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  • Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.

    Abraham Lincoln
  • My formula for living is quite simple. I get up in the morning and I go to bed at night. In between, I occupy myself as best I can.

    Cary Grant
  • Analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it.

    E. B. White
  • I'm living so far beyond my income that we may almost be said to be living apart.

    e. e. cummings
  • What then is time? If no one asks me, I know what it is. If I wish to explain it to him who asks, I do not know.

    — Saint Augustine
  • Don't go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.

    Mark Twain
  • If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.

    Henry David Thoreau
  • If two things look the same, look for differences. If they look different, look for similarities.

    John Cardinal
  • In theory, there is no difference. In practice, there is.

    — Anonymous
  • Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.

    John Adams
  • People who like this sort of thing will find this the sort of thing they like.

    Abraham Lincoln
  • History - what never happened described by someone who wasn't there

    — ?Santayana?
  • What's a "trice"? It's like a jiffy but with three wheels

    — Last of the Summer Wine
  • Inside every old person is a young person wondering what happened

    — Terry Pratchett
  • I'll be more enthusiastic about encouraging thinking outside the box when there's evidence of any thinking going on inside it.

    — Terry Pratchett
  • .. we were trained to meet any new situation by reorganising; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illuson of progress

    — Petronius (210 BC)
  • The time we have at our disposal every day is elastic; the passions that we feel expand it, those that we inspire contract it; and habit fills up what remains

    — Proust
  • So just as it is not the desire to become famous but the habit of being laborious that enables us to produce a finished work, so it is not the activity of the present moment but wise reflexions from the past that help us to safeguard the future

    — Proust "Within the Budding Grove"
  • You cannot help men permanently by doing for them what they could and should do for themselves.

    William J. H. Boetcker
  • Only a genealogist thinks taking a step backwards is progress

    — Lorna
  • No man ever believes that the Bible means what it says: He is always convinced that it says what he means.

    — George Bernard Shaw
  • A TV remote is female: It easily gives a man pleasure, he'd be lost without it, and while he doesn't always know which buttons to push, he just keeps trying.

    — Anon
  • Hammers are male: Because in the last 5000 years they've hardly changed at all, and are occasionally handy to have around.

    — Anon
  • The right thing to do is to do nothing, the place to do it is in a place of concealment and the time to do it is as often as possible.

    — Tony Cook "The Biology of Terrestrial Molluscs"
  • All that mankind has done, thought, gained or been: it is lying as in magic preservation in the pages of books.

    — Thomas Carlyle "The Hero as Man of Letters"
Elizabeth UnknownSurname (bef. 1630 - aft. 1673)
Johann Pachelbel.
Florence Bootel (bef. 1655 - cir. 1689)
John King (bef. 1655 - cir. 1686)
Andrew Graham (cir. 1662 - bet 1736 - 1739)
Jane UnknownSurname (bef. 1665 - aft. 1739)
James Barter (bef. 1669 - cir. 1711)
Ann UnknownSurname (bef. 1673 - )
John King (aft. 1676 - cir. 1737)
Elizabeth Northmore (cir. 1680 - cir. 1708)
Georg Philipp Telemann.
J S Bach.
Richard Peek (bef. 1690 - )
Stephen Graham (cir. 1690 - 1757)
Martha UnknownSurname (bef. 1692 - )
James Barter (1693 - cir. 1767)
Joseph Rowe (say 1700 - 1757)
Ann Stephens (cir. 1700 - cir. 1778)
Florence Stephens (bef. 1701 - 1760)
1707: Union of England and Scotland.
Walter King (1706/7 - cir. 1771)
Jane Corry (bef. 1710 - )
Richard Peek (cir. 1712 - cir. 1778)
Abigail Rea (cir. 1714 - aft. 1789)
Ellin Graham (bef. 1715 - )
Thomas Wines (bef. 1717 - cir. 1784)
Robert Pyke (say 1720 - 1786)
Elizabeth UnknownSurname (say 1720 - aft. 1762)
Joseph Rowe (bet 1721 - 1725 - 1763)
Ann Barter (cir. 1723 - cir. 1804)
John Andrews (bef. 1724 - 1776)
Anne Cuff (bef. 1724 - )
Elizabeth Algar (cir. 1725 - cir. 1763)
Franz Joseph Haydn.
Jane Graham (say 1736 - aft. 1804)
Andrew Graham (cir. 1736 - cir. 1801)
William Baty (cir. 1742 - cir. 1810)
Thomas Andrews (cir. 1745 - 1821)
Walter Turnbull (cir. 1745 - aft. 1791)
Culloden.
Elizabeth Cross (1747 - 1844)
Joseph Rowe (cir. 1749 - cir. 1811)
Elizabeth Dickson (cir. 1750 - )
Samuel Wines (cir. 1750 - bef. 1841)
Betty Andrews (bef. 1751 - cir. 1786)
Sarah Baty (cir. 1754 - cir. 1791)
Elizabeth Ralph (cir. 1754 - cir. 1818)
James B. King (cir. 1754 - 1824)
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
Richard Matters (cir. 1757 - 1830)
Sarah Peek (cir. 1758 - cir. 1795)
Patience Pike (cir. 1758 - 1829)
George III.
William Parker (bef. 1769 - )
Isaac Dawe (cir. 1769 - 1840)
1769: Capt Cook rediscovers NZ.
Ludwig van Beethoven.
Sarah Smith (cir. 1773 - 1833)
Stephen Graham (cir. 1774 - 1856)
Robert Turnbull (cir. 1774 - 1854)
American War of Independence.
John Andrews (cir. 1777 - cir. 1867)
Jane Baty (cir. 1778 - cir. 1826)
1620
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Matthias Rowe (cir. 1780 - 1835)
Rebekah Wines (1782 - 1870)
William Clinton (1787 - bet 1830 - 1851)
Eleanor Scott (cir. 1788 - 1846)
Ann King (cir. 1788 - 1850)
Beginning of the French Revolution.
Bettsey Metters (1792 - 1863)
Jemima Parker (1793 - 1861)
Franz Schubert.
Isaac S. Dawe (1797 - 1851)
Frédéric François Chopin.
Jane Gibson (J1a) (1812 - 1906)
Simon Andrews (1814 - 1900)
Battle of Waterloo.
Jane Graham (cir. 1819 - 1907)
George IV.
James Turnbull (1820 - 1891)
Anton Bruckner.
Emma P. Clinton (1827 - 1894)
William Rowe (cir. 1827 - 1915)
William Austin (cir. 1829 - aft. 1854)
William IV.
Honor Daw (1831 - 1897)
Johannes Brahms.
Queen Victoria.
Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky.
1840: Treaty of Waitangi signed.
William & Martha LAKEMAN arr. in Wellington on the Slains Castle (25 Jan 1841).
William & Martha LAKEMAN arr. New Plymouth (12 Feb 1841) with Carrington's survey party and later welcome 1st of the 6 ships of emigrants.
Simon ANDREWS, wife Jane, dtr Sarah, arrived in New Plymouth on the 'Timandra' (23 Feb 1842).
George G. Andrews (1851 - 1920)
Matthias Rowe (1852 - 1901)
Crimean War.
Jemima CLINTON nee PARKER, son Henry and dtr Emma and Emma's husband William AUSTIN, arr. Melbourne (on the 'Roxburgh Castle').
William ROWE arrives in NZ.
Anthony BROOKING from Australia to Taranaki.
Caroline E. Austin (1854 - 1899)
Ellen Turnbull (1854 - 1926)
1855: Wellington earthquake.
Honor DAWE follows husband William ROWE to NZ (with son Matthias).
NZ Land wars.
American Civil War.
James TURNBULL/Jane GRAHAM arrive in NZ (with children Robert, Ellen and Stephen).
Capt John GIBSON and wife Emma Parker CLINTON / AUSTIN, and (step) children arrive Taranaki, NZ.
Ralph Vaughan Williams.
Sergei Vassilievich Rachmaninof.
Maurice Ravel.
Mary Ann GRIFFIN nee ANDREWS (Simon's niece), and hubby Ebenezer emigrated on the "Mataura."
Béla Bartok.
George E. Andrews (1881 - 1944)
Honor Rowe (1886 - 1971)
2nd Boer War.
Francis Poulenc.
Edward VII.
Dmitri Shostakovich.
George V.
Jessie A. Andrews (1912 - 2005)
Leslie A. Henderson (1913 - 1995)
WWI.
1931: Hawkes Bay earthquake.
Arvo Pärt born.
George VI.
WWII.
Feb 2011: Christchurch earthquake.
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