col. Davison [sic, Davidson] my Major and Nash by General and before the term I enlisted for I enlisted a 2nd time for during the war; and in my first term of time I marched from North Carolina Surry County where I enlisted to Charleston in South Carolina and from thence marched back to Halifax

 

I then enlisted as above and got a furlough to go home I did so and joined the Army at Wilmington and spent the winter there. I marched next to Georgetown on the Potomac [River] and was after that at the battles and in them at Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth, at the Valley Forge I was put into the 1st Regiment under Colonel Clark and Colonel Maburn [sic, Mebane] Majors name not recollected, and at the siege of Charleston South Carolina, was taken a prisoner by the British, Hogan [sic, James Hogun] commanded me at Charleston when taken.

 

 He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or an annuity, except the

present, and he declares his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in the State of South Carolina.

 

Sworn to, and subscribed, the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ Reuben Johnson

 

[Robert King, a clergyman, and Elisha Kelly gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

And the above named applicant Reuben Johnson and on the same day did before me declare on oath that from the bodily infirmities that he was laboring under (viz., the gravel[)] it render him so unhappy that he could not attend a court of the kind required by the War Department unless to his very great inconvenience.

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me. S/ Reuben Johnson

 

S/ Joseph Cox, JP

 

 

[On March 29, 1843, in Anderson District South Carolina, Nancy Johnson, 72, made application for a widow's pension stating that she is the widow of Reuben Johnson, a pensioner under the 1832 act; that she married him November 20, 1788; and that he died January 26 1833.]

 

 

[Margaret Burroughs, sister of Nancy Johnson, gave an affidavit in support of her sisters application stating that her maiden name was Nancy Grunlee; that her sister married Reuben Johnson in the state of North Carolina; that her sister Nancy was 6 years older than herself; that their father, Peter Grunlee, with his family removed from North Carolina to South Carolina and that Reuben Johnson and his wife Nancy lived on the same plantation as Nancy's father; that their father, Peter, died some 40 years previous. Margaret's affidavit was dated March 4, 1843 and was given in Anderson District South Carolina.]

 

 

[fn. 13, marriage bond given by Reuben Johnson and William Johnson for the marriage of Reuben to Nancy Grunlee; given in Wilkes County, NC and dated October 30, 1788.]

 

 

State of North Carolina, Secretary of State's Office

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in and for the State aforesaid, do certify it appears from the muster rolls of the Continental line of this State in the revolutionary war, that Reuben Johnson a private in Captain Phillips’ Company of the 4th Regiment enlisted in 1777 for the war, that a Warrant was issued for his services as a Soldier in November 1795.

 

Given under my hand this 28th day of May 1833.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Reuben Johnson W10156 Nancy fn28NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/25/08

 

Richard Phillips

Joseph Philips Captain,

Micajah Lewis 1st Lieutenant,

William Hickman 2nd Lieutenant

Robert King, a clergyman,

Elisha Kelly

Nancy Johnson, or Nancy Grunlee

Margaret Burroughs or Margaret Grunlee

Father, Peter Grunlee

 

 

RICHARD JOHNSON

 

Richard Johnson S16896 VA Line: Soldier was born in 1760 in Southampton Co. Va and he lived there at enlistment. He applied 1832 Nov 5 Greene Co. Ala. age 72. Soldier also served as a sub. For his brother Jordan Johnson. In 1800 soldier moved from Southampton Co. Va to Johnston Co. NC and in 1823 he moved to Greene Co. Ala. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ROBERT JOHNSON

 

Robert Johnson or Robert Johnston wife Elizabeth: W371: NC Line: Widow applied 1844 Feb 2, Knox Co. Tn age 69. Soldier and widow married 1791 April 1 and soldier died 1840 April 20. Soldier had applied 1834 Sept 6 Hawkins Co. Tn age 74 he lived in Randolph Co NC at enlistment. Soldier was born in 1760 PA. Widow was born 1775 April 19, children shown were Mary Johnson born 1792 March, Sarah Johnson born 1794 July 17, Jane Johnson born 1796 June 5. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

On this 6th day of September 1834 personally appeared before Shadrach Epperson an

acting Justice of the peace for said County Robert Johnson resident of Hawkins County and State of Tennessee aged 74 years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States in the year 1780 as a volunteer under the

command of Colonel Collier Major Sharp and Captain Johnson I was then living in Randolph County State of North Carolina. I entered the service the first of October 1780 and marched on to Salisbury and lay there some time from there we marched. On crossing the Yadkin River at the Shallow Ford from there we went on through Salem and from there we joined General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] at the high rock Ford we lay there until Greene collected all his forces and then marched on towards Guilford Courthouse we were met by the British under the Command of Cornwallis and a severe battle took place sometime in March 1781. From there Greene and his men marched on to South Carolina I went on and stayed with General Greene until I was discharged at Rugeley's mill by Colonel Collier and returned home in my own County of Randolph, about the first of May as well as I now recollect being gone 8 months. After I

arrived at home the Tories were so troublesome it was dangerous for a Whig to stay at home.

 

The first of June 1781 I volunteered myself again under the same officers for to go against the Tories that were collected in different parts of the country doing mischief we marched against one Fannin [sic, David Fanning] a Tory Officer and his men at Linsey’s [Lindley’s] Mill we defeated them killing 36 of his men and wounded Fanning but he escaped. We were always scouting about from place to place against the Tories we came up with Fanning at another place at one Needams [sic, Needham’s?], in the night and fired on Fanning and his men and they fled and Fanning escaped again we were Continual against the Tories that were doing mischief in the Country they burned Colonel Collier's house in the time we came upon them while the house was burning but they escaped -- we had various skirmishes with them during the summer and fall

of 1781. The Tories being rousted out of that part of the Country in a great measure we had some stiller times and I was dismissed and returned home being in actual service 6 months.

 

When I entered the service this time it was in Randolph County North Carolina. I was dismissed the first of December as well as I now recollect.

 

 This declarant further states that Colonel Collier called out men after this declarant

returned home different times as occasion would require against the outlying Tories and he always volunteered himself when required and went various trips against the Tories but of short duration that he cannot now recall as to the precise length of each trip but is satisfied so served not less than 2 months actual service in short trips during the winter of 1781 in the spring of 1782. This Declarant declares he was in actual service the time he states above and always was ready and willing at any call always volunteered himself and was called out by competent authority. That he was either in the field or in Garrison and for the time during which the service was performed he was not employed in any civil pursuit. This Declarant says he knows of no one and who he can prove his service by he has no documentary evidence of his service he hereby relinquishes every Claim to a pension or annuity whatever except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed the day and year last above mentioned before me.

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

 State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

 On this 6th day of September 1834 personally appeared Robert Johnson before Shadrach

Epperson an acting Justice of the peace for said County and made Oath that he is not sufficiently acquainted with any clergyman that he can procure one to sign his declaration as he does not go about any of consequence in the neighborhood.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed the day and year above mentioned before me.

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

 Questions proposed to Robert Johnson applicant for a pension by the war department

 

1st Question

 

Ans: I was born in the year 17_0 in the State of Pennsylvania

 

2nd Question

 

Ans: I have not that I know of

 

3rd Question

 

Ans: I was living in the State of North Carolina Randolph County from North Carolina I moved into the State of Tennessee Hawkins County where I now live

 

4th Question

 

Ans: I volunteered myself every time

 

5th Question

 

Ans: Colonel Collier, Major Sharp, General Greene, Captain Sharp

 

6th Question

 

Ans: I received one from Colonel Collier which I have lost

 

7th Question

 

Ans: Thomas Epperson, Shadrach Epperson, Valentine Wolf, Captain John Wolf

 

[William Walker and Major Charles Wolf gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 

Amendment to the foregoing Declaration of Robert Johnson on the 28th of September 1834 personally appeared Robert Johnson before Shadrach Epperson one of the acting Justices of the peace for Hawkins County and after being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following amendment to the foregoing Declaration.

 

He entered the service of the United States first of October 1780 and served as he before

stated. I did not join General Greene at the high rock Ford until some time in the winter after I went out. The cause of my serving as long at one trip before I returned home was as follows: I always volunteered myself and when my tour of service expired I was importuned by my officers to remain in service That if we all would go home it would greatly weaken the forces and in all probability I would be killed by the Tories at home and if I would remain I could be dismissed whenever I chose. There were some went home when their term of service was out and some remained I being a young man and had not much to look after at home I chose to remain in

service --

 

 I knew if I went home I would have to be on my guard for fear of the Tories and I

contented myself to remain in service. This Applicant further states it was the same in relation to his service in 1781. Immediately on his return from his first trip he could not remained in safety at home the cry was Whig and Tory all round him Tories would hate the Whig whip him or hang him the same by the Whig find the men at home and he was accused of being a Tory even if he was a Whig and he was a [indecipherable word] a man it appeared was not safe in his own house and this was the cause I remained in service. I could have returned home at the end of my service but we kept embodied -- our own safety and in order to check the Tories this applicant further states if he had come home he would have been in more danger than he was, he could continually hear of the Tories making mischief either by stealing, murdering, burning [indecipherable word] and the like and he was [indecipherable word] generally searching from place to place when circumstances would require. This applicant solemnly states he was

engaged in actual service the time he before stated to the best of his knowledge and to save more or less he cannot give the never gets [indecipherable word or words].

 

Sworn to and subscribed this 26 September 1834 before me

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

 Amendment to the declaration of Robert Johnson

 

State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

 On this 6th day of December 1834 Personally appeared Robert Johnson resident of the

County of Hawkins and State of Tennessee before Shadrach Epperson one of the Justices of the peace for said County and after being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following amendment to the foregoing declaration.

 

 After mature consideration I recollect after the battle at Guilford Courthouse we marched

on to some Iron works where we encamped and from there we marched on to South Carolina some time towards the latter end of April we were attacked by the British near a town called Camden we were forced to give ground. We retreated to a place called Rugeley's Mills where we encamped -- at which place I was discharged and arrived home the first; or near the first of May being gone 8 months –

 

From the time I first entered the service in Randolph County North Carolina and took up a line of March I cannot recollect the names of the counties I went through and there being no particular occurrence took place until we joined General Greene I was always subject to military duty -- while I was gone and cooperated with the rules and regulations of the Army -- the same as any soldier in camp and thought myself bound so to do.

 

When I returned home in May Colonel Collier raised man either by draft or volunteers as men chose (whether he had any authority to do so I am not able to say but expect he had) I volunteered myself under Captain Johnson a second time and entered the service but for me to recall every little circumstance after the lapse of so many years I cannot. I do not recollect every place we camped or was stationed neither do I remember the particular direction we marched. I know we were often upon the scout after Tories and outliers that were doing mischief in the country and at different times we were stationed for a while in the country but the names of the places we were stationed at or whether they bore any particular name I am unable to say. When I say we were always scouting about I do not mean I was continually night and day But going but as circumstances would require I recollect of an attack we had with Colonel Fanning a Tory and his men at Linneys [Lindley’s] Mill and defeated him at another time we marched upon the same

Colonel at one Needham’s, and fired on him and his men and continued from place to place through the country until my time Expired. And as respects my last term of service or during my last trips of service in small scouts I cannot recollect them precisely as they occurred.

 

But I know that several times in the winter 1781 and spring 1782 Captain Collier called men by draft or volunteer in go through the country after Tories and I always went as a volunteer whenever there was need of men in the country and I am certain my last trips under Captain Johnson as well as I can now recollect was 2 months -- Sworn to and subscribed this 6th day of December 1834 before me.

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

 On this 6th day of December 1834 personally appeared Robert Johnson before Shadrach

Epperson one of the acting Justices for said County and after being duly sworn according to law deposeth and saith that owing to old age and the consequent loss of memory he cannot swear positively as to the precise length of his service but according to the best of his recollection he served not less than the periods mentioned below and the following grades, for 8 months I served as a private under Captain Johnson in 1780 in 1781 for 6 months I served under Captain Johnson a 2nd time in the summer and fall of 1781 for 2 months I served under Captain Johnson a third time in the winter 81 and spring 82 for which service I claim a pension sworn to before me the day above written.

 

S/ Shadrach Epperson, JP S/ Robert Johnson

 

 [On February 2, 1844, in Knox County Tennessee, Mrs. Elizabeth Johnston, 69, filed for a widows pension stating that she was the widow of Robert Johnson, a pensioner of the United States at the rate of $40 per annum; that she married him April 1, 1791; and that he died April 20 1840.]

 

 [Bible record

 

Robert Johnson was born the __ Day of __ in the of our Lord __

 

Elizabeth Johnson was born the 19th Day of April in the your of our Lord 1775

 

Mary Johnson was born the 19th of March in the year of our Lord 1792

 

Sarah Johnson was born the 17th Day of July in the year of our Lord 1794

 

Jane Johnson Johnson was born the 5th Day of June in the year of our Lord 1796]

 

 [facts in file: Elizabeth’s maiden name was Sumner; son, John R. Johnson, 38, on June 27, 1844, gave an affidavit in support of his mother’s claim in Knox County, Tenn.; ditto, Robert Johnson,

37.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Robert Johnson (Johnston) W371 Elizabeth fn48NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/26/08

 

Captain Johnson of Randolph Co NC

Captain Sharp of Randolph Co NC

Thomas Epperson,

Shadrach Epperson,

Valentine Wolf,

Captain John Wolf

William Walker

Major Charles Wolf

Captain Collier of Randolph Co NC

Mrs. Elizabeth Johnston, 69 born 1775 ? or Elizabeth Sumner

 

SAMUEL JOHNSON

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Pension Application of Samuel Johnson (widow's claim) W5012 Mary fn315NC

 

State of North Carolina, County of Wilkes

 

 On this 24th day of January 1839: Mary Johnson a resident of the aforesaid County, personally appeared before me James Martin one of the acting justices of the County aforesaid who first being duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed July 7th 1838, entitled an act granting half pay and pension to certain widows - That she is seventy eight years of age and that she is the widow of Samuel Johnson who was an invalid pensioner and that proof of his services has already been made when he was placed on the pension roll of the United States. She further declares that she was married to the said Samuel Johnson on the 25th day of June in the year seventeen hundred and eighty one, that her husband, the aforesaid Samuel Johnson died on the 15th September 1834, that she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service, but the marriage took place previous to the first of January seventeen hundred and ninety four, and at the time above stated and that she has not been married since. She has no more written evidence.

Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written before.

S/ James Martin, JP

S/ Mary Johnson, X her mark

 

State of North Carolina, County of Wilkes

On this 24th day of January 1839 personally appeared before the subscriber of the County

aforesaid Sarah Hammons a resident of the County aforesaid aged seventy years who first being duly sworn according to law, saith that she lived near the above applicant Mary Johnson before she was married and knew her and her husband Samuel Johnson before and after they were married as she understood but was not at their marriage, but knew them from that time until the death of her husband Samuel Johnson, and their marriage was never disputed. She further saith that she has often heard a Baptist preacher by the name of William Hammons say that he married them, and she believes it was in

the month and year stated by the above applicant.

Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written before.

S/ James Martin, JP

S/ Sarah Hammons, X her mark

State of North Carolina, Wilkes County

 

On this 2nd day of May A.D. 1854 personally appeared Ambrose Johnson, Admt. of Mary Johnson, decd., late of Wilkes County, State of North Carolina and made the following declaration, an oath before the said Worshipful and the County court of the County and State aforesaid.

To wit - That he is the son of the said Mary Johnson, Decd., late of said County and of Captain Samuel Johnson Decd. late of said County and State. He states that his said father, the said Captain Samuel Johnson Decd. was in his lifetime an invalid pensioner of the United States on account of his, the said Captain Samuel Johnson's Revolutionary Services -- That he died in the month of Sept A.D. 1834 and that his said mother, the said Mary Johnson now Decd. - after the death of his said father, the said Capt. Samuel Johnson also drew a pension from the United States on account of the Revolutionary Services of her said husband, the said Capt. Samuel Johnson. He states that his said mother, the said Mary Johnson died in Wilkes County State of North Carolina on or about the 21st day of January A.D. 1853. The said Ambrose Johnson, Admt. as aforesaid states that he is the fifth child of his said parents - the said Capt. Samuel Johnson and Mary Johnson - that he is now in this present month of May A.D. 1856 sixty one years old. He further states that his said father, the said Capt. Samuel Johnson, Decd., always said that he had been a soldier in the war of the revolution, that he first went into the service of his country as a volunteer, a private under Capt. Benjamin Cleveland (afterward Colonel Cleveland). In the expedition against the Cherokee Indians in the summer of the year 1776 - under the command of General Rutherford and he states most positively that his said father, the said Samuel Johnson, always declared that he served thusly the whole of the war of the Revolution first as a private and then as a Captain - until the close of the war except such time as he was sick or when wounded and unable to serve, his said father always said that he served minus pay - with the exception of those inconsiderable interruptions - all of which the applicant surely believes - and what was always said and believed in the whole County - so far as he ever heard or believes - and as he always heard stated by many of the old soldiers who at times during the said war - the precise date he does not now recollect - but that he knows that it was sometime before the close of the war, and he entertains no doubt but that his father did continue in the service after his marriage to said mother who was Mary Hammons and lived at the time in Wilkes County and was the daughter of one Ambrose Hammons- he states that he has heard his said father speak of many expeditions on which he went during said war - which he can not now recount the names of places &c and that he was in the expedition and Battle of King's Mountain - in which battle he was severely wounded being shot through the abdomen, that he has many times seen the scars - he states that his father, the said Captain Samuel Johnson always said that he had no doubt but that said shot would have killed him had it not been for the fact that his bowels were entirely empty - That he had been for some three days previous to said Battle without eating anything except that him and three of his men that was with him ate one small terrapin, he being on a scouting and observing expedition - They having orders from the commanding officer to fire no guns, so that they could get no game, nor nothing else to eat. He further states that his said father, the said Samuel Johnson was placed on the pension rolls of the United States as an invalid pensioner without his own knowledge and without any application on his part. This he well recollects that it was done by the late Governor Jesse Franklin who was at the time a senator in the Congress of the United States - and he further states that his said father was so very indifferent about it at the time and during the time - that for some two or three years at one time he declined drawing the pension and then again upon solicitation resumed it again. He states that the said Jesse Franklin was an intimate acquaintance of his said father and was with him in the Battle of King's Mountain and that he was a nephew of Colonel Benjamin Cleveland. He states that his said father served under the command of Colonel Cleveland -- General Rutherford, Col. Campbell & others. He further states that his father the said Captain Samuel Johnson was a most intimate and confidential friend and officer of Col. Cleveland's and that as a mark of high esteem and approbation of his said father by Col. Cleveland.

 

That after the War of the Revolution that Col. Cleveland presented to his said father the said Capt. Samuel Johnson, his True battle sword and this applicant states that he now has in his possession and care the identical sword - that the said sword by some accident in the lifetime of his said father, the Capt. Samuel Johnson, got broken across near the middle of the blade - and that he saw his said father in his own work shop draw a shank to the point end of said sword and fasten it into the previous [?] same handle guard and mounting and that it is now about one half of its original length though otherwise is in a good State of preservation - that the said sword is silver mounted guard &c and Buck

horn handle - and if it was not for the reason of its mutilation he would with great pleasure present it to the United States. He further states that he never heard of any Captain Johnson of anywhere except his said father, the said Captain Samuel Johnson having been in this section of the State during the war of the Revolution nor has he ever heard nor does he believe that there was any other Samuel Johnson in this County or section of County at that time - he states that his grandfather's name, the father of the

said Capt. Samuel Johnson was Jeffrey Johnson, that he lived and died in Wilkes County and that he was a man quite advanced in years in the time of said war and never took any part in said war that he ever heard, he being too old - that his said father, the said Capt. Samuel Johnson was among the youngest of the family of children of his said father the said Jeffrey Johnson - he does not think that there was more than one other of the said family of his said grandfather younger than his said father, the said Samuel Johnson. He further states that some years after the death of his father, the said Samuel Johnson that his widow the said Mary Johnson who was very old and feeble both in body and

mind began to show evident and rapid loss of mind and memory, that sometime about the dates of 1838, 39 or 40 - he thinks that his said mother had most violent spell or paragsis [?] of convulsions which held her for some 24 hours or more as he was informed by the family - which seemed to have been induced from a great affright given her on account of a violent storm which occurred at the time in her neighborhood and that after that time her mind seemed to fail more rapidly and at times would be worse until finally for some time before her death it could not be said that she had any mind at all. So great was the decline of her mind and memory for many years before her death that at many times she

would not know her nearest neighbors or even her own children. This applicant states - as a circumstance - confirmation of this - that on one occasion - a good many years before the death of his said mother, the said Mary Johnson, that he went to see her as he frequently did - that on meeting with her she shook hands as usual with him but did not seem to recognize him or name him as usual - which he noticed at the time and that she went away to one of the servants and asked who he was - that the servant told her that it was Master Ambrose and that then and not before did she know him. And this

applicant verily believes that his said mother, the said Mary Johnson before her application for a pension had become so much impaired in mind and memory that she most likely to him did not remember the rank or services of her said husband or at least very little about it with any degree of certainty or distinctness and that as he thinks or believes had no competent person to advise her of her rights or interests and that when she had been in her right mind that she was - although a good and most

excellent woman and mother, without education, lived in a remote part of the country, knew nothing of law, or anything of her rights or claims under it.

 

 S/ Ambrose Johnson

 

 Admt. of Mary Johnson, dec.

 

 Sworn to and acknowledged in open court the day and year above written - and I do hereby certify that the said Ambrose Johnson is a respectable resident of this County of Wilkes, State of North Carolina well known to me and in every way worthy of belief.

 

 S/ M.S. Stokes, JP

 

 and Clerk of Court

 

 State of North Carolina, Wilkes County

 

 

 

 I W. Masten, Clerk of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for the County of Wilkes in the State aforesaid do certify that M. Stokes is a magistrate as above and Chairman of the Court and that the foregoing signature purporting to be true is genuine and further that the foregoing acknowledgment and attestation was taken in open court.

 

 Given now in my hand the seal of said court and office May 6,1854

 

 S/ W. Masten, Clk

 

 State of North Carolina, County of Wilkes: Summer Session Wilkes County Court

 

 On this 2nd day of Aug. A.D. 1854, personally appeared in open court Lewis Johnson and John S. Johnson, Sons of the late Capt. Samuel Johnson and Mary Johnson, now decd. of said County, and made the following declaration on oath: To wit: That the said Lewis Johnson is now in his 55th year of age and the said John S. Johnson in his 51st year of age, that their said father, Capt. Samuel Johnson, late of said County, was an invalid pensioner of the United States and that after his death his widow &

their mother the said Mrs. Mary Johnson, also drew a pension on account of the Revolutionary service of her husband the said Capt. Samuel Johnson. They State that their said father always stated - evidence their earliest recollection - that he had been an officer & soldier in the Revolution, that he had served six years of said war—that the balance of said war that he did not serve was taken up with a long illness he had on his return from the Cherokee expedition under Capt. Cleveland and General Rutherford in 1776 and the loss of time from his wound at King's Mountain Battle, and some other

small losses of time, making about one year out of the six years continued of said war, that he always said that he served to the close of said war. They State most positively that they have many times heard both their said parents speak of a particular occurrence in his said service after their marriage: that one Sabbath they were attending church at the Roaring River Meeting House in their neighborhood when a messenger arrived from the west of the Blue Ridge informing of some depredations of Tories, that their

said father immediately summoned such of his men as was at hand, armed, and hastened on the expedition and left their said mother to go home by herself, that they came up with the Tories, had battle, routed them &c and that they have heard their said father often speak of several like expeditions against the Tories; in that direction west of the Blue Ridge about the Peach Bottom Mountain and about the edge of Virginia, that he always spoke of those expeditions as having occurred late in the war and after his marriage with their mother. They both State that in passing from their residence in Wilkes County to Grayson County, Va. with their said father where they had a sister living (Mrs. Mary Bora) that their father has pointed out to them the spot at Cox's ford on the Big River in Grayson County, Va. on the north side of said river at the Peach bottom where they had a camp in one of his expeditions spoken of, all which they fully believe to be true, together with many incidents connected with said expeditions and service too tedious to mention. They are of the opinion that these terms of service was each of short duration, perhaps not longer than ten days each, but were quite hazardous and dangerous, and they here again State most emphatically on their oaths that from what their father always said in his lifetime and what was also said by their said mother whilst in her proper mind and what was always said by all the old people, the said Capt. Samuel Johnson, did continue in active service to the close of the war of the Revolution and did serve much after his marriage with their mother the said Mrs. Mary Johnson.

 

 The said Lewis Johnson states that he was married before the death of his said father and lived near him within about 3/4 mile and the said John S. Johnson that he lived with his mother all the time up to her death. They State that she died at her residence in Wilkes County, N.C. about the 21st day of Jany A.D. 1853, that the said John S. Johnson states that he made a record of her death and is correct. They both State that soon after the death of their father they think about the Christmas following came a year that their said mother was taken ill with a kind of spasm or fits, that those spells gradually grew worse in her and it was soon perceptible to them that her mind and recollection was failing her and that sometime about the year of 1838 or 9 as they think to the best of their recollection on the occurrence of a very violent storm in their neighborhood that she had a most violent attack of fits, that for some 24 Hours her life was despaired of and that after that her mind always seemed much worse until a total State of imbecility of mind and memory occurred. They State that for many years before her death that she was scarcely ever so that she knew anything and seemed to have no recollection at all - would not

know her nearest neighbors and very often not her own Children, not truly her said son the said John S. Johnson—who was constantly with her who for many years before her death was scarcely absent from her a whole day at a time and scarcely even of a night &c.

 

 They both State that they never knew what this said mother, the said Mary Johnson, stated in her declaration bearing date the 24 day of Jany A.D. 1839 until a copy of said declaration was lately shown to them by Dr. James Calloway. That neither of them was present when said declaration was made, that had they been present that they would have known that the statement therein made "That she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service" was incorrect. That this statement is contrary to what she always stated when she was of sound mind and memory as also did their said father the said Capt. Samuel Johnson. They State upon their oaths that at the time and date if this declaration that they do not believe that she was of sufficient mind and memory by any means to make a correct statement or declaration in the premises—And that further that they do not believe that at any time in her life she would have comprehended the meaning of this passage in her declaration unless it had been explained to her—That she was an unlearned woman raised in the backwoods and frontier of the County—and was all her life used to have spoken the language in its most plain and simple words—That the word 'prior' was a word quite unusual to be spoken in her neighborhood and time and we have no hesitation in stating that we do not believe that she understood—the meaning of this declaration—if at the time she was in her mind sufficient to know anything correct which we do not believe. We further State that the said James Martin, Esq., who drew up said declaration and witnessed it lived about 20 miles from her - that he was not to our knowledge or belief in the habit of filing up pension claims nor do we believe that he is at all well qualified so to do - that he was a man of good common sense—a Justice of the peace –and plain farmer. And we further state that after her pension was allowed that the said James Martin Esq. continued as long as he lived to regularly fill up her powers of attorney to draw her pension and that for many years before the death of the said Mary Johnson that his gave us direction "That when she made these powers of attorney that it was entirely unnecessary for her to be sworn—that she could not comprehend the meaning or obligation of an oath and only to let her make her mark to these papers—which [?] the [?] and we further state that the said James Martin Esq. is now dead—That he died at his residence in Wilkes County, N.C. we think about eight years ago or thereabouts - That we have no doubt but that if the said Martin was now living that he would fully substantiate the fact of her entire incapacity to make a correct statement at the time she made the declaration.

 

 We State that our said Father, the said Saml Johnson served under the command of Col.

Cleveland and that after the Close of said war that Col. Cleveland presented him with his fine Service Sword, which Sword has remained ever since in the possession of the said Capt. Saml Johnson to the time of his death and is now in the possession of his son, Ambrose Johnson of Wilkes County, N.C., though unfortunately was broken by accident.

 

 And we further State that to the best of our recollection and belief that the said James Martin Esq. acted as agent for our said Father Capt. Saml Johnson in drawing his pension for him as well as for several other of the old pensioners—and that we suppose that that was the way and reason that he happened to draw up the declaration for our said mother Mary Johnson and which we here again declare that we believe to be totally correct as to the aforesaid statement of [?] & [?] as thus stated as [?] stated by us in this paper.

 

 S/ Lewis Johnson

 

 S/ John Johnson

 

 the day and year above written

 

 

 

 Sworn to and subscribed in open court and I do hereby certify that the above Lewis Johnson & John S. Johnson are respectable residents of the County and State aforesaid and are well known to me and I do certify that they are highly respectable and worthy men and men of exhibited good behavior - for truth and accuracy - an oath as otherwise and good citizens.

 

 S/ M.S. Stokes, JP, {}

 

 Chief of the Court

 

 [fn. p. 5, is a marriage bond given by Samuel Johnson and John Johnson to Alexander Martin, Gov. of NC, dated June 24, 1782, for the marriage of Samuel Johnson to Mary Hamons [sic], both of Wilkes County, NC.]

 

[facts in file: Veteran Samuel Johnson was the son of Jeffrey Johnson; lived on Yadkin River about 9 miles below Wilkesboro in Wilkes County, NC; he was pensioned from January 1, 1809 on account of disability resulting from a wound. He died September 15, 1834, at his residence on Roaring River, Wilkes County, NC at age 77; he married Mary, daughter of Ambrose Hammons of Wilkes County, on June 15, 1782 in Wilkes County, NC;

Mary died January 21, 1853;

Samuel and Mary Johnson had the following children:

Robert born October 25, 1783, who married a Miss Boran, sister of William Boran

Nancy born October 3, 1785, married a Gambill

Cloe born September 3, 1788

Samuel B. the born May 18, 1790

Ambrose born May 15, 1792 or 1793

Polly or Mary born June 9, 1796, married William Boran

Rachel birth date not stated, married a Forrester or Forrister [name difficult to decipher]

Lewis born about 1800

John S. born about 1803, in 1854 he is referred to as "Colonel John S. Johnson”

 

Veteran had a nephew named George, son of his brother, William Johnson, who was an officer in the Revolution according to correspondence in the file.]

[fn. p. 156:

 

“State of No. Carolina No. 273

This may Certify That by the upper Board of Auditors for the District of Salisbury Capt. Samuel Johnson was allowed Two Hundred & fifty four pounds Eight Shillings Specie for Service done by him & Company of foot Militia of Wilkes Regt Whi[ch he is] to Receive agreeable to an act of Assemby [passed] in the year 1782.

Given under our hands Jany. the 15th 1782

Test

S/ Dav. Cance, Clk S/ Alex [illegible]

S/ Jno. Brown”]

[fn. pp. 297 et. seq.]

State of North Carolina, Wilkes County

 

 Personally appeared before me James Martin one of the acting Justices of said County James Gray a resident of said County aged 80 years who being first duly sworn according to law, saith upon his oath that he was well acquainted with Samuel Johnson in the time of the Revolutionary War, who was an Invalid pensioner, and who is now dead, and his widow Mary Johnson as he is informed is trying to draw a pension on account of her husband's services in the revolutionary War; That he the said James Gray served under the above Samuel Johnson, as well as he recollects in the fall of the year 1778 or 79 but cannot be positive as to the dates, said Johnson commanded the company as Captain and Major Hargroves had the command of the troops, they were marched down to little River near Fayetteville North Carolina after the Scotch and Tories, he well remembers it was in the fall of the year, and that he and said Johnson served a 3 months tour at that time, and that he and the said Captain Samuel Johnson volunteered into the Militia service of the United States, again in the last of August or first of September 1780, under the Command of Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, Said Gray was in Captain Benjamin Herndon's company, Captain Johnson was in the Cavalry and that they was marched to King's Mountain at the time of the battle at that place in October 1780, and in this battle said Johnson got wounded by a Ball across the abdomen, & from there he was brought home, this was a 3 months tour, making in all a term of 6 months he the said Gray and Samuel Johnson was in the Militia service of the United States together as volunteers.

 

James Gray S6928

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 29th day of October 1839

S/ James Martin, JP S/ James Gray

 

Also on this 29th day of October 1839, Personally appeared before me Sterling Rose a resident of Wilkes County North Carolina aged 82 years who being first duly sworn according to law, saith upon his Oath that he was well acquainted with Samuel Johnson the husband of the above Mary Johnson now his widow, in the time of the Revolutionary War, and that he and the above Samuel Johnson served a tour in the service of the United States in the Cavalry in the Militia as volunteers, in the fall of 1778 or 79 -- said Johnson had the command as Captain and Major Hargroves commanded the whole of troops that was along, and that they were marched down to little River or Deep River not far from Fayetteville NC after the Scotch and Tories, from there they were marched back to Wilkes County NC this he the said Rose believes to be a 3 months Tour he and Samuel Johnson served at that time.

 

And also that he the said Rose and Captain Samuel Johnson volunteered in Wilkes County NC in service of the United States Johnson was Captain of the Cavalry and Rose in the foot service under Captain Benjamin Herndon, and Commanded by Major Hargroves and Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, -- in the last of August or first of September 1780 and marched to King's Mountain at the time the battle took place in October 1780, said Johnson got wounded in the battle by a Ball across the abdomen and

from there he was brought home, this was a 3 months tour he and Johnson served together at that time, making a term of not less than 6 months said Johnson served as Captain in the Cavalry of the United States in the Revolutionary War.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 29th day of October 1839

S/ James Martin, JP S/ Sterling Rose

 

 

3 Sterling Rose S4132

4 FPA S7580

5 FPA S3962

 

 North Carolina, Wilkes County: -- Personally appeared before me James Martin ( one of acting Justices for said County) John Sparks Esquire and after being duly sworn according to law, he being a resident of said County and aged 86 years, saith upon his oath that he and the above Captain Samuel Johnson Volunteered in the service of the United States in the year 1776 or 1777 in Wilkes County NC, under Captain Benjamin Cleveland (afterwards Colonel) and Major Hargroves, Major Jesse Walton, Lieutenant William Gray and Colonel Martin Armstrong, and was marched to the Indian nation after

the Cherokee Indians they had some fighting, killed some Indians, took some prisoners, some of the whites was killed and some wounded, they drove the Indians and then was marched back to Wilkes County making a term of not less than 3 months, that he served at that time in the Militia of the United States; -- And further he and the said Captain Samuel Johnson volunteered in the service again in the fall of 1778 or 1779 , Johnson was Captain of the Cavalry and he was under him, and commanded by Major Hargroves, and was marched down to little River and then as low as Deep River near to

Fayetteville NC after the Scotch and Tories from there they was marched back to Wilkes County making a tour of not less than 3 months & he and said Johnson served together in the Cavalry at that time, and making in all a term of not less than 6 months he and said Samuel Johnson served together, 3 of which Johnson served as Captain in the Cavalry, and 3 in the foot service.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this first day of November 1839

S/ James Martin JP S/ John Sparks

 

 

Also on this first day of November 1839 personally appeared before me James Martin one of the acting Justices for said County, William Spicer resident of said County aged about 90 years, who first being duly sworn according to law, saith he was well acquainted with Samuel Johnson the husband of Mary Johnson and served in the Revolutionary War with him; that they volunteered in the service of the United States in Wilkes County NC, in the year 1776 or 1777, under Captain Benjamin Cleveland afterwards Colonel and Major Hargroves, Major Jesse Walton Lieutenant William Gray and Colonel

Martin Armstrong and was marched to the Cherokee nation against the Indians, they had some fighting, killed some Indians and took some prisoners, some of the whites was killed and some wounded, they drove them & then was marched back to Wilkes County NC, making a term of not less than 3 months they served at that time; -- And that he and said Johnson Volunteered again in the fall of 1778 or 1779 in said County under the command of Major Hargroves in the Cavalry, Samuel Johnson commanded a

Company as Captain, and was marched down to little River, then to Deep River near the Fayetteville N.C., after the Scotts and Tories; from there they were marched home again making a term of not less than 3 months he and Captain Samuel Johnson served in the Cavalry at that time and making in all a term of 6 months they served in the United States service in the Militia.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed before me the day & year above written.

 

S/ James Martin, JP S/ William Spicer, X his mark

 

Transcribed by Will Graves rev’d 10/26/08

 

Researchers Notes: This reference to her husband as an ‘invalid pensioner’ probably means that he was pensioned by the US as a result of disabilities suffered from wounds he sustained in the Revolution under Acts passed prior to 1818. The papers relating to such pensions were lost in fires in Washington City DC in the early 1800’s.

 

Sarah Hammons

William Hammons Baptist minister

Capt. Benjamin Cleveland

Mary Hammons Johnson daughter of one Ambrose Hammons-

Jesse Franklin

This Johnson Family was members of Roaring River Meeting House

Father of Samuel Johnnson isJeffrey Johnson, that he lived and died in Wilkes County

Wilkes County to Grayson County, Va. with their said father where they had a sister living (Mrs. Mary Bora) that their father has pointed out to them the spot at Cox's ford on the Big River in Grayson County, Va

Dr. James Calloway.

James Martin, Esq.

William Boran

James Gray

Sterling Rose

John Sparks Esquire

William Spicer

 

 

 

SAMUEL JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Kentucky, Daviess County

 

 On this 8th day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court before Alney McLean Esquire sole Judge of the circuit court of Daviess County now sitting Samuel Johnson Senior a resident of said County and State aforesaid aged 88 years in December ensuing who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

 That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers, and

served as herein stated. That he was drafted and entered the service under Colonel William Giles Major Richard Jones Captain William Finney Lieutenant John Walthal Ensign's name not recollected in May (date not recollected) 1779 -- served one month marched from Amelia [county, Virginia] (the place of residence) to Portsmouth, or nearly [indecipherable word] that place was the point to which the troops were ordered the British having left, he returned.

 

That he was drafted in December 1779 entered the service under Captain Bennett Pullum Lieutenant Howel Rose remained in service for 2 weeks and then substituted French Frank to serve out the balance of the term to wit 2 months and a half the tour being for 3 months having previously moved from Amelia Virginia to Granville North Carolina.

 

February 1781 was drafted, entered the service under General Butler Colonel Joseph

Taylor Major Anthony Sharp Captain Richard Harrison Lieutenant James Ellison Ensign Ben Hester marched from Granville old Court house, to Guilford Court house fought the British on a March 1781 -- General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] Commanding. Served 3 months discharged 11th May 1781 at Wake Court-house now Raleigh (North Carolina).

 

Sometime in September following drafted and entered the service under Captain Charles Yancy marched from Granville County North Carolina to the high Hills of Santee (General Greene’s head quarters) guarding of public wagons tour 3 months.

 

 That he has no documentary evidence by which to prove his services.

 

 Interrogatories propounded by the Court

 

1st When and in what year were you born?

 

Ans: Bucks County Pennsylvania and in the year 1744

 

2nd Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?

 

Ans: I have none now there was one, but brother John carried it to South Carolina, it was they are destroyed by the Tories.

 

3rd Where were you living when called into service: where have you lived since the

Revolutionary War and where do you now live?

 

Ans: In Virginia and North Carolina since the revolutionary war in North Carolina and Kentucky and now lives in Kentucky

 

4th How were you called into service; were you drafted; did you volunteer or were you a

substitute, and if in substitute, for whom?

 

Ans: By order of the States, to wit of Virginia and North Carolina as I understood -- I was drafted.

 

5th State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served, such Continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service.

 

Ans: General N. Greene commanded at Guilford, Colonel Washington of the horse; I knew the Regiments in which I served the names of the commanders of which is brought to view in the preceding part of this declaration there was a Regiment from the lower part of the State (North Carolina) commanded by Colonel Eaton who I believe was taken prisoner at Augusta and then killed for an answer to the last clause of the inquiry, reference is made to the body of this declaration.

 

6th Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it?

 

Ans: I received one from James Ellison (Captain) but it has been mislaid or lost long since.

 

7th State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and their belief in your services as a soldier in the revolution.

 

Ans: Captain Benjamin Field and Benjamin Newton

 

 He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State that he knows of.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed, the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ Samuel Johnson Same year

 

[Benjamin Field & Benjamin Newton gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Samuel Johnson S16430 fn43NC [sic VA.]

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/26/08

 

Captain William Finney

Lieutenant John Walthal

Captain Bennett Pullum

Lieutenant Howel Rose

French Frank

Captain Richard Harrison

Lieutenant James Ellison

Ensign Ben Heste

Captain Charles Yancy

James Ellison (Captain)

Captain Benjamin Field

Benjamin Newton

 

 

SOLOMON JOHNSON

 

Solomon Johnson and Rachel Johnson: W20204 NC Line: A son Warren Johnson applied 1844 Nov 26 Johnston Co. NC aged 59 and stated his father married his mother Rachel Bailey in 1774 and soldier died 1810 Feb 14 aged nearly 80 and widow died 1840 Feb 14 also stated his oldest sister if living would be nearly 70 years of age. Soldier and wife had 3 or 4 children prior to his enlistment in service. The son Warren Johnson was the youngest child.1845 Feb 28 there were only 2 surviving children to wit Warren Johnson and Hanor Johnson. Pg 1857 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, Johnston County: Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions November Term

1844

 

 On this 20th day of November 1844 personally appeared Warren Johnson, before the

Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, and being duly sworn according to law testifies and says that he is now in the 59th year of his age, that he is the son of Solomon Johnson deceased, who was a private soldier in the Revolutionary War -- and who served as he has frequently heard him say 12 months in the Continental Army under Captain Jones –

 

That -- his father the said Solomon Johnson died in the County of Johnston in the month of February (14th day) in the year 1810: -- that his father the said Solomon Johnston [sic] was married in the year 1774 to the mother of this declarant, whose maiden name was Rachel Baley, who lived in said County of Johnson up to the period of her death, which was on the 14th of February 1844, supposed to be about 90 years of age: that age of this declarant's father at the time of his death, was supposed to be nearly 80: -- this declarant further States, that his oldest Sister if living would be nearly 70 years old, he always understood she was born before the Revolutionary War commenced; and at the time his father was in the service, his mother had 3 or 4 children; and he has frequently heard her speak of the great difficulty she had in subsisting them in his father's absence: -- He further declares there is no record of the marriage or the ages of the children that he knows of; and that he is the youngest one of the children left by his father and mother, and the only one now known

to be living --:

 

 S/ Warren Johnson

 

Test: S/ Thomas Bagley, Clk

 

 [fn. p.6 marriage bond dated March 17, 1774, given in Johnston County, NC by Solomon

Johnson and John Holliman to secure the marriage of Johnson to Rachel Bailey]

 

 State of North Carolina, Office of Secretary of State

 

I William Hill, Secretary of State, in and for the State of North Carolina, do hereby certify, that it appears from the muster rolls of the Continental line of this State, in the Revolutionary War, that Solomon Johnson a private in Captain Jones’s Company of the 10th Regiment, entered the service on the 15th day of January 1782 for the term of 12 months and that nothing more is said of him on said rolls.

 

 Given under my hand this 17th day of December 1844.

 

 S/ Wm Hill, Secretary of State

 

 [On August 10, 1844, Mrs. Lusey Ann Price, 96, gave an affidavit in Johnston County that she was present at the marriage between Solomon Johnson & Rachel Bailey; that they were married by John Raines Magistrate in the spring of 1774 and that she knows of her own knowledge that Solomon Johnson served 12 months in the regular service under Captain Jones in the 10th Regiment.]

State of North Carolina, Johnston County

 

 On this 8th day of August 1844 personally appeared before me James Stallings one of the Magistrates of Johnston County Jesse Green aged about 81 years, who after having been duly sworn doth upon his oath make the following Statement that to his own knowledge that Solomon Johnson was a private in Captain Jones Company of the 10th Regiment enlisted the 15th day of January 1782 for 12 months.

Sworn to and subscribed for made the 8th day of August 1844.

 

1 Jesse Green W11084

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Solomon Johnson W20204 Rachel fn17NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Rachel Baley,

John Holliman

Captain Jones’s

Mrs. Lusey Ann Price, 96,

John Raines

Jesse Green

 

 

SOLOMON JOHNSON

 

Solomon Johnson Rejected: NC Line soldier lived in Caswell Co NC at enlistment he applied 1832 Sept 3 Smith Co. TN age 74, it was stated soldier lived in VA but enlisted in NC soldier was still living in 1843 April 15. Pg 1857 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Tennessee, Smith County

 

 On this 3rd day of September 1832 personally appeared before the County Court of the

Smith County Solomon Johnson a resident of Tennessee Smith County aged 75 years, who being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the act of Congress passed June 7 1832.

 

That he enlisted in the Army of the United States in the year 1777 with Captain Hogg and served in the 9th Regiment of the North Carolina line under the following officers General Lea Colonel Minor and Major Hardiman, that he entered the service in the County of Caswell North Carolina and was a resident of said County and State, was in the Battle of Guilford marched through Virginia to Norfolk.

 

 I hereby relinquish every claim whatever to a pension or an annuity except the present,

and declare that my name is not on the pension Roll of any agency of any State.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid

 

 S/ Solomon Johnson, X his mark

 

 State of North Carolina, Secretary of State's Office

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in and for the State aforesaid, do certify, that it appears from the muster rolls of the Continental line of this State in the revolutionary war that Solomon Johnson a private Soldier and hogs Company of 10th Regiment enlisted __ for __ “Dead 15th Sept. 1778.”

 

 That they Warrant for his services was issued to his Ayers on the 22nd May 1820.

 

Given under my hand this 23rd day of April 1833.

 

 S/ Wm Hill

 

 State of Tennessee, Madison County

 

 On this 7th day of November 1842, personally appeared in open Court before the Court

of the County of Madison & State aforesaid, Solomon Johnson, a resident of said County & State, who being first duly sworn, according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed 7th June 1832: That he enlisted in the Army of the United States in the Spring of the year 1777 or thereabout -- with Captain Hogg & served in the 9th Regiment commanded by Colonel Moore -- under the following named officers viz. Bartlett Collins, Lieutenant: Captain Hogg: Major Hardeman & said Colonel Moore: Said Solomon Johnson further states upon his oath, that he was born in Spotsylvania County in the State of Virginia – that his father kept a Register of the

ages of his Children, but the same is lost -- that he was born in the year 1757 -- that he ran away from his Father at about the age of 20 years & enlisted as above said under Captain Hogg by one of his recruiting officers, named Achilles Mashman or Marshman, at Caswell, now Person Court house in the State of North Carolina:

 

That since the Revolutionary War, he lived in Halifax County Virginia -- thence he removed to Smith County in Tennessee where he resided till the year 1833 -- when he removed to Madison County aforesaid where he has resided ever since:

 

That he received a written discharge from the Regular Army by the hand of Major Hardeman -- and that the said discharge was destroyed by being wetted in swimming across the Rappahannock River -- so that the Ink with which the same was written being bad, spread in such manner as to render the same illegible.

 

He further states on oath that the discharge stated, to the best of his recollection, that he has served for the space of 3 years, 6 months & 11 days as a private Soldier, and was dated about the fall of the year 1781:

 

He further states upon his oath, that he was in the battle of Guilford -- being the only battle he was in -- that he was employed during the Siege of York on the Gloucester side of James River in making bastions or Hampors [sic?] made of willows for the use of the American Army then defending themselves against the British:

 

He further states on his oath, that 8 or 9 years ago he made proof of his identity & Revolutionary services by the oath of one Robert Tucker about the year 1833 before Samuel Givens a Justice of the Peace at that time, for this County of Madison -- said Givens now resides in the State of Mississippi: --

 

That said proof thus made was placed in the hands of one George Hainsy, who had undertaken to procure a pension for him the said Johnson -- but who has lost or mislaid the same so that he the said Johnson could never get possession of the same -- That shortly afterwards the said Tucker died -- and that he the said Johnson was advised, as his witness who alone could prove his personal identity & services, was deceased, that he could not procure his pension, & therefore made no further attempt, until now and that he has never received a pension of his services in the Revolutionary war & that his name has never been enrolled in the pension list of any agency of any State –

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year before named. S/ Solomon Johnson, X his mark

 

[Attested: S/ James D. McClellan, Clerk]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Solomon Johnson R[NC11] fn17NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/26/08

 

Captain Hogg

Bartlett Collins, Lieutenant:

Achilles Mashman or Marshman,

Robert Tucker

George Hainsy

 

 

THOMAS JOHNSON

 

Thomas Johnson S41698: NC Line applied 1820 March 30 in NC age 63, with a wife aged 67 and all his children of Age.  Pg 1858 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 

 

State of North Carolina

 

 Personally appeared before me Leonard Henderson one of the Judges of the Supreme

Court of the State aforesaid, Thomas Johnson (aged about 63 years) and makes oath that early in the revolutionary War (being an unlettered man he cannot state the date) he Enlisted in the regular Army of the United States in the North Carolina line for 12 months in the first Regiment under Captain Henry Dixon (Tilman Dixon Lieutenant) that he faithfully served his Country in the capacity aforesaid until near the Expiration of his time when he was again Enlisted in the said line under the same officers for 3 years in 1777 which period he also faithfully served and obtained his discharge at the Expiration thereof –

 

That in the year 1801 he delivered his discharge and other papers including his Services to John R. Eaton at that time as member of the North Carolina Legislature for the purpose of obtaining his military bounty lands under the laws of North Carolina – that soon thereafter [indecipherable word] Eaton delivered to him a land warrant for 274 acres of land -- that a short time ago he made application to the Secretary of State for North Carolina for his discharge &c who sent him word that his papers would not be of

any service to him and forwarded to him the annexed Certificate as more competent Evidence of his claims.

 

 He further states that he has but a very small property consisting of 100 acres of poor

unimproved land except for a very small part thereof. That his dwelling house is a log cabin that he has 7 head of cattle one feather bed and furniture and a small quantity of household and kitchen furniture, an old female slave between 60 and 70 years of little or no value. That he has no other property except wearing apparel and a few plantation tools that his wife is about 67 years old -- That his children have left him and are poor and that he in his concern [?] believes he stands in need of the Assistance of his country. That his land might be rented for $15 a year possibly twenty no part of is broke [?] but little for cultivation.

 

Sworn to before me this 29th of March 1820. S/ Thomas Johnson, T his mark

 

 John R. Eaton makes oath that in the year 1801 being a member of the North Carolina

Legislature Thomas Johnson who has made the foregoing affidavit applied to him to obtain his military bounty land from the State and showed him his papers -- that he examined them and found they were regular and satisfactory that he appeared before Committee of the Legislature to whom the Johnson petition had been referred and laid the papers before them, that they were examined and pronounced live the chairman to be not only satisfactory but highly so the [sic, that?] a warrant was directed to issue for 274 acres of land which he drew and shortly after his return home delivered to the Johnson.

 

 S/ John R. Eaton

 

Sworn to before me this 29th of March A.D. 1820

 

 Amount of Estate of Thomas Johnston [sic]

One hundred Acres of Poor Land

One old Negro woman between 60 & 70 years old

Stock of Battle 8 head, one Feather Bed and Furniture & 12 Head of Hogs than a small Quantity of household Furniture, sworn to and subscribed to before me 30th day of March A.D. 1820.

S/ Thomas Johnson, T his mark

S/ Charles Taylor, JP

 

This is to certify that Thomas Johnston was seized with the Putrid Fever towards the close of the Winter, which reduced him to [too] Such a degree that it was a long time before he got his strenth [strength] perfectly—He has been detained by Order of the Surgeon so that he is not deserving of sensure [censure].

 

S/ Ebenr Aug. Smith, [illegible]1

Hospl Baldwins Barns

July 13th 1778

Paramus Thursday May 6th, 1779 Permit Thomas Johnston Soldier to pass to Morris Town & returned home Monday.

S/ Jas Read, Capt

1st NC Batt.

I here Rec’d of Thos Johnston a Soldier in Capt. Read’s Company in the 4th NC Batt’n one Gun &c accoutrements.

Crew Compy [?]

S/ Jesse Allen, a Sergeant Capt. NC

 

It appears that Thomas Johnson head Served his time as a Soldier before he was apprehended by Lewellin and that as all the men whose times expired on the march were to receive their discharge at Halifax, Johnson by being taken up was prevented from ever getting his discharge, altho’ the Country’s claim upon him for his Services as a Soldier was entirely at an end. Under these circumstances I think it my duty hereby to discharge the said Johnson altogether from the Continental Army. Given under my hand in camp at Chesterfield this 3rd day of October 1780.

S/ William Davies Col. Com.

State of North Carolina Secretary's Office 12 April 1820

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in & for the State aforesaid, do hereby certify that it

appears from the muster rolls of the North Carolina line in the revolutionary war, that Thomas Johnston a private in Captain Nixon's company of the first Regiment was mustered in the year 1777 for the war and that he Deserted in January 1780.

Given under my hand the date above.

S/ Wm Hill

 

There is no doubt but the charge of Desertion against Thomas Johnson was occasioned by his being taken and detained by Thomas Lewellen as his apprentice.

S/ Wm Hill

 

1 An internet search on 10/27/08 found one “Ebenezer Augustus Smith” as an Hospital Surgeon in the Delaware line.

http://www.rsar.org/military/derghist.htm  

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Thomas Johnson S41698 fn8NC & fn32NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Captain Henry Dixon

Tilman Dixon Lieutenant

John R. Eaton

Capt. Read’s Company

Thomas Lewellen

 

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S7088 NC Line applied 1834 March 10 Marlborough District SC, soldier was born 1758 Jan 31. Soldier lived in lived in Wayne Co. NC at enlistment and later moved to Johnston Co. NC and also enlisted there. In 1813 he moved to SC. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of South Carolina, Marlborough District

 

 On this the 13th day of March in the year of our Lord 1834 personally appeared in open

Court, before the Court of Common Pleas and Sessions for the District & State aforesaid, now sitting, William Johnson a resident of the District of Marlborough in State aforesaid aged 75 years on the 31st day of January 1833 who being duly sworn according to Law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

That he was born on the 31st day of January 1758. That he has no documentary evidence

of his Services in the revolutionary war, that he had discharges & written evidence, but from the great lapse of time he has lost & had them destroyed, not having taken particular care of them and that he is therefore unable to be so precise in his statement as to dates as he otherwise would be -- but that early in the year 1776 at which time he resided in Wayne County North Carolina, he volunteered his services and marched under one Captain Williams in a detachment from said Wayne County, to Moore's Creek, within 15 or 20 miles of Wilmington North Carolina where the said detachment was put under the command of Colonel Caswell who had fortifications on the North side of said Creek at the end of the bridge to oppose the passage of a large body of Tories commanded by one Colonel McDonald that a short time after this deponent arrived at the said Bridge the Tories attempted to cross but that Colonel Caswell then ordered the flanks of the

bridge to be taken up & had it so impaired that they could not cross, & that in attempting to do so, several of the Tories were killed by Colonel Caswell's forces. That he this deponent's knows no particulars persons names of the Tories that were killed except a Captain McLeod who was shot at the Bridge. That this deponent & all others who had volunteered for that excursion were then discharged & this deponent returned home. That he was out at that time, about a month, but only qualifies positively to 3 weeks.

 

That afterwards either in the latter part of the winter or early in the spring 1777 -- he was drafted in the said Wayne County North Carolina for the Term of 3 months & went to Wilmington North Carolina with other the Militia of Wayne County & served & served 3 months at Wilmington in the Company of one Captain Jacob Hooks, that he

does not now recollect the names of any others of the officers. That the said service at

Wilmington was in guarding the Town, but that there was no fight or engagement there during the time he was there, & that he afterwards returned home.

 

Said deponent further states that sometime afterwards he removed to Johnson County North Carolina [sic, Johnston County] & that in the latter part of the year 1778 he was drafted in Johnson County for the Term of 5 months and marched under one Captain Goodman with others the militia of Johnson County to Hillsboro in North Carolina & was stationed there a short time & then marched through North Carolina & South Carolina to the Savannah River nearly opposite to the Town of Augusta & was stationed there some time guarding some Hessians who had been captured by the Americans and were confined in strong log buildings. That he then crossed the Savannah River and was associated with other American forces who were stationed at Brier Creek [Briar Creek] in Georgia under the command of General Ash [sic, John Ashe] that a short time after he arrived there they were surprised by the British and driven in great confusion from their Station that a considerable number of the Americans were killed in the flight, & a number drowned in crossing the River.

 

He does not now recollect the names of any other of his officers save Captain Goodman & General Ashe, and that he cannot qualify as to the name of the British commander.

 

That such of the Americans as crossed the River rendezvoused on the North side of the River at Black Swamp & were there stationed some days under General Ashe & at the expiration of the Term, 5 months, for which he had been drafted he this deponent was discharged & that he recollects his discharge was on the 10th day of April 1779 -- & that he then returned home.

 

Said Deponent further states that afterwards in the year 1782 he was drafted again in Johnson County North Carolina for the Term of 3 months & that he then employed a substitute by the name of Uriah Peacock who was excepted as such by one Colonel Smith, & that he gave the said Peacock a mare valued at $100 -- & a young horse at $35 or $40 -- & some cattle for his services that the said Peacock marched off as his substitute but he cannot say under what officers & where he went to & that Peace was not long afterwards declared -- & Peacock returned home before the 3 months expired –

 

said Deponent further states that he afterwards resided in said Johnson County until the year 1813 when he removed to Marlborough District South Carolina -- where he has ever since resided & oath which he is now a citizen & resident.

 

Said deponent states that he served himself 8 months and 3 weeks, as above -- & that he employed a substitute the said Peacock for 3 months as above -- but does not recollect how long the said Peacock actually served -- & that he knows of no one by whom he can prove his service.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present

and declares that his name is not on the pension Roll of the Agency of any State.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year above written.

 

S/ Geo. Bristow,C.C.C.pls. S/ William Johnson, J his mark

 

[Charles Manship, a clergyman and Isaiah Weatherly gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of William Johnson S7088 fn7NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Captain Williams

Captain Jacob Hooks

Captain Goodman

Uriah Peacock

Charles Manship, a clergyman

Isaiah Weatherly

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S7095 NC Line: 1832 Oct 31 applied in Wilkes Co. NC. Soldier was born 1754 July 28 in Amelia Co. Va and moved with his father to Johnston Co. NC the part that is now Wake Co.NC. When he was very small & at age 17 he moved with his father to Rowan CO.NC (now Surry Co.NC) he lived there at enlistment and after the revolution he moved to Wilkes CO. NC. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, County of Wilkes

 

 On this 31st day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the Court of

Pleas & Quarter Sessions of the County of Wilkes & State of North Carolina now sitting, William Johnson Esquire a resident of the County of Wilkes & State of North Carolina, aged 78 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

That he was born on the 28th day of July 1754 in the County of Amelia & State of

Virginia, (the record of which is entered in his family Bible) where he lived until his father removed to Johnston County (now Wake) North Carolina, at which time he was very small. He lived in said County until he was about 17 years of age, when he removed with his father to the County of Rowan (now Surry) in the same State, where he lived until he entered the service of the United States as a volunteer in the month of February 1776 in a company of volunteers commanded by Captain Hamblin, and marched forthwith to Cross Creek or Fayetteville, with a view of suppressing the Scotch Tories who were at that time committing great depredations in that section of the Country -- before how were they reached the scene of their expected operations, an engagement had been fought between the Tories, under command of General McDonald, and the Americans under General Moore, Colonel Caswell & Colonel Lillington at a

bridge on Moore's Creek, in which the former were defeated & taken prisoners. After the

engagement was over the prisoners were brought to Fayetteville where this deponent was

stationed as one of the guard for a considerable time and until the prisoners were sent off -- this deponent was one of 12 persons detailed from Captain Hamblin's Company to form part of the guard to convey the prisoners to Halifax, but for some reason unknown to this deponent they did not go, and after being detained there some time after the principal part of the troops were discharged, they were also discharged and returned home, which place this deponent reached some time in the month of April, having been in service about 2 months and a half –

 

In the month of July or August following the deponent again volunteered himself as an

Ensign in the company of Captain Samuel Mosby, under a commission given him by Governor Caswell, and rendezvoused near old Richmond in the said County of Surry, where they remained about a week, making preparations for their intended expedition, and thence marched across the Blue Ridge to Fort Chissel near the Lead mines in Virginia, where they remained a few days and thence marched direct to the Long Islands of Holstein [sic, Holston River] where they joined the Virginia troops under ColonelChristie or Christian, and after remaining there about 2 weeks,

they marched as direct as they could to the Cherokee Nation -- upon arriving at the Cherokee Towns they found that most of the Indians had fled and abandoned the Towns; & after destroying their towns, corn and such other property as they could find, they marched back as far as the Tennessee River where they were halted until they received their rations to carry them home, and then set out for home which place this deponent reached about 19 November -- having been in service during this tour from 3 to 4 months

 

-- From the time that this deponent returned from the Indian nation until the Spring of the year 1780, (at which time this deponent removed into Wilkes County) he performed several tours of duty against the Tories in various parts of the County but the length of each and the particular circumstances connected therewith, he cannot now after a lapse of so many years pretend to recollect --

 

In the month of March 1781 directly after the battle of Guilford, this deponent was drafted for a short tour, to oppose Lord Cornwallis who was supposed intended to return to South Carolina, and rendezvoused at Hamblin’s old store where he joined the company of Captain John Cleveland (son of Colonel Cleveland) and marched direct to the old trading Ford on the Yadkin [River] near Salisbury, with a view of opposing the passage of Lord Cornwallis -- and after being stationed there for a short time, it was ascertained that Lord Cornwallis had marched for Wilmington, when there being no longer any necessity for their services, they were discharged and returned home, having been in service during this expedition about 3 weeks --

 

This deponent has resided in the County of Wilkes ever since the revolutionary war, and

resides there at this time –

 

He has no documentary evidence to prove his services, the commission given him as Ensign by Governor Caswell having been lost or mislaid for many years –

 

He has no discharges, nor has he any recollection of ever having received any -- nor does he know of any person living whose testimony he can procure, who could testify to his service, but refers to Colonel William P. Waugh and Samuel F. Patterson as persons to whom he is well-known and who can testify as to his character for veracity and their belief of his services as a soldier of the revolution --

 

 He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid

 

S/ R. Martin, Clk S/ William Johnson Senior

 

[Wm P. Waugh and Saml. F. Patterson gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of William Johnson S7095 fn12NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Captain Hamblin

Captain Samuel Mosby,

Hamblin’s old store

Captain John Cleveland

Colonel William P. Waugh

Samuel F. Patterson

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S2661: NC Line: Soldier was born 1761 Nov 5 in Chesterfield CO. Va and he lived in Brunswick Co. Va at enlistment and also served as a sub for his father (not named) and in 1781 he moved to Montgomery CO NC and also enlisted there. He applied 1832 Oct 14 at Sneedsborough in Anson CO. NC.  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S10918 SC Line: Soldier was born 1757 Oct 16 on the Tar River in NC he lived in Edgefield Dist SC at enlistment. He applied 1841 July 6 Escambia Co. Fla and in 1841 was living in Perry Co. Ala at which time he reffered to 4 children not living near him and stated he was living with a widowed daughter. Soldiers father in law was Moses Prestoot: Soldiers wife was not in the claim. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

Pension application of William Johnson S10918 fn78SC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

Territory of Florida, Western District, Escambia County

On this sixth day of July A.D. 1841 personally appeared in open court before me Dillon

Jordan, Judge of the Superior Court aforesaid District, William Johnson, a resident of Escambia County in the District aforesaid aged 83 years and nine months who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That in the spring of the year 1778 he volunteered in Edgefield District in the State of

South Carolina, under Captain William Butler (afterwards General William Butler) They joined and served with a Regiment commanded by Leroy Hammond, in the whole was under the command of General Pickens; their operations were principally against the British and Tories; He was in the Battle of the Eutaw Springs under Captain Box [Lewis Box] under whom he served about four months and then returned to Edgefield District and resumed his services under Captain Butler and was soon after in the battle of Turner's defeat, at which the father of Captain Butler was killed him to be in he served as a volunteer three years and eight months, and was afterwards drafted and served under a draft three months. The principal service under the draft was in guarding the Jail at Ninety Six in which the Tories were confined; He never had any formal discharge.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in any State.

Sworn to and subscribed in open Court the day & year aforesaid.

S/ Wm Washington, Deputy Clerk S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

 

1 FPA W20803

 

2 September 8, 1781. http://gaz.jrshelby.com/eutaw.htm

 

3 This engagement is usually referred to as the skirmish at Cloud’s Creek and is thought to have occurred on November 17, 1781. The engagement was between Capt. Sterling Turner and Major William Cunningham.

http://gaz.jrshelby.com/cloudscreek.htm 

4 Both Capt. James Butler, Sr. and his son, Capt. James Butler, Jr., are believed to have been killed by William Cunningham’s forces at Cloud’s Creek. This

5 Probably William Hudgins, FPA R5322

 

William Hudgins being sworn says he is 97 years old since the 17th of March last That

he served in the revolutionary war under General Butler that he knew William Johnson now present and who makes the foregoing declaration in the service at the same time or a part of it. That he knows particularly that said Johnson served one tour of five months as the deponent was in the habit of seeing him continually during that time.

Sworn to and Subscribed before me. S/ William Hudgins

S/ William Jordan

[Joseph Bell and Richard Laremore [?] gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Interrogatories propounded by the Court to the Declarant William Johnson

 

1st Where and in what year were you born?

2nd Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?

3rd Where were you living when called into service: where have you lived since the

Revolutionary War and where do you now live?

4th How were you called into service; were you drafted; did you volunteer or were you a

substitute, and if in substitute, for whom?

5th State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served, such Continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service.

6th Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it?

7th State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and their belief in your services as a soldier in the revolution.

 

 To the interrogatories propounded by the Court the applicant answers –

 

 1st I was born on "Tar" River in the State of North Carolina in the year 1757.

 

 2nd There was a Record of my age, but I do not now know where it is.

 

 3rd South Carolina in Edgefield District. I lived in the Counties of Burke, Emanuel,

Bryant and Liberty in the State of Georgia, and now live in the County of Escambia Territory of Florida.

 

 4th I volunteered -- except for three months when I was drafted to guard 96 jail in South

Carolina.

 

 5th General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] of the regular Army. I volunteered under

Captain William Butler, who was afterwards promoted to General. Commenced services at Augusta, Georgia, marched through different Sections of South Carolina under Captain Butler. I was at the Battle of the Eutaw Springs under the command of Lewis Box. I returned to General Sumter's Army at Orangeburg where I remained four or five months. Afterwards I left Sumter's Army and went to Butler's. I was afterwards at the battle of Turner's defeat, where General Butler's father was killed, and this applicant and one Benjamin Hughes were the only two survivors out of 31 men, the others having been killed in that Battle. After which I continued in the Partisan war pursuing and taking Tories and putting them in 96 jail, and Pickens Blockhouse and at Waters’ block-house until the end of the war.

 

 6th No

 

 7th Benjamin Jernigan, James R. Riley, Allen Blaylock, Richard Larimer, and Joseph Bell.

 

I do hereby certify that the foregoing answers were given upon oath by William Johnson (the applicant) to the interrogatories herewith filed.

 

S/ William Jordan, Judge of the United States for the District of

West Florida

 

[facts in file: in 1848, veteran was living in Perry County, Alabama; refers to having 4 children, one a daughter with whom he lived, she being a widow—no names given for any children; veteran’s father-in-law was Moses Prestcott [sic, Prescott? or Prescoat?], though his wife is not named in the file.]

 

[fn p. 21 affidavit given by the Rev. Ephraim Prescoat, resident of Coffee County, Alabama, that he knew William Johnson during the Revolution; that Johnson served under Capt. William Butler; that he, Prescoat, stayed at Johnson’s house in Edgefield County, SC, during the time Johnson was in the service.]

[fn p. 35]

 

Territory of Florida, Santa Rosa County: In the County Court September Term 1843

 

 I William Johnson an applicant for a pension as a revolutionary soldier being desirous of

furnishings some additional proof of my services and deeming it to be a matter of some

importance to state the names of some of the persons with whom I served in the revolutionary hereby make oath that while I was in the Company of Captain William Butler the following named persons served with me as privates Viz. John Curley, Sherrod Curley, Miallard [?] Smith, John Blann [?], Buddy Escridge, Samuel Etheridge.

 

I was [in] Orangeburg District under Captain Box about seven or eight months having previously served under Captain Butler from about 15 days after he received his commission until I entered Captain Box's Company. At the end of said service with Captain Box I again entered Captain Butler's Company & remained in it until the close of the about three months before the close of the war Captain Butler sent me to Ninety Six to guard some Tories I remained there until Colonel McCoy and Captain Simmons Command took away the last of the Tories and they then told me I could go home I then left for home and as Captain Butler who was my Captain was not present I did not get my discharge.

Sworn to and Subscribed before me

S/ D. J. McArthur, Clerk S/ William Johnson, X his mark

[fn p. 45]

State of Alabama, Perry County

 

6 Bobby Moss lists a Burnett (Buddied) Eskridge who served under Capt. Sterling Turner and was killed at Cloud’s Creek

 

 Be it remembered that William Johnson the undersigned who is a citizen of said County

& State & who now claims and applies for a pension from the United States according to the laws thereof as a soldier of the Revolutionary war personally came this sixth day of July 1848 before me Henry C. Lea an acting Justice of the Peace in & for the County & State aforesaid, who after being duly sworn deposes & states as follows that on the 16th day of October next he will be 91 years of age, he states absolutely, on oath, that he was a soldier of & for the Colonies or States during a large portion of the Revolutionary war.

 

That he did enlist -- with some 12 or 15 others of the company he had previously been with, in South Carolina, in the fall of 1780 or spring of 1781 or, rather volunteer, under General Greene at the place called 96 or 96 miles from Charleston & that he did without a doubt serve nine months under him the time for which he entered the service, he did receive a regular discharge at the end of his time in writing -- But swears positively that he has lost it & does not know when or where.

 

He states positively that he was in the Battle of Eutaw Springs under General Greene (it is impossible, he states, for him to recollect positively all the subaltern officers) and the name of General Greene was that most often & almost entirely repeated over & over among the troops when he had previously been, on account of the word & great expection [expectation] from, what had been heard, that General Greene was coming to command in the South & all of us that went volunteers or otherwise to meet & go under him thought of him or his commanding almost entirely: to the best of my recollection at the time we were received & mustered into Greene's Army at 96 I was placed under a Captain Johnson (a man of my own name) I recollect a Colonel Washington & I think that he was there but I cannot say that I was in his Regiment I can only swear that I recollect his name as if he were there & can mention others inferior in command but will not undertake to swear now as to their exact posts or places --I have seen Colonel Morgan or did before the Eutaw battle as he passed through near Edgefield but he was not at Eutaw that I recollect now. General Marion joined General Greene between the Santee River & Eutaw & is of the belief he was with General Greene I often saw General Marion & his men but I was not under him he was mostly lower down the Country then we were.

 

I state positively that at about the age of 20 or a little upwards I commenced my first

active service as a constant soldier I had been mustered before & held liable, but in 1777 a man named Butler (William Butler, if I am not too forgetful) lived in our neighborhood who was active & brave to command & was prevailed on to take a command of Captain & at his instance, & by our agreement to act as minute men, 17 of us of greed, at one time, to join a company under his command, if he should be elected & commissioned as Captain, which company soon increased to a larger number from 65 to 80 & he was regularly, by the law, elected & commissioned as Captain & we agreed to act as minute men; we selected a place of common & uniform rendezvous: a place called Mount hilling in our District of Edgefield; there we were to be instantly always, either for drills or on alarm from the Tories or British, ready for quick marches in any direction we should be ordered –

 

We fought & skirmished from that point to the distance of sometimes 60 miles around -- We had some times to take refuge into General Sumter's command when we were like to be overpowered; we were frequently in General Sumter's Camp I have seen him & his men often -- Colonel Branham [sic, Thomas Brandon] of Fairforest on Tyger River was a great soldier; our Captain frequently had us under the immediate command of Brandon & so we were marched concentrated with other forces at different times & places in the State of South Carolina during several years, say three or four years: But I cannot, for my life, state now precisely the regular train of orders & changes made with us & about us; But one thing I do know & swear positively to; that is; that I served faithfully & hard & honestly for & during the time of six years either in actual marches, or battles, or liable at every instant of time, to military duty if I never get anything for it: & this is the last application I ever expect or intend to make -- I can state a thousand little occurrences during the war to show anyone of any sense that I was in the war faithfully, as I state but I fear I cannot comply with all the law requires, for I do not know, myself, what it requires, nor do I believe anybody else does near me & I am too old to make many more trials to learn. I will state that I was at the remarkable occurrence which gave the name of murder ground to a place near the line between Edgefield & Orangeburg districts in South Carolina -- we were & had been in pursuit of a Tory commander named Cunningham [William “Bloody Bill” Cunningham] Captain Butler divided his company into two divisions some 35 or 40 in each to take different directions so as to scout the country & to act & meet as was then ordered & agreed upon -- Captain Butler took command of one half & a man named Turner was chosen by a majority to take command of the other; some of the men however believed Turner to be cowardly & it was a fact. But the Father of Captain Butler was a member of his Company & it was arranged so that the Captain's Father was to go in Turner's division & in order that there might be safety & good reliance, as well as satisfaction with Turner & his particular supporters & friends it was agreed that if there should any engagement take place the Father of Captain Butler might act in the emergency as Captain & thus all went satisfied -- while those of us under Turner had stopped to breakfast at the house, the most of the command were at or in a house; myself & a man named Benjamin Hughs were feeding our horses at some distance & Cunningham's command rushed in upon & around the house & by a very quick work, with the loss of some seven or eight men, every one of our men with Turner & Butler the Father were killed & myself & Hughs escaped only by accidentally being off feeding our horses & lay in the woods several days before we got to our main company again -- I could state numerous occurrences favorable & unfavorable during the long service in which I was engaged -- If I do not greatly forget the regular place for Captain Butler's company was in a Colonel Hammond’s command I know he was commanded by him & both Butler & Hammond by General Pickens -- But military dispositions & regulations were not then just as they are or would be now -- when there were such men as Butler; great latitude was given them to go on their own hook was allowed; but always subject to be called & ordered in & about, on emergencies or when the enemy were in large bodies.

 

 Now I state on oath that having served constantly some four or five years as above mostly across up & down through the middle portions of South Carolina I did then as before stated in the fall of 1780 or spring 81 volunteered & go & join General Greene as soon as we heard he was in the South & we could join him; & did serve faithfully under him nine months; Joined him at 96 & was actually engaged in the hard fought shocking battle at Eutaw Springs -- I received no wounds which leaves a mark except that besides my cloths have been cut with balls often a musket ball passed between the top of one of my ears and my head at the Eutaw Springs; but unfortunately (now I suppose) it does not leave any distinct scar though I was stunned by it -- It was not a great while after the Battle of Eutaw Springs I got my discharge from further service under General Greene but what the name of the officer was that signed it or gave it to me I will not undertake to state for I confess I cannot recollect. But after the Battle at the Springs I was with the command who was ordered to guard the Tories & others who were sent to 96. The exact

length of time I remained there I cannot tell but not perhaps more than a month or so. The

prisoners were taken from 96 by Colonel McKoy & Captain Simmons & their men, what they did with them or where they carried them, I do not know.

 

 I have now stated all I suppose that I need to tell unless I were to go over hundreds of

hardships escapes & difficulties in which I was during the long war & I state what I have fully sensible that I am not many years at most to remain upon the earth, If the department will allow me pay I shall be glad, if not though destitute now -- have been in better circumstances & my friends & the few relations I have may perhaps help me out of the world as I have tried to help myself while in it. I have several Brothers & sisters yet living but they were too young to know or recollect my services -- I have as many as four children scattered over the world I have only one daughter who lives near me or rather most of the time, I with her, she herself is old a widow & quite helpless in many respects -- My children who live further off are in some better circumstances --

 

 There is not now living within my knowledge anyone except old Mr. J. F. Hoggle whose evidence I have had taken that can prove my service under General Greene for nine months nor of the other services by -- I give directions for his evidence to be sent with my oath or application -- I found him here in Perry County when I came from Florida & he knew & told me himself where he had seen & knew me -- And this has partly been the means of renewing my hopes that the Government will hear & allow my claim Hoggle lived in an adjoining district to me in South Carolina & though younger than I was with his Father in the war & we saw each other frequently -- though his recollection about some things is more clear than my own.

 

I moved from Carolina to the State of Georgia not far from Savannah about 48 years ago I then moved to Florida where I lived some seven or eight years and about two years ago came up here where I have lived since in or near the town of Marion Perry County.

 

I am confident my name was on the roll at Columbia in South Carolina if it was not it was not my fault for it ought to have been there –

 

I made application while I lived in Florida for a pension; but I then did not know that Mr Hoggle or any other person was living by whom I could prove satisfactorily my services, & except that I, on my former application while I lived in Florida, by one Ephraim Prescoat proved that he knew that I started to go to join General Greene's Army & was gone as much as nine months that time but could not swear that he saw me in the service & besides he was young at the time & I had employed him to stay at my house while I was gone in the Army. This was the objection if any I suppose to my claim -- I will be glad if the department will spare the time to turn to & see the papers in my former applications from Santa Rosa or at Pensacola by & through Judge Wright Prescoat lived in Coffee County Alabama & I came up there & got Mr. Meggs to procure Judge Claxton to take Prescoat’s evidence some three years ago. They all thought there, who knew my application as made, that it would succeed but it seems that it did not: while many many others who did not serve one fifth the time I did have received their pensions in different parts of the Country & I think it hard indeed. John B. Meggs Esquire of Walton County Florida I believe has all the correspondence from the War Department if any or (if not destroyed) which relates to my former application I wish I had it all again & could send it to the Department; but I cannot get it. I know there seemed there to be very little in the way yet I never could get my allowance -- until all seemed to get tired of trying & so it lay -- I have, nor have had, no other motive on earth, in changing the agents or persons I have spoken to to get my pension, then simply because I had moved up here & found the old Mr Hoggle whose evidence I send & I never did rest satisfied with the application lying so without trying to get it honestly & fully before the Department once more. It makes me sorry to know how hard & long I served to see that others have drawn & I am to be thought of as unworthy by their side & I feel deeply that it is not just nor right.

 

 I have to state that if there appears to be anything wrong about my not applying sooner,

or later, or in some different way, I must say that I have done the best I could or knowed how -- I am old & not active to get about I have been afflicted with rheumatism & a touch of palsy for some 17 years, off & on, & it is the good feelings of those gentlemen where I happen to be who have more learning than I, or than my close relations, if present, would have; that enables me to know how to even begin to apply for a pension & if it is not & I did not know it to be honest; I would not have it if given; much less apply for it. I have I hope now stated all that can be thought necessary & have this whole matter in the hands of those agents who have by law then appointed to do justice.

 

Sworn to & subscribed in my presence after being taken down as nearly as convenient in his own words & read slowly & distinctly over to him word for word in my presence this 6th of July

1848. S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

S/ Henry C. Lea, JP

 

[supporting affidavit as to reputation and character given by James H. DeVotie or DeVolie, pastor of the Baptist Church of which Johnson was a member.]

 

 [fn p. 58 SC Comptroller General’s certificates of payments made to a man or men named William Johnson or Johnston for revolutionary services.]

 

 [fn p. 61]

 

State of Alabama, Perry County

 

 Personally appeared John F. Hoggle for me George P. Massey an acting Justice of the

Peace in & for the County & State aforesaid who having been by me first duly sworn deposeth & says that he is personally acquainted with William Johnson who now resides & has resided in said. County some little less than two years where this affiant has resided about nine years, that said Johnson removed from Santa Rosa County in Florida to this State about three years sense as affiant is informed & believes –

 

That this affiant though about the age of 85 years has a distinct recollection of this being the same William Johnson with whom he was acquainted during the revolutionary war & that he saw the said Johnson at Eutaw Springs & to the best of affiant's knowledge recollection & belief said Johnson was in that engagement or battle and was under the command of General Greene -- This affiant was there or nearby though not actually in the

battle being posted at some distance with others as a guard to the baggage & stores of a portion of the Army the Father of this affiant was killed in that. This affiant is certain that this same William Johnson was afterwards with General Pickens -- other forces marched off to a place called 96 and this affiant also saw him occasionally at that place -- There has been a great lapse of time since my first acquaintance with said Johnson and affiant was quite a youth at the time & he will not undertake swear positively as to the exact dates or distances so long ago but he knows & recollects this William Johnson not only by the appearance of his frame & features but from hearing him relate several little things that makes his recollection more distinct in conversation with him some time since & affiant is satisfied from the best recollection he has that said Johnson from the different times, places &c that he saw him in the Army must have been in actual service as a soldier in the revolution eight or nine years -- said Johnson was from Edgefield & this affiant was from Newberry District in South Carolina. This affiant introduced himself to said Johnson on meeting in this County because he thought from his appearance &

hearing his name seeing his age &c that he must be the same William Johnson that he had seen at & since the Eutaw Battle & knew in their young days & is now satisfied that he is the same man & has not the least doubt of it. -- This affiant must state also that he had not seen the said Johnson for some 45 years before he came to this County this affiant moved directly from Newberry to this County -- and the said Johnson as he is informed & believed moved from Edgefield to Georgia near Savannah & thence to Florida & then to this State & County so that we have them long separated, until he is here.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 6th July 1848

 

S/ G. P. Massey, JP S/ John F. Hoggle, X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/20/08

 

Captain William Butler (afterwards General William Butler)

Captain Box [Lewis Box]

William Hudgins

Joseph Bell

Richard Laremore

Benjamin Jernigan,

James R. Riley,

Allen Blaylock,

Richard Larimer,

Veteran’s father-in-law was Moses Prestcott

Rev. Ephraim Prescoat,

John Curley,

Sherrod Curley,

Miallard Smith [?],

John Blann [?],

Buddy Escridge,

Samuel Etheridge

Mount Hilling

Benjamin Hughs

Mr. J. F. Hoggle or John F. Hoggle

Ephraim Prescoat

James H. DeVotie or DeVolie, pastor of the Baptist Church

 

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson and Nancy Johnson W24: Va Line: Soldier enlisted in Caroline Co. Va, he applied 1818 May 27 Hawkins Co. Tn: Soldier married 1790 or 1791 Sept 30 or Oct 1 to Nancy Briant in Northampton Co. NC and soldier died 1833 Nov 16 or 17 in Grainger Co. Tn. His widow applied there 1844 Sept 27 age 71 in 1848. She was living in Campbell CO. Tn and in 1856 she was living in Union Co. Tn Widow died 1862 April 22 or 14: Children shown were Patsy Johnson, first child was age 55 in 1845 married Daniel Widows and in 1820 was living in NC: William Johnson no data: James Johnson age about 67 in 1869 a resident of Union Co. Tn, : Ann Johnson the youngest child was aged 17 in 1820 and she married Wm Daughtry and they were living in Grainger Co Tn in 1845 and they had married in Hawkins Co. TN soon after 1820. And in 1845 the said Wm Daughtry were living in Grainger Co. Tn in 1845. And they had the son James Johnson lived in Union Co. Tn in 1875 and stated he was soldiers only surviving child a grandson (not named) was mentioned in 1856. In 869 one Jesse Daughtery was of Union Co. Tn and in 1844 James Johnson was of Grainger Co. Tn. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

Pension application of William Johnson W24 Nancy fn106Va.

 

Hawkins County, The state of Tennessee: May Sessions 1818

 

On this 27th [?] day of May before me the Subscriber Chairman of the said County Court and one of the Justices of the Quorum of said Court, personally appeared in said court William Johnson aged 56 years resident in the County of Hawkins aforesaid who being by me duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following Declaration, in order to obtain the provision made by the act of Congress entitled “An act to provide for certain persons Engaged in the land & naval Service of the United States in the Revolutionary War.”

 

That he the said William Johnson enlisted in the County of Caroline State of Virginia in the company commanded by Captain Samuel Seldon [Selden?] of the 2nd Regiment commanded by Colonel Samuel Hawes commanded by General Greene and as near as this Deponent now recollects in the year 1779 for the term of 18 months, that he continued to serve in said Corps in the United States Service until some time in the year 1781 or thereabouts that he was discharged in Caroline County aforesaid by Colonel Hawes but that said discharge which was an honorable one, is not in his possession nor has he any other Evidence in his power to furnish by reason of the long space of time, that has elapsed. That said Deponent was in the battles of Guilford County House [sic, Guilford Court House], Camden, at the Siege of Ninety Six, and at the battle of the Eutaw Springs, where he was wounded by a sword on the top of the head, was bayoneted on the left arm, was shot in the knee, hip & leg Severely by the Enemy at which battle General Greene Commanded. That he is not only in very reduced circumstances but is almost totally unable to support himself by reason of the hardship he has underwent, and the wounds he has received in the Service of his Native Country the United States and that he greatly stands in need of the assistance and support of his Country though he has no other Evidence than this declaration to offer in support of his Services and that all the time he served in the United States Service was at least twenty one months.

 

Sworn to and declared before George Maxwell one of the Justices of the Quorum and Chairman of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions for said County in open Court on this the 27th [?] day of May

1818. S/ George Maxwell

 

State of Tennessee, Hawkins County

 

On this 29th day of August 1820 first appeared in open Court, being a Court of Record for said County, William Johnson aged about 59 years Resident in said County who being first duly Sworn according to law, doth on his oath, declare that he served in the Revolutionary War as follows: Enlisted in Captain Samuel Seldon's Company who was succeeded by Captain Campbell of the 2nd Regiment, Virginia Line for 18 months that he has Received a Pension certificate number 12,140 that my first Declaration was made out on or about the 27th day of May 1818 and the County Court aforesaid.

 

And I do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property, or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any

income or personal or real estate belonging to me except the clothes on my back, nor have I any wife or children but a daughter who does not live with me who is about 16 or 17 years old: that I am extremely week & debilitated & unable to support myself by my own occupation which is that of a daily labor & Stand in abstract need of the assistance of my Country for Support. Sworn to & subscribed in open

 

Court. S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

State of Tennessee, County of Grainger

 

On this 27th day of September 1844 personally appeared before me William Colvin a justice of the peace in and for said County and State aforesaid Nancy Johnson a resident in and of the said County and State aged 70 or 71 years old; who being first duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed July 7th 1838 entitled an act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows; That she is the widow of William Johnson who was a private in the Army of the revolution and served in all the southern division of the Army under Generals Greene and Morgan was in the battles of the Cowpens, Guilford, Eutaw Springs and several other engagements as she has been informed and believes: and received several wounds in various parts of his body the scars of which I have many times seen: with a cutlass or sword on his head and his arm with a bayonet; and in his knee and hip with bullets and was a cripple until the day of his death which took place in Grainger County on the 16th day of November 1833 being three or four days after the great falling of the Stars or Meteoric Light which took place on the 13th of that month in the same year;

 

 I am unable to give a detailed or particular account of his services but he was I believe pensioned under one of the first pension laws were for Revolutionary Soldiers when we resided in Hawkins County in this States; as an invalid pensioner and drew his pension for many years before his death in Knoxville of Robert King who was then the Agent for paying pensions and was on his Roll when he died at a full pension of $96 a year and after his death I drew the arrearage of pension being some $18 or $19 the exact amount not recollected and then surrendered of his certificate and receipted for the same all of which I suppose will be found on the files of the war department in the pension office or treasury office in as before stated she supposes that the proof of his said husband's services on which he was pensioned will be as she supposes all sufficient to entitle her to the amount of pension that her husband was entitled to draw under the law above referred to; She states that she was married to her said husband about the last day of September or first day of October 1790 in Northampton County on Maheren [sic, Meherrin] River in the State of North Carolina by one James Vincent a Baptist preacher of the Gospel by a certificate or license from publication in the Church my name before my marriage was Nancy Briant being then the law of the land; she states that she is unable to produce any record evidence of her marriage or over documentary evidence from church Books or records as they have been long since gone to destruction or lost in the lapse of so many years and she has no family record of the ages of her children or marriage her said husband never having one; he being no scholar and was careless about such matters;

but will be able to prove the positive and lawful solemnization of her marriage to her late husband William Johnson who was a pensioner referred to in the first part of this declaration by the evidence contained in the deposition of James Johnson which is hereto affixed who is a man of respectable standing in society and of good moral character which will be fully sustained; she would state that her oldest child is 52 or three years old according to her best recollection.

 

She further declares that she was married to the said William Johnson on the last day of

September or first day of October in the year 1790 and that her said husband the aforesaid William Johnson did died on the 17th day of November 1833 that she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service but the marriage took place previous to the first of January 1790 viz. At the time above stated. Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written before me.

S/ Wm Colvin, JP S/ Nancy Johnson, X her mark

 

[On September 17, 1844, in Grainger County, Tenn., James Johnson (relationship, if any, not stated), 73, gave an affidavit supporting Nancy Johnson's claim.]

 

State of Tennessee, Grainger County

 

Personally appeared before me Elijah Evans one of the Justices of the peace in and for said County Nancy Johnson widow and relic of William Johnson deceased who was a pensioner of the United States and in order to amend her former declaration which is now on file with the department of war; of the United States Amends her said declaration so far to explain a statement of her said husband in the year 1820; in relation to his “family and property” She states that it was true her said husband had at the date of his statements in 1820 no property in his own right at all; and it was also true that all his children was then married or dead except a daughter his youngest which then and for two years

resided with her sister a married lady in North Carolina but returned soon after the date of the above statement and married and now resides in this neighborhood to one William Daughtry And the testimony of both son in law and daughter will accompany this declaration; which Testimony she is in hopes will fully explain the discrepancy of her late husband's statements in her own:

 

She further states that at or about the time of the statement he was in the habit of continual drinking –and drunkness and that on those occasions she sometimes left home and staid or resided with some one of the children until he would get over his fit of drinking; and at the time referred to by the Commissioner of pensions in 1820 she was staying with one Daniel Widows who married Julia Johnson who was our fourth child and who is now about 50 years old after this he built a house in 1827 or 1828 in this County and we then resided together, until his death and all other matters are referred to in my former Declaration except that she is informed and believes that no record of the license or bond or church record can be found in North Hampton [sic, Northampton County] North Carolina having made proper search and many of the records have been destroyed in the lapse of years and by [indecipherable word] and carelessness of the Clerks &c cannot be found;

 

but the Testimony of James Johnson who was present at their wedding whose character stands as far as any man in the community and other collateral testimony taken in connection with his testimony will place the date of her marriage beyond controversy and that it took place at the time and place stated in her first declaration that she was married lawfully in Northampton County in North Carolina by one James Vincent a preacher well-known in that Country she avers most positively; and the positive testimony of James Johnson ought to be sufficient She has no family record as stated in her former declaration but by the testimony of accompanying this amended declaration will prove the ages of the children of William Johnson by his then lawful wife and now this lawful widow of the late William Johnson a pension or referred to in my former declaration and now the applicant to be placed on the pension list; in right of the Services of her said husband referred to in her formal declaration in in this my amended declaration to wit William Johnson who died about the 16th of November 1833. Sworn and Subscribed to before me this 17th day

of October 1845. S/ Nancy Johnson, X her mark

S/ Elijah Evans, JP

 

[On October 17, 1845 in Hawkins County, Tenn., William Daughtry, husband of Ann Johnson, daughter of William and Nancy Johnson, gave an affidavit supportive of Nancy Johnson's claim. In his affidavit, he lists the children of William and Nancy Johnson as follows:

Patsy “will be fifty six year old last June;

Betsy was about two years younger

Reuben Johnson first son was two years younger than Betsey and Ann my present wife who is a bout forty two years old or about that age.”

Daughtry states that he William and Nancy Johnson were married “last of October or first of November at 1790 or 1791.”] 17th of October 1845

 

Ann Daughtry who was Ann Johnson being duly sworn and cautioned by me deposeth and saith as follows that she is aged 42 years old and that in 1820 my father William Johnson who was the pensioner referred to in the declaration of Nancy Johnson my mother was the lawful husband of my mother and in the year 1818 or near two years before 1820 I resided in North Carolina with a married sister of mine and soon after that time or the latter end of that year I returned to the State of Tennessee in Hawkins County and was then married to my present husband William Daughtry

 

I also know when I came home my Father was in the habit of drinking too much and it must have been in his drinking frolics that he made the Statement referred to by the Commissioners of Pensions that he had no wife for I know the present applicant Nancy Johnson was his lawful wife as I have always understood and never heard the lawfulness of their marriage disputed I was acquainted with them from my birth until my father's death and with Nancy Johnson my mother from that time to the present and knows she is the identical person she represents herself to be and that she was his lawful wife as I have always understood and never heard it disputed.

 

Question 1st Mrs. Daughtry please state if you know the names of your elder sisters and Brother the children of William Johnson by his wife Nancy Johnson the present applicant for a pension in right of the services of her husband William Johnson your Father.

 

Answer: The names of the Children was

Patsy,

Betsy,

Reuben,

Julia,

William,

James,

Ann the last named being myself the present deponent and being now 42 or three years old at this time in my oldest sister as I have always understood was 14 or 15 years older than myself my father never kept any family register as far as I know and if any it was lost or destroyed before my time.

 

Question 2nd Please state if Nancy Johnson is a widow still of your father William Johnson the deceased pensioner referred to in Nancy Johnson's declaration and so often named by yourself.

 

Answer: She is a widow still and has remained a widow from my father's death until the present time and further this deponent saith not. Sworn and subscribed to on this 17th day of October 1845

before me. S Ann Daughty, X her mark

S/ Elijah Evans, JP

 

Researchers  Notes:

 

[Nancy Johnson survived the Civil War and filed for the reinstatement of her benefits.]

 

1 Probably the Battle of Hobkirk's Hill (a/k/a the Second Battle of Camden) based on the other battles in which he says he fought.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

Captain Samuel Seldon [Selden?]

Captain Campbell

James Vincent a Baptist preacher in Northampton Co NC

Nancy Briant or Nancy Bryant

James Johnson Grainger County, Tenn., in 1790 was in Northampton Co NC

William Daughtry son in law to Nancy Briant Johnson

Daniel Widows who married Julia Johnson son in law to Nancy Briant Johnson

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson S8764: NC Line soldier was born 1761 April 6 in Faquier Co. Va and he lived in Wilkes Co NC at enlistment and he applied there 1832 Oct 31 a brother not named was wounded in the battle of Kings Mountain. Pg 1860 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

State of North Carolina, County of Wilkes

 

On this 31st day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court, before the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions of the County of Wilkes and State of North Carolina, now sitting, William Johnson a resident of the County of Wilkes & State of North Carolina aged Eighty one years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to attain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

That he was born in the County of Fauquier in the State of Virginia on the 6th day of April 1751 (the record of which was entered in his Bible by direction of his father) where he continued to reside until he was about 15 or 16 years of age, when he removed with his father to the County of Loudoun in the same State – where he lived about two years, when he again removed with his father to Rowan (now Wilkes) County in North Carolina.

 

In the spring of the year 1776, the Cherokee Indians were very troublesome on the Western side of the Blue Ridge [Mountains] in that part of the Country particularly now embraced in the limits of Ashe County N. C. and a requisition was made upon the militia of Wilkes County for a company to guard the frontier settlements on the Western side of the ridge from there depredations.

 

This deponent among others volunteered himself in the latter part of May in the year 1776 in the said County of Wilkes, and joined the company of volunteers commanded by Captain Joseph Herndon, and marched directly across the Blue Ridge near to where Ashe Court House now stands, where they found a number of the frontier inhabitants engaged in the erection of a fort – upon reaching that place, Captain Herndon endeavored to prevail upon the inhabitants to abandon the Country and remove to the Eastern

side of the mountains, but this they declined to do – and after remaining there for some time in scouring the surrounding country, they returned home and was discharged. In this expedition this deponent believes he served about two weeks.

 

About the first of August following, this deponent again volunteered himself and joined Captain Benjamin Cleveland's company and rendezvoused near where Wilkes C.H. now stands, and as soon as the company could be properly organized, and the necessary arrangements made, they marched to the Pleasant Gardens in the County of Burke, where they joined the troops under General Rutherford [Griffith Rutherford]. In a few days after joining General Rutherford they marched direct to the Cherokee Towns of Cowee, Watauga, Oconoluflee [?] and some others not particularly recollected – at what was called the Middle Towns, (the troops being a good deal sickly from eating roasting ears &

fresh beef) a proposition was made by General Rutherford for a thousand volunteers of the ablest and stoutest man to turn out and march to the Valley Towns – this deponent was one of the number, and as soon as the requisite number was made up they marched immediately to the Valley Towns, a distance of about sixty miles – upon their arrival, they found a few straggling Indians (the balance having fled) whom they captured and kept prisoners – after burning the Towns and destroying their corn and all the

property they could find, they returned again to the middle Towns, where they rejoined that portion of the Army they had left –

 

After remaining a few days at the Middle Town until they rested and recruited, they set out upon their return to North Carolina, and after reaching the County of Wilkes, Captain Cleveland discharged his company & this deponent returned home, which place he reached about the last of October, having been gone about three months. From the time that the deponent returned from the Cherokee Nation until about the month of

 

August 1780 embracing a period of nearly four years this deponent performed sundry short tours of duty against the Tories (who at that time were very troublesome) two of which were performed under Captain William Lenoir on the North Western side of the Blue Ridge – in these two tours this deponent believes he served about a month – and the particular periods of the other tours performed against the Tories cannot now be recollected – About the latter part of August 1780 information was received by Colonel Benjamin Cleveland, that Major Ferguson [Patrick Ferguson] of the British Army was supposed to be approaching North Carolina from the South with a large number of British and Tories – upon which Col. Cleveland issued orders immediately for all the militia in the County of Wilkes to rendezvous at the Court House – this deponent immediately repaired thither and joined the company commanded by Captain William Lenoir

 

– after remaining at Wilkes C. H. for some time until the troops could be organized, they set out upon their march to oppose Major Ferguson – upon the way they were joined by Colonel Campbell [William Campbell], with a Regiment from Virginia, as also by other troops from North Carolina – when they had advanced perhaps to the Cherokee ford on Broad River it was ascertained that Major Ferguson was endeavoring to post himself on King's Mountain – upon which it was proposed that all those who had horses or who could procure them, should proceed with all possible dispatch to engage with him – this

deponent having no horse, and not being able to procure one was necessarily left behind with the foot men, and did not reach the battle ground – the battle having been fought – and the Americans being on their return with their prisoners a short distance, when the foot men rejoined them – after rejoining the Army, this deponent was detailed by Colonel Cleveland with others to take charge of the wounded (among whom was a brother of this deponent) and after making what preparations they could, and administering to their wants as much as possible, they set out in advance of the Army and proceeded on

until they reached Wilkes C H when Col. Cleveland directed this deponent to convey his brother home, as he was in a very helpless condition, and to remain with him until he should recover – which this deponent accordingly did –

 

In this expedition, this deponent believes he was absent nearly 3 months, from the time that he rendezvoused at Wilkes C. H. until his return to that place – not counting the time that he remained with his brother after their return – though it was counted to him for a three months tour, and he drew pay for that length of time. –

 

In the spring of the year 1781 when Lord Cornwallis was marching through North Carolina, this deponent again volunteered himself and joined a company commanded by Captain Nathaniel Gordon -- the company to which this deponent belonged endeavored to form a Junction with General Greene's Army, which was supposed to be at that time somewhere on the waters of Dan River in the borders of Virginia – but before they had reached the Shallow Ford of the Yadkin, it was ascertained that Lord Cornwallis was ahead of them, and that he kept scouting and foraging parties constantly scouring the country so that they found it would be impossible to reach General Greene without running a great risk of falling into the hands of the enemy – they accordingly took post at a place in the County of Surry where the village of Jonesville now stands – and where they remained until they were discharged. -- In this expedition this deponent believes he served about two weeks.

 

This deponent has resided in Wilkes County ever since the revolutionary War, and resides there at this time – He never received any written discharge from the service, nor has he any documentary evidence to prove it – but refers to Mr. Elijah Vickes2 who served with him most of the time, whose affidavit is hereto annexed, as a witness who can testify to his service.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid.

S/ R. Martin C.W.C.C. S/ William Johnson

 

On the day and year aforesaid, personally appeared in open Court before the Court aforesaid, Elijah Vickes who being first duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith, that he served with William Johnson the above applicant during the following tours of service – to wit: first under Captain Joseph Herndon to the Western side of the Blue Ridge against the Cherokee Indians – secondly, under General Rutherford to the Cherokee Nation, and thirdly, under Colonel Cleveland to King's Mountain and further, that the said three several tours of duty as set forth and specified in the foregoing declaration as having been performed by the said William Johnson, were performed by him – and that the remaining tour of duty set forth in the said declaration, he believes (from his knowledge of the character of said William Johnson) was performed by him.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

S/ R. Martin C. W. C. C. S/ Elijah Vickes, X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of William Johnson S8764

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

Researchers Notes: 1 It is probable that Johnson's brother was Lt. Samuel Johnson (Johnston) FPA W5012 whose wife and son sought a pension. Moss states that Lt. Johnson was wounded in the abdomen during the battle at King's Mountain. Moss, Kings

 

Mtn. Patriots, p. 137.

2 NPA W4368

 

Captain Joseph Herndon

Captain Benjamin Cleveland's

Captain William Lenoir

Captain Nathaniel Gordon

Elijah Vickes

 

 

My notes he is son of Jeffery Johnson born Prince William Co. Va and died in Wilkes Co. Va, brother mentioned is Capt. Samuel Johnson

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson S2661: NC Line and Va Line Soldier was born 1761 Nov 4 in Chesterfield Co Va and he lived in Brunswick Co Va at enlistment and also served as a substitute for his father ( not named) and in 1781 he moved to Montgomery Co. NC and also enlisted  there. He applied 1832 Oct 14 at Sneedsborugh in Anson Co. NC

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson S15189 NC Line: Soldier lived in Chatham Co NC at enlistment and applied 1833 March 11 Trigg Co. KY age 78. PG 1860

 

Pension application of William Johnson S15189 fn13NC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Kentucky, Trigg County

 

 On this 11th day of March 1833 personally appeared in open Court before the Justices of

the Trigg County Court now sitting William Johnson a resident of Trigg County in the State of Kentucky aged 78 years the 24th of September 1832, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers, and served as herein stated. General Ramsey was the commander of the Militia with whom he served he served in the company of Captain Joseph Johnson. He does not remember the other officers of his Brigade. He was then a citizen of North Carolina in Chatham County. He entered the service as a drafted man just before General Gates was defeated near Camden and was with him in that Battle. His company marched from Chatham County in North Carolina across the Yadkin River and came up with the Main Army under General Gates on the Pedee [River] a short distance below the mouth of Rocky River just before the Battle took place.

 

After the battle he went home and was shortly afterwards called on again to finish the term for which he had been drafted, 3 months. He was marched again into South Carolina but not so far down as Camden before he was discharged and went home having completed his tour of 3 months for which he was drafted.

 

He does not know the names of any of the regiments or officers of the Continental line who were with Gates who was the chief commander. He has lost his discharge and has no documentary testimony and he knows of no person living whose testimony he can procure to testify to this service: But it is a well settled tradition where he lives that he was in Gates defeat, and he has named one of his sons for his Captain Joseph Johnson who is now 44 years old.

 

 He was drafted again for a 3 months tour and entered the service again as a County Light

horse man about the 11th of October 1781 under Major Roger Griffith and Captain Mash. The other officers he does not remember. The object of this service was to keep the Tories in subjection. He resided at the same place as when he performed the other service and was marched about through the County of his residence, (Chatham.) He marched about through the country in which he live during this period of service. He was in no battles and served with no regulars. He served out his 3 months and was discharged by Major Griffith, which he now has in his possession dated the 11th of January 1782. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

[Joseph Johnson, a clergyman, and George Daniel gave the

 

“Chatham This May Cartify that William Jonston Faithfuly Scarved a tower of Dutey in the County Light Hors and is Discharged Acordingly this 11th Janury 1782. S/ Roger Griffith, Major”

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Captain Joseph Johnson

Major Roger Griffith

Captain Mash

Joseph Johnson, a clergyman

George Daniel

 

 

ZACHARIAH JOHNSON

 

Zachariah Johnson: S32344 NC Line: 1836 May 18 applied Randolph Co. Ind. age 79.Soldier lived in Northampton Co. NC at enlistment and later moved to Loudon Co. Va and also enlisted there. Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

Pension application of Zachariah Johnson S32344 fn11NC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Indianna [sic, Indiana], County of Randolph

 

On this 18th day of May 1836 personally appeared Zachariah Johnson before the Circuit

Court for Randolph County in the State of Indiana [spelled Indianna throughout] in open court now sitting the said that Zachariah Johnson being a Resident of the County of Randolph & State of Indiana aged 79 years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Provision made by the act of Congress passed the 7th of June 1832 that he served as a substitute for Elijah Pope 18 months in the 2nd Carolina Regiment of infantry regulars that Major __ Murphy commanded the Regiment __ Stuart was his Captain __ thence was his Ensign and that the names of his other officers he does not recollect that he was a Private and served his Tower [sic tour] out and was Honorably Discharged by his Captain __ Stuart in Halifax North Carolina on the __ day of __ 1777 and the

said that Zachariah Johnson further declares that after the above services he again Enlisted as a Private in the company of Independent French Corps of Dragoons under General Arnold that his Captain was __ Bedkins his 1st Lieut. __ Head his 2nd Lieut. __ Verdieu that he served more than 18 months in said Company meaning this last Corps that he Enlisted for the term of 3 years and served to the End of the war and was discharged at Little York Honorably by his Captain __ Bedkin and states that he was in the Battle of Monmouth while in the 2nd Carolina Regiment and that during his 2nd Enlistment or Service in the Independent French Corps of Dragoons that he was in the Battle of Stony Point under General Wayne and that his Services was rendered in Pennsylvania and New Jersey North Carolina and to the North Both of which services or Enlistments was in the Army of the United States and that when he first Entered the service of the United States he lived in the County of Northampton in the State of North Carolina and that when he Entered the service of the last time in the company of Independent French Corps of Dragoons he resided in the County of Loudoun in the State of Virginia & marched through the country to the places above stated & many others.

 

 And said Johnson further states that he the first term Entered the Service on the __ day

of__ 1776 & was discharged on the __ day of __ 1777 & that he Entered the Service the last time on the __ day of 1780 and was discharged on the __ day of 1781 as well as his memory serves him being old and Infirm he states that many Partickulars has escaped his recollection he the said Zachariah Johnson relinquishes Every Claim whatever to a Pension or an annuity Except the present and he declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of any agency of any State and that he has Lost or destroyed Both his Discharges not supposing that they would Ever be of Service to him again.

 

Sworn to and Subscribed the day & year aforesaid in open court.

 

 S/ Zachariah Johnson, x his mark

 

that [Abraham Vandle & David Nugent of Fayette County Virginia gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Elijah Pope

Stuart was his Captain

Captain was __ Bedkins

his 1st Lieut. __ Head

his 2nd Lieut. __ Verdieu

Abraham Vandle of Fayette County Virginia

David Nugent of Fayette County Virginia

 

 

 

DREWRY JOHNSTON or DRURY JOHNSTON

 

Drewry Johnston or Drury Johnson: wife Rhoda R5656 NC Line: soldier married Rhoda Cole “Rody” in 1785 marriage bond signed 1785 May 7. In Orange Co NC . Soldier died in 1832 widow applied 1844 Nov 28 in Orange Co. NC age 82. One Sarah Cate made avvdt 1845 Feb 27 in Guilford Co. NC age 75 and stated she was at soldiers and wifes wedding. On 1853 Feb 10 in Orange Co. NC surviving heirs of widow were Irena Johnson, Henry Johnson, Pheby Jeffres. Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

[fn p. 2, copy of marriage bond dated May 7, 1785, given in Orange County, NC, by Drury Johnson and Thomas Browen to secure the marriage of Johnson to Rody Cole.]

 

 [On February 27, 1845, in Guilford County, NC, Sarah Cate, 75, gave testimony that she is the sister of Rhoda Johnson, widow of Drury Johnson, who resides in Orange County, NC; that her sister is the widow of Drury Johnson; that she, Sarah, was present at their marriage in 1785 by James Carrington, JP.]

 

 North Carolina, Orange County

 

On this the 28th day of November 1844, personally appeared before the undersigned one

of the Justices of the Court, of pleas and quarter sessions for said County, Rhoda Johnson, a resident of said County aged 82 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, maketh the declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed 7th July 1838.

 

That she is the widow of the late Drewry Johnson, who during the War of the Revolution

(as this Declarant has reason to believe & does believe) did serve the United States, as a private of Infantry in the Militia, after her marriage with the said Drury Johnson.

 

1st The said Rhoda Johnson has reason to believe and does believe that in the fall of 1778, there was a draft for 5 months Militia man, to serve the United States in the War of the Revolution, when this Declarant's husband, the aforesaid Drewry Johnson, was drafted to Serve in said tour, was marched from the Town of Hillsboro in the aforesaid County, to Salisbury, thence to Charlotte, thence to Rutherford's Camp in South Carolina and at the Cheraw Hills, was discharged & returned home, and in the foregoing tour was, she believes in a legally organized Corps.

 

2. This Declarant has reason to believe and does believe that in the fall of 1781, immediately after the Town of Hillsboro was captured by Colonel Fanning, September 1781. This Declarant's husband did volunteer for a Tour in the militia under Captain Hodges, Tinnin Colonel: in Butler Brigadier General -- the object in raising the troops was to rescue the Governor & the Troops which the Tories had surprised & captured in Hillsboro -- In this tour the troops were marched to near Wilmington & after remaining some time on the Cape Fear [River], returned home about Christmas following – having been absent in the Army about 3 months & 2 weeks. When he was discharged in the Town of Hillsborough & returned home, and in said tour, was called into the

Service by the proper authority.

 

3rd This Declarant remembers that some time in the early part of the year after the [battle of] Guilford [Court House] her deceased husband did volunteer a 3 months tour under Captain Guinn [Gwinn?] & Colonel O'Neal -- Butler Brigadier General, rendezvoused in the Town of Hillsboro were marched to Randolph, Grassy Island on the [?] and to Cross Creek, now

 

Fayetteville, thence to Pittsboro & were marched to Hillsboro and discharged by Colonel O'Neal.

 

In each of the foregoing tours, this Declarant has reason to believe and does believe that

her husband was in legally organized Corps & called into Service by Competent authority.

 

That as regards her Deceased husband's discharges from his tours, she has no knowledge

what has become of them.

 

This Declarant further states that her Deceased husband may have served in other tours;

but she does not recollect them -- and as to the foregoing Tours, they are as Correctly as she is enabled to state them, from what her in perfect memory furnishes her, and was she learns from those who were companions of her husband's in the Army.

 

The said Rhoda Johnson, further sets forth that she was married to the aforesaid Drewry

Johnson, to the best of her recollection in the year of 1785, that they were married by James Carrington Esquire and the aforesaid County of Orange as per Copy of her marriage Bond --

 

That her Deceased husband Drury Johnson died in the year of 1832. That she has not

married since, but still remains the widow of the aforesaid Drury Johnson.

That from old age & bodily infirmity is unable to attend to court to make this

Declaration.

Sworn to and subscribed the day & year first above written before me.

S/ Wm Lipscomb, JP S/ Rhoda Johnson, X her mark

State of North Carolina, Orange County

 

 On this 21st of November 1846 personally appeared before me John A. McMannen one

of the acting Justices for said County George Carrington1 a resident of said County aged 96 years and maketh oath that he was well acquainted with Drury Johnson Deceased Husband of Rhody Johnson who is now his widow, and that he well recollects that said Drury was a soldier in the Revolution the first tour said jury served was in the 9 months Militia That this deponent's brother James Carrington was Captain & Litle [Lytle?] was Colonel whether or not said Johnson served out the 9 months he is unable to say with certainty he will [well] recollects that said Johnson went in another tour of Duty and is under the impression it was a 6 months tour and thinks that McFarland was Captain & Mebane the Colonel, and in said tour said Johnson was with him at Ramsey's Mills on Deep River and in an engagement at Lindley's Mills N.C.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and date above written.

Before me John A. McMannen, JP S/ George Carrington, X his mark

State of North Carolina, Orange County

 

On this the 24th day of February 1845 Personally appeared before me Samuel N. Tate

one of the acting justices of the peace for said County George Carrington a resident of the said County & State aged 93 years, an United States pensioner who being Sworn according to law deposeth and saith that in the War of the Revolution he was in the United States service as a private soldier under Captain Mebane & General Butler.

This deponent was well acquainted with the late Drewery [Drewry or Drury] Johnson of

said County whose widow Rhoda is now applying for a pension -- Said Drewry Johnson to this Deponent's knowledge did serve the United States as much as 9 months as a private Soldier and under said Officers with this deponent during which time the Battle of Lindley's Mills was fought in the year 1781 And that this deponent remembers that the said Drewery Johnson was in the aforesaid Battle.

 

1 FPA S8185

 

The aforesaid Drewery Johnson has been dead about 12 years and left a widow Rhoda

surviving who has not since married but remains his widow.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed before me this 24th day of February 1845.

 

S/ Saml. N. Tate, JP S/ George Carrigan [sic], X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Drewry Johnston R5656 Rhoda fn42NC\

 

 (Drury Johnson)

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/28/08

 

Thomas Browen

Sarah Cate,

Rody Cole or Rhonda or Rhoda Cole

Samuel N. Tate

 

 

FRANCIS JOHNSTON

 

Francis Johnston and wife Hannah: W13585 and rej.#5614 NC Line:  soldier was born in 1761 in Bute Co.NC and he lived in Rowan Co. NC at enlistment. Soldier applied 1834 March 19 Ashe Co. NC age 73, in 1834 Jan. Widow applied. 1853 June 30 Schuyler Co. Mo. Age 72. Soldier and widow had married 1807 Dec 22 in Wilkes Co. NC and soldier died 1846 Sept. 22 Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

State of North Carolina, County of Ashe: Superior Court of Law Spring Term 1834

 

On this the 19th day of March 1834 personally appeared in open Court, before His Honor Robert Strange Judge of the Court now sitting for the said County of Ashe, Francis Johnson [sic], a resident of the said County aged 73 years in January last, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath, make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7, A.D. 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers &

served as herein stated.

 

That he first entered the service of the United States as a volunteer militia man for a tour

of 3 [months?], in the County of Rowan in North Carolina, in the latter in the year 1778 -- under Captain John Sloan, Lieutenant Walter Sharpe, under Colonel Rutherford of Rowan -- the militia organized at Charlotte in Mecklenburg County NC whence they marched to Camden in South Carolina, thence to the vicinity of Charleston in the early part of the year 1779 -- and after some time marched towards Savannah in Georgia, the British being there posted at that time, and a few days were marched back towards Charleston, on account of Tories doing mischief -- remained a few days at a small town called Dodgester [sic, Dorchester] near Bacon's Bridge on Ashley River

-- where his first tour of service expired he having served during the whole of the said tour of 3 months as orderly Sergeant.

 

That he immediately again entered the service as volunteer for 6 months, near Charleston

under a Continental Captain whose name was Michael McQueen, Lieutenant James Clark, under the command of Colonel William Montell who was employed in directing fortifications at that place. This was in the Spring of 1779 -- There being a Regiment of NC militia Commanded by Colonel Archibald Litles [Lytle] of Hillsboro NC -- who was a regular officer as this applicant believes: -- having served till the beginning of September, when Count d'Estaing landed his forces and joined General Lincoln -- and laid siege to Savannah -- where Count Pulaski fell -- General Lincoln then marched to Charleston, where General Huggins with his Regiment from the North joined him -- Sir Henry Clinton arrived and landed his forces in the vicinity of Charleston in February 1780 about which time or not long before, the 6 months tour for which this applicant had engaged expired -- during the whole of which service this applicant served as a

private, and continued with the Army until the landing of Clinton as aforesaid -- at which time Captain George Lowman from Salisbury NC and Captain Barnet Pullum from Granville County NC (both said captains having been of Colonel Lytle's Regiment -- most of the militia being then discharged) beat up for volunteers -- each raised a company for 3 months service, in order to see the event of the siege of Charleston then expected -- this applicant volunteered then and there under the said Captain George Lowman for 3 months -- received the appointment of sergeant major in which capacity he served until Charleston fell into the hands of the Enemy. This applicant in the capacity aforesaid and under the said General Lincoln was stationed in Charleston when Governor Moultrie -- then acting as Colonel with his brave comrades defended the Fort of Sullivan's Island against the attack of the British Squadron, when the British ship Action was blown up.1 On the 30th day of March Clinton fronted [?] Charleston by land between Ashley & Cooper rivers & commenced Blockading the town -- then a detachment of

800 [could be 300] men was ordered up Cooper River to a placed called Hobcoy point [sic, Hobcaw or Lampriers Point], to guard said place in order to secure an opening to the town -- this applicant was sent with said detachment, commanded by Captain William Hughes & Major Johnson this was in April 1780 -- the said detachment defended the place aforesaid as long as could be done the Enemy having demanded a surrender of the fort -- which was refused and an engagement ensued which resulted in a repulse of the enemy, but the next evening the British Army being close at hand & threatening to take the little fort by storm, the defendants, abandoned the place for Charleston in small boats on Cooper River -- the boat containing this applicant and 75 others of the detachment aforesaid, fell into the hands of the enemy that night, and was conveyed to the British fleet and held as prisoners of war on board the Renown a 50 gun Ship of the said fleet -- thence taken across the Bay to John's Island & on by land 16 miles to Stono Harbor where the British Squadron then lay -- where this applicant -- was put on board a

prison ship and detained until after the surrender of Charleston, on 11 of May 1780 [sic, May 12, 1780] -- In June he was taken to Charleston then in possession of the foe at that time most of the militia prisoners were paroled, and this applicant also applied for a parole but was refused in consequence of his being an officer & that he was not in the capitulation, he being prisoner before -- he was there detained as prisoner until some time in July when he effected his escape from Charleston & came home to Rowan County North Carolina. -- After the battle at Guilford C. H. N. C. in March 1781 -- there being a call for volunteers -- This applicant again volunteered for 3 months -- in the month of June 1781 under Captain Richard Dowel , & Colonel Francis Lock [sic, Francis Locke] -- in Rowan County marched on to South Carolina & put under the command of Colonel Malmedei [sic, Malmedy] a Frenchman -- joined the Army under General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] in the first of August -- in this tour I served as a private until the

8th of September, when this applicant was appointed Lieutenant -- & was immediately marched to front [?] the Enemy’s lines at the Eutaw Springs -- where the battle commenced -- between the British under General Stewart & the Americans under General Greene in the said battle this applicant was wounded by a shot in the left elbow -- which wound has ever since deprived him of the use of his left arm he was then conveyed to the Hospital in Camden thence sent home to Rowan County NC and was confined in consequence of his wound for more that [than] 12 months --

This applicant from great age and the consequent loss of memory cannot precisely state

the whole of his service -- but swears that they he served as above stated at least –

3 months first tour -- as orderly Sergeant

6 months 2nd do -- as private

5 do 3rd do -- including in imprisonment as Sergeant major

3 months -- 4th tour as private

1 Applicant is confusing Moultrie’s defense of Sullivan’s Island which occurred when the British first attempted to

take Charleston in the summer of 1776 with the later siege of Charleston in the late winter and early spring of 1780.

1 day as Lieutenant

In all 17—1 day

besides the time and the Hospital &c in consequence of his wound --

Answer to 1 Question -- I was born in Bute County NC in the year 1761


 

2 do -- I had a record of my age made in my father's Bible, which Bible is now in possession of a niece of this applicant and a copy of the said record is in my possession at my house

 

3 do I lived in Rowan County NC when first called into service, since the Revolutionary War I lived in the same vicinity until the year 1815 when I removed to Ashe County NC where I am now reside.

 

4 I volunteered every time

 

5 besides the officers already mentioned I knew General Marion, Pickens, Sumpter [sic, Thomas Sumter], Colonels Campbell, Williams, Lee, and Anderson, William Washington of the Lt. Horse -- all officers of the line -- and as this applicant believes that most of these were with him in the battle at the Eutaw Springs –

 

6. -- I never received a written discharge except one given by Colonel William Montell at

Charleston -- which discharge is lost or mislaid long ago –

 

 I received no commission as Lieutenant being wounded & disabled the day after

appointment to that office

 

 I did receive from Colonel Lytle a commission or some writing confirming the office of

Sergeant major -- which writing is also lost or mislaid

 

 My service were [sic] proven in Salisbury Rowan County North Carolina, by those who served with me at Eutaw Springs -- and as to my services at Charleston & other places I know of no person now living by whom I can prove the same except by my own oath --

 

I first obtained a state pension of $3 per month on account of my wounds -- which

pension in 1822 was transferred to the Gen. Government, and I am now on the pension Roll of the agency of North Carolina as per Certificate in my possession which was given at the war office of the United States on the 3rd of December 1822 registered in Book B Vol. 9 Page 12 – at $4.80/100 per month --

 

He relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that

his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state territory or district except as above mentioned on the rolls of the North Carolina agency -- which he does not relinquish if he can consistent with the laws of his country claim that in addition to the present claim --

 

Sworn to and subscribed in open Court the day and year first above written

 

I am well known to Colonel George Bower and John Gambill persons of my

neighborhood who can & citizens of my neighborhood who will testify as to my veracity & their belief of my services.

 

Test. S/ Francis Johnston

 

S/ R. Gentry, Clk

 

[George Bower & John Gambill gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 [On February 1847 in Ashe County, North Carolina, Hannah Johnston, widow of Francis

Johnston, filed stating that her husband died September 22, 1846 in the 86th year of his age a pensioner of the US at the rate of $4.80/month; that she married her husband on December 22, 1807 in Wilkes County, NC by Wm. P. Waugh, JP.]

 

 [On June 30, 1853 in Schuyler County Missouri, Hannah Johnston, 72, made claim for a widow's pension stating that she is the widow of Francis Johnston a pensioner of the United States; that she married him December 22 1807; that her husband died September 22, 1846.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Francis Johnston (Johnson) S13585 Hannah fn37NC

 

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/28/08

 

Colonel George Bower

John Gambill

 

FREDERICK JOHNSTON

 

Frederick Johnston of Frederick Johnson: wife Eda: W4004: SC Line: soldier applied in 1821 Sept. Rutherford Co. NC age 66 with an old wife age 50 odd years and a little girl aged 13 (unknown relationship not stated) Widow applied 1840 July 16 Rutherford Co. NC age 72. Soldier and widow had married in 1783 and soldier died 1831 May 15. A son Willis Johnston made the avvdt. 1840 July 15 in Rutherford Co. NC: Children were Willis Johnston born 1786 Feb 17: Jason Johnston born 1788 April 29: James Johnston born 1790 March 18: Susan ? not Clear born 1793 Jan 2: Enoch Johnston born 1798 Oct 18: Lese Johnston born 1801 March 27: Mary johnston born 1809 Aug 6 ( appears to be Mary Mildred Johnston) Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, Rutherford County: Superior Court of Law third Monday after the fourth Monday in September 1821

 

This day came Frederick Johnston aged 66 years old into Open Court being a Court of

record for the County and State aforesaid and States that he is a resident of said County and has been for the term of 31 years last past a resident Citizen of the State & County aforesaid and that he was on the 18th of March AD 1818 and has ever since been a Citizen of the United States in he does further Swear on his Oath taken in open Court according to law that he enlisted in the year 1775 into the Company of Captain William Mason of the Second South Carolina Regiment commanded by Colonel Commandant Moultrie that he was soon after his enlistment transferred from the said William Mason's Company to Captain John Blake’s Company of the said Regiment in the South Carolina line on the Continental establishment, that his enlistment was for the term of three years which time he served out and was honorably discharged by Colonel Isaac Molt [?] of said Regiment in the year 1778 or 1779 at Charleston South Carolina that he has lost his discharge and that he has no other evidence of his said Service in his power that he was in several skirmishes in the battle of Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island and that he now makes this declaration for the purpose of obtaining a pension from his Government under the Several Acts of Congress passed for the benefit of the persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States during the revolutionary war, and I do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property, or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed that I am by trade a farmer but old and infirm and unable to do much for my livelihood that I have an old wife infirm and almost helpless 50 odd years old with no other person to work for me but a little girl 13 years of age not able to do much for the support of herself and Family my property is as contained in the following Schedule to wit

 

100 Acres of Poor Land worth about $70

 

1 Small horse worth about 25

 

1 Cow & Calf & 2 yearlings worth 20

 

6 Shoats 1 Sow & 2 Borrows 10

 

Some Table furniture 2

 

Kitchen furniture 2

 

Farming tools 3

 

Beds and furniture 15

 

Table and chairs 2

 

1 old chest .25

 

 $154.25

 

 S/ Frederick Johnston, X his mark

 

Sworn to in Open Court this 16th day of October 1821 before me

 

S/ James Morris, Clerk

 

 [On July 16, 1840, Eda Johnson [sic], 72, filed in Rutherford County, NC stating that she is the widow of Fedric [sic] Johnson; that she married him in 1783; that he died May 15th 1831; that she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service.]

 

[fn pp. 19-35

 

Contains a photocopy of many pages from a book or pamphlet entitled Candid Reasons for Renouncing the Principles of Antipaedobaptist by Peter Edwards with a letter from Edwards to his congregation dated Portsea, Jan. 12, 1795. This book or pamphlet contains some illegible family records, presumably of the family of Frederick and Eda Johnston. Why so much of the book is copied in the file, I can only guess that rather than tear out the pages containing the family record, the entire book or pamphlet was submitted in proof of the claim.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Frederick Johnston (Johnson) W4004 Eda fn56SC

 

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/17/08

 

JAMES JOHNSTON or JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnston or James Johnson: S16168 NC Line. Applied 1832 Aug 13 Knox Co. TN age 76. He enlisted in Mecklenburg CO. NC on 1835 March 16. Soldier had moved to Carroll Co. Ind. to live with a son (not named) Pg 1862: 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSTON

 

State of North Carolina} 31 of March 1819 Buncombe County}

 

On this day came before me the Subscriber One of the Judges of

the Superior Court of Law and Court of Equity in & for the said state Personally Appeared James Johnston aged fifty nine years Resident in the County of Buncombe who being by me first duly Sworn according to Law doth on his Oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the late act of Congress entitled an Act to Provide for Certain Persons Engaged in the Land & Navel Servis of the United States in the revolutionary War that he the said James Johnston enlisted in the 2nd Redg’t of Virginia Troops in the Company Commanded by capt Pollard of the said 2n’d Redg’t for the term of eighteen months that he continued to serve in the said Corps untill the Battle at the Eutaw Springs in the State of South Carolina [8 Sep 1781] where he was taken a Prisoner by the British Troops & was put on board a prison ship where he remained for the space of thirteen months when he was exchanged for when peace was

concluded between the United States & Great Brittain. that during the time of his service

aforesaid & before he was taken prisoner he was in the Battle of Guilford [Guilford Courthouse NC, 15 Mar 1781] and in the Battle at Camden [probably Battle of Hobkirk’s Hill near Camden SC,25 Apr 1781, but possibly Battle of Camden, 16 Aug 1780] where he received a wound by a Musket Ball through the thigh that by being exposed to heats & Colds he measurably lost his hearing during the said service that he never has received any Compensation to that ever from the Government or otherwise for the said service that he is in Reduced Circumstances & stands in need of the Assistance of his Country for Support & that he has no other evidence now in his power of said services

 

Sworn to and declared before me the day & year aforesaid

 

James Johnston his X mark

 

NOTE: On 29 Dec 1852 in Henderson County NC Ann Johnston, 79, applied for a pension stating that she married James Johnston on 22 July 1791, and he died 2 July 1852. In the file is a copy of a family register stating that

James Johnston was born 16 Jan 1761,

Ann Cole Johnston was born 5 Jan 1772,

and listing the names and dates of birth of their children.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of James Johnston: W7935

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

2nd Redg’t of Virginia Troops in the Company Commanded by Capt Pollard

 

 

JONAS JOHNSTON

 

Jonas Johnston or Jonas Johnson wife Esther: W21470 NC Line: widow applied 1839 Nov. 23 Edgecombe Co. NC age 89 and soldier had lived there at enlistment. Soldier died 1779 Jul 29 at the home of Thomas Armis on Downing Creek on the SC & NC Line. Soldier and widow had married 1768 Nov 17 at the home of Aquilla Sugg in Edgecombe Co. NC. Widow referred to soldier as Col. Jonas Johnston: Children were Elizabeth Johnston born 1772 Feb 9:

Prudence Johnston born 1775 March 15:

Mary Johnston born 1776 Dec 30:

William Johnston born 1779 Feb and died 1793 Nov 7:

Soldiers father Jacob Johnston died 1781 Dec 11:

Soldiers father was referred to as husband of Mary Johnston widow died 1841 Jan 19 and Peter Hines of Edgecombe Co. NC was executor of her estate. Widows surviving children in 1847 were Prudence Hines and Mary Ruffin. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

To the Honorable William L. Marcy Secretary of War

On behalf of the Distributees of the late Mrs. Ester Johnson widow of Colonel Jonas

Johnson of the Revolutionary Army, this case has been again carried before the Commissioner of Pensions upon new evidence, and rejected by him; An appeal is respectfully passed or from his decision to you.

 

This case has been allowed for heretofore, for six months service, and that for the last six

months service rendered by Col Johnson immediately preceding his Death. He died in service on the 29th day of July 1779 on Drowning Creek in South Carolina on his march Home.

 

 The Commissioner admits that Col. Johnson was appointed a Major in Edgecombe

County on the 22nd of April 1776. And Mrs. Ester Johnson his widow, in her Declaration for a pension declares her Husband entered the Army as a Captain. Thomas Bentley 376.15.5 dated November 1776. We claimed that so much of this some of money as paid Col. Johnson for his Military services as Major as testified to by the foregoing witnesses from March to November 1776 was his in that character. And which proves his length of service between those states to have been 8 months. The balance of this sum was paid to Henry Horn, and for arms. The Comptroller further certifies that Col. Johnson received for himself and for others for their services in November 1777 the sum of £129.9.7. He also certifies that other sums of money were paid to Colonel Johnson in 1778 and 1779, many of them large showing his great connection with Military service in North Carolina. The Testimony in the case does not sufficiently locate those particular sums, to specified service, though they all imply it, too strong to be doubted. But the Parole Evidence for the Pro rata of service, to meet these various sums and payments is to be found in general terms, in the depositions of Mrs. Catharine Johnson, 1 a Revolutionary Pensioner proves that Col. Johnson served at Wilmington, and in that section of country from March to October 1776. John Bryan 2 another Revolutionary Pensioner proves the same service. Henry Barnwill [sic, Barnhill] 3 another Revolutionary Pensioner proves the same service. Also Micajah Pettaway 4 & Dr. Robert Williams 5 two other Revolutionary Pensioners, and Mrs. Catharine Johnson, all prove in part the same service. This evidence also well supported for credibility has all been rejected by the Commissioner & set aside. To fortify this Parole Testimony, in behalf of the Claimants, I adduce the certificate of the Comptroller of North Carolina which is on file, showing that in "a Book of Settlement of the Army of towns at Kingston, the name of Col. Jonas Johnson is associated with the name of Henry Horn, and that they have received for their services, and for purchasing of Guns in Edgecombe County the sum of

 

 

1 FPA S8063

2 FPA W9747

 

3 Henry Barnhill S6579

 

4 Micajah Pettaway (Petway, Pettway) S3668

 

5 Robert Williams S7922

 

Doctor Robert Williams and in the Declaration of Mrs. Ester Johnson for her Pension. What portion of service Colonel Johnson rendered between his tour to Wilmington and his tour to South Carolina, where he died, embracing and pertaining to these various psalms, and what portion of these various psalms he received for his services, can only be left to liberal estimation, as the Commissioner admits Colonel Johnson to have been a very meritorious officer.

 

According to the Parole Evidence, as well as the Recorded proves in this case, it is very

evident that Colonel Jonas Johnson served as a Captain a Major & a Colonel in the

Revolutionary war for the full period of 18 months. Six months of which have been allowed & paid for. Leaving one years pay due.

 

Similar recorded proofs to this, in the case of Colonel Johnson from the Comptroller of

North Carolina showing from his Books these statements have governed the Commissioner heretofore in allowing the claims for a Pension to the widows of Colonel James McKizzie [?] of Arkansas formerly of North Carolina and these proofs have directed him, in very many other cases to allow the claims. It is much to be regretted then, that his departure, should now appear, not allowing him to apply the same just rule in the case of the widow of Col. Jonas Johnson, who he has in his various occasions often admitted, to have been an officer of great merit. I hope the decision will be reversed, as made by the commissioner, and the claim for one year further Pension may be allowed.

 

 I have the Honor to be most respectfully

 

 Your very Humble Servt.

 

 S/ Jno D. Hawkins

 

 In behalf of the Distributees of Mrs. Ester Johnson

 

 State of North Carolina, Edgecombe County

 

On this 23rd day of November 1839, personally appeared before me a Justice of the

Peace for the County of Edgecombe Mrs. Esther Johnston of the County now in the 89th year of her age, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth, on her oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed July 4th, 1836: That she is the widow of Colonel Jonas Johnston who entered the service of the State of North Carolina in the year 1776 as a Captain for Edgecombe County and by a reorganization of the Troops my husband was made a Major of the County in the same year, in a short time after he was raised to the rank of Colonel of Edgecombe. My husband was actively engaged from the commencement of the revolution in service both in this State and the State of South Carolina up to the last of the month of July 1779 at which time he died on Drowning Creek at the house of Thomas Arnis on the South Carolina line he being on his return from the Army in South Carolina as will more fully appear by his letters of that period filed as evidence.

She declares that her husband Colonel Jonas Johnson was on two occasions in service in the State of South Carolina comprising in all not less than 8 or 9 months. In the second expedition which was commenced in February 1779 and terminated with his death at Drowning Creek on the 29th day of July of the same year -- She his widow reaching the place a few days previous to his death.

 

 She further declares that she was married at the house of Aquilla Sugg in Edgecombe

County on the 17th day of November 1768, that her husband the aforesaid Colonel Jonas

Johnston died as before stated on the 29th day of July 1779; and that she has remained a widow ever since that period; as will more fully appear by reference to the proof hereto annexed.

 

 S/ Easther Johnston, X her mark

 

State of North Carolina, Edgecombe County

 

 This day personally appeared before me a justice of the peace for the County above

written Mrs. Easther Johnston of the said County who subscribed & sworn to the foregoing declaration in due form of law. I also certify that the family Bible of Colonel Jonas Johnston and his wife Mrs. Easther Johnston has been produced to me and I have cut from it the record of the births of their children and attached it to this declaration by 3 seals. I have had also produced to me the only remaining papers of Colonel Johnston to throw light on his revolutionary services; which comprises six letters written by Colonel Johnson [sic] to his wife while in service in South Carolina in which I have placed in an envelope sealed, with my name on it -- The commissions and other papers of Colonel Johnson his widow declares have been long since destroyed by moths and were burnt not knowing they would be of service. I also certify that the very enfeebled state of Mrs. Johnston's health and her blindness prevent her from attendance at a Court. I also certify that she has produced to me an entry in a family book of the period of the death of Colonel Jonas Johnson which is in the proper handwriting of Colonel Amos Johnston

the Brother of Colonel Jonas Johnston -- which I have also affixed to this declaration by 3 seals.

 

Given under my hand and seal this 23rd day of November 1839.

 

 S/ Jno F. Hughes, JP

 

The Ages of Jonas Johnston

 

And Esther his Wife Children

 

Selah Johnston was born the 25 day of May in the year 1770

 

Elisabeth Maund Johnston Was Born the 9th Day of February In the Year 1772

 

Prudence Johnston was Born The 15th Day of March in the Year 1775

 

Mary Johnston was born the 30 Day of December in the Year 1776

 

William Johnston was Born the 24th Day of February 1779

 

Set Down by John Chitty

 

Jonas Johnston Son of Jacob Johnston and Mary his wife Died July 29th 1779

 

Jacob Johnston Father of Jonas Johnston and husband of Mary Johnston Died the 11th Day of December 1781

 

William Johnston Son of Jonas Johnston and Esther his Wife Died on Thursday the 7th Day of Novr. 1793 [fn. 51

 

North Carolina Monday, August 21st, 1775

 

 At a General meeting of the Delegates of the Inhabitants of this Province, at Hillsboro the 21st day of August A.D. 1775 aforesaid. A majority appearing, continued their meetings from day-to-day until the 10th day of September 1775.

 

Thursday September 7th, 1775

 

 The Report of the Committee, appointed to bring in a plan for regulating Minute men and Militia being taken into consideration.

 

Resolved that -- the Province be divided into 6 Districts, as they stood hereto fore under

the Superior Court-Law, viz., at Edenton, Halifax, Hillsboro, Wilmington, New Bern and

Salisbury Districts. That a Battalions consisting of 10 Companies of 50 men rank and file, each, be raised in each District; and a Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel, Major, ten Captains, ten Lieutenants, ten Ensigns, ten Sergeants, ten Drummers and ten Fifers be allowed for each Battalion. That the Field Officers for each and every Battalion be recommended by the several Districts, and appointed by the Congress, and that the number of men to be enlisted in the several Counties in the different Districts be also recommended by the several Districts, as nearly as may be the number of effective men in each County. That the Field Officers in each District appoint a suitable person or persons in each County to enlist-minute man, which said minute men, when their Companies are compleated shall choose their Captains, Lieutenants in Ensigns, and the said Captains Lieutenants and Ensigns of each Company shall appoint the respective non-commissioned Officers, That -- when any Company is compleated, and the officers chosen, the Captain shall give notice to the Chairman of the County Committee, who shall thereupon called the Committee together to review the said Company, at such place as the Chairman shall think

proper. And the Committee or a majority of them, finding the Company compleat with able and proper men, shall grant a Certificate thereof to the Captain. That -- the minute men so enlisted for 6 months, and whenever called into actual service, be subject – and bound by the rules and regulations for the Continental Army provided by the Continental Congress; That -- in case of Insurrections, Invasions or other emergency such Captain or Captains, as may be nearest to the scene of action or first informed of the danger, shall have power to order all or part of his or their man as may be necessary into immediate service, and shall give notice to be Colonel or Commanding Officer of the Battalion to which he or they belonged, and the Colonel or Commanding Officer shall upon such information from a Captain or in the first instance have power to order all or every part of the Battalion as he shall think proper into service, and marched them to any part of his District, but he shall give notice to the Committee of Safety of his District, and shall be subject to their orders when convened. But as soon as the provincial

council shall meet the power of the Committees of Safety shall cease, with respect to such Battalion, in the Colonel or Commanding Officer thereof, shall be subject to the control of said Council.

 

 [cover: fn. 39: “Jonas Johnston to Gor. [Governor] Caswell May [sic, June] 1777 To His

Excelency [Excellency] Ritchard [Richard] Caswell Esqmiar [Esquire] Capt. Generall [General] of the State of North Carrilina [Carolina]]

 

Edgecombe County June the 13 day 1777

 

 To His Excelency the Govner [governor] and gentill Men [gentlemen] of the Councill

[council] at State—

 

Sir this is to inform your Exetincy [Excellency] and gentill men at the Counsill [Council] that about 10 days ago Colenal [Colonel] Jurdin [? Jordan?] returned a List of dessarters [deserters] numbered in This County when I Imediatety [immediately] Issued Orders to Every Captain in the County to Search their dustricts [districts] for the same amongest [amongst] howme [whome] was Tristem Noswary [Tristan Norsworthy?] and Matha Joiner [Matthew Joiner, Joyner ?] who did not consider Them sulves [themselves] as dessarters for the reasons shore [shared] In by dissistions [desertions] hearing in Closed [enclosed] But Came to orth [?] with and surendered [surrendered] them sutves [themselves] to me and only Beged [begged] it as usoven [?] of me to Lay ustate [? the state] of thenir [their?] case Be foar [before] you Excelency and Councill and

what ever is dutermined [determined] on they will rust [rest] perfectly satisfied with and shoouild [should] it Be the Sence [Sense] of your Excelency and Councill for them to ruturne [return] or not to ruturne to their ridgemunt [regiment] you will be kinde [kind] unufe [enough] to Lut [Let] me know that I may know how to proseed [proceed] with them and so no more at prusent [present] But Sir I Still remain yours Excelency and the Honerabell [Honorable] Councills moste [most] obudent [obedient] Humbell [humble] Servant

 

 S/ Jonas Johnston

 

[cover: fn. p. 36: “To Excelency Rich’d Caswell Governor of No Carolina This For favor of Mr. Bignal” “a Letter from Mr. Jonas Johnston 11th June 1778”]

 

Edgecomb [Edcombe] County June 11th 1778

 

May it please Your Excelency [Excellency] these Fieus [few] Lines Comes to Inform You that ON 14th of May We Raised Our Coto [? Quota?] of Men for this County 33 as Voluntears (Volunteers) The Others Ware [were] Balleted [balloted?] and pointed Out by the Field Officers and Are Nearly Ready to march Nothing more will Detain them Over 5 or 6 Days then [than] the Lack of Mony [money] to pay them their Bounty which I Hope Your Excelency Can Furnish me with and If in your power Sir & Plase [please] to Send it by Mr. Robert Bidgnal Esqr. The whole Amount if I am Not Mistaken is Just 4800 Dolars [dollars] Your Excelency Comploying [complying] with the Above Request will be Thankfully Acknowledge [acknowledged] by Your Most Obedient Friend and most Humbl Sert

 

 S/ Jonas Johnston

 

 [cover: fn. p. 32: “Excelency Rich’d Caswell Governor of Nth Carolina”]

 

Edgecomb [Edgecombe] County, may it please your Excelency [Excellency] Sir these Fieu [Few] Lines will inform you that on 23rd of this Instant Our Detachment Marched for Halifax all in High Spirits I have payed [paid] them their Bounty to a man the mony [money] I Borrowed at my own Risk Under And Expectation of Rescvig [Receiving? or Reserving?] of it when Mr Bignal Returned But he Informed me that the mony was not Come from the Northward and further, Informed me that Your Excelency and Council had Given the pay Masters a Draught on the Treasury for the Bounty of the Several Countys [counties] But as I have Payed my men at my own Risk and my Honour is now at Stake for the mony as I Borrowed it of Gentailmen [Gentlemen] whome [whom] will want it Shortly and if Your Excelency fail Sending it to me I must Either Forfeit my honour Or Send [?] my Own Estate and Yesterday Recerved [Received] a Letter from Mr. Bignal that Capt. Blunt [Blount] was Returned with mony from the Northward

from Your Ever Readiness to Serve the publick [public] the best Advantage and not to Let the Inocent [Innocent] Suffer with the Gilty [Guilty] I Hope if it is not quite Inconsistant [Inconsistent] with Your Duty you will Send me the Money by the Barer Mr. Richard Tomlinson and his Rect [receipt] Shall be Good Against me for what Ever Sum Your Excelency Please to Send in my Last to You I stated The whole Amount at 4800 Dollars but one of our men Died Before he Rec’d his Bounty so that 4750 will be the sum Now I Know my Enemise [Enemies] would Regoice [Rejoice] to See me fail Gitting [getting] the mony So that Either my Honour or Small Fortune might Sink as they Last weak [week] Failed in their Attempt Not withstanding their Great paines [pains] and another Lye bill [libel?] as Abominal [Abominable] as the Other, A Ballance [balance] of 72 Votes in my favour [favor] my all is Now at Stake and if I fail Gitting

the mony Great Youse [use] will be maid [made] to my Hurt Both of Honour and Estate Sir, I am

Your Excelency’s Most Obedient Humbl [humble] Servt [servant]

 

June 26th 1778 S/ Jonas Johnston

 

 Dr. Sir Kingston 27 June 1778

 

 Your favor of yesterday I have now before me, and confess I am under very great concern that it not being in my power to furnish the money you mention, for to my very great astonishment, this day Captain Blount returned with only Forty Thousand pounds which will not pay half of the bounty of the Men raised in consequence of the late Act of Assembly -- I should rejoice in having it in my power to serve you, but in the present case, I could not acquit myself in my Own Judgment, was I to give a preference; I shall therefore keep the money in my possession until the meeting of the Council, which is appointed to meet here on Thursday next, when, I would advise you to attend with your receipts or other Vouchers to shew you have paid the bounty to your Men & have no doubt you will receive it.

 

 I congratulate you on your late Election and am with esteem

 

 Sir

 

 Your most Obedt Sert

 

 Col. Jonas Johnston

 

 [cover: fn. p. 41 “To Esther Johnston”]

 

Camp nuar [near] Camden on the Wateree

 

Loving Wife thus [this] coms [comes] to lut [let] you knew [know] that I am in perfict [perfect] Health at presant [present] and So is all My Men Excpt [except] John Mcdnewl [John McDowell?] who is Sick with the pluncey [?] I visited hem [him] yaster day [yesterday] in the Evinning [evening] and red and Ens to March to Agusta [Augusta] and Be Stationed [?] Their [there] as the Govner [Governor] of South Carolina Considers [?] It will be Most “Agreable [agreeable] to our Men to Take post in that quarter I am well pleased at the Station as I hope it is Healthy I am as well satisfied as I Can be at So Greate [great] a distance from you and my Children I larned [learned?] the Line of This State the Tenth day of Aprill [April] with Erring [Erwin?] and of Corse [course] shall be discharged The Seventh day of July I shall Make utt [out?] the [??] reach home in my power it is youse Less [useless] for me to mention any thing of My private a fairs [affairs] as I know not how they Sand [stand?] [?] Should be glad to have my

[???] as soone [soon] as posuBell [possible] we have [?] the Enemy in the Late Engagements with Vevery [very] Small Loss it may Be relied on as a fact as one of our Men is hear [here] that rec’d a slite [slight] wound in the action the peopele [people] of this state air [are] Turning out all most [almost] to a Man I Hope the Men with me will not be Quieted as Some have Been Be four [before] and so no Mour [more] at present But hope this will find you and My littell [little] Children in purfect [perfect] health and remember My Love So you My [text missing-- paper torn] nd [indecipherable text]

 

 S/ [J]onas Johnston

 

[Cover: fn 46: “His Excellency Richard Caswell Governor of North Carolina” -- fn. p. 43—written in a different hand—appears to be the hand of a private secretary –much more legible than letters written in Johnston’s own handwriting.]

 

 Camp at Mr. Summers a plantation 23 miles westward of Charleston June 6th, 1779

 

May it please your Excellency

 

 I am very sorry to inform you of the unhappy Situation of myself & Regiment being very

poorly supplied by the Inhabitants of this State & numbers of the men have not a Shelling to procure the least necessary for themselves I am also very sorry to inform you that I am

thoroughly sensible of my inabilities in a Military Capacity and find the same misfortune

prevails in those of a higher Rank of our own State which in my opinion is one Reason why our men are not treated as well as they otherways [sic] might have been, notwithstanding our men remain in high Spirits and are determined to be victorious in the attempt if they engage, they have performed wonders in the Eyes of Spectators & believe them to be equal to any militia on the Continent, the Enemy have posted themselves on John’s & James’ Islands where they have fortified themselves as well that I believe it would be impossible to force them from their lines without loss of a Great many men, we are now within six or eight miles of their lines & at different times have Retaken a Thousand Negroes a number of prisoners & about Four Hundred Horses without the loss of but very few men, & am convinced the Safety of this State depends on

the Spirited exertions of our own & believe if there is not men Sent from there to Supply our place Our State will become the Barriors [?] I still Remain with you Respect

Yr. Excellency's most Humble Servant

S/ Jonas Johnston

State of North Carolina, Pitt County

 

The amended affidavit of Mr John Bryan taken to explain & prove more fully the service stated by him in his former affidavit which he rendered under Colonel Jonas Johnston. This affiant being first duly sworn according to law testifies and says. That he is informed that his evidence is objected to first, because he did not state the service he rendered under Colonel Johnston in his own declaration; and secondly that he was too young to have served at that time.

 

When this affiant applied for a Pension he was then and has continued up to the present time to be deprived of the use of his legs by palsy: so as to be confined to the house and unable to get from a chair without assistance. In that situation this affiant could not procure evidence to establish all the service he performed; and the only reason why his services are stated in his former affidavit under Colonel Johnston was not mentioned was that Colonel Johnston being dead and this affiant not knowing any person then alive who could prove it, he was told it would not be allowed. This affiant got two persons to prepare his papers & he has every right to believe that great injustice has been done to him by their ignorance. First in stating his age & secondly in omitting to state all the service he rendered -- When this affiant went into service in 1776 under Colonel Johnston this affiant was 18 years old, and if it is made to appear by his declaration that he was not so, the person who sat the date down certainly made a mistake. My father in his lifetime had a record of the ages of his children & he told me that I was born on the

26th day of May 1758 and I am now Eighty two years of age. My friends Major Anderson and Dr Williams both of whom I served with both know that I was in service and old enough. I served with Dr Williams he being a surgeon immediately after the defeat of General Gates in and near Charlotte in this State for 3 months. In conclusion this affiant solemnly declares that he did serve under Colonel Johnston as stated in his first affidavit -- and any statement going to disprove it is certainly wrong.

Given under my hand this 15th day of April 1840.

S/ John Bryan

State of North Carolina, Pitt County

 

 The affidavit of Major John Anderson of Pitt County & a Pensioner of the United States now in the 81st year of his age: who being first duly sworn according to law testifies and says.

 

That he was at the Battle of Moore's Creek in the minute service and on his return home he enlisted as a regular soldier under Captain Enloe of the 5th Regiment: commanded by Colonel Buncombe and continued in the Continental service until February 1780. He then returned home, and in 1780 immediately after the defeat of General Gates this affiant served a Tour of duty with John Bryan for 3 months in or near Charlotte in this State and in 1781 I served another tour of duty for 3 months in or near Wilmington & Smithville [sic, Smithfield?] with John Bryan. (6 John Anderson S6511)

 

This affiant is told that the testimony of Mr Brian is objected to first because he was too

young to serve; and secondly that he did not claim in his own declaration the service rendered under Colonel Johnston -- as above stated I marched to the North & continued there until February 1780. I cannot therefore speak of this service rendered by Mr Brian under Colonel Johnston of my own knowledge but I am as well convinced he did serve it as I can be of any fact whatever. Because I know when on the expedition to Charlotte he frequently mentioned it; and from that time to the present I have always heard him tell the same story. I have also heard others who served with Bryan under Colonel Jonas Johnston often mentioned the same service that Bryan was in it. In relation to the age of Mr Brian I have to said that his father and mine resided in 2 1/2 miles of each other I have known him from my infancy; it is certainly wrong that he was not old enough to serve at that time he has mentioned. I know that he was not only old above but did serve; and if any person has made him out to young I again repeat it is wrong for

he is to my knowledge about my age I do not think there can be more than a years difference if that. In conclusion this affiant says that John Bryan was a good soldier, and always sustained a good character. At the time I gave evidence to establish his claim to a pension, he did most certainly mention his service under Colonel Johnston and if it is not mentioned in his declaration, it was either of omitted from negligence or not stated to calls no direct proof was none to establish it.

 

 Given under my hand this 17th day of April 1840

 

 S/ John Anderson

 

State of North Carolina Pitt County

 

 The affidavit of Mr Henry Barnhill of Pitt County a Pensioner of the United States now in the 83rd year of his age, who being first duly sworn according to law testifies and says. That he entered the service in 1776 under Captain James Armstrong and marched to Fayetteville and was at the Battle of the widow Moore's Creek; and on his return to Pitt he was mustered into the minute service and marched for Wilmington where this affiant served for 6 months from March to October of 1776. While in Wilmington this affiant well knew Major Jonas Johnston and this affiant served under him a part of the time.

 

 This affiant was born & raised in the same neighborhood with Mr John Bryan and he can

testify that Mr Bryan is quite as old a man as he is; he can also testify that at the time that this affiant was in service in 1776 Mr Brian was not only old enough but actually served. This affiant well remembers his serving in South Carolina. On the return of this affiant from Wilmington he enlisted in the service as a 9 months man & marched to the North under the command of Captain Childs and Colonel Hogan [sic, James Hogun].

 

 In conclusion this affiant knows if it is made to appear that Mr Brian was too young to be in service at the time mentioned, it is certainly wrong. This affiant has known Mr Brian man & boy all his life and he does not believe him capable of making a misstatement in a word he is a man of truth & good character.

 

 Given under my hand this 16th day of April 1840

 

 S/ Henry Barnhill

 

 

State of North Carolina, Pitt County

 

 The affidavit of Mister Moses Highsmith of Pitt County a Pensioner of the United States now in the 82nd year of his age. This affiant being first duly sworn according to law testifies and says. That he was born and raised in the same neighborhood with Mr John Bryan and can testify to the fact that he served for several years in the war of the Revolution. The first service he rendered I well recollect was at Wilmington at the commencement of the War; and I have often heard him mention Colonel Johnston as the officer he served under. I have a perfect recollection of his leaving home when he marched from Tarboro for Wilmington and I know he was again in service in South Carolina and at the Battle of Stono. This affiant has been requested to state the

age of Mr Bryan; he is informed that it is doubted if he was old enough to serve as stated above I have lived near to Mr Bryan man and boy all my life and from my own age in my knowledge of his I am fully convinced indeed I know that he is an older man than I am -- in this affiant then & does testify that to his knowledge Mr Bryan rendered the service above mentioned -- and if it is made to appear that he was too young to serve at the commencement of the Revolution; it is certainly wrong: for I know he was and did serve.

Given under my hand this 16th day of April 1840.

S/ Moses Highsmith

Fn p. 82

 

Mrs. Ester Johnson

Thomas Bentley

 

State of North Carolina Pitt County

The affidavit of John Bryan now a Pensioner of the United States taken to prove the

services and death of Colonel Jonas Johnston of Edgecombe County in the War of the

Revolution. This affiant being first duly sworn according to law testifies and says. That he first entered the service in the spring of 1776 in the month of March and marched to Wilmington and was there placed in a Regiment under the command of Colonel Lillington Major Jonas Johnston being the Major of the Regiment. I served from March until October of that year at Wilmington under the command of Major Johnston. In the month of March 1779 this affiant marched under the command of Captain James Lanier in a Regiment commanded by Colonel Jonas Johnston for South Carolina and served from that time until the middle of June of that year, at which time we were discharged and on our way home Colonel Johnston died on the way at Squire Armisn [?] on

Drowning Creek near the North Carolina line. This affiant has the most distinct recollection of the services of Colonel Johnston and his bravery at the Battle of Stono. We were discharged but a short time after the Battle and this affiant shall never forget his saying to us that he should never get home being then sick.

Given under my hand this 28th day of March 1840

S/ John Bryan

State of North Carolina, Pitt County

 

7 Moses Highsmith W7752

 

 The affidavit of Thomas Bentley a Citizen of Pitt County and now a Pensioner of the

United States taken to prove the Revolutionary services of Colonel Jonas Johnston of

Edgecombe County. This affiant being first duly sworn according to law testifies and says. That he was drafted in the month of March 1776 and marched for Wilmington under the command of Captain Godfrey Stincell [sic, Godfrey Stancil ?] and served in and near that place until the month of October - when we arrived at Wilmington we were put in a Regiment commanded by Colonel Lillington Major Jonas Johnston being the Major of the Regiment I continued to serve under Major Johnston until we were discharged in October as above stated. Major Johnston being in service all the time. After that this affiant was mustered into service as a 12 months man under Captain McRee and marched to South Carolina. This affiant well recollects hearing of the death of Colonel Johnston the period when it took place he is unable to say as he was not been

under his command.

 

 Given under my hand this 26th day of March 1840.

 S/ Thomas Bentley

 

 

 State of North Carolina, Pitt County

 

 The amended affidavit of Henry Barnhill made to explain and prove more fully his

knowledge of the Revolutionary services of Colonel Jonas Johnston. This affiant being first duly sworn according to law, testifies and says. That as stated in his formal affidavit he marched from Greenville to Wilmington and served in or near that place for 6 months viz. from about the 15th of March 1776 to the first of October in the same year. On our reaching Wilmington we were mustered into a Regiment commanded by Colonel Lillington, and Jonas Johnston as Major. We were stationed in Wilmington and in the month of May we were ordered and marched forth Smithvill [Smithville?] the mouth of the Cape Fear where the enemy had landed Major Jonas Johnston commanded the detachment; and I served under him at Smithville and between that place & Wilmington all the month of May & June 1776. Certainly 2 months. I was as before

stated in the same Regiment with him for the 6 months I served at Wilmington in near it and I know he served as long as I did viz. 6 months. In my former affidavit by have said served a part of the time under Major Johnston; and sayings so I had reference to the 2 months service performed under his immediate command. Captain James Armstrong commanded the company to which I was attached.

 

Given under my hand this 16th day of November 1840

S/ Henry Barnhill

 

 [fn p. 225 is a letter Mrs. Johnston’s heirs’ attorney wrote to President James Polk pleading her

case.]

 

 State of North Carolina, Edgecombe County

 

 The affidavit of Captain Micajah Pettaway taken to prove more fully his knowledge of

the service and death of Colonel Jonas Johnston in the War of the Revolution. This affiant being first duly sworn testifies and says Immediately after the Battle of Moore's Creek in the latter end of the month of February 1776 a draft was made of two companies of men from Edgecombe County to March to Wilmington then threatened by the enemy. The company in which I was drafted was commanded by Captain Henry Irvin Tool, and the other by Captain Hall. The 2 companies comprised about 180 to 200 men. We marched under the command of Major Jonas Johnston and carried with us several wagons of ammunition, on our arrival at Wilmington the men under the command of Major Johnston together with those from other counties were formed into a Regiment and Colonel Lillington was made Colonel and Major Johnston acted as major:

we were from the first of March to the first of April stationed in Wilmington and from that time to the first or 10th of May stationed at a camp below Wilmington on the Cape Fear River and at that time I enlisted under Captain Brinkly of the 3rd Regiment: and left Major Johnston at the camp and in a few days after marched to South Carolina first to Georgetown then to Charleston and then to Savannah, and remained until the month of October when we were ordered to return  and joined General Washington to the North. We marched back through South & North Carolina

and on reaching Tarborough, we halted for a few days; to recover from the fatigue of the journey and enlist men. I well recollect that Colonel Johnston had a parade of his Regiment to beat up for recruits and to all his appeals to the man to enlist I know that he was constantly answered that they had but a few days returned from serving him 6 months at Wilmington and could not be expected to leave home again immediately. The few who did enlist I often heard speak of the services at Wilmington under Major: afterwards Colonel Johnston, and that I had returned home almost as soon as they did -- From these facts I am as well convinced of Colonel Johnston's serving in and near Wilmington for 6 months as I can be of any fact whatever. That I served

under him for 2 months before my enlistment I can positively of firm as true. I cannot name the day we left Tarborough but I well know it was immediately after the Battle of Moore's Creek for we met on the way the prisoners taken and that Battle on their way to Halifax, from that time to the first of May I was under the command of Major Johnston in and near Wilmington. This affiant served in the Army under the command of General Washington up to the very last of the month of October 1778 when he was discharged at a place called the Orchard about 10 miles from West Point in the State of Connecticut. He then returned home and recollects well as stated in his formal affidavit the service and death of Colonel Johnston in South Carolina.

 

 Given under my hand this 4th day of March 1840.

 

 S/ Micajah Pettaway

 

 State of North Carolina, Edgecombe County

 

 The affidavit of Micajah Pettaway a Citizen of the County above written and a Pensioner of the United States now in the 79th year of his age. This affiant being first duly sworn according to law testifies and says that he was born and raised in the County of Edgecombe and in the year 1776 in the month of February he was drafted and marched from Tarborough with a detachment of men commanded by Colonel Jonas Johnston for Wilmington with ammunition for that place -- and on reaching it I enlisted under Captain Brinkley of the 3rd Regiment and shortly after this in April of that year marched for Charleston South Carolina then threatened by the enemy -- Colonel Johnston was then acting as a Major: and remained stationed between Wilmington and Smithville the mouth of the Cape Fear River and in the fall of 1776 I was marched through North Carolina on my way to the North and at that time Colonel Johnston had returned to Edgecombe County in what was made Colonel of the County. This affiant was in the

Army under General Washington until the fall of 1778 and was discharged in the month of October on his return home he still found Colonel Johnston actively employed in suppressing the Tories; and in the month of February 1779 Colonel Johnston marched with his Regiment to South Carolina and served up to the period of his death which took place in July on Drowning Creek at the House of Mr. Arnis near the North & South Carolina line. In conclusion he can testify that Colonel Johnston served in the expedition to Wilmington 6 months and from February 1779 up to his death in July of that year and South Carolina. This affiant also knows that Colonel Johnston was not only married but at the time of his death he left 5 children whom this affiant has lived near from that time to the present and in conclusion he testifies that Mrs. Esther Johnston now applying for a Pension was his lawful wife; and to his knowledge has never married.

 

 S/ Micajah Pettaway

 

 State of North Carolina, Pitt County

 

 The affidavit of Doctor Robert Williams of Pitt County now a Pensioner of the United

States and the late a Surgeon in the War of the Revolution. This affiant being first duly sworn according to law testifies and says. That at an early period of his life viz. -- as early as the year 1771 or 72 he well knew Colonel Jonas Johnston of Edgecombe County and at the commencement of the Revolution Colonel Johnston was a conspicuous man both in a civil and military capacity which he continued to do up to the period of his death while on an expedition to South Carolina.

 

 This affiant can testify to the following facts in relation to the marriage of Colonel

Johnston's and the service he rendered as Colonel of Edgecombe County in the War of the revolution. This affiant having lived all his life except 2 years at Windsor and 3 years at Greenville in 10 miles of the widow of Colonel Johnston -- first I am fully convinced from my knowledge of facts connected with the history of that period that Colonel Jonas Johnston whose widow is now applying for a pension is the identical person known to this affiant as the wife of Colonel Jonas Johnston as early as the year 1771 or 72 and that he was in the practice of physick and surgery under and with his father before the commencement of the Revolution in the neighborhood of Colonel Jonas Johnston; In the early part of the year 1779 or 80 Colonel Jonas Johnston marched from Edgecombe County in command of a detachment of man to South Carolina and in that expedition Colonel Johnston died in service. The precise period of the commencement or termination of the service of Colonel Johnston this affiant is unable at this

time unable to state. But he is satisfied it was either in the year 1779 or 80 and terminated in his death. From the period of Colonel Johnston's death up to the present time this affiant has known Mrs. Johnston and his children who are 5 in number. This affiant can testify that Mr. Micajah Pettaway of Edgecombe County was a soldier of the Revolution in his testimony in the opinion of this affiant is entitled to the fullest credit and belief – and is also that of Mrs. Catherine Johnston of the same County.

 

Given under my hand this 25th day of November 1839.

 

 S/ Robert Williams

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Jonas Johnston (Johnson) W21470 Esther fn255NC

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/28/08 supp 10/29

 

Henry Horn

John Bryan

Micajah Pettaway

Dr. Robert Williams

Mrs. Catharine Johnson

Henry Barnhill

Aquilla Sugg

Colonel Amos Johnston the Brother of Colonel Jonas Johnston

Matthew Joiner, Joyner

Tristan Norsworthy

Major John Anderson

Captain Enloe

Mr Henry Barnhill

Mister Moses Highsmith

Thomas Bentley

 

 

JOSEPH JOHNSTON or JOSEPH JOHNSON

 

Joseph Johnston or Joseph Johnson wife nancy: W5033 NC Line: Soldier applied 1832 Nov 6 Randolph Co. NC. Soldier was born 1753 May 5 in Lancaster Co. Pa. and in 1772 moved to Guilford Co. NC the part now being Randolph CO. NC and he lived there at enlistment. Soldier mentioned the Tories killing his brother Henry Johnston. A son Joseph Johnston made affdt 1844 May 7 in Randolph Co. NC age 45 and state soldier died 1838 Nov 16 leavinf a widow Nancy who died 1843 march 14, leaving children Sara or Sarah Johnston who married David Brown: Sytle Johnston, Robert Johnston and Joseph Johnston. Soldier and widow married in 1786. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

State of North Carolina, Randolph County: Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions November Term A.D.

 

On this 6th day of November A.D. 1832, personally appeared in open Court, before the Justices of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions now sitting, Joseph Johnston, a resident of the County of Randolph, State of North Carolina aged seventy nine years May 5th last; who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named Officers & served as herein stated, viz.:

 

He states that he was born in Paxton Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania May 5th, 1753. [He] Has a record of his age. In the year 1772 he removed to North Carolina & settled in Randolph County (then a part of Guilford [County]) where he resided at the time he entered the Service of the United States. He states in the early part of the year 1779 perhaps the month of January, he volunteered for three months under Col Collier & Col Balfour. From the perilous condition of the Country, it was deemed expedient to raise some troopers; & he, with John Graham, who served with him through the whole of his revolutionary Service, agreed to arm & equip themselves as troopers, being informed by their commanding officers, that if they would do so, two months service as a

trooper, would be equivalent to three months service on foot. We were then placed under the command of Captain Thomas Dougan who commanded a troop of light horse. Our first service consisted in bringing in some drafted militia from the lower part of Randolph County, who were suspected of being inclined to join the Tories. We were employed in keeping down the Tories in the County of Randolph & in adjacent Counties; & our service was particularly dangerous & arduous being subject to being dispatched at the shortest notice on Tory expeditions in the most inclement weather & at all hours of the night. We however were not in any battle with the Tories previous to Gates' defeat [Horatio Gates' defeat at the battle of Camden]. After that disastrous defeat of the American Army at Camden, Young Davie [William Richardson Davie], then Colonel of the Cavalry & afterwards General also General Locke [Francis Locke] & General Davidson [William Lee Davidson], apprehensive of the ruinous consequences of that defeat, & the subsequent approach of Lord Cornwallis to North Carolina, thought

it best to raise as large a body of Cavalry as possible in this State; to which end they sent requisitions to Col Collier of Randolph (among others) to send a quota of Troopers. Whereupon Captain Dougan was ordered to joined Col Davie with his troop, which he did at or near General Locke's in Rowan County.

 

We then immediately marched to meet the invading army under Cornwallis; we met it at Charlotte where we had an engagement principally with the Cavalry, in which the brave & promising son of Genl Locke was killed by my side. We were compelled to retreat, being overpowered by numbers; our object being principally to harass & impede their march. We retreated to the neighborhood of Salisbury and the Phifer settlement. From this place we were marched under Davie to Rocky River in Mecklenburg County, the British being still in Charlotte. This engagement at Charlotte was about the

latter part of summer or first of the fall of 1780. We lay at Rocky River until the battle of King's Mountain, I think October 7th when Cornwallis retreated to South Carolina for reinforcements, & was pursued by Col Davie as far as the Catawba; & I was sent over the River with a reconnoitering party, & returning the same night found John Graham standing sentry. Colonel Davie thence marched us back to Mecklenburg, & finding his troop a good deal fatigued & exhausted with their active service, he thought as Cornwallis had left North Carolina, he would give us some respite. He accordingly gave us permission to quarter about in the neighborhood for a few days, with directions to assemble with energy & promptness. We did so, & he then marched us into South Carolina, near the Waxhaw (1 NPA S6936 ) Settlement, where we continued until we were dismissed. While there, we (Graham & myself) were sent out with a reconnoitering party, with direction to quarter with Mrs. Doby, a Whig lady, & to get what information we could respecting the movements of the enemy. When we returned to Camp we

found Genl Morgan [Daniel Morgan], Colonel (William Augustine) Washington of the Cavalry, & Colonel Howard [John Eager Howard] with his infantry who had joined Col Davie in our absence. At this place we were discharged, some time in the month of December 1781 [sic, 1780], so well as we can recollect for before our discharge Genl Morgan, with Col Washington & Col Howard, had left us & gone South & after our discharge some few weeks the battle of the Cowpens was fought.

 

We received no written discharge, for that was considered not so much a final discharge as a respite until again called on: for being troopers we held ourselves always ready. Up to this time we (Graham & myself) had served at the least nine months. Shortly after this I went with others to guard the property of many of the citizens across the Roanoke, & upon my return, it being understood by the Tories that Graham & myself had returned home, they came down upon us and made us prisoners & we were detained by them two days & nights: when by the generosity of Colonel Fields (a Tory Colonel) a quality very rare among them, we were discharged on parole: & thus saved in all probability from the halter or the dungeon. All of this occurred some short time before the battle of Guilford. Graham & myself were also in some other excursions after Tories, who had on one occasion inhumanely murdered my brother Henry; & one Tucker, but these excursions did not amount to much length of time, say one month although there was a considerable amount of danger in them.

 

I have resided since the revolution in this County & now reside in it. I have no documentary evidence of my service but expect to be able to prove some portions of it by Dan Merrell2 & can prove the whole of it by John Graham, who was my brother in arms throughout the whole of it. I can establish my reputation for revolutionary service by Genl George Hoover & Genl Alexander Gray & John Elder. I hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present & declare that my name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

S/ Joseph Johnston

 

We Dan Merrell & John Graham residing in Randolph County, State of North Carolina, hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Joseph Johnston who has subscribed & sworn to the preceding declaration; that we believe him to be 79 years of age: Dan Merrell certifies that he saw said Johnston on several occasion serving as a trooper before he was ordered South, saw him on his way South in Salisbury & also on his return after his discharge passing through Salisbury where he was stationed. John Graham certifies that Johnston served with him as he has stated in his declaration.

 

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid.

 

S/ Dan Merrell

 

S/ John Graham

 

2 NPA S7222

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Joseph Johnston (Johnson) W5033

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

 

Captain Thomas Dougan

Brother Henry Johnson murdered by Tories

Dan Merrell

John Graham

Notes: 1751 Era: Just when the first Friends came to this “majestic wilderness” is unknown, but certainly there were a few here by 1751. That year Friends at Cane Creek in present Alamance County, comprising the first permanent meeting settled by the Pennsylvania Friends in North Carolina, requested a monthly meeting from the Perquimans and Little River meetings in eastern Carolina. Their petition stated: “There is Thirty Families and upwards of Friends settled in them Parts and Desire still in behalf of themselves and their Friends to have a Monthly Meeting settled amongst them.” Not surprisingly, the first piece of business to come before Cane Creek Monthly Meeting (October 7, 1751) was a request from Friends of New Garden for permission to hold a meeting for worship.

Notes: John Graham was born in Paxtung Township in Lancaster County, state of Pennsylvania on 1st November 1761, and has a record of his age. That he removed to Randolph County (then Guilford) in the year 1775. He also  served with Joseph Johnson in the Rev. War.
 
Notes: Constructed History Of Colonel Thomas Dougan
JOHN DOUGAN-“I entered the service…in the year 1778, the day and month I do not  recollect, in Randolph County, North Carolina, as a volunteer private, in a  volunteer company of horse militia commanded by Captain THOMAS DOUGAN, and served in said company to the best of my recollection, one year, during which time we were stationed at Bells Mill in said county of Randolph, as a public store of provisions, said BELL then being a Commissary to furnish provisions for the Army of the Revolution. During said service, I found my own horse, 
saddle, and bridle and guns.”
“Our company was raised for the purpose of guarding said public store, and suppressing the Tories and disaffected, with whom that county was then largely infected. During the year service aforesaid, we were employed in guarding said 
public store, and in detached companies in guarding provision wagons conveying provisions to said store, and in traversing the country looking out for Tories and protecting the country from their incursions.”
“At the end of the said year of service, said Captain DOUGAN was advanced to the rank of Major and WILLIAM GRAY, the ensign of said company was advanced to the rank of Captain of said company and took the command thereof. During said year service, the inferior officers commanding in said company under the said Captain DOUGAN, were Lieutenant WILLIAM CLARK and Ensign WILLIAM GRAY, above named. The said WILLIAM CLARK at the expiration of said year service, to the best of my recollection, resigned his post as lieutenant. One NEWLAND was commissioned Lieutenant in his stead, whose given name I do not recollect, and one JOSEPH CLARK was commissioned ensign in said company. I continued in said company under Captain GRAY, Lieutenant NEWLAND and Ensign CLARK, and served as 
a private until the termination of the war, during which time we were stationed at Bells Mill, when not engaged in active service, until the latter part of 1782, to the best of my recollection. After that time until the close of the war, we were stationed when not engaged in active service, at the home of Colonel EDWARD SHARP, in County of Randolph, during all of which time I found my own horse, saddle and bridle, and arms. 
“The first active service during said latter period of my service was a short time after Captain GRAY took the command of said company. We were ordered out under the command of Colonel JOHN COLLIER and Lieutenant ANDREW BALFOUR of County of Randolph, with a number of volunteers, in all about sixty men. We marched about twenty-five miles towards the east end of said named county to oppose a company of Tories under the command of one Colonel FANNEN [FANNING], a Tory Colonel who was embodying a Tory force in the county adjoining below ours. 
The second night after leaving our station, we encamped at the house of one JOHN NEEDHAM. During the night, we were attacked by Colonel FANNING and his Tory force. After a short conflict, we repulsed them with two of their men 
killed and four or five wounded. The next morning we pursued Colonel FANNING and two days after the conflict, we came upon one Captain MICHAEL ROBBINS, a Tory captain with ten or twelve Tories under his command. We dispersed them 
with three of their men killed. We then returned to our station at Bells Mill.”
                    “The next active service we were engaged in was three or four months after the last named expedition, we were ordered out in the fall, I think in September [the year I cannot recollect], against the Highland Scotch of North 
Carolina, who were embodying a Tory force sixty or seventy miles from our station in the highlands of said state. We were joined by one Colonel SAUNDERS of Wake County, North Carolina, with a body of over one hundred men. Said 
Colonel SAUNDERS took the command of the whole, and marched us into the highlands and across Cape Fear River. We stole a march on the Tories by marching all night one night, and took fourteen prisoners. Our company was 
ordered to guard and did guard the prisoners to Hillsborough in Orange County, North Carolina, the District jail. We lodged the prisoners in jail and returned to our station.”
“Another piece of service we rendered occurred a few weeks previous to the last named expedition (I did not think of it when I related the last named expedition), was in defending the public store at our station. The store was 
attacked by one Captain EDWARD FRANKLIN (a Tory captain commissioned by Lord CORNWALLIS) and his company about fifteen in number. We repulsed them and the next day we pursued them, overtook them, and killed FRANKLIN (the captain) and one of his men, and dispersed the company.”
“The next active service that I now recollected that we were engaged in, I think occurred in March 1782 (the spring after Lord CORNWALLIS surrendered). Captain FANNING and his company consisting of forty or fifty Tories came into 
our county and ravaged the country and killed Lieutenant Colonel BALFOUR and Captain JOHN BRYAN in their own houses and burned my mothers house and barn (she being a widow), Colonel COLLIERs and Esquire MILLIGANs houses. We pursued them and overtook them and put them to flight, but the day being wet, 
our guns missed fire, so that we only wounded two men.”
                    “The next piece of active service and the last service I did during the war occurred as follows: Colonel ELROD, Captain MICHAEL ROBBINS and Captain SAMUEL STILL, Tory officers, were passing through said county of Randolph. They killed one young man and wounded another. We pursued them several days and our 
company separated into two parties. One part of the company overtook them, and killed Colonel ELROD and Captain STILL. The part of the company I was in was not present when they were killed. We marched over one hundred miles over the Blue Ridge, from thence we returned to the station at Colonel SHARPs, and 
shortly afterwards were disbanded.”
                    “I cannot now state positively whether I received a discharge from my captain. But I do recollect that vouchers for my services were placed in the hands of my older brother, THOMAS DOUGAN, who took them to Hillsborough, North Carolina and purchased land for me with them. To the best of my recollection, 
the rate of pay that I received was twelve dollars per month for my services…
etc.”
 
EDWARD BEESON-“He entered the service as a volunteer from the state of North Carolina, Guilford County, now Randolph. It was the spring of the year 1778, as he believes. DAVID BROWER was his captain, JAMES WOODS-Lieutenant, this deponent ensign. ROBERT MCLEAN was their major, THOMAS DOUGAN, colonel, BUTLER- 
general. Their object was the destruction of the Tories. Next day, after they left Johnsonville, their place of rendezvous, their captain and three men were killed by the Tories who waylaid them (the Tories were commanded by Major 
RAINS) and fired on them from a steep hill on the side of Brush Creek.”
“After BROWER was killed, WOODS became captain and this deponent Lieutenant. They pursued the Tories about forty miles to Fork? Creek, and there besieged them in a house belonging to one JOHN NEEDHAM. In the morning before they got to NEEDHAMs, their colonel (DOUGAN) joined them. This deponent was then ordered with half of his company to the back of the house under a concealment of an orchard, while the rest were to attack in front. This deponents company were the first who took possession of the same, those in front having feigned a retreat to draw out the Tories, which accordingly succeeded. Twenty-one were killed, seven at the house and fourteen at the place where they kept the 
horses, the Tories having fled there, to where they were concealed on the bank of Deep River. And where Colonel DOUGAN himself had gone with a detachment to surprise them if they should be driven from the house.”
“They then marched down to Cape Fear (or Fair)Town and from there to the Brown Marsh near Wilmington, where they again had to battle with the Tories on open ground. They there (again) defeated the Tories who being reinforced by the 
British from their shipping at Fort Johnson, they returned and defeated us in turn. From thence they (the Americans) returned by Cape Fear to Guilford (now Randolph). At this time they were out three months and were discharged.”
“His next term of service was again as a volunteer. This he believes was the next year. At this time they were roused by the Tories who came and burned Colonel DOUGANs house, and Colonel BALFOURs house, at the same time killing 
Colonel BALFOUR. They also killed JOHN BROWN and burned his house. Also MILLICANs and COLLIERs houses were burned. They pursued them under the command of Colonel BLETCHER (or BLEECHER) [Brashear?], this deponent being still captain and remaining so until the close of the war, the same lieutenant and ensign were with him at this time as at the last.”
                    DAVID EIRWIN-      “That in the summer of the year succeeding the Battle of Camden, the declarant again volunteered into the company commanded by Captain YORK, while residing in the place aforesaid, for three months, to serve as a private in the light horse. The principle object or rather cause of raising this company was to watch a body of disaffected, or Tories, commanded by one Colonel FANNING, and to which a brother of this declarant belonged, by the name of JOHN ERWIN, some years older than declarant and who resided about 20 miles from his fathers residence. The company assembled at Captain YORKs. He does not recollect any other officer, except one Colonel DOUGAN was occasionally with the company. They were constantly engaged in their scouts or marches. The declarant with the company went down Deep River, up and down Tar River and Cane Creek in pursuit of FANNING. Near the close of the campaign, they came down on one side of Deep River and discovered FANNINGs forces on the 
opposite bank. There were shots exchanged from each side of the two forces, but owing to the width of the river at that place, no harm or injury resulted to either party. At the close of the expedition, he received a discharge from 
Captain YORK, which he has lost, certifying his faithful service for three months in this last campaign.”
 
WILBOURNE GIBSON-“I was drafted into the service of the United States in Randolph County, North Carolina in the spring of 1781. The precise month and day I do not recollect, and served for and during the term of three months. The 
captain of the company in which I served was John KNIGHT, Colonel [THOMAS] DOUGAN, Major [JAMES] DOUGAN, brothers. Names of the sergeants and corporals not now remembered. When my term of service was ended, I received from Captain JOHN KNIGHT, a regular discharge and considering it as no value or importance whatever, and being totally unlearned, it has long ago been lost and destroyed.”
“Under the command of the aforesaid officers, I was out on scouting expedition most of the time in and through the counties of Randolph, Rockingham, Stokes and Guilford, and was in several skirmishes with the Tories, but no general 
engagement. Colonel FANNING, as he was called, was the Tory that we were after most of the time, as he was constantly destroying of property, burning of houses, etc.”
“I recollect on one evening we were in a little town called Hillsborough, and were compelled to leave it for the want of provision, and on that very night, this Tory, FANNING took the town and all the inhabitants were made prisoners, 
and one genl, General TYRON, among the rest, and on that same night our company formed behind a fence along the road to take them by surprise, but we were afraid to fire for fear of killing our own friends who were prisoners, and 
so we mounted our horses which had been hitched back in the edge of the woods and retreated, and on the next day we had a skirmish at Mendenhalls Mill, in which we were defeated, but Colonel FANNING got his arm broke, etc…”
“The houses of John KNIGHT and Col. and Major DOUGAN, and many? other houses 
were destroyed by this same FANNING.”
 
JOHN GRAHAM-“He states that he entered the service of the United States with JOSEPH JOHNSTON, at the same time and under the same officers (to wit), he volunteered for three months under Captain THOMAS DOUGAN, Colonel BALFOUR and Colonel COLLIER, and armed and equipped himself for the light horse service, and joined the troop which the said Captain DOUGAN commanded. He states that this was early in the year 1779, and that the circumstances of his service so far as he can recollect them, are accurately detailed in the declaration of the said JOSEPH JOHNSTON, to which he begs leave to refer, and to adopt so far as these are concerned, as his own, deeming it unnecessary here to recapitulate them. He declares that his service amounted in all, to the best of his recollection to ten months; and that neither he nor JOHNSTON was in any important service in which both were not engaged.”
JOHN MERRILL-“That in the year 1781, he volunteered at the courthouse in Randolph County in the light horse under the command of Captain THOMAS DOUGAN, Major JAMES DOUGAN, and Colonel JOHN COLLIER. That they ranged about the country. That at that time the company with whom he served had a rencounter with Tories in the County of Guilford on the 15th day of April 1781, where he received a severe wound with a sword on his head, the marks of which are now to be seen. His brothers [BENJAMIN MERRILL] horse was shot under him, and his captain, then JOHN KNIGHT, received two balls in his head. About the 30th of July, 1781, he received his discharge as may appear by the discharge herewith filed, marked B.”
                    “After that time, he never was regularly in the service, tho scouting parties and some rencounters with the Tories…I know no one who can testify to my services but my brother BENJAMIN MERRILL, who was with me on my tours, but he is now sick and unable to come here.”
 
SAMUEL JACKSON, -lived in Guilford County at enlistment, served under Col. DOUGAN, Capt. JAMES BELL, Capt. COLLIER. Widow was able to provide few details. Was in the Battle of Guilford, and was a guard protecting the baggage wagon.
 
ROBERT MOORE-[This is probably not the same Thomas Dougan. No one else has mentioned this tour, and it may overlap some of the previously described periods of time.] “In the month of September 1780, I went out as a substitute 
for MALICA DICKERSON, who was drafted for the term of three months (the said DICKERSON having hired me to perform the tour for him), so I again entered the service of the United States as a substitute some time in the month of 
September 1780 in Randolph County, state of North Carolina, for the term of three months under Captain THOMAS DOUGAN. The company marched from Randolph to Salisbury and there joined Colonel DAVIEs regiment. Then they marched to Charlotte and was there when CORNWALLIS entered that place. When there was a slight skirmish, CORNWALLIS retreated to Camden. We went in pursuit. On the route, I took the smallpox. The rest of the companys time was out and discharged before my recovery. He therefore got no discharge.”
                    “After the Battle of Guilford when CORNWALLIS retreated through Virginia, I joined a light horse company in Randolph County, North Carolina under Captain THOMAS DOUGAN and Colonel EDWARD SHARPE, for the purpose of keeping down the Tories who would, every chance, rise up against the interest of the United States. In this capacity, I served from time to time as my services may be called for until the end of the war."
 
 
Additional Comments:
Constructed History is my term for a soldier who did not file for a pension himself, but about whom there is enough evidence from other soldiers to form an equivalent to a pension application. Most of the testimony comes from other men 
mentioning the officer or non-comm. officer, but in some cases, the actual soldier himself testified on behalf of other men, thus revealing his own history.
File at: http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/nc/guilford/military/revwar/pensions/dougan313gmt 

 

 

 

LANCELOT JOHNSTON

 

Lancelot Johnston wife Zeruiah W5114 NC Line: Soldier married Zeruiah (/) 1774 Jan 17. Soldier died 1832 Sept 19 Caswell Co NC and is widow applied there 1838 Nov 24, leaving children William Johnston of Morgan Co. Ga: John Johnston of Caswell CO. NC: and Mary Johnston: Mrs. Jane Slade: Lancelot Johnston; Mrs Elizabeth Jones of Madison Co. Ga: Mrs. Mildred Harrison of La Grange Tn: and David Johnston of Tuskegee Ala. Children’s birth were Thomas Johnston born 1777 July 16: John Johnston born 1778 Dec 12: Mary Johnston born 1780 Sept 1: Jane Johnston born 1782 Aug 8: William Johnston born 1784 March 15: David Johnston born 1792 Jan 14:  Elizabeth Johnston born 1794 Jan 25: and Mildred Johnston no birth given: Grandchildren show were Lancelot Johnston, Richard Johnston and Alfred Johnston and Mrs. Nancy Motley’s children of soldiers deceased son Thomas Johnston, also James M. : Alfred G. William I or J and  Mildred A Yancey children of soldiers deceased daughter Zilpah Yancey. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress of the 7th of June 1832, And also to obtain the benefit of the third Section of the Act of Congress of July 4th, 1836 &c

 

State of Georgia, Morgan County

 

On this the 19th day of March 1846, personally appeared in open Court before the Court of Ordinary now sitting in & for said County, William Johnston, a resident of Madison, in the County of Morgan & State of Georgia, who being first Sworn according to Law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration, in behalf of himself and others, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832, And also the benefit of the Act of Congress passed July 4th, 1836.

 

That his Father Dr. Lancelot Johnston entered the Service of the United States in December 1776 as Chirugeon [sic, Surgeon] to the ninth Regiment of the Continental Army raised in the State of North Carolina as will fully appear by Document No. 1 Signed by Jas. Greene Jr. Secretary and which accompanies this declaration,

 

And that this appointment was confirmed by the Congress of the United States by a commission bearing date of the Tenth (10th) day of May 1777, Signed by John Hancock, President, and Charles Thompson, Secretary, as will appear by Document No. 2.

 

That he was appointed Surgeon to the New raised Levies of Salisbury & Hillsborough Districts on the 15th of August 1778, as will appear by reference to Document No. 3.

 

And received in conformity with that appointment a Commission from Ja. Thackston Lt. Col., on the sixth day of November 1778. as will be seen by reference to document No. 4.

 

And that that he Served in the Capacity of Surgeon until he was honorably discharged by Jethro Sumner, Brigadier General on the 15th day of March 1779, as may be Seen by reference to Document above No. 4.

 

Thus embracing a period from the commencement of his Service, until his discharge, of Two years and about three months.

 

And your declarant further States, that the before mentioned Lancelot Johnston did on the 17th day of January 1774, intermarried with his wife Zeruiah, as appears from the old family Register hereto annexed, established by the oath of Mary Johnston, in whose possession it has been kept in for the last 25 years, and marked as Document No. 5.

 

And your declarant further States, that the before mentioned Lancelot Johnston departed this life in North Carolina on the 19th day of September 1832, as appears from the Certificate of A. Slade, Clerk of Caswell County Court, and marked as Document No. 6.

 

And that Zeruiah Johnston his widow departed this life on the 24th day of November 1838 – as appears by reference to the above Document No. 6.

 

And your declarant further States that the aforementioned Lancelot Johnston having died

without having received a pension to which he was entitled under the Act of Congress of June 7th 1832, and his Widow Zeruiah Johnston having died without having received a pension to which she was entitled under the Act of Congress of July 4th, 1836, He files his declaration as one of the Sons and Legal Representatives of the deceased parties above named, in connection with John Johnston of Caswell County North Carolina, Mary Johnston, Mrs. Jane Slade, Lancelot Johnston, Mrs. Elizabeth Jones of Madison Morgan County Georgia, Mrs. Mildred Harrison of Lagrange Tennessee, David Johnston of Tuskegee Marion County Alabama, all of the living Children and heirs of the aforesaid Dr. Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his wife, together with Lancelot Johnston, Richard Johnston, Alfred Johnston, and Mrs. Nancy Motley, the children of Thomas Johnston deceased who was Son of Lancelot & Zeruiah Johnston aforesaid. Also James M. Yancey, Albert G. Yancey, William J. Yancey & Mildred A. Yancey, the Children of Zilpah Yancey deceased who was the daughter of Lancelot & Zeruiah

Johnston aforesaid, Setting forth the foregoing facts, and claims for himself and the above named Children & heirs of Lancelot Johnston & Zeruiah Johnston to be entitled to all the benefit of the Several Acts of Congress above specified, in which the aforesaid Lancelot & Zeruiah Johnston were entitled prior to their death, and to which they would be entitled if yet in life.

 

Sworn to and Subscribed in open Court the day & date above written.

S/ Ernest L. Wittich, C. C. S/ Wm Johnston

 

 

No. 1

North Carolina In Congress December 1776

 

these a Certify that Lancelot Johnston was appointed Chirurgeon [sic, Surgeon] to the Ninth Regiment of the Continental Army raised in this State.

By order S/ Jas. Green, Jr., Sec.

 

No. 2

Copy

In Congress

 

The Delegates of the United States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island,

Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the Counties of Newcastle, Kent at Sussex of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, to Lanslot [sic] Johnston,

Gentn, Greeting: -

 

We, reposing special Trust and Confidence in your Patriotism, Valor, Conduct and Fidelity, Do, by these Presents, constitute and appoint you to be Surgeon of the Ninth Battalion in the Army of the United States, raised for the Defense of American Liberty, and for repelling every hostile Invasion thereof You are therefore carefully and diligently to discharge the Duty of Surgeon by doing and performing all manner of things thereunto belonging. And we do strictly charge and require all Officers and Soldiers under your Command, to be obedient to your Orders as Surgeon. And you are to observe and follow such Orders and Directions from Time to Time, as you shall receive from this or

any future Congress of the United States, or Committee of Congress, for that Purpose appointed, or Commander in Chief for the Time being of the Army of the United States, or any other your Superior Officer, according to the Rules and Discipline of War, in Pursuance of the Trust reposed in you. This Commission is to continue in Force until revoked by this or a future Congress. Dated at Newbern the

10th day of May Anno Dom. 1777-- By order of the Congress

Attest: S/ Chas. Thomson, Sec. S/ John Hancock, President

 

No. 3

State of North Carolina

 

In Senate 15th of August 1778

Resolved that Dr. Lancelot Johnston be appointed Surgeon to the new raised Levies of Salisbury & Hillsborough Districts during their Continuance in this State.

 

S/ Allen Jones, S. S.

By order S/ T. Sitgreaves, C. S.

 

 In the House of Commons 17 August 1778

Concurred with -

By order S/ Tho. Benbury, S. C.

 

 

S/ John Hunt, H. C.

Extract from the Journals

S/ T. Sitgreaves, C. S.

 

No. 4 Copy

 

The bearer Doctor Lancelot Johnston is hereby appointed Regimental Surgeon to the New Levies & Continental Troops now about to March from the District of Hillsborough & Salisbury to the assistance of South Carolina during that Campaign.

 

Given under my hand this sixth day of November 1778.

 

S/ Ja. Thackston, Lt. Col.

 

 Commandant

 

No. 5

Camp Purysburg, 15th of March 1779

This is to certify that Dr. Johnston resigned to his appointment in United States service at this day. He has been diligent in his department, and we are sorry to part with him.

S/ Jethro Sumner

Brigadier General

 

Pension Office February 18th 1857

 

The Originals [ Nos. 4 & 5 above] of which the foregoing are true copies were this day Sent to the Honorable Joshua Hill Ho. Rep. for the purpose of returning them to Lancelot Johnston, the Son of the Officer. S/ S. C. Boynton

 

No. 6

State of North Carolina, Caswell County

 

I Abisha Slade Clerk of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for the County and State

aforesaid hereby Certify that Dr. Lancelot Johnston late of this County died from the best Information I am able to obtain in the month of September 1832, say the 19th day, And that Zuriah Johnston his widow died in November 1838, say the 24th day. I have obtained this Information from the friends and neighbors of Dr. Lancelot Johnston and his widow – together with my own Knowledge.

 

And Testimony of all of which I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of my office this fourth day of March A.D. 1846.

 

S/ A. Slade, Clk

 

of Caswell County Court

 

State of North Carolina, Office of Secretary of State

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in and for the State of North Carolina, do hereby certify, that it appears from a book of the settlements of the accounts of the Officers & Soldiers of the Continental line of this State in the revolutionary war that Lancelot Johnston a Surgeon of said line, was allowed for his services by a Board of Commissioners which sat at Halifax in the year 1783 -- & 1784, the sum of Four Hundred and fourteen pounds twelve shillings (£414.12.0) for his services as Surgeon aforesaid.

 

Given under my hand at office in Raleigh this 6th of April 1846.

 

S/ Wm Hill, Secretary of State

 

 State of Georgia, Morgan County

 

Personally appeared before me John Robson a Judge of the Inferior Court of said County; Miss Mary Johnston who being duly sworn, deposeth and saith that the two small sheets hereunto annexed, contains the only original register of the marriage of the late Dr. Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his wife – of the County of Caswell in the State of North Carolina; by which it appears that they were married January 17th, 1774: also containing the dates of the births of all their children – and was the family register kept in the blank leaves of an old English Prayer book, and that she took them from out of the said Book to preserve them, the book being frequently loaned out – for the purpose of performing the marriage ceremony, and that said leaves have been in her possession for the last 25 or 30 years.

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 12th day of March 1846.

S/ Mary Johnston

S/ John Robson, Judge of the Inferior Court

 

[Family records from the Prayer Book]

Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his Wife married Jany 17th 1774

Thomas Johnston Son of Lanclot Johnston & Zeruiah his Wife born on 6th July 1777

John Johnston born December the 12, 1778

Mary Johnston born Sep. 1st 1780

Jane Johnston born Augt. 8Th 1782

William Johnston born March 15th 1784

Zilpah Johnston born January 22nd 1786

Milridge Johnston born February 28th 1788

Lancelot Johnston born March 29th 1790

David Johnston born January 14th 1792

Elizabeth Johnston born January 25th 1794

 

Births of Negro Sarah Children

 

Vincy born 29th Augt. 1787

 

Adam born 13th May 1789

 

Beck born 6th July 1791

 

Died February13th 1792

 

Cale born 25th March 179[last digit lost born right below it and appearing to be a correction appears the

 

date “1799”]

 

Frank born Oct. 1794

 

Beck born Apl. 1795

 

Phebe born Oct. 1798

 

Eley born 16 June 1801

 

Alexr born Oct 1801

 

Lettuce born Decr. 1803

 

Sam born June 27th 1804

 

Cynthia born June 18th 1806

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Lancelot Johnston W5114 fn81NC

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

wife Zeruiah,

 

Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his Wife married Jany 17th 1774

Thomas Johnston Son of Lanclot Johnston & Zeruiah his Wife born on 6th July 1777

John Johnston born December the 12, 1778

Mary Johnston born Sep. 1st 1780

Jane Johnston born Augt. 8Th 1782

William Johnston born March 15th 1784

Zilpah Johnston born January 22nd 1786

Milridge Johnston born February 28th 1788

Lancelot Johnston born March 29th 1790

David Johnston born January 14th 1792

Elizabeth Johnston born January 25th 1794

 

 

All of the living Children and heirs of the aforesaid Dr. Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his wife, together with Lancelot Johnston,

 

John Johnston of Caswell County North Carolina,

Mary Johnston,

Mrs. Jane Slade,

Lancelot Johnston,

Mrs. Elizabeth Jones of Madison Morgan County Georgia,

Mrs. Mildred Harrison of Lagrange Tennessee,

David Johnston of Tuskegee Marion County Alabama,

 

Children of Thomas Johnston deceased who was Son of Lancelot & Zeruiah Johnston aforesaid.

 

Richard Johnston,

Alfred Johnston,

Mrs. Nancy Motley, 

 

Children of Zilpah Yancey deceased who was the daughter of Lancelot & Zeruiah

Johnston

 

James M. Yancey,

Albert G. Yancey,

William J. Yancey

Mildred A. Yancey,

 

 

LEWIS JOHNSTON

 

Lewis Johnston R5643 NC Line soldier applied 1840 May 18 Burke Co. NC leaving no widow but left children: Elizabeth Johnston, Nelly Johnston: Mary Johnston: Lewis Johnston: Abraham Johnston: Alburton Johnston: Sarah Johnston: Myra Johnston and John Johnston who were all living in 1852 One Joseph Benfield of Burfield, soldiers son in law and one Samuel M. Thompson were both heirs of deceased soldier. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of North Carolina, County of Burke: Superior Court of Law May Term 1840

 

On this 18th day of May 1840 -- personally appeared in open Court, before the Honorable

Edward Hale one of the Judges of the Superior Court of law now sitting Lewis Johnston a

resident of Burke County & State of North Carolina, (aged 77 the 4th of July next) who, being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his Oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832

 

That he entered the Service of the United States under the following named officers; and

served as herein stated. That he was drafted in the Militia of the 4th division of the NC Militia in the revolutionary War in the month of May 1780 (the day of the month not recollected) at Halifax Town N. C. under Captain John Williams, Lieutenant Nat. Brickell & Colonel Seawell -- (Sumner was our General) we remained at Halifax a short time, when we joined the Main Army under General Sumner, then we were ordered to March & passed through the Counties of Franklin by the Court House (now Louisburg) and crossed Tar River, & passed along through Wake across Crab-Tree [Crabtree] Creek, to Wake C. H. (now Raleigh) and passed on through Cumberland County near Cross Creek into the State of South Carolina, and crossed Drowning [Creek] at Coles Bridge -- turned up the Creek with a scouting party under the Command of Lieutenant Colonel Brickell; had a skirmish with the Tories, which continued at intervals all night -- we were ordered to destroy all the growing crops, of this Creek we came to a still, we there filled our canteens with whiskey, & destroyed the balance, when we struck Camp; early in

the night we were fired upon by Tories, the firing kept up off & on all night, nearly daylight they left us, the next morning we discovered a spy some distance off up a tree, we attempted to take him but he ran off -- we pursued the Main body of them, & were in search of them the greater part of that day, they dispersed & we only took one of them, which we severely equipped, who, I learned, afterwards died. We then joined the Main Army again, & marched near Rugeley's Mills in a short time after this the battle of Gum Swamp took place (Gates defeat) near Camden, we were on our way to reinforce General Gates, but we met the Army retreating, and we retreated with them in a confused State. Afterwards a part of us were collected together, under my same officers and passed by Charlotte C. H. where we [word obliterated] a while to see the men that were wounded in Bluforts [sic, Buford’s defeat ?] (at the Hanging Rock) from thence to Salisbury crossed the Yadkin River at Sloan's Ford, where we threw up a breastworks, I was there taken sick and put in a hospital near that place, where I remained some weeks until

discharged, making 3 months Service, of which I have no documentary evidence.

 

Again in July 1781 (the day of the month not well remembered) the 1st, 2nd & 3rd

Divisions having served their times I was again rendezvoused under the Command of Colonel Nicholas Long at Halifax Town, where I was stationed & served 3 months more, when & where I was discharged which was some time in October of 1781, this affiant further states that he has no documentary evidence -- having lost or mislaid my discharges, & that he knows of no person whose testimony he can prove his service by, except those hereunto annexed.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity, except the present;

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State, or, if any, only on that of the agency of the State of North Carolina.

Sworn to & subscribed the day & year aforesaid 20 May 1840

S/ D. P. Kebler, CSC S/ Lewis Johnston

 

[Thomas Carlton, a clergyman, and James Avery gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

[Joseph Benfield, 50, claimed to be the husband of an unnamed daughter of Lewis Johnson in a power of attorney dated October 9, 1852, filed in Burke County, NC]

 

State of North Carolina, County of Warren

 

Personally appeared before me, Henry J. Macon, one of the Justices of the Court of pleas

& quarter Sessions for the County of Warren, Joseph J. Alston, who being duly sworn on the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God, deposeth & saith, that he is in his 77th year of age, & that he is well acquainted with Lewis Johnston, being born & raised within 7 miles of the above named Lewis Johnston, this affiant states that he knows, that the said Lewis did serve in the revolutionary War, & believes that he served under Colonel Seawell & General Lawson & that they marched from Halifax NC -- this affiant does not know the country or places he passed, not being in the Service.

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 20 April 1840

S/ Henry J. Macon, JP S/ J. J. Alston

State of North Carolina, Burke County

 

Be it known that on the 9th day of March 1841 before the subscriber a Justice of the

Peace in and for the County aforesaid Personally came Lewis Johnson (aged 78 years) who being first duly sworn on the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God deposeth as follows – That he entered the service of the United States in the War of the Revolution in the year

1780 and served a 3 months tour under Captain John Williams Commonly called (Sleter John Williams from the fact of his having married a widow Lady by the name of Sleter or Slatter) -- a particular history of his service may be found in his Declaration now on file in the Pension Offers to which he refers.

 

His next tour was for 3 months likewise and was performed the summer following 1781

under Colonel Long -- the particulars of this service are also fully set forth in the Declaration before of alluded to.

 

This Deponent swears that Sterling Johnson and Ford Jenkins whose testimony he

accompanies his declaration for a Pension are the only living persons by whom he is now

enabled to prove his services.

 

He also swears that he served 2 tours of 3 months each making 6 months in defense of the

United States during the war of the Revolution and that by reason of old age and loss of memory he is unable to give a more minute detail of his services than is contained in his Declaration now on file in the War Department.

 

1 Joseph John Alston S6498

 

 He further swears that he has resided in Burke County NC for the last 30 years -- that he is distant from where he lived at the time he entered the service of the US at least 300 miles & that he knows no person except those whose testimony he has offered by whom he can prove his services and that they have lived during this time 300 miles from him and that he has never been able until recently to procure the benefit of their testimony -- that this is the only cause why he has delayed making application for a Pension until the present.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed before me day and year first above written.

 

S/ R. C. Pearson, JP S/ Lewis Johnston

 

 [There are 2 depositions in the file, one from Sterling Johnson and the other from Ford Jenkins, stating that they were aware of the applicant’s service during the Revolution, but both were too young to have served themselves and were not in service with the applicant.]

 

 [There is a power of attorney dated February 7, 1854, given by Samuel M. Thompson who claims to the ‘heir and legal Administrator’ of Lewis Johnston, given in Burke County, NC to Shimuel Godwin of Washington City to pursue Johnston’s claim.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Lewis Johnston (Johnson) R5643 fn51NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/30/08

 

Captain John Williams,

Halifax Town

Lieutenant Nat. Brickell

Thomas Carlton, a clergyman

James Avery

Joseph Benfield

Joseph J. Alston; Joseph John Alston S6498

Sterling Johnson

Ford Jenkins

Shimuel Godwin of Washington City

 

 

NATHANIEL JOHNSTON or NATHANIEL JOHNSON

 

Nathaniel Johnston or Nathaniel Johnson: S1841 NC Line: See Nathaniel Johnson Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

ROBERT JOHNSTON

 

Robert Johnston S7092 NC Line: soldier was born 1762 March 18 in Bladen Co. NC and he lived there at enlistment and he applied there 1832 Oct 11: Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 

State of North Carolina, Bladen County: Superior Court of Law Fall Term 1832

 

 On the 11th day of October 1832, personally appeared in open Court before the

Honorable Robert Strange one of the Judges of the Superior Courts of Law & Equity for said State, presiding in the Superior Court of Law for said County -- Robert Johnston, a resident of the County of Bladen, State of North Carolina, aged 70 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress, passed June 7th 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States, under the following named Officers and

served as herein stated.

 

 He was one of a Volunteer Company of Light Infantry under the Command of Captain

Jared Irwin, who for 2 or 3 years before the termination of the Revolutionary Commanded said company. He was an active and intrepid partisan Officer, who with his men was almost constantly engaged in service, against the Tories, who were numerous and active, being mostly emigrants from the Highlands of Scotland. Captain Irwin's head Quarters were at or near Elizabethtown, unless when obliged to retire before superior numbers of the Tories; the Company in their numerous expeditions against the Tories -- exposed to severe hardships and privations, were almost constantly engaged in active service for 2 or 3 years, but he is willing to claim but a small portion of that time, the time being so long since the service was performed, that he would prefer being under the mark, rather than over it. He is confident that he served 7 months. He recollects being on the following expeditions under Captain Irwin, but does not recollect the length of time he served in those expeditions, except as above stated.

 

 About the 1st June 1780 or 1781, but does not recollect which, he engaged in an

expedition as a Private in a company of volunteer Light Horse, under the command of Captain Jared Irwin and Lieutenant Argulus Pointer, accompanied by Colonel James Richardson, one of the Field officers of the Bladen Militia; their object was to attack the Tories, who had collected in considerable numbers, in the upper part of Bladen, (now Robeson) County, under the command of Colonel Hector McNeil. They heard of the Tories being on the Raft Swamp -- marched there, and ascertained where they were encamped, and that they were way-laying in ambush: there was much difficulty in crossing the Swamp; and in consequence thereof Colonel Richardson marched  his force to Stewart's Mill on a Creek leading into Rockfish Creek, with a view of getting around

the Swamp and surprising them -- but on arriving there Captain Peter Robeson who was a

Volunteer, but not in commission -- volunteered, at the head of 50 men to perform that service -- encamped at the Stewart's Mill, that night after their arrival there, and when in the act of shooking [?] two notorious Tories, who had been taken a few days before. They were surprised by McNeil's men, and defeated -- being attacked in front & rear at the same time; but succeeded in cutting their way through them. Colonel Robeson who had been Colonel of the County, but was then out of Commission accompanied the Whigs: there was with them a Company of Cumberland Militia under Captain Travis, one of whose man by the name of Armstrong was killed; after the defeat every man made his way home, in 2 or 3 days afterwards collected at the Plantation of Robert Edwards, on the North side of the Cape Fear River, 10 or 12 miles below Fayetteville; where he was permitted to return home, on account of his leg being so much swelled; that he was unfit for service.

 

He was engaged in another expedition under the same officers, against the Tories in

Bladen County (then Robeson) under the command of Captain Andres -- Captain McDaniel with a Company of Bladen Light Horse were also in the expedition. They came upon the Tories suddenly, and put them to flight completely, that they left their Horses, and made their way into [a] Swamp. All their horses were taken. A man by the name of Samuel Richardson belonging to Irwin's Company was killed – wounded.

 

 In the year 1781, he was engaged in another expedition against the Tories -- who had

collected in considerable numbers in Elizabethtown, Bladen County, having encamped there, overawing the surrounding Country. Captain Erwin with his volunteer Light Horse owing to the inferiority of his force was obliged to cross the Cape Fear River -- a Plan was concerted between him, Colonel Robeson & Colonel Brown, to surprise them -- And was carried into effect by appearing to abandon the County by crossing Neuse River; but they suddenly returned, and crossed the Cape Fear River, one mile below Elizabeth -- surprised the Tories -- defeated them and killed there Commanding Officer Colonel Slingsby [?] -- who was mortally wounded in the action; a Tory Captain named Baldwin was wounded -- having his leg broken -- several privates were also killed & wounded. The Whigs were 63 in number & the Tories 3 or 400.

 

 He was engaged in another expedition, in 1781, under the same officers, and the same

Company, Colonel Thomas Owen of the Bladen Militia at their head. They joined General Butler commanding several Regiments of back country militia at the Brown Marsh Bridge -- marched thence to Marsh Castle in Columbus then Bladen -- crossed it, and marched up the same to Baldwin's Plantation -- where there was an engagement between General Butler’s command & the British under Major Manson from Wilmington. He did not participate in the engagement, being on Picquet Guard -- Butler was defeated, being completely surprised, his men having fled on the first fire -- The Bladen Militia, and the Duplin Militia under Captain Dodd, it was said

behaved with much gallantry -- After the men were collected after the defeat, they were marched to White Hall, 12 miles below in Elizabethtown, where they crossed the Cape Fear River, and marched up the River to Waddel’s Ferry, 2 miles below Elizabeth, where Irwin & his Company left Butler, and after returning home for 2 or 3 days, again joined him, 10 or 11 miles above Fayetteville; where it was understood that General Rutherford with several Regiments of Back Country Militia, was before us. Colonel Robeson, of Bladen, who was a Volunteer under General Butler, was sent by him to General Rutherford, & was accompanied by him (Johnson) & 3 other men. Generals Butler & Rutherford with their respective forces, formed a junction, the same evening, at a large branch leading into Rockfish Creek; whence they marched to the Raft Swamp in Robeson County, where they met with a considerable body of Tories, under a Colonel Elrod -- defeated them; took their horses & baggage, and some prisoners, and encamped the same night at McPhail's Mills in the same County -- thence marched back to the Brown Marsh; thence to Marsh Castle, where Butler and Rutherford separated, and the Bladen Man under Irwin were permitted to return home

 

 He was again called into service in November 1782, under Captain John Willis,

afterwards General Willis, on a Tour of 3 months service, in a Company of Bladen Militia, as a Substitute for one Richard Plummer; The Company embodied at the plantation of one Peter Lord, on the Cape Fear River; and proceeded thence, on an expedition against the Tories, and to the upper part of Bladen, (now Robeson) County, for the purpose of getting in the Tories, under what was called the Act of Grace; collected a considerable number of them, and drove a large number of their cattle to Belfort Old fields, and were discharged at the fork of the roads near Belfort, about 2 miles below Elizabeth town. He never received a discharge, could have got one, but never applied for it.

 

He resided in Bladen County when he entered his respective terms of

service. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

Sworn to and subscribed the day & year aforesaid.

S/ Robert Johnston

Answers to the questions prescribed by the War Department and propounded to Robert Johnston

the aforesaid applicant for a pension on account of Revolutionary Services

Ans 1. I was born in Bladen County NC 18 March 1762

“ 2. I have a record of my age at home in a family Bible

“ 3. When called into service I was living in Bladen County NC where I also lived during

the Revolutionary War & ever since and now reside there

Ans 4. I volunteered first and served as a substitute my last Term.

“ 5. Major McRee & Major Raiford & another regular officer whose name I am now do

not recollect, I do not recollect any Continental regiments, I recollect the militia

regiments I have stated in my declaration, The general circumstances of my service are

stated in the preceding declaration.

6. I never received any written discharge

7. Governor John Owen, General James Owen, Isaac Wright Esquire, Robert Harvey &

John Beard Esquire, John Russ, Frederick Miller & James Smith & others I could name

[Robert Harvey & John Beard gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

State of North Carolina, Bladen County: Superior Court of Law Fall Term 1832

 

 Personally appeared in open Court, this the 11th day of October in the year 1832,

Musgrove Jones who after being duly sworn according to law deposeth and saith. That he served during the revolutionary War, in a Company of Volunteer Light Horse under the command of Captain Jared Irwin with Robert Johnston for the space of 2 years: that they were in frequent expeditions together against the Tories -- and recollects that Robert Johnston was in the expedition against the Tories at Elizabethtown -- Further this Deponent saith not.

Sworn to and subscribed in open Court S/ Musgrove Jones

S/ Alex McDowell, CSC

 

1 FPA S7094

 

2 Richard Cheshire W25403

 

 Personally appeared in open Court, this the 11th day of October 1832, Richard Cheshire

who after being duly sworn, deposes and saith --

That he served during the Revolutionary War, with Robert Johnston in a Company of

Volunteer Light Horse under the Command of Captain Jared Irwin -- that for the space of at least 2 years; that they were in frequent expeditions together against the Tories, and that he was with him in the engagement with the Tories at Elizabethtown -- further this Deponent saith not.

Sworn to and subscribed in open Court S/ Richard Cheshire, X his mark

 

State of North Carolina, Cumberland County

 

 Personally appeared before me Esek Arnold one of the Justices of the Peace in & for the

County aforesaid, Zachariah Reeves [sic, Zachariah Reaves or Reves] & Sherwood Ford [sic, Sherwood Fort] who first being duly sworn according to Law depose & say as follows Z Reeves being first sworn deposeth & saith, that he is well acquainted with & have known Robert Johnston of Bladen County for about 50 years -- that during the Revolutionary War, and as well as this deponent recollects between the years 1880 and 1882 [sic, 1780 and 1782] -- the said Robert Johnston was a private Soldier and belong[ed] to Captain Irwin's Troop of Horse acting as a volunteer in said Company, and that he continued as a volunteer in the service at times, off and on for about 2 years -- and that during the aforesaid period, the Company Commanded by Captain Irwin was alternately, when in service Commanded by Colonels T. Brown & T. Owen, & this deponent further saith that he believes the said Robert Johnston was in actual [service] during the 2 years above named for [the] space of 6 months and upwards

Sworn to & subscribed before me the 3rd day of October 1832

S/ Esek Arnold, JP S/ Zach Reeves

 

 

Sherwood Ford being next duly sworn deposeth and saith that having read the foregoing

deposition of Z Reeves, he fully concurs in all therein stated & That he believes & swears from his own knowledge that the deposition of Z Reeves contains the truth & no more further this

Deponent Saith not.

Sworn & subscribed before made this 3rd day of October 1832

S/ Esek Arnold, JP S/ Sherwood Fort

[Attested by Daniel McDiarmid, Clerk of Cumberland County Court of Pleas and Quarter

Sessions.]

 

3 FPA S41973 (Zachariah Reaves, Reves)

4 FPA S8499 (Sherwood Fort)

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Robert Johnston (Johnston) S7092 fn22NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/30/08

 

Captain Jared Irwin

Lieutenant Argulus Pointer,

Robert Edwards,

Captain Andres

Captain McDaniel

Samuel Richardson

Captain John Willis

Richard Plummer

Peter Lord,

Governor John Owen,

General James Owen,

Isaac Wright Esquire,

Robert Harvey

John Beard Esquire,

John Russ,

Frederick Miller

James Smith

John Beard

Richard Cheshire

Musgrove Jones

Zachariah Reaves or Reves Zachariah Reeves

Sherwood Ford

 

 

ROBERT JOHNSTON

 

Robert Johnston or Robert Johnson: S15482 NC and SC Lines: Soldier lived near Camden SC at first enlistment and he lived in Rowan Co. NC and 2nd enlistment. In 1781 soldier had married and was living on the Catawba River in Burke Co. NC where he also enlisted and in 1783 he moved to KY. Applied 1834 March 10- Nelson Co. KY age 84. Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

State of Kentucky, Nelson County court

Be it remembered that upon this 10th day of March in the year 1834, personally appeared

in open court Robert Johnson aged 84 years a citizen of Nelson County Kentucky and in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress of the United States passed in the year 1832, granting pensions & further benefit of certain officers and soldiers of the Revolution and being sworn upon his oath makes the following declaration.

 

That in the year 1775, he was a citizen of South Carolina and resided near Camden. That in the fall of the year 1775, he cannot state the precise day but believes it was in the month of September and the last of the month he entered the service as a private Militia man for a tour of duty of 3 months in the company commanded by Captain Drakeford and the first Lieutenant was John Landing, our principal commander was Colonel Richardson. The troops were marched up on Reedy River and near a large Cane break on said River we took some Tories prisoners who had joined the King, these Tories were called Scofle Ites. The troops to which he was attached continued their services in different sections of the country in suppressing and dispersing the Tories for the full term of 3 months at the termination of which time this affiant was discharged

 

And he states that although he cannot remember the precise day he entered into the military service of the United States or quit it under this engagement he states positively that he served for the full period for which he entered and that was for 3 months. After this tour the affiant moved to Roan [sic, Rowan] County State of North Carolina and in the year 1776 in the fall of that year and after he had raised his crop, to wit on the first of September as near as he can recollect for he will not be positive as to the precise day, he again entered the public service as a private Militia man in the company commanded by Samuel Young our company was under the command of General Griffin Rutherford [sic, Griffith Rutherford] of said County of Rowan, the troops to which he was attached during this War was stationed upon the Catawba River and remained there some time to guard the frontier against the Indians and we were afterwards marched into the Cherokee Country against the said Cherokee Indians the troops marched as far as the Over-hill towns, we destroyed the corn and other property of the Indians in this tour and

that other places After destroying the Indian towns and property the troops returned and were discharged, this affiant returned to the County of Rowan having faithfully served upon this tour Scofolite, Scoffelites, Scopholites, Scovelites or Coffelites (Joseph Coffell): before period of 3 months as a private in the manner stated.

 

In the year 1781, he was still a resident of North Carolina, he had moved and resided on the Catawba River when he was called upon by his Country again to enter her service and he United himself under the command of Captain Walker, and was marched from his residence in Burke County in Stationed at a Fort situated above the Quaker Meadows near the Blue Ridge.

 

There were 30 men stationed at this Fort as a guard under Walker and this affiant remained in the military service of his country upon this tour for the full period of 3 months, the time for which he entered and was honorably discharged from the service on the termination of each tour but he has lost his discharge having long since lost or mislaid the same, nor has he any written evidence of his service nor does he know that he can prove the fact of his actual service by any living witness.

 

He moved to Kentucky in the fall of 1783 and has resided here ever. He is known personally to many of the citizens of Nelson County to wit the Honorable Benjamin Hardin now a member of Congress C. A. Wickliffe formerly a member of Congress, John Rowan Esquire & others and also to James and William Settles. He states that he served in all 3 tours of duty of 3 months each, and in all 9 months as a private soldier in the militia of the United States. That he is not upon the pension Roll of any State or of the United States and hereby relinquishes all claim to a pension other than the one now claim.

 

 Signed Robert Johnston

 

[Alexander Hunter, James Settle, William Settle, and Stanislaus Hayden gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

[Isaac Taylor at the clergyman, gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Researchers Notes: A name given to white Tories who dressed up like Indians when attacking patriot fortifications in the hope of deflecting their neighbors' animosity away from themselves and onto the Cherokees who constituted a constant threat to the frontier settlers prior to and throughout the period of the Revolutionary War. The name derived from Joseph Scoffel, a Tory, who was active in the loyalist cause from an early period of the war.For an excellent discussion of the "Scoffol Lights," see, Rachel N. Klein, "Frontier Planters and the American Revolution: The South Carolina Backcountry, 17751782,” in Ronald Hoffman, Thad W. Tate and Peter J. Albert, eds., An Uncivil War: The Southern Backcountry During the American Revolution, (Charlottesville: United States Capitol Historical Society by The University Press of Virginia, 1985), 37-

69.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Robert Johnston (Johnson) S15482 fn13NC[SC]

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/30/08

 

Captain Drakeford

First Lieutenant was John Landing

Samuel Young

Captain Walker,

Benjamin Hardin

C. A. Wickliffe

John Rowan

Alexander Hunter,

James Settle,

William Settle,

Stanislaus Hayden

Isaac Taylor a clergyman,

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSTON

 

William Johnston S31780 VA Line: soldier was born in Amelia Co. Va he enlisted at Valley Forge. Soldier moved from Amelia Co. Va to Prince Edward Co. Va then to Henrico Co.Va then to NC to SC then returned to NC and lived first in Guilford Co. NC then to Salisbury NC then to Ga and lived in Columbia Co. Ga, Washington Co. Ga, Hancock Co. Ga, Baldwin Co.Ga and Bibb Co Ga. Soldier applied 1835 Feb 9 Bbib Co. Ga. Age 82: Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files