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Stephen Graham1,2

(circa 1690 - between June 1757 and October 1757)
FatherAndrew Graham3,4 b. cir. 1662, d. bet Nov 1736 - May 1739
MotherJane UnknownSurname3,4 b. bef. 1665, d. aft. 1739
Relationship5th great-grandfather of Lorna Henderson

BMDB data

     Stephen Graham was born cir. 1690 at Arthuret, CUL, ENG, (baptism not yet found).5,3
     Stephen Graham married Abigail Rea on 26 Jun 1735 at Crosby upon Eden, CUL, ENG, entry in the Crosby-on-Eden registers reads: "Stephen Graham of the parish of Arthuret and Abigail Rea married june the 26th" (Abigail presumed to be of the parish. no marriage bond found).1,6,7,8,9,10
     Stephen Graham died bet Jun 1757 - Oct 1757 at Fauld, nr Longtown, Par. of Arthuret, CUL, ENG; as he wrote his will on the 8th Jun and it was proved on the 1st Oct.11

Census/Where lived/Occupations

      In Jun 1735 Stephen Graham was living in the Par. of Arthuret, CUL, ENG, when he married Abigail.7 Fr 1736 - 1757 Stephen and Abigail Graham were living at Fauld, nr Longtown, Par. of Arthuret, CUL, ENG, according to the baptisms of their children from Andrew 1736 to Jane 1755, and Stephen's 1757 will.12

Wills/bequests

     Jane Graham and Stephen Graham were named as joint executors and beneficiaries in the will of Andrew Graham on 24 Nov 1736 of Fauld, nr Longtown, Par. of Arthuret, CUL, ENG.4
     Stephen Graham wrote a will on 8 Jun 1757 at Fauld, nr Longtown, Par. of Arthuret, CUL, ENG, appointing his wife Abigail his executrix, and leaving £20 each to "my seven younger children (that is to say) Mary, David, Richard, Stephen, Grimston, William and Jane" to be paid when they reached 21 or married, whichever came first. If any died unmarried or in minority, their share to be divided amongst the remainder, but excluding the eldest son Andrew "who is my lawful son" (I am assuming that Andrew inherited the land in a separate deed) All goods, chattels etc were bequeathed to Abigail as executrix and she was to pay all debts, legacies, funeral expenses etc. Stephen also appointed Edward Irwin of Baily town and George (looks more like Gooner!) Graham of Stonyclose Rigg as Trustees to supervise and "to see this my sd last will and testamt performed" Signed 8th Day June 1757 by Stephen Graham and witnessed by William Corry and Geo: Graham. Proved Oct 1st 1757.11

All the other info

      Fr Oct 1728 - 1757 Stephen Graham was connected with Craggs, Bewcastle, CUL, ENG, having purchased it from Mrs Mary Forster, who inherited it from her mother "Janett Forster of a Messuage & Tenement called Craggs", who had owned it from Oct 1701 to 1728. Prior to that 1696-1701 Adam Routledge of Baileyhead held it "in trust for Mary Forster, daughter of Janet Forster, deceased, of Craggs and Bent", and was farming there in 1693.13

Family

Abigail Rea (cir. 1714 - aft. 1789)
Marriage*
     Stephen Graham married Abigail Rea on 26 Jun 1735 at Crosby upon Eden, CUL, ENG, entry in the Crosby-on-Eden registers reads: "Stephen Graham of the parish of Arthuret and Abigail Rea married june the 26th" (Abigail presumed to be of the parish. no marriage bond found).1,6,7,8,9,10 
Children
ChartsMaternal ancestors of Lorna
Maternal timeline
GRAHAM
Last Edited28 Apr 2007

Citations

  1. RootsChat Msge Board online at http://www.rootschat.com, Will 1810 Grimston GRAHAM of Fauld, extract posted Feb 2007 by Bridget, extracted Feb 2007.
  2. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Bap. 1748 Grimston to Stephen GRAHAM, batch C042991 Arthuret, CUL, extracted Feb 2007.
  3. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Birth c 1690 Stephen to Andrew & Jane GRAHAM, Fauld, Arthuret, post 1991 patron submission, no details, extracted Feb 2007.
  4. Andrew GRAHAM of Fauld, Will 1736 (proved 1739) (24 Nov 1736) WI 56 [46v]: Copy rcvd Apr 2007.
  5. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Marr. 1735 Stephen GRAHAM & Abigail REA, patron submission Film 455423, extracted Feb 2007.
  6. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Bap. 1741 David to Stephen & Abigail GRAHAM, batch C042991 Arthuret, CUL, extracted Feb 2007.
  7. Baptisms marriages burials: Crosby-on-Eden, CUL, Marr. 1736 Stephen GRAHM of Arthuret & Abigail REA, copy rcvd Apr 2007, JAC 1136.
  8. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Marr. 1735 Stephen GRAHAM & Abigail REA, patron submission Batch A455423 sheet 00 Source all 455423-455427 Book, extracted Feb 2007.
  9. Carlisle Marriage Bonds (DRC7/4): Searched, Apr 2007.
  10. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Marr. 1735 Stephen GRAHAM & Abigail REA, patron submission Film 455423, extracted Feb 2007, Abigail Rea born c 1714 Crosby Upon Eden, Stephen GRAHAM born c 1710 Arthuret.
  11. Will 1757: Stephen GRAHAM (8/6/1757) Proven Oct 1 1757: Copy rcvd Apr 2007.
  12. Bishop's Transcripts: births burials marriages, Arthuret, CUL, ENG, Baptisms to Stephen & Abigail GRAHAM, of Fauld, extracts rcvd from Carlisle RO, Apr 2007.
  13. Carolyn R, "EM: GRAHAM of CUL ex Carolyn," e-mail to Lorna Henderson, Craigs, Bewcastle, extracted from the Manor Court Book of Nicol Forest by Mike JACKSON of the Bewcastle Heritage Society (http://www.genuki.org.uk:8080/big/eng/CUL/Bewcastle/…), rcvd Mar 2007.
  14. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Bap. 1736 Andrew to Stephen & Abigail GRAHAM, batch C042991 Arthuret, CUL, extracted Feb 2007.
  15. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Bap. 1738 Mary to Stephen & Abigail GRAHAM, batch C042991 Arthuret, CUL, extracted Feb 2007.
  16. Probate 1810 Grimston GRAHAM of Fauld, proved Court of Carlisle 6 Jun reg IR26/302, copy d/loaded Apr 2007.
  17. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Bap. 1742 Richard to Stephen GRAHAM, batch C042991 Arthuret, CUL, extracted Feb 2007.
  18. Will 1808: Grimston GRAHAM (8/11/1808) W801: Copy rcvd Apr 2007.
  19. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Bap. 1745 Stephen to Stephen GRAHAM, batch C042991 Arthuret, CUL, extracted Feb 2007.
  20. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Bap. 1747 Jane to Stephen GRAHAM, batch C042991 Arthuret, CUL, extracted Feb 2007.
  21. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Bap. 1751 William to Stephen GRAHAM, batch C042991 Arthuret, CUL, extracted Feb 2007.
  22. Online search: assorted surnames, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Bap. 1755 Jane to Step GRAHAM, batch C042991 Arthuret, CUL, extracted Feb 2007.

E. & O. E. Some/most parish records are rather hard to read and names, places hard to interpret, particularly if you are unfamiliar with an area. Corrections welcome
 
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