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ABRAHAM JOHNSON

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Georgia, Wilkes County

 

 On this 9th day of April 1819, before me the Subscriber one of the Justices (or Judges of

the Inferior) Court for the County of Wilkes personally appeared Abraham Johnson of the State and County aforesaid, aged 63 years and resident in the said State and County seven years immediately preceding the date hereof who being first by me duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the late act of Congress Entitled an Act to provide for Certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war, that he the said Abraham Johnson Enlisted for the term of three years in the month of June in the year 1775 in the State of South Carolina in the Company Commanded by Captain Robert Lile [sic, Robert Lyle ?] of the Regiment Commanded by Colonel William Thompson [sic, William Thomson] in the line of the State of South Carolina

on the Continental Establishment that he continued to serve in the said Corps or in the Service of the United States until some time in the year 1778 when he was discharged from service in the State of South Carolina that he was in the battle at Stono, & at the skirmishes at Bacon's bridge, Talliposee [sic, ?] and other skirmishes during the time of his said enlistment and that he acted and performed his duty faithfully according to orders during his said Enlistment, and that he is in reduced Circumstances and stands in need of the assistance of his Country for support and that he has no other evidence now in his power of his said Services. Sworn to -- and Subscribed

before me this ninth day of April 1819

 

S/ Johnson Wellborn, JIC S/ Abraham Johnson, A his Mark

 

 Georgia, Wilkes County

 

 On this 16th day of July 1819, Before me the Subscriber one of the Judges or Justices of

the Inferior Court for the County of Wilkes personally appeared Abraham Johnson of the State and County aforesaid who after being duly sworn deposeth and saith that he this deponent was whilst he was in Enlisted (Soldier) as stated in the accompanying alphadavit [sic, affidavit] taken prisoner by the Enemies of the United States called Tories and by them carried into the City of Savannah and there detained by the British troops whilst they were in possession of Savannah on board of their prison ship and in the said City for the Time of five months and seven days as nearly as this deponent can recollect and that whilst he was a prisoner in the said City of Savannah he this deponent received a severe wound (by which) he suffered so that his life was greatly despaired of which said Imprisonment this Deponent believes was in the year 1778 and

this deponent further deposeth and verily doth believe that he this deponent was the only enlisted Soldier of the same name in Colonel Thompson's [Thomson’s?] Regiment, and this deponent further saith that as to the precise dates or the time of his Enlistment & discharged -- it may be that some small Inaccuracies may have taken place, but that the whole of this and the accompanying affidavit are substantially true as aforesaid and this deponent further states that years after his discharge from the Service of the United States, he understood that one John Cook half Brother of this deponent undertook without his Knowledge to make some exertions with the war department or authority to obtain for him a pension or some remuneration for his services & Sufferings, whilst he was in the United States Service but as yet, nothing has been received by this deponent nor does he believe that any one has for him before born Sworn to and subscribed

before me this day and date aforesaid

 

 S/ Johnson Wellborn, JIC S/ Abraham Johnson, A his Mark

 

 State of Georgia, Wilkes County: In Wilkes Superior Court, July term 1820

 

 On this 19th day of July 1820 personally appeared in open Court, being a court of record

for the said County & State aforesaid, Abraham Johnson, aged 67 years in March last, resident in this said County & State, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath declare that he served in the Revolutionary war as follows, That he was enlisted as a private in Camden district in the State of South Carolina, and the third Regiment, commanded then by Colonel William Thomson, in a company Commanded by Captain Robert Lyles, which Regiment belonged to the South Carolina line on Continental establishment. That he is now a pensioner under the act of Congress of the 18th day of March 1818. That his original declaration to obtain his pension bears date of the 15th day of June 1818 this pension Certificate is numbered 14,833.

That he served in said Regiment for three years, & for further particulars of his enlistment, service & discharged refers to his original declaration sent to & now in the War Department. Further the deponent's saith "And I do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property,

or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed” -- and I further swear & declare that I have been a shoemaker by trade, but am now too old & feeble to follow my trade so as to make it a means of support. That I live in a house rented of Christopher Rinder [?], have a wife & one child, a daughter, named Frances aged 15, residing with me, my wife is 55 years old -- All which

circumstances I submit to the war department.

 

Sworn to & Declared on the 19th July 1820 before

 

S/ Jno. M. Dooly, JIC S/ Abraham Johnson, A his mark

 

 Schedule annexed to the foregoing declaration

 

 3 dozen avil[?] blades

 

 1 gross shoe tacks

 

 3 shoe Knives

 

 1 pr punchers [?] & sones shoe making lasts

 

 1 shoe making bench

 

 I swear & declared that the foregoing contains all that I own, real or personal [several

indecipherable words], my necessary bedding & clothing only excepted.

 

 S/ Abraham Johnson, A his mark

 

 

 

[facts in file: veteran died December 26, 1826; son, Tyre Johnson was living as of 1854.]

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Abraham Johnson S38099 fn18SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

John Cook half Brother

Christopher Rinder [?],

 

BENJAMIN JOHNSON

 

Benjamin Johnson wife Elizabeth Price former widow: W27761: MD Line: Soldier applied 1834 May 19 in Fayette Co. Va age 76 on March 25 1834.  Soldier mentioned a brother living in Charles Co. MD who later moved to Ga. Soldier lived in Charles CO. MD at enlistment widow applied 1866 Oct 16 Fayette Co. Va age 63 a resident of Kanawha Co. Va but formerly of Fayette Co. Va soldier married Elizabeth McGraw 1829 Aug 7 in Kanawah CO. Va  and soldier died 1834 July 15 in Fayette Co Va. Widow married 2nd on 1836 April 26 James Price in Fayette Co Va and he in 1859 in IN. Pg 1842 Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

State of Virginia, Kanawha County to wit

 

On this 13th day of August 1833. personally appeared in open court, before the justices of the County Court of said County, now setting, Benjamin Johnson, a resident of said County in the state aforesaid, aged seventy seven years and two months who being first duly sworn, according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and

served as herein after stated – The first service which the applicant performed was in collecting cattle jointly with one George Richardson, for the use of the soldiers and guards then stationed at New London, in the County of Campbell [sic: formed from Bedford in 1782] Virginia, under the command he thinks of Captain Holt. He was at this time a resident of the adjoining county of Bedford, and was detached and appointed to this service by Capt. Christopher Ervine, who had charge of the provisions and supplies for the magazine & barracks at New London. the applicant served in this capacity for two summers, those of the years 1779. and 1780. during which time he was constantly employed from about the 1st of June untill late in the fall of each of those years, serving about four & half, or five months during each of said years, and using his own horse all that time  In February 1781 the said applicant entered the service as a volunteer in a rifle company commanded by Capt Boen [sic: Bowen] Price of New London, and was attatched to a regiment of Rifle men commanded by Col. Charles Lynch of Campbell County, and Major John Callaway of the same county. about the same time Colo. [William] Campbell marched a regiment of Riflemen from the counties of Bottentout [sic: Botetourt] and Rockbridge. Each regiment was intended for service in the south, and were marched immediately on their completion to join the southern army commanded by Gen’l. Green [sic: Nathanael Greene]. on their arrival near Guilford N. C. the regiment to which the applicant belonged was attached to Col. Wm. Washingtons troop of horse. He was with his regiment in the battle of Guilford Courthouse on the 15th of March 1781. his regiment with Washington’s horse was stationed on the right wing and Colo. Campbell’s regiment, with [Col. Henry] Lee’s horse, occupied the left. The battle was brought on early in the morning by Washingtons troops who advanced upon the enemies line, supported by the regiment to which the applicant belonged, and by about two hundred regulars of the infantry During the action, the applicant and his regiment was in the brunt[?] of the engagement. The British returned the fire and the American forces were under the necessity of retiring[?] from the conflict, an event which this applicant attributes to the flight of about two thousand of the N. Carolina Militia, at the onset, who had been [illegible word] to occupy the center of the line. After losing the field, the American troops were marched about 18 miles to the “[Troublesome] Iron

Works”, where they remained about two days, recruiting. They then pursued the British army to [Ramsey’s Mill in Chatham County on] “Deep River” the rear guard of their army being in sight on the opposite Bank when the American army arrived. The applicant and his Regiment remained at Deep River two days, where the same was disbanded, and the soldiers discharged.  This applicant was in this service seven weeks and two days, during all which time he was a private, and for the most part engaged in some marches occupying much of the night as well as day. After his return from Deep River, this applicant remained at home in the County of Bedford, untill the latter part of the month of September of that year, when he was drafted into a company commanded by Capt. Edmund Tate, designed[?] to unite with the American forces to repel the invasion of Cornwallis. He was marched with his company forty miles to Falling River in the County of Campbell, where other companies had collected; and where it was intended to form a Regiment. He and his company remained at Falling River two days, when intelligence arrived of the surrender of Cornwallis and his Army at York Town [on 19 Oct 1781]. The companies were then discharged and returned home.

The applicant when discharged at Deep River, was furnished with a written discharge, which has been lost. upon the other two occassions he had no discharge in writing. He has not other documentary evidence of his services, and he knows of no one in this quarter by whom he could prove his said services.

 

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year first aforesaid in open Court

[signed] Benj. Johnson

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension Application of Benjamin Johnson: R5674

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris

 

HARDY JOHNSON

 

Hardy Johnson S16428 NC Line: Soldier was born in 1757 or 1758 in Cumberland Co. NC and he lived in Wake Co. NC at enlistment and shortly after his service he moved to Ga, applied 1823 April 24 Houston Co. Ga. PG 1845 Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 State of Georgia, County of Houston

 

 On this 24th day of April in the year of our Lord 1833 personally appeared in open Court

before the Honorable Christopher B. Strong Judge of the Superior Court in and for the County aforesaid, now sitting, Hardy Johnson a resident and Citizen of the said State and County, aged in and about 75 years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

 

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named Officers, and served as herein stated, to wit, in Wake County in the State of North Carolina, the day and month not recollected, but he thinks about 2 months previous to the Battle of Guilford Court House in said State of North Carolina, this deponent was drafted to serve a 3 months Tour & was mustered in the Company commanded by Captain Thomas Philips, at Raleigh in said County of Wake & proceeded thence to Guilford Court House where the said Company to which the deponent belonged was assigned to the Command of Captain Edward Gwinn who as deponent is informed had been a Captain in the Continental line of North Carolina -- Said Company was attached to the Regiment Commanded by Colonel Taylor (His Christian name not recollected if ever known

by deponent) of the Militia under the Command of General Butler –

 

The Deponent was in the Battle, at Guilford Court House before named, and during the engagement, Colonel Taylor was immediately in the rear of this Deponent, encouraging & urging the Soldiers to fight bravely, which they did do, General Greene on that occasion conducted the operations of the American forces, but more immediately Commanded the Regular Troops -- The deponent recollects General Greene, he was of larger stature then common and his countenance was rather pleasing than otherwise and indicated mildness of temper and disposition. The deponent saw him a few days before said Battle when his passions were very much excited in consequence of one of the Soldiers improperly discharging his musket whereby one of the men was killed, -- on that occasion he acted with a sternness and decision, and seeming determination to punish exemplarily the offender, until he ascertained it was accidental merely.

 

In the early part of the succeeding fall, & after the deponent had accomplished and was discharged from the before mentioned tour, the deponent was again drafted and mustered into service at Raleigh in the said County of Wake North Carolina under the Command of Captain Robert High, and was attached to a Regiment commanded by Colonel Moore and the before named General Butler was the General in Command -- the said Company proceeded towards Wilmington North Carolina & remained in the neighborhood of that City until it was evacuated by the enemy -- The last mentioned Service was a 3 months tour –

 

The deponent served 2 tours of 3 months each as before mentioned & received regular discharges for the same, -- which discharges have long since been destroyed & cannot be produced by this deponent –

 

The deponent contributed the sum of $90 in employing two substitutes to serve in the Army of the United States for 2 years & 6 months and was thereby exempted from a draft to himself -- This was some 3 years or about that length of time before the Battle of Guilford Court House -- The circumstances of the aforesaid contribution were these, it was proposed by the then Military Authorities that every 12th man who would employ one Substitute would be exempt from Draft for the space of time for which such Substitute might be employed, and the deponent & others employed substitutes as

before named and each paid the sum of $90 for the services of the 2 substitutes.

 

The deponent was born in Cumberland County State of North Carolina, about the year 1757 or ‘58, according to the statements of his Parents -- The deponent has no recollection that any record was ever kept of his age -- The deponent during the Revolutionary War was a citizen of & resident within (except while in service as before stated) Wake County in the State of North Carolina -- Shortly after the Conclusion of said War the deponent removed to the State of Georgia in which he has

resided ever since -- The deponent did serve as herein before stated, but has no evidence of his said Service that he can procure at this time his said discharges having been long since destroyed

 

-- The deponent was not with soldiers of the Continental line excepting at the Battle of Guilford Court House, & he has forgotten the names of the Regular officers whom he then saw excepting that of General Greene --

 

The deponent is acquainted with Isaac Norris, Benjamin Webb, James Dixon, and others his neighbors who can testify as to the deponent's character for veracity &

their belief of his services as before stated -- The deponent hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension Roll of the agency of any State, or (if any) only on that of the agency of the State of Georgia.

 

 Sworn to & subscribed in open Court the day and year first aforesaid.

 

S/ C. B. Strong, O. Judge S/ Hardy Johnson, X his mark

 

 [Isaac Norris, a clergyman, and Reuben Runnells gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 State of Georgia, Houston County

 

 On this 24th day of August in the year of our Lord 1833, personally appeared before me

James Holderness a Justice of the Peace in & for the said County, Hardy Johnson the Declarant named in the foregoing Declaration, who being duly sworn deposes and says (By way of amendment to the said foregoing Declaration). The first 3 months tour of service served by the deponent has stated in the said Declaration, was about that period of the Revolutionary War in which the battle of Guilford Court House was fought. The deponent was in said Battle, and has detailed in said Declaration the circumstances of his said first tour of 3 months service –

 

That the 2nd and last tour of 3 months service served by deponent was about that period of the said Revolutionary War in which Lord Cornwallis surrendered to General Washington at the Siege of Yorktown in Virginia -- the deponent was in Camps when information arrived of the said Surrender, near Wilmington North Carolina -- The British forces about the same time evacuated Wilmington –

 

The deponent knows of no person living and can find no person that he knows of,

by whom he can prove the facts stated in said Declaration or in this amendment thereof -- During the last Tour that deponent served Colonel __ Moore commanded the Regiment to which deponent belonged, -- the names of the other officers under whom deponent served are contained in said Declaration –

 

And in answer to the Interrogatories annexed to the instructions

accompanying the Brief submitted to this deponent by J.L. Edwards Esquire Commissioner of Pensions, this deponent answers & says

 

1. That he was born in the County of Cumberland and State of North Carolina about the year 1758, as he has been informed by his parents –

 

2. He does not know that any record of his age was ever kept by his parents, -- he thinks not.

 

3. At the time Deponent was called into service he resided in Wake County in the State North Carolina, -- And that shortly after the expiration of his 2nd Tour of service, about 51 years ago he removed from Wake County North Carolina where he then lived to Burke County in the State of Georgia, -- he resided in Burke County several years & then removed to Emanuel County in the said State of Georgia where he resided between 30 & 40 years, and then he removed to the said County of Houston Georgia where he now lives.

 

4. That he was drafted both tours

 

5. That he has stated the name of General Greene as the only Continental officer whom he knew by sight & whose name he at this time remembers -- The Circumstances of his service are detailed in the Declaration of which this is amendatory

 

6. That he received regular Discharges, but they are lost or destroyed. –

 

7. That he has already stated in said Declaration the names of persons acquainted with him.

 

 Personally sworn to & subscribed before me this 24th day of August A.D. 1833

 

S/ James Holderness, JP S/ Hardy Johnson, X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Hardy Johnson S16428 fn20NC

 

Transcribed by Will Graves 10/20/08

 

Isaac Norris,

Benjamin Webb,

James Dixon

 

JONATHAN JOHNSON

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 Georgia, Gwinnett County: Inferior Court adjourned Term October 5th, 1832

 

 Personally appeared in open Court (it being a Court of record) now sitting Jonathan

Johnson Senior a resident of said County of Gwinnett & State of Georgia aged 72 years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to avail himself of the benefits of the late act of Congress passed the 7th June 1832

 

 That he entered the Service of the United States under the following named officers and

Served as herein Stated (To wit) --

 

That he entered the service at 16 years of age in the latter part of the year 1777 as a

militia soldier under Captain Lushington [Richard Lushington] Lieutenants Jacob Reid –Obryan [O’Bryan?] & Cole -- at Charleston in the State of South Carolina -- attached to the Major John Badley’s [probably John Baddeley’s] division of General William Moultrie’s Army -- that he did Garrison duty in Charleston aforesaid until sometime in January 1778 -- when we were ordered out to Sheldon Bull under the officers aforesaid -- in Company with the light Infantry of Charleston -- and took post at Hatcher’s [?] old fields -- at the ferry on the road leading to Port Royal -- from thence marched to Port Royal & took possession of the Town on the sixth of February 1778 [sic, 1779]. On the same day left Port Royal and met the enemy at the 5 mile House -- and had an engagement at which General Moultrie commanded together with Major

Kenlaw [Francis Kinlock?] -- and Major John Lawrence [sic, John Laurens?] with other officers under his command -- Thence we returned to Camps at Hatcher's [?] old fields, aforesaid -- and remained there without doing any other active duty until the Term of our service expired when we returned home to Charleston -- and remained employed in Garrison duty in the City -- during the above expedition he served as Corporal -- after returning to Charleston he joined the German Fusiliers commanded by Captain Shepherd -- volunteers of the first Regiment -- commanded by Colonel Morris Simmons [sic, Maurice Simons?] Major Badley -- Lieutenant Colonel Smith &c -- On the Sunday ensuing before the battle of Stono left Charleston for James Island -- took possession of the same -- attempted to attack the enemy in the rear -- who were in possession of

John's Island -- but failed on account of a storm -- this above expedition was commanded by General Moultrie – after some days returned to Charleston and about the first of September in the year 1779 -- embarked for Savannah in the State of Georgia under the command of the above named officers on board 3 privateers -- landed at Cumbee ferry on Cumbee [Combahee] River -- and marched on foot from thence to Savannah -- was there at the Siege of the same and until the defeat of the US forces by the British at that place -- After the above defeat returned to Charleston on foot -- and again did Garrison duty -- and was engaged in the same and in defending the City while under Siege by the British until the surrender of the same sometime in May 1780 -- was taken prisoner at the surrender of the City -- & remained a prisoner of war in Charleston about one year as he believes when he was exchanged and set at liberty -- that his Term of actual Service continued more than two years & was a prisoner about one year -- that he acted as Sergeant -- after Joining the Fusiliers as above until taken prisoner at the surrender of

Charleston --

 

That he has no documentary evidence at hand whereby he can prove either his Services

or his birth -- that after he was exchanged he went to his uncle's plantation on Santee thence after the declaration of peace he returned to Charleston and lived with his father there -- two or three years -- removed to Lawrence [sic, Laurens] County in the State of South Carolina & remained -- remained there about 41 years -- He then as he believes in the year 1826 -- removed to Gwinnett County in this State of Georgia -- where he now resides

 

 He hereby relinquishes all claim whatever to any pension or annuity except the present

and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State.

 

Sworn to & subscribed in open Court the day & year aforesaid

 

Attest: S/ Wm Maltbie, Clk S/ Jonan Johnson

 

[John Lawrence and Clifford Woodroof gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

 Georgia, Gwinnett County

 

 Personally came before me the undersigned, a Justice of the Peace in & for said County --Jonathan Johnson Senior and being duly sworn deposeth and saith that by reason of old age and the consequent loss of memory -- he cannot swear positively as to the precise length of his Service -- but according to the best of his recollection he served not less than the periods mentioned below – and in the following grades -- For three months I served as a private militia soldier -- for three months I served as a Corporal in that Division of the United States Army under the command of General William Moultrie -- This was in the latter part of the year 1777 & first part of 1778. I then in June 1779 Joined a volunteer Company styled the German Fusiliers -- served in said Company in the Capacity of a private soldier for some short time perhaps one month -- was then promoted to the rank of Sergeant and served as such Sergeant in said volunteer Company 10 months -- was then taken prisoner at the Surrender of Charleston and

remained a prisoner of war Fort about one year -- making in all 17 months in which he was in actual service in about one year he was a prisoner.

 

Deponent further states that his reasons for not having produced the Certificate of a clergyman as required by the War Department are as follows -- He was raised up & educated in the faith and worship of the Church of England there being no denomination professing the tenets of the above named Church He did not think proper to attach themselves to any denomination of Christians -- in this County or State -- and that together with his age & infirmities prevented him from becoming acquainted with any Clergyman of his neighborhood.

 

 To the first question prescribed by the War Department He answers -- I was born

according to the best of my information on the 26th day of October 1761.

 

 To the sixth Question he answers that in consequence of his having been taken prisoner

as before stated -- he received no regular discharge having done no more service after having been exchanged as aforesaid -- He never received a commission -- having been a non-commissioned officer –

 

To the seventh Interrogatory he answers -- That John Lawrence & Clifford Woodroof

who have certified -- and divers others of his neighbors & acquaintances can testify as to his character for veracity and their belief of his having served as he has stated. And for all of such foregoing stated services I claim a pension.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 23rd day of April 1833

 

S/ John Mills, JP S/ Jonan Johnson

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Jonathan Johnson S31779 fn12SC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 11/18/08

 

Captain Lushington [Richard Lushington]

Lieutenants Jacob Reid –

Lieutenant Obryan [O’Bryan?]

Lieutenant Cole

 

 

JOSEPH JOHNSON

 

Joseph Johnson S7093 NC Line: Soldier applied 1818 May 9 in Chatham Co. NC age 63, soldier married Mary Cummings in 1801 both were of Chatham NC ( she was his 2nd wife, 1st not named) soldier died 1841 may 23 in Troup Co. Ga. Having moved there in 1839: Widow died 1841 Sept 27, In 1820 soldier reffered to children: Hannah Johnson 17, Joseph Johnson 15: Caswell Johnson 12, Daniel Johnson 1o, Morgan Johnson 6 or 7L Jackson Johnson 4, and Jasper aged 2: IN 1843 surviving children were Hannah widow of Arris Sorrell, Joseph Johnson, Daniel Johnson, Morgan Johnson, Andrew I. or J. Johnson, Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original on footnote.com and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

 District of North Carolina

 

 On this 9th day of May 1818, before the Subscriber, one of the Judges of the United

States for the District aforesaid personally appeared Joseph Johnson, age 63 years, resident in Chatham County in the said District, who being by me first duly sworn, according to law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the provision made by the late act of Congress, entitled "An Act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land & naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war:" That he the said Joseph Johnson, in the year 1776, obtained a commission of Ensign, in the State of North Carolina, in a company commanded by Captain Matthew Ramsay of the 9th Regiment, of the North Carolina line, on the Continental

establishment, in the war of the Revolution; that he continued to serve under said commission for some months, when, in the year 1777, he received a commission of Lieutenant, under the same Captain, and served as such, and the said service of the United States, in said Regiment & in the 6th Regiment, to which he was transferred, until the end of the war, when his service ended of course, in the State of North Carolina -- that he was in the battles of Gates defeat, Stono, & Guilford, and that he is in reduced circumstances, & stands in need of the assistance of his country for support -- and that he has no other evidence now in his power, of his said services, except the papers now exhibited.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me, the day & year aforesaid. S/ J. Johnson

 

S/ H. Potter, DJUSNC

 

 State of North Carolina, Chatham County: Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions begun & held on Monday, 14 August 1820

 

 On this day of August 14, 1820 personally appeared in open Court being a Court of

record for the County and State aforesaid Joseph Johnson aged about 66 years resident in the County of Chatham and State of North Carolina who being first duly sworn upon the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God according to law, doth on his oath declare that he served in the Revolutionary War that the said Joseph Johnston was appointed an Ensign in the year 1776 in the Company commanded by Captain Matthew Ramsey in the Regiment commanded by Colonel John Williams in the Line of the State of North Carolina in the Continental establishment; that he continued to Serve in said Corps until about the year 1778; and the said Joseph Johnson still continued to serve in the Continental Army of the United States under the said Captain Matthew Ramsey & commanded as well as I can remember by Colonel Thomas Armstrong until the peace

between this Country & Great Britain in 1781 at which time the said Joseph Johnson was held as a prisoner in Wilmington North Carolina. That he was engaged in the Battles of Stono, Cambden [sic, Camden], in Guilford besides many other skirmishes with the Enemy and that he has no further evidence of his services save that which was exhibited before his Palmer Henry Potter at Raleigh Judge of the District Court North Carolina in the year 1818 and thence returned to the War Department at Washington City on which a pension was granted to the said Joseph Johnson commencing with the date of the aforesaid declaration before his honor Judge Potter and that he has regularly received his pension down to the 4th of March last 1820 commencing as well as I

can State about May 1818.

 

And I the said Joseph Johnson do solemnly swear that I was a resident Citizen of the

United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by gift, sale or other wise disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provision of an act of Congress entitled “an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the revolutionary war” passed on the 18th day of March 1818, and that I have not nor has any person in trust for me any property, or securities, contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed--

 

Here follows a List of my property, I owned no real estate to wit of personal one small heifer; a small Hogs; 3 grown Hogs; 5 small pigs, one pine chest, one pine Table; 3 old chairs; one Pot, one Dutch oven; some small articles of pewter & earthen Ware about the value of $5, one weeding hoe, one grubbing hoe, 2 old plow hoes, I have been in the habit of cultivating the Earth; but have been for some years unable to pursue it; That for some 2 or 3 years I have been in the habit of earning as far as I was able for my support the business of shoemaking; but now from a loss of my eyesight am unable to do but very little at that business –

I have a wife aged about 45 years,

a daughter Hannah aged about 17 years;

a son Joseph aged about 15 years,

a son Caswell aged about 12,

Daniel about 10 years,

Morgan about 7 or 6 years,

Jackson about 4,

Jasper about 2 years old –

I have a charitable neighbor who allows me to live on a small piece of Land –

 

 S/ Joseph Johnson

 

 Sworn to and declared on the 14th day of August 1820 before

 

 S/ N. Stedman

 

 S/ Thomas Parish

 

 S/ Thos. Clegg

 

 

State of North Carolina Secretary's Office 25th of December 1818

 

I do hereby Certify that it appears from the muster roll of the North Carolina Continental line that Joseph Johnston a Lieutenant was in the service of the United States on the 28th of November 1776 and served until the 15th of May 1782 in the 9th Regiment in Captain Ramsey's Company.

 

Given under my hand the date above

 

 S/ Wm Hill, Secretary of State

 

 [On November 15, 1843, Hannah Sorrell, 41, daughter of Joseph Johnson, filed in Chatham County filed seeking the ‘more liberal’ pension due her father under the 1832 Act versus the 1818 Act under which he was pensioned. She states she has heard her father speak of serving under Capt. Ramsey, Col. Williams, Genl. Caswell, Genl. Gates & others. She files on behalf of herself and all the surviving children of Joseph Johnson, to wit:

herself,

Joseph,

Daniel,

Morgan,

Andrew J., and

Benjamin J. Johnson, all of lawful age;

she states that her father married a ‘second time’ to their mother, Mary Cumming, in 1801; that Mary died in 1841; the court found that Lieutenant Joseph Johnson was pensioned under the 1818 act; that he settle in Troupe County, Ga., in 1839 and died there May 23rd 1841.] Georgia, Muscogee County

 

 Personally came before me Daniel Higdon who being duly sworn deposeth and saith that Lieutenant Joseph Johnston volunteered in the revolutionary war in the year 1774 or 5 and continued until the end of the war and the witness further deposeth and saith that the said Lieutenant Joseph Johnston was married in the year 1801 or thereabouts to Mary Cummings both of Chatham County North Carolina and continued there until the said Joseph Johnston removed to Georgia I saw him in Troupe County Georgia in 1839.

Sworn to and subscribed before me in office this August 18, 1843.

 

S/ Daniel Higdon, X his mark

[facts in file: Mary the widow died September 27, 1841; Hannah Johnson, daughter of the

veteran, married Arris Sorrell.]

 

1 Daniel Higdon W25769

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Joseph Johnson S7093 fn44NC

 

 Transcribed by Will Graves 10/23/08

 

Captain Matthew Ramsay of the 9th Regiment

Hannah Sorrell, 41,

Arris Sorrell

Daniel Higdon,

Mary Cummings married 1801

daughter Hannah Johnson aged about 17 years; born ABT 1803

son Joseph Johnson aged about 15 years, born  abt 1805

son Caswell Johnson aged about 12, born abt 1808

son Daniel Johnson about 10 years, born abt 1810

son Morgan Johnson about 7 or 6 years, born abt 1814

son Jackson Johnson about 4,  born abt 1816

son Jasper Johnson about 2 born years old abt 1818

son Andrew J. Johnson,

 son Benjamin J. Johnson

 

 

JOSEPH PAYNE JOHNSON

 

Joseph Payne Johnson S38095 VA Line: applied 1818 Wilkes Co.Ga aged 70 on 1817 June 4, in Soldier stated he only had a wife in his family (she is not named) Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

WILLIAM JOHNSON

 

 

Pension application of William Johnson S10918 fn78SC

 

[Methodology: Spelling, punctuation and grammar have been corrected in some instances for ease of reading and to facilitate searches of the database. Also, the handwriting of the original scribes often lends itself to varying interpretations. Users of this database are urged to view the original and to make their own decision as to how to decipher what the original scribe actually wrote. Blanks appearing in the transcripts reflect blanks in the original.]

 

Territory of Florida, Western District, Escambia County

On this sixth day of July A.D. 1841 personally appeared in open court before me Dillon

Jordan, Judge of the Superior Court aforesaid District, William Johnson, a resident of Escambia County in the District aforesaid aged 83 years and nine months who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.

 

That in the spring of the year 1778 he volunteered in Edgefield District in the State of

South Carolina, under Captain William Butler (afterwards General William Butler) They joined and served with a Regiment commanded by Leroy Hammond, in the whole was under the command of General Pickens; their operations were principally against the British and Tories; He was in the Battle of the Eutaw Springs under Captain Box [Lewis Box] under whom he served about four months and then returned to Edgefield District and resumed his services under Captain Butler and was soon after in the battle of Turner's defeat, at which the father of Captain Butler was killed him to be in he served as a volunteer three years and eight months, and was afterwards drafted and served under a draft three months. The principal service under the draft was in guarding the Jail at Ninety Six in which the Tories were confined; He never had any formal discharge.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present,

and he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in any State.

Sworn to and subscribed in open Court the day & year aforesaid.

S/ Wm Washington, Deputy Clerk S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

 

1 FPA W20803

 

2 September 8, 1781. http://gaz.jrshelby.com/eutaw.htm

 

3 This engagement is usually referred to as the skirmish at Cloud’s Creek and is thought to have occurred on November 17, 1781. The engagement was between Capt. Sterling Turner and Major William Cunningham.

http://gaz.jrshelby.com/cloudscreek.htm 

4 Both Capt. James Butler, Sr. and his son, Capt. James Butler, Jr., are believed to have been killed by William Cunningham’s forces at Cloud’s Creek. This

5 Probably William Hudgins, FPA R5322

 

William Hudgins being sworn says he is 97 years old since the 17th of March last That

he served in the revolutionary war under General Butler that he knew William Johnson now present and who makes the foregoing declaration in the service at the same time or a part of it. That he knows particularly that said Johnson served one tour of five months as the deponent was in the habit of seeing him continually during that time.

Sworn to and Subscribed before me. S/ William Hudgins

S/ William Jordan

[Joseph Bell and Richard Laremore [?] gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

 

Interrogatories propounded by the Court to the Declarant William Johnson

 

1st Where and in what year were you born?

2nd Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?

3rd Where were you living when called into service: where have you lived since the

Revolutionary War and where do you now live?

4th How were you called into service; were you drafted; did you volunteer or were you a

substitute, and if in substitute, for whom?

5th State the names of some of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served, such Continental and militia regiments as you can recollect and the general circumstances of your service.

6th Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and if so, by whom was it given and what has become of it?

7th State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood and who can testify as to your character for veracity and their belief in your services as a soldier in the revolution.

 

 To the interrogatories propounded by the Court the applicant answers –

 

 1st I was born on "Tar" River in the State of North Carolina in the year 1757.

 

 2nd There was a Record of my age, but I do not now know where it is.

 

 3rd South Carolina in Edgefield District. I lived in the Counties of Burke, Emanuel,

Bryant and Liberty in the State of Georgia, and now live in the County of Escambia Territory of Florida.

 

 4th I volunteered -- except for three months when I was drafted to guard 96 jail in South

Carolina.

 

 5th General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] of the regular Army. I volunteered under

Captain William Butler, who was afterwards promoted to General. Commenced services at Augusta, Georgia, marched through different Sections of South Carolina under Captain Butler. I was at the Battle of the Eutaw Springs under the command of Lewis Box. I returned to General Sumter's Army at Orangeburg where I remained four or five months. Afterwards I left Sumter's Army and went to Butler's. I was afterwards at the battle of Turner's defeat, where General Butler's father was killed, and this applicant and one Benjamin Hughes were the only two survivors out of 31 men, the others having been killed in that Battle. After which I continued in the Partisan war pursuing and taking Tories and putting them in 96 jail, and Pickens Blockhouse and at Waters’ block-house until the end of the war.

 

 6th No

 

 7th Benjamin Jernigan, James R. Riley, Allen Blaylock, Richard Larimer, and Joseph Bell.

 

I do hereby certify that the foregoing answers were given upon oath by William Johnson (the applicant) to the interrogatories herewith filed.

 

S/ William Jordan, Judge of the United States for the District of

West Florida

 

[facts in file: in 1848, veteran was living in Perry County, Alabama; refers to having 4 children, one a daughter with whom he lived, she being a widow—no names given for any children; veteran’s father-in-law was Moses Prestcott [sic, Prescott? or Prescoat?], though his wife is not named in the file.]

 

[fn p. 21 affidavit given by the Rev. Ephraim Prescoat, resident of Coffee County, Alabama, that he knew William Johnson during the Revolution; that Johnson served under Capt. William Butler; that he, Prescoat, stayed at Johnson’s house in Edgefield County, SC, during the time Johnson was in the service.]

[fn p. 35]

 

Territory of Florida, Santa Rosa County: In the County Court September Term 1843

 

 I William Johnson an applicant for a pension as a revolutionary soldier being desirous of

furnishings some additional proof of my services and deeming it to be a matter of some

importance to state the names of some of the persons with whom I served in the revolutionary hereby make oath that while I was in the Company of Captain William Butler the following named persons served with me as privates Viz. John Curley, Sherrod Curley, Miallard [?] Smith, John Blann [?], Buddy Escridge, Samuel Etheridge.

 

I was [in] Orangeburg District under Captain Box about seven or eight months having previously served under Captain Butler from about 15 days after he received his commission until I entered Captain Box's Company. At the end of said service with Captain Box I again entered Captain Butler's Company & remained in it until the close of the about three months before the close of the war Captain Butler sent me to Ninety Six to guard some Tories I remained there until Colonel McCoy and Captain Simmons Command took away the last of the Tories and they then told me I could go home I then left for home and as Captain Butler who was my Captain was not present I did not get my discharge.

Sworn to and Subscribed before me

S/ D. J. McArthur, Clerk S/ William Johnson, X his mark

[fn p. 45]

State of Alabama, Perry County

 

6 Bobby Moss lists a Burnett (Buddied) Eskridge who served under Capt. Sterling Turner and was killed at Cloud’s Creek

 

 Be it remembered that William Johnson the undersigned who is a citizen of said County

& State & who now claims and applies for a pension from the United States according to the laws thereof as a soldier of the Revolutionary war personally came this sixth day of July 1848 before me Henry C. Lea an acting Justice of the Peace in & for the County & State aforesaid, who after being duly sworn deposes & states as follows that on the 16th day of October next he will be 91 years of age, he states absolutely, on oath, that he was a soldier of & for the Colonies or States during a large portion of the Revolutionary war.

 

That he did enlist -- with some 12 or 15 others of the company he had previously been with, in South Carolina, in the fall of 1780 or spring of 1781 or, rather volunteer, under General Greene at the place called 96 or 96 miles from Charleston & that he did without a doubt serve nine months under him the time for which he entered the service, he did receive a regular discharge at the end of his time in writing -- But swears positively that he has lost it & does not know when or where.

 

He states positively that he was in the Battle of Eutaw Springs under General Greene (it is impossible, he states, for him to recollect positively all the subaltern officers) and the name of General Greene was that most often & almost entirely repeated over & over among the troops when he had previously been, on account of the word & great expection [expectation] from, what had been heard, that General Greene was coming to command in the South & all of us that went volunteers or otherwise to meet & go under him thought of him or his commanding almost entirely: to the best of my recollection at the time we were received & mustered into Greene's Army at 96 I was placed under a Captain Johnson (a man of my own name) I recollect a Colonel Washington & I think that he was there but I cannot say that I was in his Regiment I can only swear that I recollect his name as if he were there & can mention others inferior in command but will not undertake to swear now as to their exact posts or places --I have seen Colonel Morgan or did before the Eutaw battle as he passed through near Edgefield but he was not at Eutaw that I recollect now. General Marion joined General Greene between the Santee River & Eutaw & is of the belief he was with General Greene I often saw General Marion & his men but I was not under him he was mostly lower down the Country then we were.

 

I state positively that at about the age of 20 or a little upwards I commenced my first

active service as a constant soldier I had been mustered before & held liable, but in 1777 a man named Butler (William Butler, if I am not too forgetful) lived in our neighborhood who was active & brave to command & was prevailed on to take a command of Captain & at his instance, & by our agreement to act as minute men, 17 of us of greed, at one time, to join a company under his command, if he should be elected & commissioned as Captain, which company soon increased to a larger number from 65 to 80 & he was regularly, by the law, elected & commissioned as Captain & we agreed to act as minute men; we selected a place of common & uniform rendezvous: a place called Mount hilling in our District of Edgefield; there we were to be instantly always, either for drills or on alarm from the Tories or British, ready for quick marches in any direction we should be ordered –

 

We fought & skirmished from that point to the distance of sometimes 60 miles around -- We had some times to take refuge into General Sumter's command when we were like to be overpowered; we were frequently in General Sumter's Camp I have seen him & his men often -- Colonel Branham [sic, Thomas Brandon] of Fairforest on Tyger River was a great soldier; our Captain frequently had us under the immediate command of Brandon & so we were marched concentrated with other forces at different times & places in the State of South Carolina during several years, say three or four years: But I cannot, for my life, state now precisely the regular train of orders & changes made with us & about us; But one thing I do know & swear positively to; that is; that I served faithfully & hard & honestly for & during the time of six years either in actual marches, or battles, or liable at every instant of time, to military duty if I never get anything for it: & this is the last application I ever expect or intend to make -- I can state a thousand little occurrences during the war to show anyone of any sense that I was in the war faithfully, as I state but I fear I cannot comply with all the law requires, for I do not know, myself, what it requires, nor do I believe anybody else does near me & I am too old to make many more trials to learn. I will state that I was at the remarkable occurrence which gave the name of murder ground to a place near the line between Edgefield & Orangeburg districts in South Carolina -- we were & had been in pursuit of a Tory commander named Cunningham [William “Bloody Bill” Cunningham] Captain Butler divided his company into two divisions some 35 or 40 in each to take different directions so as to scout the country & to act & meet as was then ordered & agreed upon -- Captain Butler took command of one half & a man named Turner was chosen by a majority to take command of the other; some of the men however believed Turner to be cowardly & it was a fact. But the Father of Captain Butler was a member of his Company & it was arranged so that the Captain's Father was to go in Turner's division & in order that there might be safety & good reliance, as well as satisfaction with Turner & his particular supporters & friends it was agreed that if there should any engagement take place the Father of Captain Butler might act in the emergency as Captain & thus all went satisfied -- while those of us under Turner had stopped to breakfast at the house, the most of the command were at or in a house; myself & a man named Benjamin Hughs were feeding our horses at some distance & Cunningham's command rushed in upon & around the house & by a very quick work, with the loss of some seven or eight men, every one of our men with Turner & Butler the Father were killed & myself & Hughs escaped only by accidentally being off feeding our horses & lay in the woods several days before we got to our main company again -- I could state numerous occurrences favorable & unfavorable during the long service in which I was engaged -- If I do not greatly forget the regular place for Captain Butler's company was in a Colonel Hammond’s command I know he was commanded by him & both Butler & Hammond by General Pickens -- But military dispositions & regulations were not then just as they are or would be now -- when there were such men as Butler; great latitude was given them to go on their own hook was allowed; but always subject to be called & ordered in & about, on emergencies or when the enemy were in large bodies.

 

 Now I state on oath that having served constantly some four or five years as above mostly across up & down through the middle portions of South Carolina I did then as before stated in the fall of 1780 or spring 81 volunteered & go & join General Greene as soon as we heard he was in the South & we could join him; & did serve faithfully under him nine months; Joined him at 96 & was actually engaged in the hard fought shocking battle at Eutaw Springs -- I received no wounds which leaves a mark except that besides my cloths have been cut with balls often a musket ball passed between the top of one of my ears and my head at the Eutaw Springs; but unfortunately (now I suppose) it does not leave any distinct scar though I was stunned by it -- It was not a great while after the Battle of Eutaw Springs I got my discharge from further service under General Greene but what the name of the officer was that signed it or gave it to me I will not undertake to state for I confess I cannot recollect. But after the Battle at the Springs I was with the command who was ordered to guard the Tories & others who were sent to 96. The exact

length of time I remained there I cannot tell but not perhaps more than a month or so. The

prisoners were taken from 96 by Colonel McKoy & Captain Simmons & their men, what they did with them or where they carried them, I do not know.

 

 I have now stated all I suppose that I need to tell unless I were to go over hundreds of

hardships escapes & difficulties in which I was during the long war & I state what I have fully sensible that I am not many years at most to remain upon the earth, If the department will allow me pay I shall be glad, if not though destitute now -- have been in better circumstances & my friends & the few relations I have may perhaps help me out of the world as I have tried to help myself while in it. I have several Brothers & sisters yet living but they were too young to know or recollect my services -- I have as many as four children scattered over the world I have only one daughter who lives near me or rather most of the time, I with her, she herself is old a widow & quite helpless in many respects -- My children who live further off are in some better circumstances --

 

 There is not now living within my knowledge anyone except old Mr. J. F. Hoggle whose evidence I have had taken that can prove my service under General Greene for nine months nor of the other services by -- I give directions for his evidence to be sent with my oath or application -- I found him here in Perry County when I came from Florida & he knew & told me himself where he had seen & knew me -- And this has partly been the means of renewing my hopes that the Government will hear & allow my claim Hoggle lived in an adjoining district to me in South Carolina & though younger than I was with his Father in the war & we saw each other frequently -- though his recollection about some things is more clear than my own.

 

I moved from Carolina to the State of Georgia not far from Savannah about 48 years ago I then moved to Florida where I lived some seven or eight years and about two years ago came up here where I have lived since in or near the town of Marion Perry County.

 

I am confident my name was on the roll at Columbia in South Carolina if it was not it was not my fault for it ought to have been there –

 

I made application while I lived in Florida for a pension; but I then did not know that Mr Hoggle or any other person was living by whom I could prove satisfactorily my services, & except that I, on my former application while I lived in Florida, by one Ephraim Prescoat proved that he knew that I started to go to join General Greene's Army & was gone as much as nine months that time but could not swear that he saw me in the service & besides he was young at the time & I had employed him to stay at my house while I was gone in the Army. This was the objection if any I suppose to my claim -- I will be glad if the department will spare the time to turn to & see the papers in my former applications from Santa Rosa or at Pensacola by & through Judge Wright Prescoat lived in Coffee County Alabama & I came up there & got Mr. Meggs to procure Judge Claxton to take Prescoat’s evidence some three years ago. They all thought there, who knew my application as made, that it would succeed but it seems that it did not: while many many others who did not serve one fifth the time I did have received their pensions in different parts of the Country & I think it hard indeed. John B. Meggs Esquire of Walton County Florida I believe has all the correspondence from the War Department if any or (if not destroyed) which relates to my former application I wish I had it all again & could send it to the Department; but I cannot get it. I know there seemed there to be very little in the way yet I never could get my allowance -- until all seemed to get tired of trying & so it lay -- I have, nor have had, no other motive on earth, in changing the agents or persons I have spoken to to get my pension, then simply because I had moved up here & found the old Mr Hoggle whose evidence I send & I never did rest satisfied with the application lying so without trying to get it honestly & fully before the Department once more. It makes me sorry to know how hard & long I served to see that others have drawn & I am to be thought of as unworthy by their side & I feel deeply that it is not just nor right.

 

 I have to state that if there appears to be anything wrong about my not applying sooner,

or later, or in some different way, I must say that I have done the best I could or knowed how -- I am old & not active to get about I have been afflicted with rheumatism & a touch of palsy for some 17 years, off & on, & it is the good feelings of those gentlemen where I happen to be who have more learning than I, or than my close relations, if present, would have; that enables me to know how to even begin to apply for a pension & if it is not & I did not know it to be honest; I would not have it if given; much less apply for it. I have I hope now stated all that can be thought necessary & have this whole matter in the hands of those agents who have by law then appointed to do justice.

 

Sworn to & subscribed in my presence after being taken down as nearly as convenient in his own words & read slowly & distinctly over to him word for word in my presence this 6th of July

1848. S/ William Johnson, X his mark

 

S/ Henry C. Lea, JP

 

[supporting affidavit as to reputation and character given by James H. DeVotie or DeVolie, pastor of the Baptist Church of which Johnson was a member.]

 

 [fn p. 58 SC Comptroller General’s certificates of payments made to a man or men named William Johnson or Johnston for revolutionary services.]

 

 [fn p. 61]

 

State of Alabama, Perry County

 

 Personally appeared John F. Hoggle for me George P. Massey an acting Justice of the

Peace in & for the County & State aforesaid who having been by me first duly sworn deposeth & says that he is personally acquainted with William Johnson who now resides & has resided in said. County some little less than two years where this affiant has resided about nine years, that said Johnson removed from Santa Rosa County in Florida to this State about three years sense as affiant is informed & believes –

 

That this affiant though about the age of 85 years has a distinct recollection of this being the same William Johnson with whom he was acquainted during the revolutionary war & that he saw the said Johnson at Eutaw Springs & to the best of affiant's knowledge recollection & belief said Johnson was in that engagement or battle and was under the command of General Greene -- This affiant was there or nearby though not actually in the

battle being posted at some distance with others as a guard to the baggage & stores of a portion of the Army the Father of this affiant was killed in that. This affiant is certain that this same William Johnson was afterwards with General Pickens -- other forces marched off to a place called 96 and this affiant also saw him occasionally at that place -- There has been a great lapse of time since my first acquaintance with said Johnson and affiant was quite a youth at the time & he will not undertake swear positively as to the exact dates or distances so long ago but he knows & recollects this William Johnson not only by the appearance of his frame & features but from hearing him relate several little things that makes his recollection more distinct in conversation with him some time since & affiant is satisfied from the best recollection he has that said Johnson from the different times, places &c that he saw him in the Army must have been in actual service as a soldier in the revolution eight or nine years -- said Johnson was from Edgefield & this affiant was from Newberry District in South Carolina. This affiant introduced himself to said Johnson on meeting in this County because he thought from his appearance &

hearing his name seeing his age &c that he must be the same William Johnson that he had seen at & since the Eutaw Battle & knew in their young days & is now satisfied that he is the same man & has not the least doubt of it. -- This affiant must state also that he had not seen the said Johnson for some 45 years before he came to this County this affiant moved directly from Newberry to this County -- and the said Johnson as he is informed & believed moved from Edgefield to Georgia near Savannah & thence to Florida & then to this State & County so that we have them long separated, until he is here.

 

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 6th July 1848

 

S/ G. P. Massey, JP S/ John F. Hoggle, X his mark

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

Transcribed by Will Graves 11/20/08

 

Captain William Butler (afterwards General William Butler)

Captain Box [Lewis Box]

William Hudgins

Joseph Bell

Richard Laremore

Benjamin Jernigan,

James R. Riley,

Allen Blaylock,

Richard Larimer,

Veteran’s father-in-law was Moses Prestcott

Rev. Ephraim Prescoat,

John Curley,

Sherrod Curley,

Miallard Smith [?],

John Blann [?],

Buddy Escridge,

Samuel Etheridge

Mount Hilling

Benjamin Hughs

Mr. J. F. Hoggle or John F. Hoggle

Ephraim Prescoat

James H. DeVotie or DeVolie, pastor of the Baptist Church

 

 

 

LANCELOT JOHNSTON

 

Lancelot Johnston wife Zeruiah W5114 NC Line: Soldier married Zeruiah (/) 1774 Jan 17. Soldier died 1832 Sept 19 Caswell Co NC and is widow applied there 1838 Nov 24, leaving children William Johnston of Morgan Co. Ga: John Johnston of Caswell CO. NC: and Mary Johnston: Mrs. Jane Slade: Lancelot Johnston; Mrs Elizabeth Jones of Madison Co. Ga: Mrs. Mildred Harrison of La Grange Tn: and David Johnston of Tuskegee Ala. Children’s birth were Thomas Johnston born 1777 July 16: John Johnston born 1778 Dec 12: Mary Johnston born 1780 Sept 1: Jane Johnston born 1782 Aug 8: William Johnston born 1784 March 15: David Johnston born 1792 Jan 14:  Elizabeth Johnston born 1794 Jan 25: and Mildred Johnston no birth given: Grandchildren show were Lancelot Johnston, Richard Johnston and Alfred Johnston and Mrs. Nancy Motley’s children of soldiers deceased son Thomas Johnston, also James M. : Alfred G. William I or J and  Mildred A Yancey children of soldiers deceased daughter Zilpah Yancey. Pg 1863:  Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files

 

 

Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress of the 7th of June 1832, And also to obtain the benefit of the third Section of the Act of Congress of July 4th, 1836 &c

 

State of Georgia, Morgan County

 

On this the 19th day of March 1846, personally appeared in open Court before the Court of Ordinary now sitting in & for said County, William Johnston, a resident of Madison, in the County of Morgan & State of Georgia, who being first Sworn according to Law, doth on his oath make the following Declaration, in behalf of himself and others, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832, And also the benefit of the Act of Congress passed July 4th, 1836.

 

That his Father Dr. Lancelot Johnston entered the Service of the United States in December 1776 as Chirugeon [sic, Surgeon] to the ninth Regiment of the Continental Army raised in the State of North Carolina as will fully appear by Document No. 1 Signed by Jas. Greene Jr. Secretary and which accompanies this declaration,

 

And that this appointment was confirmed by the Congress of the United States by a commission bearing date of the Tenth (10th) day of May 1777, Signed by John Hancock, President, and Charles Thompson, Secretary, as will appear by Document No. 2.

 

That he was appointed Surgeon to the New raised Levies of Salisbury & Hillsborough Districts on the 15th of August 1778, as will appear by reference to Document No. 3.

 

And received in conformity with that appointment a Commission from Ja. Thackston Lt. Col., on the sixth day of November 1778. as will be seen by reference to document No. 4.

 

And that that he Served in the Capacity of Surgeon until he was honorably discharged by Jethro Sumner, Brigadier General on the 15th day of March 1779, as may be Seen by reference to Document above No. 4.

 

Thus embracing a period from the commencement of his Service, until his discharge, of Two years and about three months.

 

And your declarant further States, that the before mentioned Lancelot Johnston did on the 17th day of January 1774, intermarried with his wife Zeruiah, as appears from the old family Register hereto annexed, established by the oath of Mary Johnston, in whose possession it has been kept in for the last 25 years, and marked as Document No. 5.

 

And your declarant further States, that the before mentioned Lancelot Johnston departed this life in North Carolina on the 19th day of September 1832, as appears from the Certificate of A. Slade, Clerk of Caswell County Court, and marked as Document No. 6.

 

And that Zeruiah Johnston his widow departed this life on the 24th day of November 1838 – as appears by reference to the above Document No. 6.

 

And your declarant further States that the aforementioned Lancelot Johnston having died

without having received a pension to which he was entitled under the Act of Congress of June 7th 1832, and his Widow Zeruiah Johnston having died without having received a pension to which she was entitled under the Act of Congress of July 4th, 1836, He files his declaration as one of the Sons and Legal Representatives of the deceased parties above named, in connection with John Johnston of Caswell County North Carolina, Mary Johnston, Mrs. Jane Slade, Lancelot Johnston, Mrs. Elizabeth Jones of Madison Morgan County Georgia, Mrs. Mildred Harrison of Lagrange Tennessee, David Johnston of Tuskegee Marion County Alabama, all of the living Children and heirs of the aforesaid Dr. Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his wife, together with Lancelot Johnston, Richard Johnston, Alfred Johnston, and Mrs. Nancy Motley, the children of Thomas Johnston deceased who was Son of Lancelot & Zeruiah Johnston aforesaid. Also James M. Yancey, Albert G. Yancey, William J. Yancey & Mildred A. Yancey, the Children of Zilpah Yancey deceased who was the daughter of Lancelot & Zeruiah

Johnston aforesaid, Setting forth the foregoing facts, and claims for himself and the above named Children & heirs of Lancelot Johnston & Zeruiah Johnston to be entitled to all the benefit of the Several Acts of Congress above specified, in which the aforesaid Lancelot & Zeruiah Johnston were entitled prior to their death, and to which they would be entitled if yet in life.

 

Sworn to and Subscribed in open Court the day & date above written.

S/ Ernest L. Wittich, C. C. S/ Wm Johnston

 

 

No. 1

North Carolina In Congress December 1776

 

these a Certify that Lancelot Johnston was appointed Chirurgeon [sic, Surgeon] to the Ninth Regiment of the Continental Army raised in this State.

By order S/ Jas. Green, Jr., Sec.

 

No. 2

Copy

In Congress

 

The Delegates of the United States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island,

Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the Counties of Newcastle, Kent at Sussex of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, to Lanslot [sic] Johnston,

Gentn, Greeting: -

 

We, reposing special Trust and Confidence in your Patriotism, Valor, Conduct and Fidelity, Do, by these Presents, constitute and appoint you to be Surgeon of the Ninth Battalion in the Army of the United States, raised for the Defense of American Liberty, and for repelling every hostile Invasion thereof You are therefore carefully and diligently to discharge the Duty of Surgeon by doing and performing all manner of things thereunto belonging. And we do strictly charge and require all Officers and Soldiers under your Command, to be obedient to your Orders as Surgeon. And you are to observe and follow such Orders and Directions from Time to Time, as you shall receive from this or

any future Congress of the United States, or Committee of Congress, for that Purpose appointed, or Commander in Chief for the Time being of the Army of the United States, or any other your Superior Officer, according to the Rules and Discipline of War, in Pursuance of the Trust reposed in you. This Commission is to continue in Force until revoked by this or a future Congress. Dated at Newbern the

10th day of May Anno Dom. 1777-- By order of the Congress

Attest: S/ Chas. Thomson, Sec. S/ John Hancock, President

 

No. 3

State of North Carolina

 

In Senate 15th of August 1778

Resolved that Dr. Lancelot Johnston be appointed Surgeon to the new raised Levies of Salisbury & Hillsborough Districts during their Continuance in this State.

 

S/ Allen Jones, S. S.

By order S/ T. Sitgreaves, C. S.

 

 In the House of Commons 17 August 1778

Concurred with -

By order S/ Tho. Benbury, S. C.

 

 

S/ John Hunt, H. C.

Extract from the Journals

S/ T. Sitgreaves, C. S.

 

No. 4 Copy

 

The bearer Doctor Lancelot Johnston is hereby appointed Regimental Surgeon to the New Levies & Continental Troops now about to March from the District of Hillsborough & Salisbury to the assistance of South Carolina during that Campaign.

 

Given under my hand this sixth day of November 1778.

 

S/ Ja. Thackston, Lt. Col.

 

 Commandant

 

No. 5

Camp Purysburg, 15th of March 1779

This is to certify that Dr. Johnston resigned to his appointment in United States service at this day. He has been diligent in his department, and we are sorry to part with him.

S/ Jethro Sumner

Brigadier General

 

Pension Office February 18th 1857

 

The Originals [ Nos. 4 & 5 above] of which the foregoing are true copies were this day Sent to the Honorable Joshua Hill Ho. Rep. for the purpose of returning them to Lancelot Johnston, the Son of the Officer. S/ S. C. Boynton

 

No. 6

State of North Carolina, Caswell County

 

I Abisha Slade Clerk of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for the County and State

aforesaid hereby Certify that Dr. Lancelot Johnston late of this County died from the best Information I am able to obtain in the month of September 1832, say the 19th day, And that Zuriah Johnston his widow died in November 1838, say the 24th day. I have obtained this Information from the friends and neighbors of Dr. Lancelot Johnston and his widow – together with my own Knowledge.

 

And Testimony of all of which I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of my office this fourth day of March A.D. 1846.

 

S/ A. Slade, Clk

 

of Caswell County Court

 

State of North Carolina, Office of Secretary of State

 

I William Hill Secretary of State in and for the State of North Carolina, do hereby certify, that it appears from a book of the settlements of the accounts of the Officers & Soldiers of the Continental line of this State in the revolutionary war that Lancelot Johnston a Surgeon of said line, was allowed for his services by a Board of Commissioners which sat at Halifax in the year 1783 -- & 1784, the sum of Four Hundred and fourteen pounds twelve shillings (£414.12.0) for his services as Surgeon aforesaid.

 

Given under my hand at office in Raleigh this 6th of April 1846.

 

S/ Wm Hill, Secretary of State

 

 State of Georgia, Morgan County

 

Personally appeared before me John Robson a Judge of the Inferior Court of said County; Miss Mary Johnston who being duly sworn, deposeth and saith that the two small sheets hereunto annexed, contains the only original register of the marriage of the late Dr. Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his wife – of the County of Caswell in the State of North Carolina; by which it appears that they were married January 17th, 1774: also containing the dates of the births of all their children – and was the family register kept in the blank leaves of an old English Prayer book, and that she took them from out of the said Book to preserve them, the book being frequently loaned out – for the purpose of performing the marriage ceremony, and that said leaves have been in her possession for the last 25 or 30 years.

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 12th day of March 1846.

S/ Mary Johnston

S/ John Robson, Judge of the Inferior Court

 

[Family records from the Prayer Book]

Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his Wife married Jany 17th 1774

Thomas Johnston Son of Lanclot Johnston & Zeruiah his Wife born on 6th July 1777

John Johnston born December the 12, 1778

Mary Johnston born Sep. 1st 1780

Jane Johnston born Augt. 8Th 1782

William Johnston born March 15th 1784

Zilpah Johnston born January 22nd 1786

Milridge Johnston born February 28th 1788

Lancelot Johnston born March 29th 1790

David Johnston born January 14th 1792

Elizabeth Johnston born January 25th 1794

 

Births of Negro Sarah Children

 

Vincy born 29th Augt. 1787

 

Adam born 13th May 1789

 

Beck born 6th July 1791

 

Died February13th 1792

 

Cale born 25th March 179[last digit lost born right below it and appearing to be a correction appears the

 

date “1799”]

 

Frank born Oct. 1794

 

Beck born Apl. 1795

 

Phebe born Oct. 1798

 

Eley born 16 June 1801

 

Alexr born Oct 1801

 

Lettuce born Decr. 1803

 

Sam born June 27th 1804

 

Cynthia born June 18th 1806

 

Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements

 

Pension application of Lancelot Johnston W5114 fn81NC

 

Transcribed by Will Graves

 

wife Zeruiah,

 

Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his Wife married Jany 17th 1774

Thomas Johnston Son of Lanclot Johnston & Zeruiah his Wife born on 6th July 1777

John Johnston born December the 12, 1778

Mary Johnston born Sep. 1st 1780

Jane Johnston born Augt. 8Th 1782

William Johnston born March 15th 1784

Zilpah Johnston born January 22nd 1786

Milridge Johnston born February 28th 1788

Lancelot Johnston born March 29th 1790

David Johnston born January 14th 1792

Elizabeth Johnston born January 25th 1794

 

 

All of the living Children and heirs of the aforesaid Dr. Lancelot Johnston and Zeruiah his wife, together with Lancelot Johnston,

 

John Johnston of Caswell County North Carolina,

Mary Johnston,

Mrs. Jane Slade,

Lancelot Johnston,

Mrs. Elizabeth Jones of Madison Morgan County Georgia,

Mrs. Mildred Harrison of Lagrange Tennessee,

David Johnston of Tuskegee Marion County Alabama,

 

Children of Thomas Johnston deceased who was Son of Lancelot & Zeruiah Johnston aforesaid.

 

Richard Johnston,

Alfred Johnston,

Mrs. Nancy Motley, 

 

Children of Zilpah Yancey deceased who was the daughter of Lancelot & Zeruiah

Johnston

 

James M. Yancey,

Albert G. Yancey,

William J. Yancey

Mildred A. Yancey,

 

 

WILLIAM JOHNSTON

 

William Johnston S31780 VA Line: soldier was born in Amelia Co. Va he enlisted at Valley Forge. Soldier moved from Amelia Co. Va to Prince Edward Co. Va then to Henrico Co.Va then to NC to SC then returned to NC and lived first in Guilford Co. NC then to Salisbury NC then to Ga and lived in Columbia Co. Ga, Washington Co. Ga, Hancock Co. Ga, Baldwin Co.Ga and Bibb Co Ga. Soldier applied 1835 Feb 9 Bbib Co. Ga. Age 82: Pg 1865: Abstract of Rev. War Pension Files