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ABSALOM JOHNSON

 

Absalom Johnson S15484 MD Line applied 1832 Oct 8 Nelson Co. Ky he was born 1757 Aug 21 in Baltimore Co. MD and he lived there at enlistment and he lived there 3 or 4 years after the Revolution. He moved to Denwide “Dinwiddle Co. Va for 8 years then moved to Henrico Co. Va for 5 years then to Prince George Co. Va for 4 years then moved to Nelson Co. Ky soldiers Uncle Ephriam Johnson was age 80 a resident of Nelson Co. Ky in 1833. pg 1840 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Pg 1840 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

CAVE JOHNSON

 

Cave Johnson: S8767 VA Line: Soldier enlisted in Orange Co. Va and served under his brother Capt. Robert Johnson, applied 1839 Sept 16 Scott Co. KY, age 72 but lived in an adjacent County (not named) in 1847 soldier had moved to Boone Co. KY the Honorable Richard M. Johnson of Georgetown KY in 1833 was the son of Capt. Robert Johnson PG 1842 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

DILMUS JOHNSON

 

Dilmus, Dalmath or Dillamas Johnson wife Nancy W2662 VA Line widow applied 1844 feb 5 Christian Co. KY age 81, soldier died 1837 or 1838 Aug 30. Soldier and widow had married in 1786. widow died 1845 Dec 23, leaving children: Elizabeth Patton age 65 in 1852, William A. Johnson, Martha Lockhart, David Johnson and Hannah Lacy: The following made affdvt 1852 May 31 in Christian Co. KY to wit William A. Johnson age 61, Martha Lockhart age 60, Hannah Lacy age 57, widows name before marriage was Hannah Ashley and she was married in Fluvanna Co Va and he lived in there at enlistment. Soldier had applied 1832 Nov in Christian Co. KY age 71 on April 3 1832. After the Rev. soldier moved to Albemarle Co. Va then returned to Fluvanna Co Va then to Amherst Co. Va for 7 or 8 years then to Logan Co. KY for 1 year then to Christian Co

 

ISAAC JOHNSON

 

Isaac Johnson: PA AND VA Lines: applied 1818 June 1 Bullitt Co. KY, in 1820 soldier was aged 72 with a wife age 66 and referred to a married daughter and his son who was born 1799 Oct 12 (both were still living with soldier but were not named) soldier died 1833 Oct 21: Pg 1847 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JACOB JOHNSON

 

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

State of Kentucky, Morgan County

 

On this 17th day of September 1832 personally appeared in open Court before the

Justices of Morgan County now sitting Jacob Johnston a resident in the County of Morgan and State of Kentucky aged 74 years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of an act of Congress passed June 7th 1832 – That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated.

 

He states that he served under General Francis Marion Colonel __Baxter, that Capt.

Goodman Pathrigh [?]1 he served under immediately -- he states that he enlisted for five years at the Eutaw Springs, that he had been about one year in the service before he enlisted under a Draft, that he was in the battle at the Eutaw Springs and the battle at Quinbee [Quinby] about seven or 8 miles from Charleston, That he remained in the regular service two years and six months, that he lived in Morgan County in the State of South Carolina, was born on the eighth of

October 1758 and was born in Rewen [sic, Beaver?] County Pennsylvania, That he knows of no one who can now testify to his service in this Country, that he received a discharge from General Marion which he has lost in has no documentary evidence of his Service, that for a number of years

 

After the close of the war he resided in Morgan County South Carolina, that about 20

years since he removed to the State of Kentucky and is now a citizen of Morgan County in said State –

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State --

 

Questioned by the court:

When and in what year were you born

 

Ans: I was born in the State of Pennsylvania in Beaver [?] County 8th Oct. 1758

 

Q. -- have you any record of your age

 

Ans: No

 

Q. where were you living when you entered the service and where have you lived since

the Revolutionary War

 

Ans: I lived in Morgan County on the Adkin River [Yadkin River] in South Carolina and have lived in South Carolina & Kentucky ever since

 

Q. how were you called into that he Service were you drafted or did you volunteer or

were you a Substitute –

 

Ans: I was drafted when I first entered the service and afterwards enlisted –

 

1 The War Department interpreted this as two men “Captains Goodman and Pathrigh [?]”. I don’t see an “s” at the end of the word “Capt.” nor do I see an “and” or “&” between Goodman and Pathrigh.

 

Q. State the name of some of the Regular officers, who were with the Troops where you

served –

 

Ans: General Marion, Colonel Baxter, Captain Goodman Pathrigh, and Lieutenant Mayams [?]. I do not recollect the names of [indecipherable word] the officers -- I served in and about the Eutaw Springs, in the neighborhood of the Biggin Church and in the neighborhood of Charleston

 

 Q. did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given,

and what has become of it –

 

Ans: I received a discharge from General Marion and have lost it –

 

 Q. State the names of the persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood

& who can testify as to your character for veracity and good behavior, your services as a soldier of the Revolution –

 

Ans: I am known by William Lewis, Esq. -- Thomas Lewis Senior and a number of others -- that he Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ Jacob Johnson, X his mark

 

[William Coffee, a clergyman, and Isaac Nickell gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Jacob Johnson (Johnston) S13579 fn22SC

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

William Lewis, Es

Thomas Lewis Senior

William Coffee

Isaac Nickell

 

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson: S3664 BLW: #1963-100: Cont. Line Va: applied 1818 May 20 Shelby Co Ky, age 58: The page with reference to family was to dim to read in this microcopy ( only daughters Sarah aged 25 and Nancy age 19 were readable) See national Archives Series M804 roll # 1423 for a copy of the entire file) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson S16891 Va line: Soldier was born in 1759 Louisa Co. Va and was raised in Bedford Co. Va. And he was living with a brother (not named) in Amherst Co. at enlistment and after the Revolution lived in Campbell CO. Va. The part which was formerly a part of Bedford Co. Va. For 2 years. He then moved to SC for 6 years then moved to Sullivan Co. Tn for 33 years. Then moved to Wayne Co. Ky then moved to Washington Co, Mo. He applied there 1833 Feb 5, in 1833 soldiers brother John Johnson was of Washington CO. Mo, and in 1833 a James J. Johnson was a JP from Washington Co. Mo, but no relationship to soldier was stated. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSON

 

James Johnson: S35471 VA Line applied 1818 July 7 Montgomery Co. KY aged 64 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson R53634 Cont. Line Va: Soldier was born in 1763 in Maryland and he lived in Stafford Co. Va at enlistment and he lived there some 27 years after the Revolution then moved to KY and applied 1832 Aug 27 in Clark Co. KY. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson S30512 NC Line soldier was born in 1760, he lived in Burke CO NC at enlistment. He applied 1834 June 2 in Pike Co. KY having moved there from Tn. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

[The handwriting of the scribe is very challenging—use this transcript with great care and

circumspection. The handwriting got worse the more the scribe wrote. THIS IS A VERY

POOR TRANSCRIPTION, LARGELY DUE TO THE EXTREME DIFFICULTY OF

DECIPHERING THE HANDWRITING OF THE SCRIBE.]

 

 State of Kentucky, County of Pike

 

 On this 2nd day of June 1834 personally appeared before the County Court of Pike

County, John Johnson, a resident of Pike County and State of Kentucky, aged 74 years who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

 That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and

served as herein stated.

 

 He was drafted for 6 months in the State of North Carolina in the year 1777 under

Captain Samuel Henry, Colonel John Sevier in Burke County North Carolina he was the first Sergeant in his Company -- he marched over to the Cherokee Nation, crossing French Broad [River], he was marched down to the South West Point, commonly called “Sow West Pint” he was in no battles during this 6 months, after arriving at “Sow Wes Pint” he used to scout, as did many, from the block houses, he states that many scalps were taken, and he was in several brushes, himself went out a scouting. The country through which he marched was all then North Carolina, and Tennessee being formed out of the same. He states that he was in no battles, only in skirmishes, There was no Continental regiments that served with him during the period aforesaid. McDowell's Regiment came from Quaker Meadows, he states he was at Big Pigeon

[River], this was shortly after Christy [sic, William Christian’s] & Pickens [Andrew Pickens’] Campaign. He knew Colonel Cocke [could be Locke], Captain Jamieson, Lieutenant Caleb Wallace and many other militia officers that was out.

 

 And the next spring 1788 [sic, 1778], he entered for a 6 months Tour as a volunteer and

served out his tour under Colonel Cocke, Captain Samuels, and this was also in Burke County North Carolina, he thinks it was April, about the 10th of that month, and he was marched down to the Tennessee [River] after crossing the mountains [indecipherable word, looks like ‘drunding’] the Tennessee waters from Catabee [Catawba] River. The Indians had killed several families and they [the?] State of North Carolina had to Kich futs [keep forts?] all along on the Catawba during the summer season of that year [indecipherable word or words] fort at this place as the head of the same he remained during the summer of 1778. He states that the scouts from the Fort killed several Indians in the period of his last engagement. He does not know certainly that he ever did kill any Indians, The Tories had approached before this to the same place and the Whigs had burnt it up in August 1778 there were several families killed and they were chiefly all

women and children. In October the Indians most all left the County for the Indian Nation the country through which he marched was then North Carolina the Cherokee Indians had made peace before but there was one [indecipherable word] there who did not like the old Chiefs and could not be prevented [?] from plundering and burning. He served with no Continental officers and he never did as he did. Joe White from Rowan [County] was killed up on the Catawba [River] [indecipherable word]. This year he knew Colonel Cleveland, Myer Jones [Major Jones?], Capt. John Harris Captain Black, Captain Fisher and many officers during his last service. He believes Colonel McDowell was a regular officer. He served out his term of 6 months in the left the service.

 

 He served another tour of 6 months as substitute for one John Clarke in the year 1780 on the 15th day of March under Colonel Ware [? War Dept. interpreted this as Wau], Captain Blair and served with [one or more indecipherable words] November [one or more indecipherable words] at 9 miles [one or more indecipherable words] at the station down the French Broad, he served there till April, and [indecipherable word] scouting and protecting the North Carolina frontier during the whole of that summer, but [several indecipherable words] was done during that year's service and no battles were fought he scouted from the 1st of May (the bushes in that County about that time were all full-grown until the fall, each day no Indian disturbance worth a mention occurred during that year and he does not believe the Indians done anything but steal horses, but few men could be spared out of Rowan whilst the frontier and the forts on French Broad and Catawba [Rivers] had to be kept up. He marched directly to the Fort and there

remained until he was discharged in September or about the first of October 1780. He left the service for each of the tours of service aforesaid he received a written discharge. He knew Colonel Ollaw [?], Major Harrow, Capt. Speight, Lieut. Privel [?could be Privet], but he served: as an Indian scout and was not after the British or Tories, and he states he has always lived in the mountains and never saw a Continental Regiments, he knows of no particular circumstances to mention unless it is to name the persons who was killed by the Indians, which he can do, he states he can establish this claim by living witnesses. He was very young when he entered the service and it being so long since he cannot remember all-- as to what has become of his discharges, he has no idea and therefore can only say they have been long since lost in fact he never took any care of them. He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State, Sworn to

and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ John Johnson, X his mark

 

[William Tackitt, a clergyman, and Thomas May gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 His answers to the Questions –

 

1. He was born [indecipherable word] in the year 1760.

 

2. He has it only by the count of the family.

 

3. In Burke County North Carolina and then moved to Tennessee and then to this state.

 

4th He was drafted for 6 months in North Carolina Burke County for 6 months, the 2nd tour was

as a volunteer for 6 months -- the 3rd tour for 6 months as a substitute.

 

5th He knew but few officers -- Captain Blair Colonel McDowell Captain William Nelson, A. Lofton Captain, Colonel Ware & Colonel Sevier and Colonel Otlaw [Outlaw?] who lived at the end of French Broad for many years afterwards -- he states that he served 3 tours of 6 months each against the Cherokee Indians during which time many were killed, and some few whites were massacred by the Indians, he was never in any battles of any particular. The hardest fighting was some way the year of our first served.

 

6. He received his discharges & they were all given by his Captain As he now remembers, but what has become of them nobody knows and they are all not among his papers.

 

7. There is Thomas May Esquire, General Ratliffe, Rev.d James Roberts, Rev’d William Tuckitt, Samuel Hall, George Tuckitt, Henry Newson and Hart Newson.

 

 [Thus ends the horrible handwriting—hallelujah!]

 

 [In a letter dated July 9, 1935, the War Dept. personnel interpreted some of the names in the application as follows: Captain Samuel Henry, Colonel John Sevier, Captain Samuel; Colonel Cocke, Captain Blair and Colonel Wau (?).]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of John Johnson S30512 fn24NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/23/08

 

William Tackitt, a clergyman,

Thomas May

General Ratliffe,

Rev.d James Roberts

Samuel Hall,

George Tuckitt,

Henry Newson 

Hart Newson

Substitute for one John Clarke

 

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson S32345 BLW #26-160-55 VA Line: Soldier was born 1762 May 14 in Hanover Co. Va and he lived there at enlistment and he lived there 10 years after the Revolution. He then moved to KY for 8 years then moved to Marion Co. Ind. with his children (not named) and soldier applied there 1835 Oct 6 and in 1855 he was living in Rochester in Fulton Co. Ind. In 1857 a son in law (not named) was aged 62: Soldiers brother was Richard Johnson age 75 in 1835 and a a minister of the Gospel in Sumner Co. Tn. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson S35480: Va Line: 1819 Aug 2 applied Garrrad Co. KY age 63, stated he had 12 sons and 5 daughters of which 9 were still living at home. 1821 Feb 8 Soldier moved to Madison Co. KY with a wife and 5 sons aged 15, 10, 8 to 9, 7 and 5 years. 3 daughters still at home. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson or John Johnston: S36026: VA Line: Soldier was born 1748 Aug. He applied 1818 April 6 Scott Co. KY in 1820 soldier stated he had no person in his family but himself. Soldier died 1825 March 27. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnson and Elizabeth: W9086 Va Line: widow applied 1853 march 25 Garrard Co. KY aged 85: Soldier married Elizabeth Dodd on 1789 March 9 in Va. Widow stated soldier had been dead so long she could not remember the date. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN G. JOHNSON

 

John G. Johnson BLW #1167-300-3 1799 July: Assignee Robert Camp, no papers served as a Capt. In the VA line. It was stated in the file that one John Boswell Johnson recd VA State BLW #2117 for 4000 acres issued 1783 Dec 13 and later emigrated to KY and that in Frankfort KY a John B. Johnson recd BLW #13788 on 1783 Jan 3 for 1137 ½  acres and was surveyed 1798 Sept 24 and located in Washington CO. KY near salt River in what became Anderson Co. KY ( the data concerning the VA State BLW’s was not confirmed Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOSEPH JOHNSON

 

Joseph Johnson or Joseph Johnston S13782 VA line: 1833 April 12 Monroe Co. IN. Soldier was born 1755 Oct 20 in  Frederick Co.Va and he lived there until 14 years of age and his father moved to New River in Va for 6 to 7 years then moved to Clinch River in VA where Soldier was of 18 and he lived there at time of enlistment and later enlisted in Montgomery Co.Va in 1776 where he live and in 1781 he moved to Powell’s Valley in What is now Lee County Va and also enlisted there. He lived there 4 or 5 years after the Revolution then moved to Knox Co. KY for 14 years then moved to Hawkins Co. Ohio for 2 years then to Jackson Co. Ind. for 5 or 6 years then to Owen Co. Ind for a short time then to Monroe Co. In. Soldier mentions his brother David Johnson who served with him. There is an affdt by Ebenezer Johnson who he had not seen for 17 or 18 years until he moved from IN to KY in 1841 and he stated he had also served in the Revolutionary Army with his brother Joseph Johnson. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

State of Indiana} Monroe County}

On this the twelfth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty three personally appeared in open Court before me Amory Kinney President Judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit of our state of Indiana aforesaid and Stephen P Seall and Abram Rusthik[?] Associate Judges of our said Court for the said County of Monroe being a Court of Record now sitting Joseph Johnston a resident of said County in said state aged seventy eight years the twentieth day of October next who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That he was born in the County of Frederick in the State of Virginia on the twentieth day of October in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and fifty five, where he resided untill fourteen years of age when his father removed to New River in Virginia and settled within a few miles of Englishes Ferry [sic: Ingles Ferry near present Radford] on said River where he resided six or seven years, when he removed to Clinch River what county if any at that time unknown in Virginia [Fincastle County 1772 - 1777, then Washington County]. When his Father removed with him as above last mentioned to Clinch River he was about eighteen years of age it was in the spring season of the year he feels pretty certain There were but a few settlers there then: – This Declarants family and a few other. – He resided there untill and at the time of entering the service. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated to wit

 

That in the month of July in the Year seventeen hundred and seventy four he

volunteered in a Company of Foot men under Captain Walter Crocket [Crockett] in the Militia of the State of Virginia in the service of the United States in the War of the Revolution. There was no Regiment formed there. He was rendezvoused under said Captain at New River, and marched to the Levels of Greenbrier Virginia there joining other troops was in said Company put in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Lewis his first name he thinks was Charles not certainly [Charles Lewis, killed at the Battle of Point Pleasant]. He was marched in said Regiment of Virginia Militia from the said Levels of Greenbrier under the said Colonel in said Company down New River on the east side crossing Gauly Mountain [sic: Gauley Mountain in present Fayette County WV] to the mouth of Kenawa [sic: Kanawha] River into the Forks of said River and the

Ohio, where was fought the Battle called the Shawnee Battle [Battle of Point Pleasant] on the 10th day of October Seventeen hundred and seventy four Previous to arriving at that place Colonel Lewis was the highest in command. upon such arrival this Applicant & said Colonel Lewises Regiment was under the command of a general officer whose name he has forgotten [Gen. Andrew Lewis]

 

Before reaching said Battle Ground Col. Lewis had preceeded with three or four

companies leaving Captain Crocket’s Company and this applicant in the rear with the Beeves and Baggage and Colonel Lewis was to have left canoes at Gauly River for said Capt Crocket and other three or four rear companies but from some cause no canoes being so left this applicant and said near companies were delayed a whole day in swimming their beeves and getting their baggage over on rafts. Said rear companies under the command of a Major Christy [sic: Christian] and this applicant in consequence of said delay did not engage in said Battle. The next day after crossing Gauly in the evening a couple of runners came from Colonel Lewis stating that the Battle had been fought and that the Indians threatened to fight them again – Major Christy then commanded that the Beeves and baggage be left and a forced march

commenced which was done, and this applicant in said company joined Colonel Lewis; but no further fighting took place. The Celebrated Cornstalk an Indian Chief as this applicant understood commanded at said Battle on the side of the Indians An Expedition from said Battle Ground was commenced but meeting a flag and the Indians suing for peace, said expedition being intended against their Towns, they this Applicant and his troops returned to and completed the Fort in the forks of said Rivers called Fort Pleasant, the spot being previously called Point Pleasant. He was employed in building said Fort & was there several weeks after said Battle. He had volunteered to go in said Expedition against said Indians but not to serve any particular period At the request of his officers and as a duty he voluntarily served in said Expedition four months; when at said Fort he was dismissed and started home about the latter part of October seventeen hundred and seventy four. He received no discharge in writing. All said services he rendered cheerfully faithfully and satisfactorily to his officers.

 

He remained at home untill the year next after his said expedition under Colonel Lewis

the year seventeen hundred and seventy five

 

In said year seventeen hundred and seventy five in the month of April as near as he is

able to state living at the County of Montgomery in the State of Virginia he volunteered in the Militia of said State in the service of the United States as an Indian Spy under an engagement with Major Robison whose first name he has forgotten. He was employed as such spy principally against the Shawnee Indians in company with James Whitton also an Indian Spy. This applicant spied through the country about Sandy and Clinch Rivers.

 

He engaged to serve three months or as long as there was a necessity in the opinion of

said officer for his said service. He served at least five months in said campaign faithfully and satisfactorily to his said officers. He was by the promise of said Officer to have been paid by him or his paymaster one dollar per day which he never received. He was dismissed in said County in the latter part of Summer or fall of said seventeen hundred and seventy five. He received no discharge in writing.

 

In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy six on the eighteenth

day of May he married and it promising a troublesome year he was prevailed on by his father in law and family to go with them to New River And after reaching New River at the request sent him by an Uncle living on Roanoke River he went down with his wife to stay the season with him.

 

But when he got to his Uncles two of his sons had drafted and this applicant volunteered in the same company commanded by Hugh Crocket Captain, brother to the Captain Crocket under whom he had formerly served. (He can not recollect the name of the County where he volunteered it was near said Roanoke River. no town near [Botetourt County].) in the Regiment commanded by Colonel William Christy [sic: Christian] in the Militia of the State of Virginia. Said Company was of Footmen. He volunteered as above either in June or July in said year seventeen hundred and seventy six for the period of three months to go a Campaign against the Cherokee Indians he rendezvoused in said Company at Jacob Kents near Colonel Rawleigh Madisons and marched and joined Colonel Christy at the Long Islands and Holstein River (Tennessee) [sic: Long

Islands of Holston River at present Kingsport TN, then North Carolina] and proceeded to the Indian Towns, and burned and destroyed them, except two of them belonging to friendly Indians and Traders. After being in the Cherokee Indian country about two months (being about one month going and returning or upwards) they set out on their return. In said Expedition he served upwards of and at least three months He was dismissed on his march homeward about the first of October in said year 1776. he does not know in what county it took place At that time the territory which composed one county now making several He received no discharge in writing nor did any of his comrades within his knowledge and memory

 

In the year seventeen hundred and seventy seven at said County of Montgomery Virginia in the early part of summer he volunteered in the Militia of said state to serve as an Indian Spy under an engagement with Major Robison before mentioned for and during said summer and as long as in the opinion of said officers necessary against the Shawnee Tribe of Indians as well as the Mingos, Wyandots &c (in the service of the United States) through the country about Sandy [probably Big Sandy] Guian [probably Guyandotte] and Cold Rivers. He served in company with Richard Prey[?]. He was to have received one dollar per day which he received from his paymaster through the hand of his said Major. He was dismissed in said County about the end of said summer without any discharge in writing. He served in said engagement three months.

 

In the year seventeen hundred and seventy eight still living at said County of

Montgomery in said state of Virginia in the early part of summer of said year he volunteered as an Indian Spy in company with John Sharp his fellow spy under an engagement with (Major) Walter Crockett who was at one time Colonel he does not know whether then or afterwards, against the before mentioned tribes of Indians for a period of three months or as long in said season as in the opinion of said officers necessary. He served in the country about the before-mentioned Rivers of Sandy &c. He was to receive one dollar per day which he never got. He was dismissed in said County about the end of said summer without any discharge in writing. Said service was in the Militia of the said state of Virginia and the United States. He served faithfully

and to the satisfaction of said officer constantly three months at least

 

In the year seventeen hundred and seventy nine whilst living at said County of

Montgomery in said State of Virginia he volunteered about the first of summer of said year in the Militia of said state and the service of the United States as an Indian Spy in company with his partner in the former season John Sharp under and engagement with Major Thomas Mastin to serve during said Summer season, and to receive one dollar per day. He spied in the country about Sandy and Cold Rivers against the Shawnee, Wyandots Mingos &c Indians. He served constantly and faithfully and satisfactorily to his officer during said summer and probably longer but at least three months. He was dismissed in said County without any discharge in writing. He received no pay for said service. He was dismissed sometime about the end of said summer or beginning of the Fall of said year probably in September not certain

 

In the year seventeen hundred and eighty whilst living at said County of Montgomery in

said State of Virginia he volunteered in the spring or beginning of summer of said year in the Militia of said state in the service of the United States as an Indian Spy in Company with Archibald Prater under an engagement with said Major Thomas Mastin to serve during the need or said season at one dollar per day He spied about said last mentioned Rivers against said last mentioned Indians He served faithfully and constantly and satisfactorily to his said Officer at least three months and dismissed about the end of said summer without any discharge in writing. he received no part of his said pay.

He still continued to reside in the County aforesaid untill entering the following Service.

 

In the year aforesaid of seventeen hundred and eighty he thinks in the month of

December in said year he entered the Service of the United States in the Militia of the state of Virginia as a Volunteer in the company of Fort commanded by Captain Robbin Moffett in the Regiment commanded by Colonel — Preston whose first name he has forgotten [William Preston]. He rendezvoused in said company near the head of Clinch River and marched and joined other companies at Harboards Ferry just below (four or five miles) the Lead mines [near Fort Chiswell in Wythe County] and fell under the command of said Colonel at or near New River thence they marched to Moravian Town [near present Winston-Salem] in North Carolina, and thence joined General [Nathanael] Greene near Guilford Court House, thence marched down to Hawe [sic: Haw] River. They were at Hawe River, the Hanging Rock, and many other places some of which forgotten scouting & traversing the country like playing prisoners baste[?]. He so entered the service for the period of three months which he served out and which expired a few days (perhaps three) before the Battle of Guilford [Guilford Courthouse, 15 March 1781]. He was not in said Battle being dismissed at the end of said period without any discharge in writing. He never has received one cent of pay for said tour. He served faithfully and to the acceptance of his officers. He was dismissed at Guilford Court House in the first part of march in the year seventeen hundred and eighty one

 

In the same said year seventeen hundred and and eighty one he removed to Powells

Valley leaving his family behind untill the Fall season in said State of Virginia he does not recollect the name of the County [Washington] if any formed at that time (now Lee County) At said Powells Valley in said year last mentioned of seventeen hundred and eighty one he entered the service of the United States in the Militia of the State of Virginia as an Indian Spy under an engagement with Colonel Charles Cox at one dollar per day in company with Alexander McFarland his partner Spy in the spring of the year aforesaid. He spied in said Valley down to Hickory Gap on Yellow Creek and Cumberland Waters and on Goose Creek Waters. He served constantly and faithfully during said season at least for three months. He was employed in this spying against the Cherokee Indians He was dismissed at Colonel Coxes in the Valley aforesaid

near Cumberland Gap. He received his pay for said services duly He received no written

discharge for said tour of spying. He served as a volunteer.

 

In the year seventeen hundred and eighty two at said Powells Valley in Virginia he entered the service of the United States in the Militia of the State of Virginia as an Indian Spy to serve during the summer season of said year or longer if requested as necessary by his officers. He commenced service in or about the beginning of said summer or latter part of the spring of said year and spied about the same Rivers and country spied in his former last mentioned spying and against the same Indians (Cherokees) in company for his partner spy with Dan’l Coulson He was dismissed at Colonel Coxes aforesaid in said Powells Valley about the latter part of said summer and received his one dollar pay per day by the hand of said Colonel having served constantly and faithfully to the acceptance of his officers. He received no discharge in writing. He served in said service at least three months.

 

He served as a volunteer in such tours as well as all his other tours heretofore stated. He

has no record of his age; many years ago the last he knew of it, it was in the possession of a sister Elizabeth Monday of Kentucky. Upon reflection he thinks he got a discharge in writing from his Captain Hugh Crocket for the Cherokee Campaign herein described.

 

He never received any pay other than herein mentioned for any of said services. His

memory is much impaired and where in his declaration he has omitted anything it is on account of such failure of memory. He has no documentary evidence of any part of his said services nor does he know of any person or persons whose testimony he can procure of his services except those whose certificates are herewith annexed.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present and

declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

After the War of the Revolution he continued to live four or five years in said Powells Valley, then removed to Knox County Kentucky where he resided fourteen years or upwards, then he removed to Hawkins Ohio and lived there two years or about it then he lived five years or about it in Jackson County Indiana, then he resided five or six years and now resides in Monroe County in the State of Indiana He resided formerly a short time in Owen County in Indiana.

 

He is known to his brother David Johnston [pension application S32349] who served with him in the tour to Guilford North Carolina and is known to Cornelius Cox and William Followell who can testify the said David as to services and the others to his character for veracity and their belief of his services as a soldier of the Revolution Whatever is omitted of dates circumstances and events is by reason of old age, & a remote backwoods life where he has not had the learning or books to refresh his memory, which has failed greatly. Joseph Johnston his X mark

 

State of Kentucky Fleming county Sct.

 

I Ebenezer Johnson of Fleming county Kentucky aged Eighty one years do state on oath that Joseph Johnson who has made the foregoing declaration is my brother and that I had not seen him for seventeen or eighteen years untill he moved from Indiana to this state in the fall of 1841. I also state that I served with him in the company command by General Broadhead [sic: Col. Daniel Brodhead] I think the year 1779 [August]. the detachment marched from Pittsburg [sic: Pittsburgh] up the Alleganie [sic: Allegheny] river to some Indian Towns which were destroyed together with their growing corn &c. I am certain he served at least three months on this campain, of the field officers I recollect Col. Campbell Maj. Byrum and Maj. John Finley. Capt. Ross command the company to which we were attached. Genl. Broadhead and the other field officers mentioned were officers of the Regular army. Capt. Ross commanded a company of Militia which was attached to the regulars.

 

That in the spring of the year 1780. said Joseph Johnson was drafted and attached to the

company of Capt. Andrews and served as a Spye and Ranger a tour of three months garding the frontier along the Ohio river and in the neighbourhood of Holladays Cove [sic: Hollidays Cove at present Weirton WV] – I was serving in another part of the country at the time he was with Capt. Andrews, but in the next year (I think it was in 1782) said Joseph and myself ware both drafted and attached to the company of Capt. Reed in the month of March of that year, and was actively engaged as a Spye guarding the frontier on the Ohio River untill the month of October or

November following.

 

I know said Joseph Johnson also served a tour of three months as a

substitute for William Conyears. he was engaged in guarding country on the Ohio river from Holladays cove to Mingo’s bottom. Capt Andrews commanded the company on this tour as well as the one before mention. I know he was attached to some other companies but cannot state the particulars. Ebenezer Johnson his X mark [3 Nov 1843]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Joseph Johnson (Johnston): S31782

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

So we Have Joseph Johnson

Brother is Ebenzer Johnson

Brother is David Johnson

Sister Elizabeth Monday of Kentucky

Joseph Johnson was 18 and enlisted in the Army when he lived on the CLINCH RIVER in Va. He also enlisted in Montgomery CO Va. In 1776

 

Captain Walter Crocket or Crockett

Major Robison

Hugh Crocket Captain, brother to the Captain Crocket

(Major) Walter Crockett

John Sharp

Archibald Prater

Captain Robbin Moffett

Dan’l Coulson

Sister Elizabeth Monday of Kentucky

David Johnston [pension application S32349]

David Johnson S32349 VA Line: Soldier was born 1759 Oct 10 or 1760 in Frederick Co. Va and he lived there until age of 11 then moved to Montgomery Co. Va and in 1773 he moved to the head of the Clinch River and he lived there at enlistment applied 1832 Nov 12 Jackson Co. Ind Pg 1844 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

Ebenezer Johnson of Fleming county Kentucky

Capt. Ross

Capt. Andrews

Capt. Reed

Substitute for William Conyears.

 

 

 

MOSES JOHNSON

 

Moses Johnson or Moses Johnston: S36024: VA Line: 1818 July 13: Ohio Co. KY: in 1820 soldier was age 71 with a wife aged 66 or 67 and no children living with him. 1834 June 2 soldier had moved to Lawrence Co. Il to be near his children (not named) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

PHILIP JOHNSON

 

Phillip Johnson or Phillip Johnston: S36657: Cont. Line VA: 1818 Sept 12: applied Montgomery Co. KY: age about 60 he had enlisted in Essex Co. Va. In 1820 soldier had 5 children at home towit Berry Johnson 18, Lanston Johnson 15, Clement Johnson 10 (the other 2 children were not named) In 1825 soldier had moved to Ripley Co. Ind. having moved there in 1824 from KY. Soldier died 1835 July 11. Pg 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 
 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, Montgomery County, Sct.
 
On this 12th day of September 1818, before me the subscriber, one of the Judges of the
circuit court, in and for the state aforesaid, personally appeared Philip Johnson aged about sixty years;–who being by me first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following statement and declaration, in order to obtain the provision made by the late law of Congress. entitled, “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the Revolutionary War;”
 
That he is a citizen of the state of Kentucky, and resident in the county of Madison; and that he was enlisted for three years or during the war at Hobs hole [Hobbs Hole], Essex County in the state of Virginia on or about the [blank] day of April 1777 by one Leut Bohannon [sic: Ambrose Bohannan] and served in the company commanded by captain James Pendleton of the first Regiment of Artilery Virginia line on continental establishment that he continued to serve in the said corps, or in the service of the United States, in the continental army, against the common enemy, until the close of the war when he was honorably discharged from service at Old Town, Halifax County in the state of Virginia; that he was in service about five years and was in the battles of Monmouth [28 Jun 1778], Stony Point [15 Jul 1779], Gates defeat [defeat of Gen. Horatio Gates at Camden SC, 16 Aug 1780], and at Peters Barg [possibly Petersburg VA, 25 Apr 1781] and that he is in reduced circumstances and stands in need of the assistance of his country for support; and that he* has lost his discharge, and has no evidence in his power, of his services and discharge, other than that which is here transmitted.
 
*Gave his discharge to Capt Bohannan to draw the balance of his pay and has never seen it since
 
Kentucky Madison Circuit sct September Term 1820.
 
On the 5th day of September 1820 personally appeared in Open Court being a Court of
record for the State of Kentucky and Circuit of Madison County Philip Johnson aged Sixty one years resident in Madison County in said State who being first duly Sworn according to Law doth on his oath declare that he served in the revolutionary war as follows
 
He belonged to the 1st Regiment of Virginia artillery and to Capt. James Pendleton’s
Company the date of his original declaration is on the 12th day of September 1818, And that he had not since that time by gift sale or in any manner disposed of his property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring himself within the provisions of an act of Congress entitled an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and Naval service of the United States passed on the 18th day of March 1818 and that he has not nor has any person in trust for him any property or securities contacts or debts due to him nor has he any income other than what is contained in the Schedule hereto annexed and by him subscribed towit One Mare two Cows and calves one Steer Six hogs (Signed) Philip Johnston
 
He states that he is a farmer by occupation but entirely unable to follow it by reason of his having lost the use of one of his shoulders. He states that he has five children living with him of the following names and ages (viz)
Berry 18
Langston 15 years
Clement 10
all of his children are able to maintain themselves by there own labour except Clement who is a Cripple. He states that he states that he is in such indigent circumstances as to be unable to support himself without the assistance of his Country.
 
NOTES: “Phill Johnston” is listed as a Matross (artillery private) on the Mar 1780 payroll of Capt. James Pendleton’s Company. Other documents in the file indicate that Johnston moved to Ripley County KY around 1824 and died 11 Jul 1835.
 
Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements
 
Pension Application of Philip Johnston S36657
Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

Leut Bohannon [sic: Ambrose Bohannan]

Captain James Pendleton

 

SAMUEL JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Kentucky, Daviess County

 

 On this 8th day of October 1832 personally appeared in open Court before Alney McLean Esquire sole Judge of the circuit court of Daviess County now sitting Samuel Johnson Senior a resident of said County and State aforesaid aged 88 years in December ensuing who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

 That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers, and

served as herein stated. That he was drafted and entered the service under Colonel William Giles Major Richard Jones Captain William Finney Lieutenant John Walthal Ensign's name not recollected in May (date not recollected) 1779 -- served one month marched from Amelia [county, Virginia] (the place of residence) to Portsmouth, or nearly [indecipherable word] that place was the point to which the troops were ordered the British having left, he returned.

 

That he was drafted in December 1779 entered the service under Captain Bennett Pullum Lieutenant Howel Rose remained in service for 2 weeks and then substituted French Frank to serve out the balance of the term to wit 2 months and a half the tour being for 3 months having previously moved from Amelia Virginia to Granville North Carolina.

 

February 1781 was drafted, entered the service under General Butler Colonel Joseph

Taylor Major Anthony Sharp Captain Richard Harrison Lieutenant James Ellison Ensign Ben Hester marched from Granville old Court house, to Guilford Court house fought the British on a March 1781 -- General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] Commanding. Served 3 months discharged 11th May 1781 at Wake Court-house now Raleigh (North Carolina).

 

Sometime in September following drafted and entered the service under Captain Charles Yancy marched from Granville County North Carolina to the high Hills of Santee (General Greene’s head quarters) guarding of public wagons tour 3 months.

 

 That he has no documentary evidence by which to prove his services.

 

 Interrogatories propounded by the Court

 

1st When and in what year were you born?

 

Ans: Bucks County Pennsylvania and in the year 1744

 

2nd Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?

 

Ans: I have none now there was one, but brother John carried it to South Carolina, it was they are destroyed by the Tories.

 

3rd Where were you living when called into service: where have you lived since the

Revolutionary War and where do you now live?

 

Ans: In Virginia and North Carolina since the revolutionary war in North Carolina and Kentucky and now lives in Kentucky

 

4th How were you called into service; were you drafted; did you volunteer or were you a

substitute, and if in substitute, for whom?

 

Ans: By order of the States, to wit of Virginia and North Carolina as I understood -- I was drafted.

 

5th State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served, such Continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service.

 

Ans: General N. Greene commanded at Guilford, Colonel Washington of the horse; I knew the Regiments in which I served the names of the commanders of which is brought to view in the preceding part of this declaration there was a Regiment from the lower part of the State (North Carolina) commanded by Colonel Eaton who I believe was taken prisoner at Augusta and then killed for an answer to the last clause of the inquiry, reference is made to the body of this declaration.

 

6th Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it?

 

Ans: I received one from James Ellison (Captain) but it has been mislaid or lost long since.

 

7th State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and their belief in your services as a soldier in the revolution.

 

Ans: Captain Benjamin Field and Benjamin Newton

 

 He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State that he knows of.

 

 Sworn to and subscribed, the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ Samuel Johnson Same year

 

[Benjamin Field & Benjamin Newton gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Samuel Johnson S16430 fn43NC [sic VA.]

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/26/08

 

Captain William Finney

Lieutenant John Walthal

Captain Bennett Pullum

Lieutenant Howel Rose

French Frank

Captain Richard Harrison

Lieutenant James Ellison

Ensign Ben Heste

Captain Charles Yancy

James Ellison (Captain)

Captain Benjamin Field

Benjamin Newton

 

 

THOMAS JOHNSON

 

Thomas Johnson: S31177 VA Line: Soldier was born 1764 Feb 28 in Almbemarle CO Va, he was living in Amherst CO Va at enlistment and later moved to Lincoln Co Va (Now in KY). And also enlisted there afterwards moved to Knox Co. KY then to Caldwell CO KY and lived there when he applied 1834 July 9 in Rockcastle KY Pg 1858 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson S30510: Va line: applied 1834 June 6: Woodford Co. KY age 73. Soldier lived in Loudon at enlistment. Soldier was born in 1761 Bucks Co. PA. In 1790 Soldier moved from Loudon Co Va to Woodford Co KY and soldier died there 1841 Feb 17 leaving no widow or children. A Robert Johnson was administrator of Soldiers estate in 1844. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S13583 VA line: Soldier lived in Fairfax Co. Va at enlistment 1832 Sept 17 applied in Pendleton Co. KY age 74. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson: S46050 VA line: Soldier applied 1833 Feb 9: Grant Co. KY age 75 in March 1832: Soldier lived in Westmoreland Co. Va at enlistment and in 1797 he moved to KY. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson, Margetta Johnson: W1051 VA Line soldier was born in 1762 in Fairfax Co. Va and he lived there at enlistment and in 1783 he moved to KY where he lived in different counties but most of the time in Harrison Co. KY and in 1829 he moved to Marion Co. Mo. He applied 1832 Nov 13 and he was referred to as William Johnson Sr. Soldier married Margeretta daughter of Peter Tittle at whose home they were married in Bourbon Co. The part that became Harrison CO. Ky. Soldier died 1838 June 19 in Marion Co. Mo. Widow applied 1843 Oct 2 Lewis Co. Mo. Age 73, was living with a son John C. Johnson and she was still there in 1848 she died prior to 1855. Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson wife nancy or Alsey: R5650: VA Line: Soldier lived in Albemarle CO. Va at enlistment and afterwards he moved to Madison Co. KY and in 1832 he moved to Estill Co. Ky. He applied there 1832 Aug. 20 Soldier was born 1759 Oct. Soldier was married twice but only the wife Nancy of Alcey was named. Son In Law of soldier and widow was Micager Pittman of Owsley Co. KY in 1855. In 1833 a Matthews Johnson was of Madison Co. Ky. Pg 1861 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson R5672 VA Line: applied 1836 Monroe Co. Va age 76. Soldier lived in Prince William Co. Va at enlistment and he married there in spring of 1780 he moved to the Falls of the Ohio on the side that is now in KY (near Louisville now stands) and he also enlisted there. Pg 18611855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

William Johnson S15189 NC Line: Soldier lived in Chatham Co NC at enlistment and applied 1833 March 11 Trigg Co. KY age 78. PG 1860

Pension application of William Johnson S15189 fn13NC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Kentucky, Trigg County

 

 On this 11th day of March 1833 personally appeared in open Court before the Justices of

the Trigg County Court now sitting William Johnson a resident of Trigg County in the State of Kentucky aged 78 years the 24th of September 1832, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers, and served as herein stated. General Ramsey was the commander of the Militia with whom he served he served in the company of Captain Joseph Johnson. He does not remember the other officers of his Brigade. He was then a citizen of North Carolina in Chatham County. He entered the service as a drafted man just before General Gates was defeated near Camden and was with him in that Battle. His company marched from Chatham County in North Carolina across the Yadkin River and came up with the Main Army under General Gates on the Pedee [River] a short distance below the mouth of Rocky River just before the Battle took place.

 

After the battle he went home and was shortly afterwards called on again to finish the term for which he had been drafted, 3 months. He was marched again into South Carolina but not so far down as Camden before he was discharged and went home having completed his tour of 3 months for which he was drafted.

 

He does not know the names of any of the regiments or officers of the Continental line who were with Gates who was the chief commander. He has lost his discharge and has no documentary testimony and he knows of no person living whose testimony he can procure to testify to this service: But it is a well settled tradition where he lives that he was in Gates defeat, and he has named one of his sons for his Captain Joseph Johnson who is now 44 years old.

 

 He was drafted again for a 3 months tour and entered the service again as a County Light

horse man about the 11th of October 1781 under Major Roger Griffith and Captain Mash. The other officers he does not remember. The object of this service was to keep the Tories in subjection. He resided at the same place as when he performed the other service and was marched about through the County of his residence, (Chatham.) He marched about through the country in which he live during this period of service. He was in no battles and served with no regulars. He served out his 3 months and was discharged by Major Griffith, which he now has in his possession dated the 11th of January 1782. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

 S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

[Joseph Johnson, a clergyman, and George Daniel gave the

 

“Chatham This May Cartify that William Jonston Faithfuly Scarved a tower of Dutey in the County Light Hors and is Discharged Acordingly this 11th Janury 1782. S/ Roger Griffith, Major”

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/27/08

 

Captain Joseph Johnson

Major Roger Griffith

Captain Mash

Joseph Johnson, a clergyman

George Daniel

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

State of Kentucky, Wayne County

 

On this 24th day of September 1832 personally appeared before the Court of the County of Wayne, William Johnson a Resident of Wayne County and State aforesaid age 75 years old on the second day of August 1832, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832.

 

That he enlisted in the Army of the United States in the year he thinks of 1776 in the fall or summer thereof with Captain James Franklin & was appointed and acted as a Sergeant & served in the 10th Virginia Regiment of the line under the following named Officers, my Captain was James Franklin, 1st Lieutenant Cluff Shelton, 2nd Lieutenant James Dillard, Colonel Edward Stephens [?], was first Colonel who being promoted our Regiment was commanded by Colonel __ [blank in original] Green at Brandywine Battle.

 

General Weeden commanded the Brigade, I lived at the time of my enlistment in Bedford County in the State of Virginia, but enlisted in Amherst County Virginia for three years and served the full time & was regularly discharged at Petersburg in Virginia, at the expiration of my enlistment in writing but have lost the discharge, the particular time when discharged not recollected. I was at the Battle of Brandywine, at the Battle of Germantown, at the Battle of Monmouth during my three years of enlistment & in some other small engagements. After the Battle of Brandywine, my Captain James Franklin resigned and our company was commanded by Cluff Shelton. After I was enlisted, I was marched to Baltimore & was there inoculated for the smallpox & then was marched northerly & was at said Battles. I volunteered a was [sic] enlisted for six months in 1775 (in the year before my said enlistment for three years) under Captain James Buford in Bedford County in the State of Virginia & acted as a Sergeant by appointment we marched to Williamsburg Virginia, and the company was soon marched Back to the frontiers under the Command of Colonel William Christie and Burnt several Indian towns, on the Tennessee River & was discharged.

 

After my Enlistment for three years I served one term of three months as a Sergeant in the militia under Captain Jeremiah Pate of Bedford County Virginia & was at the Battle or siege of Ninety Six, returned home & was regularly discharged.

 

I again served a small tour under Captain Charles Christian of Amherst County in the State of Virginia as a Substitute for Ballenger Wade as a Sergeant.

 

In all of which tours I was regularly discharged in writing as a Sergeant But in the great length of time past have lost them, & now have no documentary evidence of my services & know of no person in this Country by whom I can prove my services.

 

I the said William Johnson hereby relinquish every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declare that my name is not on the Pension roll of the Agency of any State. I claim for compensation for two years as a Sergeant.

 

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

 

S/ William Johnson

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of William Johnson S1226 fn12Va.

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

Captain James Franklin

1st Lieutenant Cluff Shelton,

2nd Lieutenant James Dillard

Captain James Buford

Captain Jeremiah Pate

Captain Charles Christian

Ballenger Wade

 

 

ANDREW JOHNSTON

 

Archibald Johnston: S38092 VA Line: Soldier was born 1750 or 1751 Jan 17 in Frederick Co. Va and he lived in Loudon Co. VA at enlistment and later moved to Fairfax CO. Va and also enlisted there in 1781 and in 1815 he moved to Shelby CO. KY and he applied there 1834 April 17. Pg 1861; 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JAMES JOHNSTON

 

James Johnston: S1225 BLW #34964-160-55 VA Line: Soldier was born in 1764 Culpepper CO Va and he lived there at enlistment: and he applied 1833 Aug 22 Henry Co. KY. He had lived in KY since 1792 and he applied there BLW 1855 July 15. In 1833 Jack Johnston was of Henry Co. KY and in 1855 a Reuben Johnston was a witness for Soldier. Pg 1862: 1855 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOHN JOHNSTON or JOHN JOHNSON

 

John Johnston or John Johnson: S31168: VA Line: soldier was born in 1757 Culpepper CO. Va and he lived there at enlistment applied 1832 July 31 Henry Co. KY Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

JOSEPH JOHNSTON

 

Joseph Johnston: S36654 VA Line: applied 1819 May 13 Henry Co. KY soldier died 1820 march 17. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

MARTIN JOHNSTON

 

Martin Johnston or Martin Johnson: wife Nancy: W436 Va Line: Soldier was a son of William Johnston and wife Sarah he was born 1758 Feb 1 in Va. Soldier lived in Culpepper CO Va at enlistment and soldier married there to Nancy Wright on 1779 March 1. She was born 1762 March 27. Soldier applied 1818 June 20 Clark Co. Ky and he died there 1820 July 2 and his widow applied there 1839 Nov 25.Soldier and wife had 3 children;

(1)William Johnston born 1780 Sept 11 and he married 1800 Dec 22 to Elizabeth Laurence who was born 1781 Oct 2 and in 1840 they lived in Clark Co. KY: Soldier’s widow had lived with them since 1820 and they William and Elizabeth Johnston had soldiers grandchildren towit: Matilda Johnston born 1801 Oct 2: Martin Johnston born 1803 June 2 and he married Lucy Sanders 1822 March 28: Henry Johnston born 1805 March 9: Nancy Johnston born 1806 May 29: Betsey Johnston born 1808 Feb 28, William Johnston born 1810 March 11: Frances Johnston born 1812 Feb 17:

(2) Frances “Fanny” Johnston born 1783 June 3 and she married  1802 Feb to John Johnson who was born 1774 Dec 25 and died prior to 1840

(3) George W. Johnston born 1793 July 31 and he married 1820 Sept 5 to Murtilla Murphey and in 1840 they lived in Tn.

Also shown were Laurence Johnston born 1821 Oct 7, Cornelius Spry born 1801 Jan 6: Asa S. Wright married Martilda Johnston 1819 Sept. 9: Soldiers brother George Johnston was age 84 in 1840 when he made affdt in Muary Co. Tn and it was stated in 1840 that widows brother William Wright was deceased. Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

 

State of Kentucky

 

Martin Johnston of Clark County and State aforesaid came before me James Clark one of the Circuit Judges for the State aforesaid this 20th day of June 1818 and made the following statement upon oath for the purpose of obtaining a pension under an Act of Congress entitled an act “to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval services of the United States in the Revolutionary War.” Being first sworn [he] makes the following statement: That he is at present a citizen of Clark County and State of Kentucky – that he is by birth a Virginian.

 

That he was two years a soldier in the war of the Revolution on Continental establishment. That on the 9th of February 1776 in Culpeper County Virginia he enlisted for the period of two years in Captain John Thornton's Company, Third Regiment, Virginia line in the Continental establishment. That he faithfully served the two years and was on the eighth day of January February 1778 duly and regularly discharged at the Valley Forge Pennsylvania which discharge was issued by the General Woodford which discharge he has lost or misplaced so that at this time he cannot find it.

 

He further states that he is about 61 years old and from infirmity he is incapable of labor and that by reason of his reduced circumstances in life, he is in need of sustenance from his Country for his support. The said Johnston further states that he can prove that he was a soldier as aforesaid by his Excellency James Monroe President of the United States who was part of the time Lieutenant of the company in which he belonged and was present with him at the battle of Trenton where the said Monroe was wounded.

 

S/ Martin Johnston

 

[Transcriber's Note: the above quoted text is the only direct testimony given by Johnston in support of his application that is given in the HeritageQuest file. A letter dated February 12, 1940 which purports to abstract the information in the full file indicates that subsequent to the service described above, Johnston served at the battle of King's Mountain.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Martin Johnson W436

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

Captain John Thornton's Company,

Monroe President of the United States who was part of the time Lieutenant of the company

 

 

ROBERT JOHNSTON

 

Robert Johnston or Robert Johnson: S15482 NC and SC Lines: Soldier lived near Camden SC at first enlistment and he lived in Rowan Co. NC and 2nd enlistment. In 1781 soldier had married and was living on the Catawba River in Burke Co. NC where he also enlisted and in 1783 he moved to KY. Applied 1834 March 10- Nelson Co. KY age 84. Pg 1864 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

State of Kentucky, Nelson County court

Be it remembered that upon this 10th day of March in the year 1834, personally appeared

in open court Robert Johnson aged 84 years a citizen of Nelson County Kentucky and in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress of the United States passed in the year 1832, granting pensions & further benefit of certain officers and soldiers of the Revolution and being sworn upon his oath makes the following declaration.

 

That in the year 1775, he was a citizen of South Carolina and resided near Camden. That in the fall of the year 1775, he cannot state the precise day but believes it was in the month of September and the last of the month he entered the service as a private Militia man for a tour of duty of 3 months in the company commanded by Captain Drakeford and the first Lieutenant was John Landing, our principal commander was Colonel Richardson. The troops were marched up on Reedy River and near a large Cane break on said River we took some Tories prisoners who had joined the King, these Tories were called Scofle Ites. The troops to which he was attached continued their services in different sections of the country in suppressing and dispersing the Tories for the full term of 3 months at the termination of which time this affiant was discharged

 

And he states that although he cannot remember the precise day he entered into the military service of the United States or quit it under this engagement he states positively that he served for the full period for which he entered and that was for 3 months. After this tour the affiant moved to Roan [sic, Rowan] County State of North Carolina and in the year 1776 in the fall of that year and after he had raised his crop, to wit on the first of September as near as he can recollect for he will not be positive as to the precise day, he again entered the public service as a private Militia man in the company commanded by Samuel Young our company was under the command of General Griffin Rutherford [sic, Griffith Rutherford] of said County of Rowan, the troops to which he was attached during this War was stationed upon the Catawba River and remained there some time to guard the frontier against the Indians and we were afterwards marched into the Cherokee Country against the said Cherokee Indians the troops marched as far as the Over-hill towns, we destroyed the corn and other property of the Indians in this tour and

that other places After destroying the Indian towns and property the troops returned and were discharged, this affiant returned to the County of Rowan having faithfully served upon this tour Scofolite, Scoffelites, Scopholites, Scovelites or Coffelites (Joseph Coffell): before period of 3 months as a private in the manner stated.

 

In the year 1781, he was still a resident of North Carolina, he had moved and resided on the Catawba River when he was called upon by his Country again to enter her service and he United himself under the command of Captain Walker, and was marched from his residence in Burke County in Stationed at a Fort situated above the Quaker Meadows near the Blue Ridge.

 

There were 30 men stationed at this Fort as a guard under Walker and this affiant remained in the military service of his country upon this tour for the full period of 3 months, the time for which he entered and was honorably discharged from the service on the termination of each tour but he has lost his discharge having long since lost or mislaid the same, nor has he any written evidence of his service nor does he know that he can prove the fact of his actual service by any living witness.

 

He moved to Kentucky in the fall of 1783 and has resided here ever. He is known personally to many of the citizens of Nelson County to wit the Honorable Benjamin Hardin now a member of Congress C. A. Wickliffe formerly a member of Congress, John Rowan Esquire & others and also to James and William Settles. He states that he served in all 3 tours of duty of 3 months each, and in all 9 months as a private soldier in the militia of the United States. That he is not upon the pension Roll of any State or of the United States and hereby relinquishes all claim to a pension other than the one now claim.

 

 Signed Robert Johnston

 

[Alexander Hunter, James Settle, William Settle, and Stanislaus Hayden gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

[Isaac Taylor at the clergyman, gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Researchers Notes: A name given to white Tories who dressed up like Indians when attacking patriot fortifications in the hope of deflecting their neighbors' animosity away from themselves and onto the Cherokees who constituted a constant threat to the frontier settlers prior to and throughout the period of the Revolutionary War. The name derived from Joseph Scoffel, a Tory, who was active in the loyalist cause from an early period of the war.For an excellent discussion of the "Scoffol Lights," see, Rachel N. Klein, "Frontier Planters and the American Revolution: The South Carolina Backcountry, 17751782,” in Ronald Hoffman, Thad W. Tate and Peter J. Albert, eds., An Uncivil War: The Southern Backcountry During the American Revolution, (Charlottesville: United States Capitol Historical Society by The University Press of Virginia, 1985), 37-

69.

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Robert Johnston (Johnson) S15482 fn13NC[SC]

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/30/08

 

Captain Drakeford

First Lieutenant was John Landing

Samuel Young

Captain Walker,

Benjamin Hardin

C. A. Wickliffe

John Rowan

Alexander Hunter,

James Settle,

William Settle,

Stanislaus Hayden

Isaac Taylor a clergyman,

 

ROBERT JOHNSTON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Kentucky, Barren County

 

This day Robert Johnston personally came before me Christopher Tompkins Circuit

Judge for the State & County of aforesaid & made oath That he enlisted in March 1777 as a private soldier in Captain Felix Warley's company in the 3rd Regiment of South Carolina on Continental establishment Commanded by Colonel William Thompson & that he served three years in said Regiment in the Continental line during the revolutionary war with Great Britain.

 

This affiant was discharged in March 1780 by Colonel William Henderson Lieutenant Colonel in said Regiment Colonel Thompson being absent. This affiant has been much in the habit of moving from place to place & not knowing that his discharge would be of service to him has long since lost it or mislaid it in a manner which he cannot state as he has no particular recollection on the subject but supposes his name may be found on the records of the war department of the State of South Carolina or of the United States. This affiant is now a citizen of Allen County Kentucky he has never received a pension on his country for his services. From his reduced circumstances in life stands in need of the assistance of his country for support.

 

 ` S/ Robert Johnston

 

Subscribed & sworn to before me this 28th day of June 1818

 

S/ Christopher Tompkins

 

[Col. Samuel Parker gave a supporting affidavit as to Robert Johnson [sic] being a poor man in need of support.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Robert Johnston (Johnson) S36637 fn9SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/17/08

 

Captain Felix Warley's

Col. Samuel Parker