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Hill Surname Origins & Heraldry

Page 2


The 7th Viscount Hill (Sir Gerald Rowland Clegg-Hill) of Hawkstone and Hardwicke.
Arms: Quarterly: 1st and 4th erm., on a fesse, sa., a castle, triple towered, arg. for HILL; 2nd and 3rd, per pale sa. and az. a cross-crosslet crossed between 2 acorns in bend, dexter, and as many fleurs-de-lis in bend sinister arg. for CLEGG.
Crests: 1st, HILL, tower, arg., surmounted with a garland of laurel, ppr.; 2nd, CLEGG, in front of two branches of oak fructed in saltire, pprl, a cross-crosslet, crossed or.
Supporters: Dexter, a lion, arg., murally crowned or gorged with a wreath of oak, fructed ppr.; sinister, a horse, arg., bridled and saddled, ppr., murally gorged, gu.
Motto: Avancez (Forward!) Hill College House is named for Robert C. Hill, Class of 1889, a Wharton graduate and Penn trustee.

The source of this credit: College Houses at Penn http://www.upenn.edu/resliv/chas/ch_index.html
E-mail chaswebmaster@pobox.upenn.edu

IMAGE WILL BE ADDED SOON

BLAZON OF ARMS:  Azure, a chevron between three fleurs de lis or, a canton of
                          the last.

CREST:  A lion rampant argent pierced through the breast by a broken spear in
            bend proper, the head guttee de sang.

MOTTO:  Ne tenta vel perfice.

Translation:  Attempt not or else succeed.

The Irish surname Hill is toponymic in origin, belonging to that group of surnames derived from the place where the original bearer once resided.  In this case the surname can be traced back to the Old English "hyll" meaning a "hill", and the original bearer would have been simply "one who dwelt on the hill".   The surname is recorded in England as early as the Twelfth Century when one Gilbert del Hil appears in the Pipe Rolls of Norfolk in the year 1191, while in the Assize Rolls of Cheshire in 1260 we note one William atte Hil.  In the Hundred Rolls of 1273 we find a reference to one Simon Hille of Worcestershire.   The surname first arrived in Ireland in the year 1573 when Sir Moyses Hill, a knight, numbered among the forces of the Earl of Essex sent to Ireland by Elizabeth I in order to suppress the O'Neills of County Tyrone.  Sir Moyses was a distinguished soldier who became Governor of Olderfleet, first Mareschal of Carrickfergus, and Provost Mareschal of Ulster, later representing Antrim in the English parliament.  He acquired huge estates in Ulster, and the family went on to become Hereditary Constables of the province; they also created the towns of Hillsborough and Hilltown.  Perhaps the most illustrious member of the family was Wills Hill, the Eighteenth Century politician who added no fewer than six noble titles to his name, including the Earl of Hillsborough and Marquess of Downshire.  He was the sponsor of Oliver Goldsmith's "Deserted Village".  The surname Hill remains associated with the northern counties of Ireland, particularly County Down.

Hill:  "The name Hill in Ireland is usually of immigrant origin having been brought to the country by settlers who arrived in to the Province of Ulster especially during the seventeenth century.  This name is also sometimes used as a variant of the Irish names Glanney and Glenny."

History and origin of the above two shields are unknown.
Shield credit: Copyright, 1999, 2000 Irish Surnames
Http://www.irishsurnames.com

History and origin of the above two shields are unknown.
Shield credit: Copyright, 1999, 2000 Irish Surnames
Http://www.irishsurnames.com

History and origin of the above two shields are unknown.

History and origin of the above two shields are unknown.



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