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These pages contains transcripts of newspapers, a postal directory and a register that have been typed up from the original. 
I have no further information than what is on these pages.  You may find microfische of the originals at your local or state
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Annette Piper 's Newspaper Transcripts:

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Western Post (Newspaper)

Saturday, October 20, 1860

Local advertisers (not Sydney)
Jacob JULIAN, Gardeners' Arms Hotel, Market Lane, Mudgee
John SMITH, Carriers' Arms Hotel (late the Old Royal Oak) Market Square, Mudgee
Andrew CARTAN, proprietor, Mudgee Brewery
C FLOOD, Tailor and Outfitter, Lewis Street, Mudgee
W. HOWARTH, Hon. Secretary, Mudgee Mechanics Institute
James CHRISTIAN, Saddlery and Harness-making, Market Street, next door to READFORD's Hotel.
Mudgee Emporium, Cnr. Gladstone and Perry Streets; cash purchasers of colonial produce.
Arthur WILLMOTT & Co., Drapers, Grocers, Ironmongers, &c. &c.,Union Stores, Market Square, Mudgee (Gold and colonial produce purchased)
John KNOX, Saddle and Harness Manufacturer, Market Street West, Mudgee
Eugene DALY, butcher (taken Mr. John HEALY's shop), Market-street, Mudgee
Charles POLDEN, carcass and retail butcher
DICKSON and BURROWS, advert. For Mudgee Rag-Stones.
John BARRY, Auctioneer, and Agent for Mr. John DOREY's superior oaten hay and chaff.
Geo. WALKER, superior oaten hay for sale, Short street, Mudgee
Arthur WILLMOTT & Co's Union Stores - for hay, chaff, corn, etc; woolpacks; Professor Barry's Tricopherous.
J. Dudden BRODRIBB, Sums from £50 to £1000 advanced on deposit of Deeds, Market Square, Mudgee
R. CROSSING, cash purchaser of fat cattle, also hides, skins, &c., and all kinds of colonial produce. Stocks of drapery, grocery, wines and spirits, Settlers' General Store, Mortimer Street, near the Mudgee brewery.
Moses PHILLIPS, contact for draught stallion Young Brown Prince, standing at the Mudgee Hotel (horse imported by Mr. FARMER of Windsor).
George ROUSE, contact for imported cart horse, Atlas; three parts bred horse Merrylegs; and Problem (by Slender, dam Problem by Theorum), standing at Guntawang.
C B LOWE, contact for blood horse, Gray Marquis (bred by Mr. LEE of Bathurst); cart horse, Goliath, standing at Gooree, Mudgee.
Henry FROST, contact for dapple grey Entire , Ploughboy (bred by Mr. ROBINSON, Reedy Creek), standing at H. FROST's Victoria Inn, Market Lane, Mudgee.
R B HASKEW, Hon. Sec. For Lily of the West C C (Club). Notice of meeting.
George WALKER, notice of public auction of draught stallion Young Tom, bred by the late Mr. M'LABY of Umby.
John BARRY, notice of auction (horses, dray and harness, hay, bricks, etc) under instruction from Mr. W WILTON
J BARRY, auctioneer, superior stringy bark for sale
Mr. FLOOD, tailor, sale of three room cottage with shingle roof, Lewis-street
George H COX, Broombee, Cook wanted.
Mrs. RODGERS, opposite Mr. GUNTHER's - general servant wanted.
Mrs. HOWARTH, general servant wanted.
ROWELL & KELLETT, new summer drapery and clothing, Old Flagstagg Stores, Court and Market streets, Mudgee
Mrs HOWARTH, "receives Young Ladies to board and educate in every branch of a Useful and Ornamental Education"
Matthew SHARP, Carpenter, Joiner and Cabinet Maker, Court Street, Behind Mr. CROSSING's stores.
S H BARNES, Mudgee Drug Store "P.S. Family Receipts and Physician's Prescriptions accurately dispensed with the Purest Drugs. Teeth extracted."
George WALKER, auction of various properties, runs and stock
James A CULLEN, Secretary, Tambaroora Annual Races (Judge - Captain BROWNE; Stewards - J WALFORD, Esq., Harold M'LEAN, Esq., G.C., Joseph COX, Esq., A.C., J B SUTTOR, Esq., A BELL COX, Esq., Mr. John BEARD, Mr E LONG, J DAVIDSON, Esq., Mr W BALDWIN.

A MAN FOUND DEAD IN THE BUSH
Information having reached Mudgee on Monday evening last that the body of a man was found near Five Mile Creek. The coroner, Dr. KING, accompanied by Dr. RAMSAY, proceeded to the spot for the purpose of holding an inquest.
Finding it impossible to summons a sufficient number to form a jury, Dr. KING ordered the body to be removed to the Royal Hotel, Cudgegong Corner, where the necessary number was obtained.
J BALL, overseer to W. BOWMAN, Esq., having been sworn…that he found the body laying a short distance from the road, near it was a pair of blankets, some tea, damper, and a box of matches.
Dr. RAMSAY having examined the body, said it was……….that he could form not satisfactory…….(paper torn and missing).

POLICE
Friday, October 19
Before the Police Magistrate and E MARLEY, Esq., J.P.

Daniel HERN, charged with drunkenness, was fined 10s or 24 hours imprisonment.

Eliza PIPER, an old offender, was charged with using obscene language and being drunk on Perry-street. She pleaded hard to be excused on the ground of its being the first time she had the honor of appearing before his Worship. On the promise of leaving town she was fined 20s., or three days imprisonment.

George PEDLER, was fined 10s., or 24 hours in the lock-up for drunkenness and obscene language in Market-street.

James M'LAUGHLAND and Jane his wife were accused by constable MORAN with stealing a teapot, comb, and a pair of trousers.
Mr. BRODRIBB for the defence.
W TOWNSEND, cook to Mrs. McKENNA, swore to the teapot being the property of his mistress. While he was dressing himself early in the morning he heard a noise in the kitchen, and shortly after saw the male prisoner leaving the house; on going into the kitchen he found the lock had been picked, and shortly after missed the teapot. He went with a constable to prisoner's house and there found the missing articles.
Mrs. McKENNA swore to the teapot as her property.
J. DOWNEY thought the trousers were his, but as there was no private mark on them he would not swear to them.
The male prisoner was sentenced to be imprisoned for one month, and the female prisoner discharged.

Richard BROWN and Jane M'LAUGHLAND were charged with stealing £2 17s from Michael SHAW. Constable MORAN, who apprehended the prisoners, said he only found 3s 6d on them.
M. SHAW said he was on a visit to Mudgee. On passing prisoners' house he met an old pal, and finding her hard up gave her a pound note; the female prisoner invited him in, when BROWN gave him a glass of medicated rum, which put him in a stupor, during which BROWN put his hand into his pocket; about sundown the female prisoner woke him by saying, "Come, old chap, it is time you were out of this"; he then found that all his money had been taken.
Hannah COYLE, a young lady with a black eye, said after she received the note BROWN said, "That fellow seems to have plenty of money; I will 'fit him'." I replied "If you do I will go agin you". BROWN shortly afterwards treated me to a glass, and told me he had done the "fitting".
His Worship discharged the female prisoner with a caution that if she did not alter her mode of life she would get into trouble.
She was then put into the box, and told a long rambling tale.
Owing to the contradictory evidence, BROWN was discharged.

PIGS, GOATS & HORSES
Alderman CROSSING, Messrs. H W OLIVER, READFORD, LORENZ, Arthur COX, HATTON, CONNELL, and Dr. RAMSAY were severally fined for breaches against the Towns' Police Act.

G. FOSTER summoned P MALLEY for balance of wages due. Verdict amount claimed.

John GREENWOOD was charged with assaulting, on Sunday last, one James SAUNDERS. Complainant confessed that he had not been much hurt, but felt aggrieved at his dignity being insulted. Fined 5s and costs.

CRICKETER'S MEETING
On Saturday last a general meeting of cricketers was held at the Carriers' Arms H W OLIVER, Esq., in the chair.
Mr. ATKINSON proposed "That a challenge should be sent to Wellington and Dubbo to play a home and home game early in December". A B COX., Esq. having seconded the proposition, it was carried unanimously.
It was proposed by Mr. NICHOLSON, and seconded by Mr. BROAD, "That a committee be formed, for the purpose of collecting subscriptions for defraying the expenses of the forthcoming match, and to make the necessary arrangements, and to consist of the following gentlemen: Messrs A B COX, S BLACKMAN, J. ATKINSON, CHRISTIAN, HONEYSETT, J JULIAN, W READFORD, J F SKINNER, HEARD, G WALKER, M LAMROCK, E DALY, and the mover and seconder, with power to add to their number. Mr H W OLIVER, treasurer, R B HASKEW, honorary secretary."
The players to be selected at a future meeting, which was carried.


CAUTION
To Butchers and others.
Notice is hereby given that from and after this date no drovers with fat-stock in charge, the property of the undersigned, either for Sydney or Maitland, are authorized to sell or dispose in any way whatever of any Cattle under their charge (not even lame ones).
Thomas G DANGAR, Bullerawa, Namoi River, Wee Waa, October 1st, 1860.

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Undersigned, having purchased from the Widow of the late Eugene CONNLY the Station known as Tugland, situated on Terebles and Middle Creeks, District of Bligh, together with all stock belonging to the said Run, Cattle branded oc or OC, with other brands; horses branded OC and other branded JR, the undersigned respectfully requests all parties in search of stray stock on the said run to take them first to the Yard at Tugland before removal; and information respecting an strayed stock of the above brands will be thankfully received.
Charles COLWELL, Wambalong, District of Bligh, 12th September, 1860.

£10 REWARD
LOST, from Balaro, Talbragar River, and supposed to have gone in the direction of Lowee, the following HORSES, for the recovery of which a Reward of FIVE POUNDS a head will be paid by the undersigned, on receipt of said Horses at Balaro, viz.,
A Black Horse, small star in forehead; SH S near shoulder. Also, A Black Horse, branded 8B near and off shoulders.
Arthur H MACARTHYR
Balaro, 6th October, 1860.

£10 REWARD - CAUTION
The above Reward will be paid to any person giving such information as will lead to the punishment of any person or persons trespassing upon the Stations of Calf-Pen, Tucklebone, or Marthaguy, contrary to the provisions of the Act in such case made and provided.
Arthur H MACARTHUR
Marthaguy, 10th October, 1860.

£10 REWARD
TO Constables, Poundkeepers, & others.
STOLEN or STRAYED from here, about two months ago, a Light Bay thick butt of a Cob of a Horse, broken-in, black points, mouth inclined to be mealy, docked tail, with hairs grown long, branded TS D off shoulder, IW off shoulder.
£10 will paid, if stolen, of conviction of the offender, and £5 if strayed, on delivery of the Horse to the undersigned.
Thomas G DANGAR
Bullerawa, Namoi River, Wee Waa, September 20, 1860.

£20 REWARD
STOLEN or STRAYED out of my Paddock on the night of the 3rd instant, one GREY DRAUGHT HORSE, branded MM conjoined near shoulder. The above reward will be paid, if stolen, on conviction, or £2 if strayed, on delivery to
Hugh DOUGHERTY, Burrendulla

£2 REWARD
STRAYED from World's End, Meroo, on the 1st April, one Yellow Bay COB, branded JK near shoulder, star and snip down face. Whoever will deliver it to Mr. COVER, Grattai, will receive the above reward.

LIST of SUBSCRIPTIONS in aid of the Widow and Children of the late WILLIAM DOUGLASS.
Rev. A M'EWEN £2 2s
Mr. J COLEMAN £1
A B COX £1
J DICKSON £1
G H COX 10s
R HUGHSON 10s
W KENNEDY 10s
S BLACKMAN 11s
J D BRODRIBB 10s 6d
Mrs. M'KENNA 10s 6d
T MILLS 10s 6d
Mr T. NICHOLSON 10s
J HEALEY 10s
Edw. CLARKE £1
KEEFE 10s
F S 10s
Mr. J HOLBURD 10s
P NEVILLE 10s
G GIBSON 8s
J ATKINSON 10s
James CAIN 10s
Edw. FENTON 10s
A B C 10s
Rev. C M'CARTHY 10s
B 10s
Mr. C POLDEN 8s
D. CLEARY 7s 6d
Mrs M'COY 5s
Mr W SCHALKE 2s 6d
J R MILLER 5s
MOORE, Keene's Swamp 5s
LAMROCK 5s
BRANSCOMBE 5s
S HILL 5s
C FLOOD 5s
Miss MOORE 5s
Mr. E PHILLTOT 5s
F MOORE 5s
J MILLS 5s
UNCLES 5s
PATERSON 5s
W B 5s
Mr G CAMPBELL 5s
Miss KEATING 5s
Mr J C WILLIAMS 5s
F H 2s
Mr. WINTERS 5s
MOLLOY 5s
Jas. DALE 5s
J W FOREMAN 5s
BELL 5s
HONEYSETT, Sr 5s
SCHLACHTER 5s
Mrs HEARD 10s
Miss BELLMAN 5s
W THORNHILL 5s
W WOODS 5s
J FOX 5s
S WARD 2s 6d
Frances DONOVAN 2s 6d
M A DEVENY 2s 6d
Marg. M'PHEE 2s 6d
W HOLMES 2s 6d
Mr G WALKER 5s
P HENNESSEY 2s 6d
N MURPHY 3s
J CHRISTIAN 2s
Mrs S WILTON 5s
ALLPASS 5s
CONNELL 5s
SMITH, Carriers' Arms 2s 6d
ADAMS 2s 6d
SULLIVAN 2s 6d
E DALEY 2s 6d
Mr. WEBB 2s 6d
Mrs FOSTER 2s 6d
WILLIAMS 2s 6d
D C 2s 6d
SUEY 2s 6d
Mr L'ESTRANGE 3s
WILLIAMS 2s 6d
Mr. ROGERS 3s
H R R 3s
Mr. MURPHY 2s 6d
P RIDLEY 2s 6d
FOLEY 2s 6d
Mr. ANDERSON 2s 6d
Mr. SMITH 2s 6d
JOHNSON 2s 6d
WOODS 2s 6d
P LAHENE 2s 6d
D EARLS 2s 6d
Mr. S GARDENER 5s
W TULLOCH 5s
J MACEY 5s
J EDWARDS 5s
R PORTER 5s
A COCHRANE 5s
H W O 5s
Mr A BUCHANAN 5s
KNOWLES 5s
JACKSON 10s
J J MILLS 5s
SHUTTLEWORTH & CHARLTON 10s
Mrs PIDDINGTON 10s
Mr M H LYONS 10s
SCOLTOCK 10s
Mrs BLACKMAN 10s
Rev. J GUNTHER 7s
Mr G WARBURTON 5s
W KELLETT 5s
SULLIVAN 5s
SETTELL 5s
FOWLER 5s
T LEWIS 5s
J WILLIS 5s
W BALL 5s
J AKEHURST 7s 6d
H J LAVERS 5s
Mrs CHAPPELL 5s
Mr BRIAN 5s
J MALONEY 5s
Mr T ANDREWS 3s 6d
M DALY 2s 6d
CAMPBELL 2s 6d
G BARNES 2s 6d
W CURNOW 2s 6d
CHAMBERLAIN 2s 6d
SANDERS 2s 6d
EDWARDS 2s 6d
SHARPE 2s 6d
E R 2s 6d
Mr. BELL 2s 6d
LAHEEN 2s 6d
KEOGH 2s 6d
O'CONNOR 2s 6d
MELLON 3s
BLEHSCHMIED 2s 6d
JACKSON 2s 6d
FLEMING 2s 6d
ROBBINS 2s
COLEMAN 2s 6d
BARRY 2s 6d
CAPLIN 2s 6d
JOHNSON 2s 6d
CLARK 2s 6d
SEYMOUR 2s 6d
ROBINSON 2s 6d
Mr A NEATE 10s
Mr Geo. IVERY 5s
Mr Thos. HONESETT, junior 5s
Mr. LYONS 5s
Mr. BLACKMAN 10s
Mr W LUCK 2s 6d
Mr. John HONEYSETT, junior 5s
James DWANE, Charles FLOOD, collectors.

Saturday October 27, 1860

DEATH
On the 19th instant, Elizabeth Jane, only daughter of Mr. Charles SMITH, of Redbank, aged 21 months.

POLICE
Tuesday, October 23
Before the Police Magistrate

The case against Alderman WILTON, for presenting fire-arms to the Town Clerk was postponed till Tuesday next, owing to their being only one magistrate on the Bench.

Angus M'DONALD, charged with being drunk in Market-street, was fined 10s or 24 hours imprisonment.

Robert WELSH was fined 10s for being drunk on Sunday. His Worship said as it was his first offence, and he had been two days in the lock up, he would have let him off, had it not happened on Sunday.

W WAGG, of Guntawang, was summoned for a breach of the Masters and Servants Act. Adjourned in consequence of there not being another magistrate present.

Charles JOHNSTON, farmer, of Burrundulla, was charged by John BREWER with horse stealing.
Constable CAMPBELL apprehended prisoner by warrant for stealing and taking away a brown mare. Upon taking him into custody he denied taking the mare, but admitted that as he was riding along the Sydney road the mare galloped before him.
John BREWER, a native of Zommersetshire (stet), on oath, swore that he stayed at Johnny COX's on Tuesday night, and in the morning stated with a mare for Mudgee. The prisoner overtook him on horseback, and said I must have a pound from you to run your horse. I then turned the mare round, when he said he would crack my head if I did not give him 10s. He then galloped the mare away. There was a team ahead. I cried out to the driver to stop the mare, when JOHNSTON drove it into the bush. I have not seen the mare since. I value it at £10.
Eliza BREWER said I was riding on the dray. I saw my husband running after the mare, and calling out. A man like the prisoner was on horseback driving our mare. On reaching the dray he turned into the bush.
Thomas SMITH, farmer, knew both prisoner and witnesses; he heard BREWER called out "stop my mare". Could not swear that JOHNSTON was driving it away.
Mr. BRODRIBB contended there was not sufficient proof of taking, or of intention to appropriate the horse to his own use, and called
E MORLAY, who said he lived with JOHNSTON, saw him when he came home. He did not see a strange horse, nor had one been on the farm since.
W COX, aged 10 years and a half. I know JOHNSTON was riding with him on Wednesday. We passed BREWER on the road; he had a mare with him which had got loose. JOHNSTON offered to drive the mare for him. The mare went trotting on alongside of the dray. I left JOHNSTON at Redbank Creek. We did not drive the mare before us into the bush. We left it on the road near the dray.
In answer to the magistrate the boy said that he never said his prayers, and that he did not go to school.
The mother was severely reprimanded for her neglect.
JOHNSTON was discharged.

Eliza PLAYER was charged with being drunk and using obscene language in the public streets, and with riotous conduct in the watchhouse. She pleaded hard to be let off on account of her poor little children, who were hungry, she having been locked up since Friday. Dismissed with a caution.

MUDGEE COURT OF APPEALS
Monday October 22
Present the Police Magistrate and E MARLAY, Esq., J.P.

No.1. Mr. COCHRANE, who was rated at £52 for land adjoining his store, which he considered more than its yearly value, and contended there was no reason why he should e rated higher than Mr. DICKSON was for the land on the other side of the road. Mr. TEBBUTT, in the absence of Alderman LYONS and BLACKMAN (who were appointed to watch the proceedings on behalf of the Corporation) said that the rating was exceedingly moderate, the ground being worth from £5 to £7 per foot. Mr. COCHRANE called witnesses who said it was not worth more than £3 per foot. Mr. SHUTTLEWORTH declared he had such a poor opinion of the street that he would be sorry to have a house in it. The court reduced the amount to £45.
No. 2. Mr. SIMPSON objected to the valuation put upon his house and smithy: he would willingly let it for £1 per week, and yet he was assessed at £100 - reduced to £60. Mr. SIMPSON likewise objected to the assessment of his land in Mortimer and Gladstone streets. These cases were dismissed.
J. CLUFF objected to the valuation (£26) placed upon what Mr. TEBBUTT called a small township of bark huts. Mr. CLUFF, who set a much lower estimate on his property, was unable to obtain a reduction.
The next case was No. 9. Messrs TEBBUTT and GULLEY, who were rated at £300, and succeeded in reducing it to £250.
No. 10. Mr. LAMONT, for building in Market street, assessed at £320. This Mr. LAMONT considered excessive, especially as property has depreciated in value. He considered £250 a fair rental for the property - reduced to £300.
No. 14. J W FOREMAN, reduced from £160 to £145.
No. 16. Dr. RAMSAY could not see the justice of rating his property higher than the actual rental. His rent was £32 per annum and he was called upon for £2 12s - reduced to £40.
Mr. G WALKER - house and lands in Short-street, assessed at £65 - reduced to £57.
Mr. BRODRIBB appeared for Mr. DARE, who appealed against the assessment (£400) upon his steam mill. Mr. BRODRIBB contended that trade fixtures had no right to be assessed, and that allowance ought to be made for repairs, insurance, &c. Case dismissed.
Mr. CHARLTON, for dwelling house, rated at £100. Dismissed.
Mr. WILTON objected to the rating of his store in Market-street, and his new building in Church-street, the former being assessed at £100, the latter at £200. The Court reduced the store in Market-street to £80.
30 - Mrs Sarah BURTON from £1 10s to £1
32 - Mr. E BAYLY from £2 to £1
35 - Mr. J BARRY from £3 to £2 10s
37 - Mr W R HEARD from £12 to £10
39 - Mr. G HILL from £2 5s to £2
44 - Mr CLUFF from £1 10s to £1
45, 46, 47 - Mr. CLUFF from 15s to 10s
48 - Mr E FOLEY, from 10s to ?
49 - Mr. E FOLEY, from 10s to 5s

RESULT OF LAND SALES
Thursday, October 25th - Country Lots
Lot 1, 43acres, 1rood, R LOWE £1 per acre
Lot 2, 28 acres, R LOWE, £1 2s 6d per acre
Lot 3, 160 acres, lot 4, 99 acres, lot 5, 180acres, lot 6, 48acres, R LOWE, £1 per acre.
Lot 7, 40 acres, J W FOREMAN, £1 per acre
Lot 8, 40 acres, lot 9, 31 acres, J DERWIN, £1 per acre
Lot 10, 25 acres, Elizabeth RUSHBY, £1 per acre
Lot 11, 57 acres, lot 12, 36 acres, M H LYONS, £1 per acre
Lot 13, 66 acres, M H LYONS (amount obscured by tear in paper)
Lot 14, 30 acres, Elizabeth RUSHBY £1 per acre
Lot 15, 30 acres, lot 16, 40 acres, J GERWIN (? Obscured), £1 per acre
Lot 17, 53 acres, John HEALY (amount obscured)
Lot 18, 37 acres, John HEALY (amount obscured)
Lot 19, 80 acres, Richard CROSSING (amount obscured)
Town lots - too torn to transcribe correctly.

BIDDEN CREEK
(From a Correspondent)
Michael BRUCE, late of Piper's Flat, who was a short time since attacked by a deranged shepherd, has since died from the effect of the wound. It will be remembered that the shepherd had cut down a bullock young Bruce had killed; and on being remonstrated with the old man drew a knife and ripped him up, so that his bowels fell out. The poor fellow collecting tem into his arms ran to the hut. Three men cam up to the hut about the time and were requested by the woman (the only other person near the spot) to run for a medical man, which they refused to do. The consequence was young BRUCE had to hold his bowels up for full five hours before assistance could be obtained to replace them. Dr. HENTIG sewed them up, and for a time hopes were entertained that BRUCE would eventually recover. A change, however, for the worse took place, and death ensued. It is hoped that the three inhuman fellows who refused toe fetch the doctor will read this. An inquiry has been held on the body and a verdict returned in accordance with the evidence.


CRICKET
A match took place on Tuesday afternoon at A B COX Esq.'s, Burrundulla, between nine selected by Alderman S BLACKMAN and an equal number chosen by Mr. T HONEYSETT. The following is the score:-
BLACKMAN's side
OLIVER, b. by CUMMERFORD, c. by D M'KENZIE…3
T. HONEYSETT, junior, b. by HONEYSETT, senior…2
T NICHOLSON b. by CUMMERFORD…19
S BLACKMAN b. by CUMMERFORD, c. by F. COX…2
A B COX b. by HONEYSETT, senior…11
M WALKER, not out…5
MILLER b. by HONEYSETT, senior…0
J M'KENZIE b. by COMMERFORD…4
DAVIDSON…0
Byes…6
Total…52
HONEYSETT's side
HONEYSETT, senior, b. by S BLACKMAN…0
J. HONEYSETT b. T HONEYSETT, c. NICHOLS…16
M. CUMMERFORD, run out…2
T LEWIS, b. by T. HONEYSETT…0
J LWEIS, b. by ditto…2
G H COX, b. by ditto…0
J WILKIE, b. by ditto…4
F COX, not out…9
D M'KENZIE, b. by T HONEYSETT…4
Byes…6
Total…43
Mr. BLACKMAN's team winning by nine runs.

MUDGEE POLICE COURT, FRIDAY - Charles JOHNSON, who was sentenced by the Coonabarabran Bench for horse-stealing, and who escaped from the police when being escorted to Maitland, has been recaptured in Mudgee by constable KELLY. He was remanded till Tuesday next.

CAUTION
I HEREBY caution all storekeepers and others not to give trust or credit to my Wife, Mary WILSON, maiden name Mary M'SHANE, or to any other person, as I will not be responsible for any debts contracted in my name after this date, without my written authority.
James J WILSON
Burrundulla
Mudgee, 18th October, 1860

TO LET
THE HOTEL lately occupied by Mrs George VILE, known as
The Welcome Inn
and situated in Market-street, MUDGEE, together with the Stores, Stabling, and everything connected herewith.
Apply to M. J J WILSON, Burrundulla, Mudgee.

TO LET
THOSE centrally located Premises next the Mudgee Emporium, lately occupied by Mrs. RENER. Rent moderate.
Apply at the Mudgee Emporium.

SOLD FROM MY STATION
ONE BLUE SPECKLED BULLOCK, branded J sideways over B on near rump. The owner can have proceeds by applying to
E BLOOMFIELD, Louee.

Western Post (Newspaper)

Saturday, November 3, 1860

DEATH
At the Wesleyan Parsonage, Mortimer-street, Mudgee, Arthur Barrett, infant son of Rev. William J K PIDDINGTON, aged 17 months.

POLICE
Tuesday, October 30
Before the Police Magistrate, M H LYONS, T CADELL and E MARLAY, Esqrs., J.P.s.

Charles JOHNSON, remanded on Friday last for escaping from a constable who was conveying him to Maitland Gaol, was again remanded till Saturday next, in order to obtain the evidence of the Coonabarabran constable.

Michael PERRY and John LOFTLAND, apprehended by warrant on suspicion on horse-stealing. This case was postponed for a fortnight on account of Mr. BOWMAN being detained at Richmond through illness.
Mr. BRODRIBB appeared for Mr. BOWMAN.
Mr. CLARKE for PERRY.
Michael PERRY was again placed in the dock charged with using on the 16th July a brown mare without consent of the owner.
Arthur GARLING, of Macdonald's Creek said he had for some time lost a mare which returned on 30th September badly used and in poor condition. On Thursday, when in Mudgee with the mare, Charles JOHNSON recognized it, and said it was one he had seen in PERRY's possession.
Charles JOHNSON (prisoner on remand) said he know both prosecutor and PERRY. Had often seen the mare about GARLAND's place, but did not recollect ever seeing PERRY with it. On the day he was arrested he told GARLAND for a joke that he had seen PERRY riding the mare.
There being no other evidence the case was dismissed.

Alderman WILTON was charged by H TEBBUTT with presenting fire arms.
Mr. BRODRIBB for complainant
Mr. CLARKE for defendant
The Chief Constable deposed that on Saturday, October 20th, defendant was given into custody at DARE's mill, Mortimer-street, for an assault. On arriving he saw WILTON sitting on a flour sack with a revolver in his hand; he was in the act of lowering his arm as if he had been preparing for a shot. Mr. TEBBUTT, at the same time, stooped a little as if to avoid one. I took possession of the pistol which I now produce; it is still capped and loaded. He gave it up at once. My belief is that he had presented it at Mr. TEBBUTT.
Henry TEBBUTT said he knew the defendant and gave him in charge on the 20th instant for presenting a pistol at him at DARE's mill while he was discharging his duty as a special messenger of the Supreme Court. He had taken the precaution to provide himself with a revolver. On entering the mill WILTON presented his revolver and said "TEBUTT, I will drop you". I immediately covered him with my revolver; he then lowered his and was taken into custody.
H DWAIN, millwright, in the employ of Mr. DARE, said he saw a revolver in the possession of Mr. WILTON at the time Mr. TEBBUTT came to take possession. Mr. TEBBUTT was reading a paper when WILTON raised his revolver and said, "Read no more, TEBBUTT, or I will shoot you". He had carried a pistol himself that day.
J HAVILAND, carpenter, knows DARE's mill, and was there on Saturday to see the sport. WILTON had a revolver in his hand, which he raised. I cannot say to whom he presented it.
Job EDWARDS was present when the door was broken in. Several persons immediately went inside, himself amongst them. Mr. WILTON was sitting on a sack in front of HARDY. He did not see a revolver in Mr. WILTON's hand. Had he raised his arm he would have seen if he had one. Will not swear that he did not present one. He was close to TEBBUTT; had WILOTN fired he would have shot the Chief Constable.
John O'NEIL was the bailiff in possession. Heard Mr. WILTON say something to TEBBUTT about not giving any more "jaw". He did not see WILTON raise his revolver. He had one buckled about him all that day.
P LAHEEN went to the mill, expecting to see a row. Saw WILTON given into custody; both he and TEBBUTT had revolvers. Did not see WILTON raise his; had WILTON done so he must have seen it. Was in the mill from five to six seconds.
Thos. HONEYSETT, sen., said on the evening of the day in question he was at Mr. MILL's public house, when he heard a deal of "blowing". TEBBUTT said WILTON had not raised his revolver, but that he held it across his breast. Had he presented it, he (Mr. TEBBUTT) would certainly have shot him (WILTON).
A LAMONT was in front of the Court intending to bail Mr WILTON. Had some conversation with Mr. TEBBUTT, who said had WILTON offered to raise his arm he would have shot him. He replied, "Surely you would not have been game enough to have done that?" when he declared that he had shot more slaves when on board a man of war than WILTON had ever fired shots.
This being the whole of the evidence, and the Court being excessively close, the Bench adjourned for half-an-hour. On re-assembling the Police Magistrate said the Bench were unanimous that a breach of the peace had been committed. No doubt both parties had acted improperly; they would therefore inflict a lower penalty than they otherwise would have done - 20s. and costs.

DISCHARGING FIREARMS
Henry TEBBUTT was charged by John CRIMMINS with firing a revolver in Mortimer-street. Defendant admitted the fact, and pleaded in justification that he had found it necessary in self-defence to provide himself with arms; as soon as the cause was removed, he did not consider it prudent to carry his weapon loaded through the public street, so discharged it in the air.
The Bench said they considered discharging firearms in the township such a serious offence that they should have inflicted the highest penalty - £5. In this case they would reduce it to 20s and costs, and trusted it would act as a caution to others; it was a most dangerous practice, and one that a stop must be put to; for considering the frequency of the offence, and the number of horsemen constantly riding through the town it would result in something fatal.

MR. MARLAY, J.P.
Mr. MARLAY, the gentleman so handsomely mentioned in the following address from the "Maitland Mercury", having come to reside amongst us, we have pleasure in giving it insertion in our columns. From the little we have seen of Mr. MARLAY, we are satisfied his residence amongst us will prove an acquisition to our district.
Address presented to Edward F MARLAY, Esq., Merriwa
We the inhabitants of Merriwa and its district, wish, prior to your departure, to offer you our very sincere thanks and kindness you have evinced to all classes since you first came amongst us, and for the untiring zeal shown by you in your endeavours to further the interests of this township.
As an old and must esteemed resident we cannot allow you to depart without expressing our deep regret at losing so kind and valuable a friend, one who honorable principles, upright conduct, and generous disposition have won the goodwill of us all, and a name never to be effaced from the memory of one of us, and which, when brought into mention, will always be spoken of with the greatest respect.
We are not unmindful of your past services as a Justice of the Peace, not is it our intention in return to shew any ingratitude for the same; but as a token of the high manner in which we esteem your impartiality as a magistrate and thorough gentlemanly demeanour on all occasions, we have much pleasure in asking you to accept this Service of Plate, together with a Flower Vase, the free gift of us all, which we fully believe will convince you of our devoted attachment to your person, and of our best wishes for your future welfare and happiness.
We must beg of you to convey to Mrs. MARLAY our sentiments of good feeling, together with our sincere hope that you may both be spared to see your young family grow up around you, endowed with the good qualities of their parents, and that you, Sir, may live to see your sons begin life with the determination of following in the steps of him to whom we must now, with reluctance, say farewell.
Signed by eighty-seven of the inhabitants of Merriwa.
(REPLY)
It is with feelings of no ordinary intensity that I have listened to your very flattering address, and received the generous and munificent present which accompanies it. Believe me that it is with every genuine and sincere feeling of pride, delights, and gratitude that I accept them; and beg to thank you from my heart for so truly splendid manifestation of your appreciation of my past conduct, which, however, you must permit me to remark, you have rewarded far, very far, beyond its desert. Let my future lot be cast wherever it may, I shall never cease to remember Merriwa and its inhabitants with feelings of the most unfeigned and grateful pleasure; and I most fervently pray that, individually and collectively, you may enjoy peace, happiness, and prosperity in your homes, and in your various avocations.
For your kind expressions of regard towards Mrs. MARLAY and our children, I also offer you my sincere thanks. Rest assured that she will most truly appreciate the honour you have conferred upon me, and hail with unfeigned delight the testimony you have given of your interest in our future welfare.
Your beautiful and valued gift will indeed be a proud memento to hand down to my children, and most truly do I join with you in hoping that, by God's blessing, it may prove a successful means of imbueing them with a never-ceasing desire to secure the happiness of those around them, by obeying that golden rule, "Do unto others as you would they should do unto you".
Once more receive my deeply-felt and grateful thanks not only for your splendid and esteemed testimonial, but also for the many, many acts of attention and kindness me and mine have received at your hands during our residence among you. I need not, I am sure, pain you and myself more by uttering the feelings of regret I entertain at our separation than by saying, how earnestly I wish it were otherwise. But so it must be, and nothing is left me but to say "Farewell", with every sincere wish for the continued advancement of yourselves and district.


HARGRAVES
From a Correspondent

LOUISA CREEK, October 27 - The sleepiness of the almost "Sleepy Hollow" of the diggings has been aroused during the last week - not by any great finds, nor even by a find of the smallest of nuggets, but the people have been put on the qui vive by a case at the Police Court, which has afforded them the sole topic of conversation for the past week. The hearing of the case (Ellen HOUGHTON versus Mary YOUNG) came off on Thursday last before our Commissioner and Captain BROWNE, P.M. Ellen HOUGHTON, the complainant, deposed: I am the wife of James HOUGHTON, miner on this creek, &c., (and then followed the usual amount of endearing epithets from the fair Ellen and her affectionate friend which are generally in the mouth of ladies who have come off senior wranglers at the College of Billingsgate. After a patient investigation, the case was dismissed, the P.M. seeming to think that neither of the ladies were quite as white as they painted themselves. Ellen deposed that she (the said Mary) did not only stone but bone her. Ellen further deposed that a horse belonging to her husband had strayed from her hut, and while seeking it, Mary rushed at her from behind scrub, heavily charged with the missiles beforenamed, viz., stones and bones, and did then and there discharge the said missiles at her. Ellen, however, although one of the smartest frigates that ever sailed into action, was not prepared for the precision and practice of her rival; she therefore cried "peccavi!" which brought her loving spouse, Jemmy HOUGHTON; and who, at the Magistrate's table corroborated all her statements Mary pleaded in extenuation that, hearing Ellen had obtained a polite invitation from the police magistrate to attend one of his levees, she proceeded forthwith to inform her husband of that interesting fact, and in doing so encountered the fair Ellen, who saluted her with "I've got you now, my lady", and discharged a volley of four rounds, two shots of which took effect, to convince the Bench of the amount of injury sustained the fair Ellen laid bare her alabaster and for muscular development, "Oh, ye gods and little chickens what a sight for mortals to behold".
After a further hearing of the case the lady was bound over to keep the peace for a year and a day.

The next case was James HAMILTON and James JOINER. The smallest slip of a fight had occurred between these gentlemen on the night of Wednesday, which fight HAMILTON was anxious to renew on the following day. JOINER expressed his willingness to accede to the request provided he was allowed a small pickaxe; this not meeting the views of Mr. HAMILTON, the case was eventually left to the Police Magistrate for decision, who bound JOINER in two ten pounds and a twenty to keep the peace for six months.

In mining matters I have nothing of any moment to report, save the party working under the direction of Dr. STREET, who are going to a great deal of expense to sluice the crushed quartz left by The Colonial Gold Company. I trust that their efforts will be rewarded by ample success. The public at large and the miners in particular are much indebted to the worthy doctor for the unwearied efforts made by that gentleman over a period of six years to develop the mineral resources of this district. I am quite unknown (I believe) to that gentleman, but I really think, without any flattery, that he deserves the thanks of this community.


RESULT OF LAND SALE, MUDGEE
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2. - COUNTRY LOTS.
Lots 1 and 2, 30a. each, £1 per acre; lot 3, 38a., £1 4s; lot 4, 41a., £1 6s; lot 5, 48a., £1 10s.; lot 6, 28a., and lot 7, 31a., £1; E. BLACKMAN.
Lot 8, 37a., £1 9s., W. MOGG.
Lot 9, 38a., 1 10s., E. BLACKMAN.
Lot 10, 294a., £1, S.A. BLACKMAN.
Lot 11, 54a., £1, C. ROBINSON.
Lot 12, 52a., £1, E. BLACKMAN.
Lot 13, 56a., £1, W. COLEMAN.
Lots 14, 40a., 15, 50a., 16, 40a., £1, N. P. BAYLY.
Lot 17, 30a., £1 M'MANUS.
Lots 18 to 23, no bid.
Lots 24, 25, 26, each 30a., lot 27, 39a., lot 28, 33a., £1, G. ROUSE.
Lot 29, 30a., £1, E. ROUSE.
Lot 30, 42a. 2r., £1, E. RICHARDS.
SUBURBAN LOTS
Lot 31, 7a. 2. 22p., lot 32, 6a. 0r. 2p., £2 10s. per acres, S.A. BLACKMAN.
Lot 33, no bid.
Lots 34 and 35, each 5a., £2 10s., H. W. OLIVER.
Lot 36, 5a., £2 10s., E. RICHARDS.
Total amount of sale £1322 13s. 8d.

Agents for Western Post, 3 November 1860
Bathurst…F G JOHNSON
Cobbera…J BLAKEMORE
Coolah….J M'CUBBIN, JAMES BELL
Cassilis…__MILLER
Coolabarrabeyan…Wm. FIELD
Coonamble…David M'CULLUM
Dubbo…___McDONALD
Erringganerring…John ENWRIGHT
Grattai…Edward COVER
Guntawang…___OLIPHANT
Mundooran…David COCKBURNE
Merriwa…David MUNRO
Oakey Creek….___ALLISON
Rylestone…Dr. WESTON
Sydney…GREVILLE, Bridge-st
Urawilky… James HILL
Wee Waa…Wm. THURLOW
Wellington…__DUCKETT

Saturday, 10 November, 1860

BIRTH
On the 7th instant, at her residence, Mortimer-street, the wife of Mr. John Hardesty WATTS, of a daughter.

MUDGEE COURT OF REQUESTS
Monday, November 5
Before the Police Magistrate and M H LYONS, Esq., J.P.

W H DICKER v. W BESSANT. Mr. CLARKE for plaintiff. Mr. JAMES for defendant. This was an action for £9 12s., being the balance due for splitting. Nonsuited, no account having been rendered.
WILLIS v. John ROW. For goods sold and work done. Verdict for plaintiff for £7.
RAMSAY v. Walter ROBINS. A claim of £3 for medical attendance. To be paid in fourteen days.
RAMSAY v. T. LEWIS. Also for medical attendance. Verdict for plaintiff for 15s.
RAMSAY v. J. MILLER. For £9 10s. MILLER disputed the charge as being excessive, and said he did not think he out to be called upon to pay it as the boy died after he was cured. To be paid with 16s. 6d. costs within a month.
C. LEE v. W.H. DOCKER. This was a debt of £3 15s. contracted during the election of L. H. BAYLY, Esq.; as defendant was in liquor at the time he could not dispute the amount, and would pay it when he had the means. One month given to liquidate the debt.
T. CLOUGH v. M.H. LYONS. In this case 30s. was paid into Court for work and labour done. CLOUGH claimed £2 10s. Witnesses were called to prove the price of fencing, after which the Police Magistrate decided that the money paid into Court was sufficient.
A GARLAND v. W. ROE. This was for a balance of £2 for a beast sold. Settled out of Court.
LAMROCK v. T. PARKER. For promissory note for £10 12s. Not served.
J. WILLIS v. A.B. COX. £1 11s. for work done. Deferred till next Court.
J. WILLIS v. C. WILLIAMS. Balance for work done. Verdict for plaintiff - 10s.
J. WILLIS v. G. H. COX. This was an action for £3, being the charge for making two brands of the letter G X. It was contended by defendant that the charge was excessive, the usual price being 6s. per letter. J. CAMPBELL had made the same brand for 12s. The Court gave a verdict for 30s. as the brands in question were of a superior description. WILLIS declined giving them up for that sum - he preferred to keep them as specimens.
RAMSAY v. BEEK. £2 4s for medical attendance. Settled out of court.
W. HOWARTH v. C. WOOD. Verdict for plaintiff - £10.
W. HOWARTH v. Ann M'DONALD £10. Order to be paid by monthly instalments.
W. HOWARTH v. W. PIPER. Verdict for £5 18s.3d.
E. DALY v. BROOKS. £1 15s. for goods sold and delivered. Settled out of court.
R. JACKSON v. T. BOYCE. An action for £4 15s. for trespass on defendant's cows and pigs in plaintiff's paddock. Plaintiff said he had suffered greatly through BOYCE allowing his cows to be roaming at large; it was only the day before he turned six head out of his grounds. BOYCE said plaintiff was in the habit of letting down his slip rails for the purpose of allowing the cattle to enter; he had himself seen plaintiff lying on the stack like a "possum" for the purpose of watching an opportunity. N. BREWER, formerly in the employ of JACKSON, said he was not only in the habit of letting down the rails, but had likewise offered to give him half the damage for pound dues. Verdict for plaintiff for £2 5s. 6d. and costs, which plaintiff said he would hand over to the hospital, less professional costs.
E. CLARK v. KNOWLES. Promissory note for £3 11s. 8d. Verdict for plaintiff.
C. LAMROCK v. J. MILLER. CLARKE (for TEMPLETON) for plaintiff. BRODRIBB for defendant. This was £4 13s. for goods supplied and stabling of horse. Defendant was working at Cherry Tree Hill, and as a traveler was in the habit of calling at plaintiffs for drink. He had on one occasion two gallons of strong rum, which was delivered to him, part of which he left to be sent on by the ail. Mr. BRODRIBB contended he was bound by the Act to take the whole away. The Court took a different view, and ordered the amount claimed to be paid.
W. HOWARTH v. J. MORLEY. £4 12s. for goods sold. Verdict for plaintiff.

POLICE
Saturday, November 3
Before the Police Magistrate and M H LYONS, Esq., J.P.
Charles JOHNSON was charged by the Chief Constable with having unlawfully used a grey horse, the property of Mr. J J WILSON, of Burrundulla, which horse was found near the Round Water Hole, on the Road to the Queen's Pinch.
J J WILSON deposed that he lost the horse about a fortnight since, it was then "rolling fat", the horse was now in the yard of the Police Court in very bad condition with marks of hard riding and ill usage.
Edward COVER had about a fortnight since overtaken the prisoner on the Bocoble Road; he was riding a horse similar to the one in the yard; prisoner said he should not like being caught with the horse as he would get "three months".
W. BESSANT, sawyer at Triangle Swamp, identified the horse as one he had seen in prisoner's possession.
Mr. BRODRIBB, in an ingenious speech, tried hard to prove that the witnesses had been mistaken in the horse.
The Bench sentenced the prisoner to pay a penalty of £20, or to be imprisoned in Bathurst gaol for six months with hard labour.
Mr. BRODRIBB, on behalf of the prisoner, requested that as he had first to undergo a sentence at Maitland, an order might be made for his detention there, it would save the trouble and expense of removing prisoner all the way to Bathurst. The Bench granted the application.
On request of the Chief Constable the prisoner was ordered to be detained in Mudgee lock-up for seven days in order to allow time for preferring another charge.

Tuesday, November 6
Before the Police Magistrate, E. MARLAY, and M H LYONS, Esqrs., J.P.s.

W. BISHOP, saddler, was charged by James MATHEWS with detaining trade tools, his property.
James MATHEWS swore that he had been engaged by defendant for twelve months on piecework; being short of tools, he requested BISHOP to send to Sydney for those required, and that he was to be charged with them; he had never come to a settlement; some weeks he received 5s. at others 10s. for work he had done; he always considered the tools were his; he valued them at 20s.
BISHOP said when he wrote fro the tools MATHEWS owed him £8; he was seldom long at work together, and was promised that tools should be his when he had earned the money. Case dismissed.

W. WAGG was charged under the Master and Servants' Act, upon information of Mr. G H COX with retaining one Winifred FORD, a hired servant. The female, it appeared, was hired in Sydney as a house-servant for 12 months, with the understanding that her fare was paid, but which she was to return in case of leaving within the stipulated time. After being about five weeks at Broomby, WAGG paid her a visit, whom he styled his "cousin", and requested permission to take her to Mudgee; this being refused, she absconded, and it appears got married to defendant on the night in question. WAGG said he was bound to marry the woman; in fact, if he had not taken her away she would have followed him to Guntawang. Owing to some difference of opinion on the Bench, the case was adjourned till the 6th December, WAGG having received a piece of paper from the Police Office in Sydney to attend a charge for neglecting his children.

John HEALY was fined 5s and costs for allowing a cow and calf to be in the public streets.

Robert CANN, brickmaker, Burrundulla, was charged with having fired a gun at Sarah, his wife, on Saturday morning.
Constable MORAN, being sworn, stated that he arrested the prisoner at the brickyard on Saturday last for firing at his wife; he saw the marks of shot on her arm; upon searching he found a gun which had recently been discharged; the reason given by the wife for the prisoner shooting her was that she had refused to fetch a bag of flour from the mill.
Sarah CANN (who had cooled down, gave her evidence most reluctantly, evidently wishing to screen her husband from the charge. On being sworn she said her husband was in liquor at the time; they had a quarrel when he fired at her; he did not intend to hurt her; she had no shot marks about her, at the time she was afraid of her husband, but was not now.
Dr. RAMSAY having been requested to examine the left arm, said there were marks of shot on it.
The Bench seriously admonished the prisoner, and said he had to thank his wife he was not sentenced to two years' imprisonment, in consideration for her they would only give him seven days in the lock-up.

Friday, November 9
Before the Police Magistrate and M H LYONS, Esq., J.P.

Johnny COX was summoned for having swapped with John JOHNSON, a roan filly branded EC No. 2, the supposed property of Thos. ISBESTER, for a black horse called Tiger.
Thos IBSESTER, on oath, stated that he had bought the chance of the mare in question of Little about two years ago; he should know her 300 yards off, irrespective of brands. Had lost her nine or ten months.
D. LAWSON said he believed the mare in the yard to be ISBESTER's; it was the same brand and the same colour as one ISBESTER had lent him.
James KIRKNESS, upon being called, refused to take the oath. Not being able to give any reason, the Police Magistrate ordered the oath to be administered, which had the effect of vanishing his scruples, for he immediately kissed the book. He knew the mare, and believed it to be the property of ISBESTER.
John JOHNSON swore at having exchanged the mare with COX. She was perfectly wild, not having been broken in; he claimed her as his property.
For the defence,
C. PALMER said he knew both parties in Court, likewise the mare; the one in the yard is not the one ISBESTER used to ride.
W. HAINES would swear that the mare in the yard was not ISBESTER's; it was not more than four years old. Had branded ISBESTER's filly three years and a half ago, when she was at least two years old.
Mr. CLARK was about to call other witnesses, when the Bench said there was no occasion; the plaintiff had evidently made a mistake. They should therefore dismiss the case.

Mrs. BLACKMAN was fined 5s. and costs for allowing four pigs to be straying in one street, and 5s. and costs for a single pig running in another street.

Saturday, November 17, 1860

BIRTH
On Friday (yesterday), the 16th instant, at her residence, Mudgee, Mrs. Samuel A BLACKMAN, of a daughter.

POLICE
Tuesday, November 13
Before the Police Magistrate, E. MARLAY and M H LYONS, Esqrs., J.P.s.

John HOWARD was charged with stealing a horse, saddle, and bridge, the property of Mr. DURHAM.
Constable FARRAND apprehended prisoner about seven o'clock on Sunday evening on Menah Flat. He was walking towards Mudgee; on telling HOWARD what he was charged with, he said he knew nothing about the matter. The horse is now in the Police Court yard.
Mr. Charles DURHAM, of Sydney, said that the horse referred to was his property. On Saturday last he had occasion to see Mr. MILLS on business, and fastened his horse to a post outside the house; when he came out he found it was gone, and was told that a man without a coat had taken it away; he valued it at £25.
John HAYWOOD, messenger to the Bank of New South Wales, saw prisoner at the Royal Hotel on Saturday night; was invited by him to have a glass, which I refused. He said, "I have a nugget of a horse here - will you buy it?" I replied that , supposing I wanted one, I had not funds enough to purchase it. He said he had two more like it. He then walked away with the horse towards Mr. W BLACKMAN's, but shortly after I saw him riding back. Hearing inquiries about a horse, I gave information, and watched on the bridge for the prisoner till after 10 o'clock. HOWARD is the man.
Jacob JULIAN stated that prisoner was drinking at his house on Saturday; he purchased a bottle of rum, which he left on the counter. About eight o'clock he returned with a horse which I remarked was a fine one. "Yes", said he, "it belong's to my mate".
Constable KELLY having had information of the robbery, went in search of the man, and found the horse now in the Police Yard at Wilbertree. He was hobbled with a strap. I led him to Mudgee, where he was claimed; he is branded LM.
Mr. DURHAM recalled, said he had not received his saddle or bridle; he valued them at £10.
The prisoner having received the usual caution, said he knew nothing about the horse; he had been drinking the last five weeks, he had no idea of stealing.
Committed to Bathurst Quarter Sessions.

J FERGUSON was summoned under the Masters and Servants Act with having unlawfully absconded himself from his situation without leave.
Jacob JULIAN said the defendant came to him in great distress, and requested to be hired. Having heard a bad character of the man, he said he would take him on trial for two months at 11s per week with the promise of a glass or two each day. On Friday last, having occasion to go to the bank, FERGUSON got drunk, spoiled a splendid plumb pudding that was cooking, and left the place.
Mr. JULIAN not wishing to be troubled with him again, the Bench ordered that he should forfeit his wages, amounting to thirty shillings, which Mr. JULIAN directed to be paid to the treasurer of the hospital.

Mrs. BATES v. John ENRIGHT. Settled out of court.

John HAVILAND was summoned for unlawfully detaining the property of Jane BODMIN.
Jane BODMIN, on oath, swore that having spent all her money in paying the expenses of defendant's wedding, she had taken a situation, and left her little boy in HAVILAND's care with the understanding that he was to have the use of her furniture so long as he used the child well. On calling to see the child Mrs. BODMIN found all the things sixes and sevens, and the child's clothes converted into aprons for defendant's wife.
HAVILAND declared the goods were his; that plaintiff owed him £9 16s. for bonnets, dresses, board and lodging, &c., an that he would not give £2 for all the things she claimed.
The Bench ordered the whole of the articles to be restored.

Michael PERRY and John LOFTLAND remanded on suspicion of horse stealing were allowed bail to appear as soon as Mr. BOWMAN was well enough to give evidence.

Friday, November 16
Before M H LYONS, Esq., J.P.

A ROBERTS, charged with being drunk, was admonished and discharged in consequence of its being his first offence, and having been in the lock-up 24 hours.

Dan HERN was fined 20s., or 48 hours' for being drunk in Market-street.

The case against Mr. READFORD for having in his possession a horse (which he had purchased), the property of W FIELD, was adjourned till the 30th instant, in order to send to Coonabarabran for witnesses.

Thomas BOLLARD, summoned by T. WILSON, of Burrundulla, for breach of Impounding Act. Case dismissed, J. CATLIN being the owner of the cattle.

Jane COUGHLIN, charged with stealing £3 from the person of R. BARLOW and Mary GAILLETT with stealing £3 10s. from the person of W. CROSSLAND, were, on the application of Mr. BRODRIBB, discharged in consequence of the prosecutors not appearing.

Ladies' Subscription
FOR THE COMMUNION, PULPIT, AND DESK FITTINGS FOR ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, MUDGEE.

Mrs OLIVER £5
Mr. E BLOOMFIELD £1
Mrs. N P BAYLY £2 10s
Mrs. A B COX £2
Mrs G H COX £3
Mrs. BLACKMAN £2 10s
Mrs. W R BLACKMAN £2 10s
Mrs J E MILLS £1
Mrs HUGHSON £1 1s
Mrs ENRIGHT 10s
Miss Clara MILLS 10s
Miss LAMROCK 5s
Miss READFORD 10s
Miss GUNTHER 10s
Mr W BLESCHMED 10s
Mrs STANBURY £1
Mrs S A BLACKMAN £2 10s
Mrs W LEWIS £1
Mrs AKEHURST 10s
Mrs SHUTTLEWORTH £2
Mrs H FROST £1 1s
Mrs JACKSON 10s
Mrs JULIAN 10s
Mrs T CHAPPELL £1
Miss MILLER 5s
Mrs HOSLING 10s
Mrs R CROSSING 10s
Mr. John KNOX 10s
Mrs KNOX 10s
Mrs J A H PRICE £1
Mrs KING £1
Mrs C B LOWE £1
Mrs Robt. LOWE £2
Mrs W LOWE £2
Mrs MOND £1
Mrs NRANSCOMBE 5s
Mrs HOWARTH £2
Mrs CARTER 2s 6d
Mr J BURGESS 10s
Mrs M'KENNA £1
Mrs ATKINSON £1
Mrs M A KING 2s 6d
Mrs WILLIS 10s
Mrs HAVES 10s
Mrs PATECEL 10s
Mrs REUBEN 10s
Mr T H SINDEN £1
Mr H DEAN 10s
Miss MILLER (Oakfield) 10s
Mr W BANNERMAN (Sandhurst) £2 4s
Mr W WOODHOUSE (Sydney) £1
Mrs Geo. ROUSE £5
Miss ROUSE £2
Mr. W BOWMAN £1 1s
Mr J A H PRICE £5
Mrs T D MILLER (Oakfield) £1

Saturday, November 24, 1860

POLICE
Tuesday November 20
Before the Police Magistrate, the Mayor, E MARLAY, and M H LYONS, Esqrs.,J.P.s.

Elizabeth PIPER (that old offender) was fined 10s., or 48 hours in the lock-up for drunkenness.

Two cases against James CARMICHAEL for stealing two anti-macassars and a dog were dismissed, the affair having arisen through a quarrel amongst a party of women.

John COX was sued under the Masters and Servants Act for £2 15s balance of wages due to John FLANAGAN. Verdict for plaintiff.

Alfred JACKSON, the Mudgee Champion, was summoned at the instance of John SHEAHAN for balance of wages due for splitting. Verdict for amount claimed (£5 6s 8d) to be paid in fourteen days.

Charles JOHNSON was charged with horse stealing.
The Chief Constable said that on the 27th October he found a horse (now in the yard) in the bush at Burrundulla. On informing the prisoner of the charge, he said he took it from Bolaro (Mr. WALKER's station), and rode it to Burrundulla, where he turned it out.
W H BAYLY having been sworn, said he knew the horse - it was the property of Mr. MACARTHUR. It was in has charge as agent to Mr. MACARTHUR. It was missed from the station about the 20th October. He had never given any one authority to take it. The horse was one that never strayed, and was always easily caught. He is branded NK, and is worth £25.
Fined £10, or in default of payment to be imprisoned for three months, such sentence to commence at the expiration of the six months already inflicted by this Bench.

Wednesday, November 21
Before M H LYONS, Esq., J.P.
Patrick KENNEDY was charged with being drunk, and assaulting a constable in the execution of his duty.
Constable MORAN said at eight o'clock yesterday he found prisoner drunk in Market-street. He asked if I had seen his dray. Upon taking him in charge he called me a bloody _____, caught me by the hair, struck me with his clenched fist, and afterwards attempted to strike me with a stone.
Constable MACBEATH said when prisoner was brought to the lock-up; he was very drunk and violent, and during the night broke through the lid of a tub, the property of the government.
Fined 20s., or 24 hours imprisonment.

Philip KENNEDY was charged with attempting to rescue the above prisoner while in the custody of the police; his excuse was that he preferred taking his brother to the lock-up.
Fined 40s., which was immediately paid.

Charles JOHNSON, charged by Constable KELLY with escaping from Coonabarabran lock-up was ordered to be forwarded to Maitland.

Friday, November 23
Before his Worship the Mayor and M H LYONS, Esq., J.P.

JUPP v. REITER. Case of assault, adjourned till Tuesday.


FIRE AT BROOMBY
On Wednesday afternoon a fire occurred at the establishment of Mr G H COX, which but for its timely discovery might have been attended with distastrous consequences. It appears that Mr. COX, who was about proceeding to Mudgee for the purpose of attending a meeting, had his attention attracted by some smoke arising from a hay shed and on going up to it found the hay on fire. Providentially a good supply of water and plenty of assistance being at hand it was speedily extinguished. We believe it was occasioned by a little child playing with a fire stick. The amount of damage done was the destruction of a few tons of hay.

DEVIL'S HOLE
Mr. SCHMYTH and party have made considerable progress in the opening of their quartz reef; the indications of gold continue to be of a most favourable character. Within a short distance of this reef a party of Chinamen have during the last three weeks obtained upwards of £600 worth of gold. Last week this claim yielded 32 ounces.

HARGRAVES
A NUGGET WORTH £70 FOUND
We have been informed by a storekeeper from the Louisa Creek that Mr. CHARD, an old resident on those diggings picked up a beautiful nugget, worth about £70, which he found cropping above the ground, the late rains having washed away the soil, which for ages have hid it from vulgar gaze.

RYLESTONE
From our Correspondent.
Nov. 17 - Our land sale on Tuesday was exceedingly well attended, and for one or two………….very spirited bidding took place.
The first lot, 39 acres, at £3 9s. per acre, T BARNABY
Lot 4, 30 acres, upset price, G PHILPS
Lot 5 and 6, upset price, M. MOORE
Lot 7, to R and W MARTIN
Lot 11, to W BOWMAN
Lot 13, 30 acres, at £3 5s. per acre, Hon. R FITZGERALD
Lots 14 and 15, 100 acres and 30 acres, upset price.
The other lots, up to 23 were withdrawn by Government, we have heard in consequence of gold being found on them; be this as it may, we saw a very nice sample of gold on Monday obtained from Carwell Creek, and we hope that a gold field may be discovered in the neighbourhood of Rylestone, and then our village, hitherto so little known, and I may, so little thought of, may perhaps be heard a little more of.

To S H TERRY, Esq.
SIR
We the Undersigned Electors of the District of Mudgee, desire to express our satisfaction with your Parliamentary conduct. Your honesty, and your attention to your post, but above all, your votes on the Land question, have excited our admiration, and we hereby pledge ourselves to use our utmost exertion to again secure your return, felling satisfied you will never betray the People's cause.
Callaghan McCARTHY, R.C.C.
W J K PIDDINGTON, W.M.
M H LYONS
W READFORD
D CASSIN
J SULLIVAN
C S DEACON
W F STANBURY
J DICKSON
S MOORE
J JOHNSTONE
W KELLETT
J FAHL
T BODMAN
P HOGAN
T PANDER
O LOYDIN
R BAYLISS
E LOVEJOY
A CHOCHRANE
W BISHOP
W F KERR
T E MILLS
C FLOOD
J MOLLOY
J J MILLS
S MILLS
W TULLOCH
J CRONIN
M GRADY
J SAUNDERS
C MILLER
H K REUBEN
M JACOBS
M LAMBROCK
C LAMROCK
A MURPHY
W MURPHY
C BROOKES
D HEATHERMAN
M DALEY
J SMITH
A COX
T HANDLEY
T BOYCE
R CROSSING
J BOWES
E RICHARDS
W COLEMAN
J MYLES
W ROBBINS
W PRESTON
G COLE
J ORCHARD
J WILLIAMS
G SIMPSON
J M GIBSON
H J LAVERS
H SMITH
J KELLY
P CONNOR
W BENNETT
J THOMPSON
J HARRIS
J RANDELL
S G HATTON
G GIBBS
A RODGERS
P LAHENE
J C WILLIAMS
R J HASSALL
H ALBURY
C GARDOLL
M BAILY
T AIMES
J CORLEY
J THOMAS
J FINNCANE
E SWORDS
A THOMSON
W CURRAN
J T WOODS
E LEANE
J CAIN
J ANDERSON
J KERR
J D MILLER
C LEE
G E SHETTLE
L H KNIGHT
J HUME
J KNAUE
P READY
T KANE
T KNOWLES
D GLEESON
J WESTLEY
T WRESTLEY
T KEOGH
C RYAN
J JUPP
C WARMAN
John DARVIN
James DARVIN
J DARVIN
M DARVIN
P DARVIN
J HANNAN
J QUIN
John MURRAY
James MURRAY
H FLYNN
T HENSLEY
H BEAD
W KERNEY
W KERSHAW
G CAMPBELL
J BARTON
G BARTON
T HICKEY
J CURRAN
N M'BUDE
J HALL
S PARKINS
M MIDLEY
J MIDLEY
J WALSH
J WALSH
J HUTCHINSON
B CULLEN
C CULLEN
R H REUBEN
J CHAMBERLAIN
C SMITH
J GOHOGHON
J SHEAN
W KEENEDY
J HOGAN
J BOURKE
D BATTEN
O LARGAN
J ROSS
M BROPHY
E MURPHY
P HENNESSY
J STARKE
W CHRISTIAN
D EARLS
D HEAVIN
T NICHOLSON
M MORRIS
J COMYN
J GLOGEEN
John CORTER
James CORTER
J SOUTHWICK
J ARBUCKLE
W SEKNEIKER
F B GULLEY
T McINTYRE
A T P CUTTING
W PYNE
J W FOREMAN
E BAX
H BENNET
J ASHTON
G McGUIGGAN
H DOYLE
J DOYLE
W RYAN
W HURLEY
T JONES
J CANE
J DWANE
E FANTON
M SADDINGTON
James MADIGAN
John MADIGAN
J KELMAN
J KENNEDY
T KENNEDY
E TOOHEY
E REILEY
P REILEY
J REILEY
J GLAGIER
J CARTER
M SHARE
J JONSON
T BROWN
J CARLEY
W CORTER
W GILLESPIE
W BRANSCOMBE
D LAHANE
John McGUINESS
J McGUINESS
T McCUIGGAN
W ARNOLD
R BEDIDON
J CONNELL
W BATTEN
W SIMPSON
W ARNOLD
J HOLBURD
M SHEPHERD
F BUCHHOLTZ
W JONES
J WARREN
O LAYDIN
W MARTIN
W SIZE

Western Post (Newspaper) August 1861

August 3, 1861

SUPPOSED MURDER ON THE MEROO
On Thursday, the 1st instant, Dr KING, the coroner, held an inquest at Cox's Flat, in the district of Mudgee, on the body of a man of the name of Frederick SCHOFIELD lying dead there. Corporal EWING deposed from information he received he proceeded to Cox's Flat, where he found the body of deceased lying in a hut near the tent of a man named KELLY. There was a wound upon the left side of the head, and a quantity of blood on the ground. Blood had likewise trickled out of the right eye. From further informant he received he arrested James KELLY; a man of the name of AMBLER gave him a tomahawk covered in blood.
Michael EGAN said prisoner's wife came to his tent after sunrise, and said she thought SCHOFIELD was dead; KELLY came shortly after and said that he would give himself up, for he expected he had killed SCHOFIELD. He remained in the tent until the police came; he would not answer any question, and appeared like a man who was wild. Ann EGAN deposed that prisoner's wife came running to the tent crying "EGAN, EGAN, myself and children have run for our lives; I expect he has killed poor SCHOFIELD; watch him, I expect he will come up. Open the door he has got no arms." She (Mrs EGAN) did so; KELLY came in soon after and fell upon the floor, saying that his wife and children were gone to destruction. SCHOFIELD was staying in KELLY's hut. She went out and saw him lying on the road bleeding from a wound over the ear.
Joseph AMBLE, was partner with deceased; they were miners working on the Meroo; SCHOFIELD was sleeping at KELLY's in consequence of prisoner being ill; he asked him on Sunday when he would be down; he said as soon as KELLY was better; he came there in consequence of having been told SCHOFIELD was murdered.
Edmund KELLY, son of prisoner, saw his father running after SCHOFIELD; he got so frightened he ran away; when he went back SCHOFIELD was dead.
Mr Wilson RAMSAY testified that death was caused by the wound which had fractured the skull and compressed the brain. This being the whole of the evidence, the jury found a verdict. That the deceased came to his death by the blow of a tomahawk. By whom the blow was inflicted is not known; and that KELLY was of unsound mind and not fit to be at large.
When the inquest was ended, Captain BROWN ordered the police to take KELLY into custody.

MISCELLANEOUS NEWS

Messrs Richardson and Wrench sold on Monday, by auction, a family residence on the South Head Road; known as the property of Mr JAMES, for £2350; Mr William MOFFITT purchaser. The Radfordsleigh Estate, 2000 acres, near Singleton, for £3400; Mr James DICKSON, purchaser. Wimbledon Cottage, Parramatta Road, for £625. 59 acres of land adjoining Irishtown, Liverpool Road, for £215. - Herald.

YASS - Two of the bandsmen at the riot on the 30th, named Henry BELLANSOM, and Peter WEBBER, were apprehended today and tried together, with John CANNON, who was apprehended at the Royal Hotel. All three men were committed to take their trail at Goulburn. - Herald.

WINDEYER
From our Correspondent
Distressing Affair - One of the most distressing affairs ever recorded was witnessed in the family of a shepherd on Stoney Creek, about four miles from town. It appears the man is shepherding for Mr LUCKIE, at Avisford; his wife, who was a little out of her mind, had strayed into the bush; the man not finding her, reported the circumstance to the police here, and serjeant EWAN and a Mr JACKSON immediately went in search; they cooeed and she answered faintly at a distance; on coming up with her they found her crouched under a gum tree and nearly naked; she was perfectly helpless, and was obliged to be carried to a place of refuge. On arriving at the man's tent poverty and distress met their eyes; three or four children were found nearly naked, the man was equally badly off, having only a coat and trousers, and no shirt. While out shepherding, he carried an infant in his bosom for the purpose of keeping it warm; one of the children who was stopping in the tent, caught fire with what little clothing it had on - it was only a pinafore, but the little fellow had the presence of mind to put it out. In addition to this no food was in the tent. The serjeant, after witnessing the distress, immediately started to town, and reported the state of things, when the inhabitants of Windeyer, in their usual benevolent way contributed in finding food and raiment for the poor family; the woman, I am happy to say, is getting much better, and the man and family are now pretty comfortable. It is only strange that the man, when he found the miserable state his family was in, did not crave some assistance from his employer, Mr LUCKIE, who was only two miles from where the man lived. I have heard of many distressing circumstances, but never did I hear of a case to equal this. July 30th.

August 7, 1861

POLICE COURT
Monday August 5th
Before the Police Magistrate, his Worship the Mayor and E MARLAY, Esq.

Daniel HEARN, charged with being drunk in Church-street, was fined 10s or twenty four hours' imprisonment, with the promise of six months the next time he appeared before their worships.

SMALL DEBTS COURT
Monday August 5
Before the Police Magistrate, the Mayor, and E MARLAY, Esq.

M LAMROCK v T PARKER - £10 promissory note. Verdict for plaintiff £6 3s
William ORAM v John WRIGHT - £2 16s work and labour done. Verdict for defendant.
Wilson RAMSAY v John McKENZIE - £2 2s medical attendance. Verdict for the amount.
M LAMROCK v Samuel BARNABY - £9 goods sold. Settled out of Court.
M LAMROCK v John SUCIDER - £3 goods sold. Settled.
Sophia PATCIEL v John HUME - £7 rent. Verdict for plaintiff.
H R REUBEN v T NICHOLSON - £5 rent. Verdict for plaintiff.

MERRIWA
From our Correspondent.
FURTHER PARTICULARS OF THE MURDER BY A BLACKFELLOW.
On the 16th July, a dreadful murder was committed by a blackfellow named Harry, who for three months past was engaged by the Messrs HALL as a stockman. On the morning of the day he committed the murder he sharpened a large American tomahawk, and said he was going to get opossums; but went direct to the hut of a shepherd named MILLS, and enticed a boy (nine years old) to go with, as he said, to kill opossums. No objection was made by the boy's mother, as the blackfellow was well known to the family, being in the same employ. The black filled four opossums, and, having made a fire, roasted and ate one. Then he struck the poor little fellow three times on the head with the back of the tomahawk and left him for dead. The boy lay there insensible till Thursday morning (18th ), when he was found by a shepherd quite blind. The little boy is now quite sensible, and his sight has returned. After murderously assaulting the little boy, the inhuman wretch must have returned to the mother in the hut, murdered her, and stolen away a female child four and a half years old, a double-barrelled gun, powder, and shot, and some percussion caps. Some few trinkets were found about 50 yards from the hut, but nothing beyond what is above enumerated was missed from the hut.
A sad spectacle presented itself to poor MILLS when he returned with his sheep at sundown Wondering why his children did not run to meet him as usual, he went into his hut and found the corpse of his wife, the head lying in a large pool of blood, three fractures in the skull, and a large cut about 6 inches long and 5 deep, given from behind, almost severing the head at the base of the skull from the body. Of course death was instantaneous. The children were nowhere to be found. Three boxes outside the hut and their contents scattered all about. Poor MILLS stopped in the dwelling that was lately to him a happy home, while his fellow shepherd carried the horrid tidings to the head station, about three miles off. News of the outrage having been conveyed to Merriwa (six miles) with all haste, the constables and a large party of the male inhabitants, well armed and mounted, with J P BETTINGTON, Esq., JP at their head, proceeded in search of the fiend. The whole party, in sections of three or four, with a thorough bushman of great local knowledge at the head of each, scoured the country in all directions. Every individual determined to risk his own life, if necessary, so that the foul fiend might meet the end his awful deed demanded.
The morning after the murder, the blackfellow having the poor little girl with him, called at a Chinaman's hut six miles from the scene of the butcheries. He had the double barreled gun and a small bundle in a handkerchief, but nothing else. He then appeared as if making for Miller's Gap, in the Liverpool Range. His object seems to be to get the child with him to his tribe on the McIntyre. The scoundrel must have concealed himself in the mountains during the day and traveled at night, else he never could have escaped from the numbers who were searching for him. Mr BETTINGTON discharged his duty nobly, and inspired the whole party with the same energetic spirit he displayed himself. For five days and five nights this young gentleman and his party never ceased their exertions to rescue a human being from a life worse than death, and to bring to justice a villain who life is a curse to the earth.
Mr BETTINGTON's first step was a most judicious one, viz., to ride fast ahead and give notice to the stations on the other side of the Range. I am told the people there are all on the look out for the murderer. I hope their exertions will be more successful than were those of the people in this neighbourhood.
Last Friday, a station of Mr MARLAY's was robbed, at the foot of the Range. Many suppose this was done by the blackfellow. But tracks of a man and child were discovered on Miller's Gap the day before the robbery. Many think these were the footprints of the blackfellow and child, and if so, the robbery must have been committed by someone else.
I am told those tracks were not more than half a day old when Mr BELL with a blackfellow, a good tracker, were put upon them; also that the whole people on Liverpool side were out on the search for the foul murderer. And lest there might have been a chance of his robbing the hut, and lying to on the Range till his pursuers lost hope in the search, the Cassilis and Merriwa constables are out on the Ranges. It is to be hoped he will yet be taken.
The people have contributed liberally towards a reward for his apprehension, and the Messrs HALL and the Government are expected to double the amount. The love of money it is hoped will induce the blacks to fetch him out of his own tribe, should he unfortunately get there. But was is already the fate of the poor child? Many fear that when she is no longer able to travel, he will murder and perhaps eat her.
It is shocking to relate, that a catalogue of crimes such as these, murder, rape, robbery and kidnapping could be perpetrated in the very heart of the settled districts, and yet the foul perpetrator escape even so long as this.

LIST OF LETTERS LYING AT THE GENERAL POST OFFICE UNCLAIMED
ADAMS Alexander, Mudgee
ARCHBOLD George, Dubbo
BAYLISS J S S, Dubbo
BARNARD F., Mudgee
BLACKMAN James, Mudgee
BOWLING John, Mudgee
BOWLES John, Orange
BOROMAN E M, Mudgee
BOYD Alexander, Mudgee
BOYLE Thomas, Dubbo
BOYD Mr, Schoolmaster, Mudgee
BROWN Robert, Orange
BUTABY Miss, Mudgee
CAMPBELL D, Mudgee
CAUL R, Mudgee
CHADBURN Mr., Mudgee
CLARK W G, Mudgee
CORBETT James, Orange
CROMBIE C O , Merrendee
CURBERY Mrs, Mudgee
CULLEN B, Mudgee
DALE J S, Mudgee
DALE J L, Walgett
DARLING James, Mudgee
DARVIN John, Mudgee
DAVIS William, Mudgee
DENTON Mr., Mudgee
DEANS Thomas, Mudgee
DERVINE Mrs., Mudgee
DEUR A., Merrendee
ERSTELL W., Orange
FARRELLY A., Mudgee
FISHER Thomas, Mudgee
FOSTER Jos., Orange
FOSTER J and J W, Orange
FORD James, Mudgee
FRASER Mr., Mudgee
GALLAGHER Charles, Mudgee
GENDRY O J, Dubbo
GEORGE O., Mudgee
GELLEGAN C T, Orange
GILBERT M., Orange
GORDEN M, Mudgee
GODDARD George, Orange
GRAHAM G K , Avisford
GREEN John, Mudgee
GRANT J S Mudgee
GULST William, Mudgee
HARPER John, Mudgee
HARNETT J M, Mudgee
HAYES James, Mudgee
HEWLETT G, Mudgee
HEARD Mrs., Louisa Creek
HEAP Thomas, Mudgee
HIGGINS Miss L, Mudgee
HOMER M., Mudgee
HUME John, Mudgee
JONAS F, Mudgee
KERVESSON Henry, Orange
KNIGHT Mr., Mudgee
LAKEMAN Henry, Mudgee
LONGHON Mr., Avisford
LOWE D, Mudgee
LOWRY Johanna, Mudgee
MARGERRISON James, Dubbo
MAGUIRE Mrs., Mudgee
MAGUIRE Mr., Rylstone
MANK William, Mudgee
MATTHEW William, Dubbo
MAHAN John, Orange
M'KAY Angus, Mudgee
M'MILLAN R., Wee Waa
M'GRATH James, Mudgee
M'MAHON Mrs F, Mudgee
M'EWAN J., Mudgee
M'LARAN P., Mudgee
MECAHER H., Mudgee
MIDDLETON Thomas, Mudgee
MIDDLETON R., Walgett
MURPHY B., Orange
MUMFORD Thomas, Mudgee
MUSGRAVE Charles, Mudgee
MYLES James, Mudgee
OLIVER Mr., Merrendee
O'NEIL W., Coonabarabran
PAIN Thomas, Merrendee
PIERCE H., Mudgee
PHORIL H., Mudgee
QUIGLEY M., Orange
ROLFE James, Dubbo
ROSE R., Merrendee
ROBINS W., Mudgee
ROLF A, Mudgee
RYAN J., Mudgee
RYAN Mrs J., Mudgee
SENIOR T., Mudgee
SELF William, Mudgee
SLACK Mrs S., Mudgee
SMITH Mary Ann, Mudgee
STEWART John, Mudgee
TAIT D., Orange
TAYLOR Mr., Mudgee
THORNTON John, or R B GOW, Mudgee
THOMPSON M, Dubbo
THOMPSON R , Mudgee
THOMPSON James, Mudgee
THOMAS John, Mudgee
THOMAS A E, Mudgee
TURNER John, Mudgee
WALKER T., Rylstone
WALSH John, Coonabarabran
WALKER Mr., Cassilis
WILCOCK R F, Mudgee
WHITE H., Mudgee
WISE George, Mudgee
WINN Mr., Mudgee
WILSON Mr., Mudgee
WOOD H., Avisford
WYATT William, Dubbo
YORK Thomas, Mudgee

MISCELLANEOUS NEWS
CHILD BURNT TO DEATH - On Friday afternoon last a little girl named Eliza CHOWNE, the daughter of Mr Alfred CHOWNE, a farmer residing at Tarago, was so severely burned that she died on Sunday morning. - Goulburn Chronicle.

SERJEANT MIDDLETON, who was so badly wounded in the recent attempt to capture Gardiner, is slowly recovering.

£10 Reward
The above reward will be paid by the undersigned for information leading to the conviction of the parties who worked and ill used my horse known as "Brown Paddy". John COX, Broomby.

SUBSCRIPTION LIST
Towards Raising a Fund for paying the Funeral Expenses of the late W BROWN, who has left his family in a complete state of destitution.
Collected by Mr LYONS:
H FROST 2s 6d
Mr CHAPPELL 2s 6d
Mr DEAN 2s 6d
Mr CASSIN 2s
Mr RICHARDS 2s 6d
Mrs A M'DONALD 5s
Mrs BALL 2s 6d
Hugh CAMPBELL 2s
J NEATE 2s 6d
G VOWLES 2s 6d
Mrs HEARD 5s
Geo. HOSKINS 3s
E FOLEY 1s
S WINTER 5s
F D MILLER 5s
Mathew BROWN 5s
Mrs SAWYER 5s
Mrs RANDELL 4s
Mr G J GIBSON 5s
Mrs HOLBURD 2s 6d
E SAYWELL 2s 6d
Mrs S MOORE 2s 6d
W TULLOCH 2s 6d
Robert COHEN 2s 6d
Andrew M'CAULEY 10s
William HAZELTINE 2s 6d.
J JUPP 3s
William CAPLIN 2s 6d
J JONES 2s 6d
Mr M'CAULEY 2s 6d
M DALEY 1s 6d
John SULLIVAN 5s
Eugene DALY 2s 6d
W READFORD 5s
William SUMMERHAYS 2s 6d
M SHARP 5s
C M'CARTHY 5s
Mrs JAMES 2s 6d
William J MILLS 2s 6d
M E WARREN 10s
Mrs BLACKMAN, sen., 5s
W R BLACKMAN 5s
Thomas H SINDEN £1
Thomas NEW 5s
James PATEMAN 2s 6d
Henry DARE 5s
James DWAINE 2s 6d
Edward FANTON 2s 6d
Tim O DRISCOLL 2s 6d
John C TINDALL 2s 6d
Thomas LEWIS 5s
Mr ALLPASS 10s
Plus other unidentified donations.

August 10, 1861

SUPPOSED DEATH BY POISON
An inquiry was held at the hospital on Thursday afternoon before G WARBURTON, Esq., P.M., touching the death of a patient of the name of Thomas BURNS.
Dr W KING having been sworn, deposed that he was sent for on the 2nd instant to see deceased at the Royal Oak, he found him very cold, with an anxious countenance and very feeble pulse; he had said he had not been drinking, and that his bowels were very regular. He had vomited, and a dog which partook of the matter was immediately paralysed. He (Dr KING) having to leave Mudgee for the purpose of holding an inquest at Cox's Flat; and suspecting that the man had taken something deleterious, requested Dr CUTTING to visit him during his absence. On his return he found deceased had been removed to the hospital, where he attended him. He several times went off almost into a state of collapse. On Wednesday he felt s much better that he arose from his bed. On his next visiting him he found him dead; he died about 12 o'clock at night. From the symptoms of the case he was of the opinion that death was occasioned from his having taken poison, especially when the state of the dog was taken into consideration.
T HEALY said that deceased came to the Royal Oak on the 31st July; he was accompanied by two gold diggers who said that hey had picked the man up on the Sydney Road; that he was in a very destitute condition. They afterwards went on their way. On the following morning deceased asked witness's wife if he could get any work; they promised to employ him provided he could give a reference to any one in the town, and in the meantime set him to a job in the yard. He did this work very well, and appeared to be in a very healthy state till the afternoon, when hearing a moaning noise he (Mr HEALY) went out to see what was the matter, and found deceased in the kitchen shriveled up and apparently in great pain, with his hands across the region of his stomach. He gave him a glass of brandy and applied a mustard poultice, which gave him considerable relief for an hour. Towards evening he had a relapse; he then gave him a mustard bath, and hot drinks, which eased him until morning, when the pain returned. He vomited, and a dog belonging to the house which ate part of the vomit became perfectly paralysed. The dog was not now to be found; search had been made in all directions for it. He immediately went for a medical man. On Friday the deceased was removed to the hospital. The dog was perfectly well and lively up to the time of its eating the vomit. Did not think that the man was poisoned; he had been in a very destitute state, and had slept in the cold upon the mountains. Had told him that the two men had been very kind to him.
Arthur Thomas Pigot CUTTING, was a duly qualified medical practioner, had held a post mortem examination on the body; he found the heart half as large again as the usual size, the lungs were very much congested, the liver enlarged to twice the normal size and much congested; and the right kidney was slightly diseased, which appearances were quite sufficient to account for death. From the appearance of the man previously to death, and the circumstances of the dog suffering in the manner he did, he was of the opinion that the man had taken some deleterious substance. Upon Dr KING leaving Mudgee he at his request visited deceased, who told him that he had drank nine glasses of rum at SULLIVAN's; had known men drink as much as thirty glasses of rum without being ill; had not made an analysis it being too late.
This being the whole of the evidence, and considering the diseased state of the body, and the privation the man had evidently undergone, the Police Magistrate considered there was sufficient cause for death.

POLICE COURT
Friday, August 9th
Before the Police Magistrate and his Worship the Mayor.

Mrs SIMPSON summoned Mrs REID for unlawfully detaining five girl's hoods. From the evidence it appeared that Mrs SIMPSON had employed defendant to work her five children's hoods at one shilling each; Mrs REID having been occupied a whole week in completing the work, refused to give the hoods up unless five shillings extra were paid over the price first agreed upon, especially as she could obtain five shillings per day be her needle. The Bench said as she had agreed to do the work for the sum named in the summons, they had no alternative but to make an order that the hoods be given up, with 3s 6d costs.

Messrs SIMPSON, ARNOLD, M'COY and HOWARTH were severally fined under the Towns Police Act for allowing horses and cows to stray in the public streets.

WINDEYER
From our Correspondent
MURDER - A murder was committed on Wednesday last at a place called Cox's Flat, near the Pyramil, situated about ten miles from this place by a man named KELLY. His victim was a respectable man named Frederick SCHOFIELD, the son of a clergyman. I have not heard the particulars only that he was killed by a tomahawk. The deceased was buried in the cemetery belonging to this township. The funeral was attended by a large number of friends. KELLY was forwarded to Mudgee escorted by two of the mounted patrol.

NARROW ESCAPE OF THE REV MR BIRDS BY DROWNING
A correspondent at Hall's Creek, Merriwa, send us the following report:- During the late rains, the Rev. Mr BIRDS, minister for Cassilis, narrowly escaped being drowned, whilst attempting to cross the flooded creek at Mr PEBERDY's Hall's Creek. He had been observed to come to the crossing-place, and on seeing it flooded, to turn back, as if to head the water, which had been down about twenty minutes; but Mr PEBERDY's son, on coming some minutes after, found a horse saddled and bridled, and not knowing who was the owner, led it home. It was then recognized to belong to Mr BIRDS. A search was at once instituted, and the rev. gentleman was seen clinging to the branch of a tree. With great difficulty, he being much nearer the opposite bank, a rope was thrown to him, with a running noose, which Mr BIRDS had just enough strength to place over his body; he was then drawn to the bank, very much exhausted. He had been washed about one hundred and fifty yards after losing his horse, and sank several times while being drawn out. If Mr PEBERDY had been half an hour later returning home, a valuable life had been lost, for no human being was within hearing, and it was quite impossible for the rev. gentleman to have reached the land by himself - Maitland Mercury.

August 14, 1861

POLICE COURT
Tuesday August 13
Before the Police Magistrate, his Worship the Mayor, and T CADELL, Esq.

Thos. BURNS charged with maliciously destroying property. Mr CLARKE appeared for the defence. Charles POLDEN, baker, on oath, stated that he was standing at the bar of HUGHSON's public house on Thursday, when defendant came up to him in a very familiar way, and greeted him with "how are you Charley?" and at the same time giving him a knock on the head which rendered his hat useless; he gave 15s for it when it was new. Cross-examined by Mr CLARKE: There was no "scrimmaging" of hats at the time when BURNS spoilt his hat; WALSH said "Never mind old man, take my hat"; would not swear that several hats were not thrown into the fire! He took his hat home; it was in such a dilapidated condition that he expected his "missus" had thrown it away. It was perhaps eighteen months since he bought the hat; at the time of the bonneting he considered it was worth ten shillings.
T McGUIRE was present at the "scrimmage"; he helped to knock the hats about; his won came in for a share; saw Charley's hat knocked about; all hands had a turn at it; could not say what its value was, as it was not his style of "castor"; did not think he should have picked it up had he seen it lying in the street; each tried to knock one another's hats about; it was like a regular game of blind man's bluff. Mr CLARKE said he had other witnesses, who could prove that the damage was not done intentionally; it was one of those public house games too common in Mudgee. His witnesses, from some cause, not being present, he should only ask their Worships to assess the amount of damage at the value of the old hat, which, form complainant's statement had been in use eighteen months. Verdict 10s and costs.

Richard CROSSING was summoned for unlawfully detaining a bullock. Mr CLARKE appeared for Mr CROSSING. John BROOKS said on Saturday he saw a bullock in Mr CROSSING's possession branded JTM on the off rump, which he (complainant) had purchased from Charles WILLIAMS, of Hartley, on the 10th of last month; he lost him about a week afterwards; he knew the bullock by his colour and general appearance, and valued him at 50s. The man of whom he bought him was driving a mob at the time. R CORSSING bought the bullock in question in a mob of cattle he had purchased from MORRIS. It had never been out of his possession since, which was about six weeks. He knew it well; it being an 'old stag' which he tried to sell to a man on the diggings, who when seeing what he was doing said "for goodness sake don't push that one in the lot, whatever you do". James LESTER, stockman to Mr CROSSING said the plaintiff came and claimed the bullock, which had been in his charge for six weeks. This being the case, the Bench said they had no alternative but to dismiss the case.
ORANGE
From our Correspondent
August 8th - a melancholy accident occurred here on Sunday evening last by which a young woman named Margaret DARLEY met an awful death from burning. Being in the house alone at the time the immediate cause of the catastrophe must remain shrouded in mystery, and but little light was thrown upon the sad affair at the coroner's inquiry held yesterday. The deceased, who was addicted to intemperance, was found by a man who had occasion to call at the house, lying on the floor with life nearly extinct, but evidently making every effort to crawl to an adjoining room. Medical aid was immediately rendered, but not before the vital spark had fled. Verdict: accidental death….

August 17, 1861

POLICE REPORT
Before the Police Magistrate, and his Worship the Mayor.

William ANDREW and Margaret ANDREWS were charged with stealing the sum of £16. Mr CLARKE for TEMPLETON, for prosecution. Mr BRODRIBB for defence. C HARDY, Chief Constable, arrested the prisoners on Tuesday, 18th instant, for stealing in April last the sum of £16, the property of William HEALY. Upon taking them into custody they said that hey knew nothing about the charge. William HEALY, residing near the Pipe Clay Creek, recollected giving evidence on a previous occasion of a sum of money which he had lost on a Sunday morning. He had on that day received from one of his brothers £19 and went to Mr JULIAN's for the purpose of paying a note he owed him, he changed another note for a bottle of brandy supplied to him by JULIAN's daughter. He took the brandy to the prisoner's dwelling; there were two other parties present. He had £16 odd in his pocket. The parties in the hut helped him to drink the brandy. After taking the first glass he became insensible. Some hours afterwards he was found by his brother in the road near his residence. The only thing he recollected was his brother and the constables searching his pockets; they found that the whole of his money was gone. Constable CAMPBELL went to prisoner's residence on the 14th where eh saw the prosecutor; from information he received he was induced to search the premises, and found fourteen one pound notes in a bottle under a heap of wood. He took W ANDREWS and a man of the name of WRITE into custody, who after being examined before the magistrate were discharged. Cross-examined by Mr BRODRIBB: Both prisoners said that they knew nothing about the matter; the yard was partly opened; there was no objection to his searching the place. Caroline HAYES, wife of the James HAYES, Market-lane, prisoners lived next door to her; on the day in question she saw the male prisoner about dinner time coming from a heap of wood in the yard towards the house; she afterwards heard of the robbery. John WRITER, busman, having been reminded that he was not obliged to answer any question that would criminate himself, said that he remembered seeing William HEALY between 7 and 8 o'clock at the prisoner's residence; after being there for about ten minutes he left and returned with a bottle of rum; the bottle went round to the bottom; whilst the breakfast was getting ready he saw Mrs ANDREWS with her hand in the prosecutor's pocket, and afterwards counting some notes. The male prisoner invited him to FROSTs where he had a glass and returned home, the police in the course of the day searched the place and took him and the male prisoner into custody. Cross-examined by Mr BRODRIBB: When the constable came he asked him to allow him to search the place; he asked him to show his warrant; did not object to the search; did not see the notes in the bottle; was given into custody by Mr HEALY; had not quarreled with the prisoners; had not given information to the police. Thos HEALY remembered giving his brother £19, who went to JULIAN's. Later in the day he found him laying in the road, searched him to see if he had the money he had given him in the morning; he found what he supposed was a roll of notes, which afterwards proved to be a note rolled round with a piece of cloth. Committed to the Quarter Sessions. Bail allowed.

James COUGHLAN, illegally on premises. Constable MORAN said the prisoner was given into his charge by Peter the Frenchman, for being illegally on his premises. On his way to the lock-up he said he went to the house because he was going to swap huts with Peter. Peter EWIN, tripe dresser, said he had his door locked up about eight o'clock on Friday evening, when the prisoner came and forced it open; upon ordering him to leave, he tucked up his sleeves and said he would not; he next took the candle and went into the bedroom; when he went out he threw down a half a crown and said take that and hold your tongue. He did not miss anything. He was, however, robbed a short time since of all his clothes. In answer to an enquiry from the Bench, the Chief Constable said that the prisoner was a very troublesome character; he had been several times before the bench and was a ticket of leave holder. The Bench said as he had so often been before them, and would not take warning, they should imprison him seven days for the present offence and write to Sydney recommending that his ticket be cancelled. The prisoner, as usual, pleaded on behalf of his poor children, who would be left without a protector, &c.

Ellen MASON charged by Constable MILLER with being drunk and using obscene language in Mortimer-street, on the night of Wednesday last. Upon being asked what she had to say Mrs MASON said that she did not think she had been very bad; she had a little trouble on her mind through hearing that her husband had been found dead in the bush, and hoped that it would be excuse enough for her being let off, as she would like to stop in Mudgee till one of her daughters arranged to get married. The Police Magistrate told her that she had been so many times before the Court that he did not know what to do with her, he thought the better plan was would be to send her to Bathurst for two years, during which time she would get into better habits. They would, however, try her once more and only fine her £5 or two months' imprisonment.

Catherine TIGHE, a female who has filled one or two situations as governess in families, was charged by Constable CAMPBELL with being drunk and disorderly in Market-street. It being her first offence, she was discharged.

SUICIDE - ANOTHER VICTIM
Yesterday morning Dr VAN ROSSUM, who has for some time past lead a very irregular life, informed his landlady that he had poisoned himself, and was about leaving the house when Mr G TAYLOR, happening to pass, he said "Mr TAYLOR, I have done it", or words to that effect, and handed him a bottle containing the remainder of the poison. Dr Wilson RAMSAY and Dr KING were immediately sent for but too late to be of any use. An inquest will be held this day.

COONAMBLE
From our Correspondent
August 6th - The young but flourishing township of Coonable has been almost deluged with the heavy rains during the last three weeks, and a Chinaman lost his life on the 30th ult. in attempting to cross the creek during the time when it was bank high. The body was found the next day by drags, and was conveyed to Mr J M'CUBBIN's, the Royal Hotel, and ___ BLACKSTONE, Esq., J.P. being there at the time, an inquest was held on the body and usual verdict in such a case returned. ON account of the constant rain we were deprived of our mail until Saturday, and had it not been for the kindness of ___ BLACKSTONE, Esq., J.P., and Mr MASON, who brought it, we should have been without mail for a fortnight. The second Race Meeting will be held in Mr M'CUBBIN's Hotel on the 13th instant, and judging from the interest and activity which the Coonamble gentlemen are displaying in the matter, there will be good races, and something worth racing for, and everything will be done in the first style.

August 21, 1861

DEATH
At the Upper Meroo, on the 16th July, Mary, the beloved wife of Mr R GLASSCOCK, aged 30 years.

BIRTH
On the 20th instant, at her residence, Gladstone-street, the wife of Mr L KNIGHT, of a son.

POLICE COURT
Tuesday Aug 20th
Before the Police Magistrate, His Worship the Mayor, and Thomas CADELL, Esq., J.P.

Thomas JONES, charged with being drunk in Market-street, was fined five shillings. Not having the money he was ordered to be lock up twenty four hours.

H ORAM charged with using obscene language in the public streets on Sunday last, during divine service. Pleased as an excuse, vexation through losing a case in Court last week. In consideration of his having been locked up since Saturday, and not having previously been brought before the bench, he was fined 10s. Not having, as he said, the money, he was about being locked up for twenty four hours' longer, when, to his surprise, his friend Mr McBEATH, said he had had a note belonging to him which was taken from him at the time he was locked up.

Richard BROWN, charged with being drunk, which he denied. Constable MORAN said he found prisoner drunk in Mortimer-street, between twelve and one o'clock this morning; he told him to go him, which he promised to do. Returning some time after, and finding him still there, he took him into custody. BROWN said he was looking after his mate, who was at Mrs MASON's and he wanted to know if he would be ready to go to work in the morning. Fined 10s or twenty four hours in the lock up.

James COUGHLAN. Mr BRODRIBB applied on behalf of prisoner's wife, that instead of a letter being sent below, recommending that prisoner's ticket should be cancelled, that an application might be made to have him transferred to one of the pastoral districts, where he would not have the means of getting drunk, and at the same time be able to support his family. The Bench declined doing so, but said they would, on consideration of the children, give the prisoner one more chance; and after very seriously addressing him upon his conduct, agreed to release him at the expiration of his seven days, with the assurance that if he ever again appeared before the bench, upon no matter how trivial a charge, that his ticket would be cancelled.

MISCELLANEOUS NEWS

A FATAL ACCIDENT occurred lately on the Lachlan gold field. Mr F LEEMAN was driving a tunnel under a hill, when a large mass of earth fell on him, injuring his spine so that he died shortly afterwards - Armidale Express.

RAYMOND TERRACE - An inquest was held at Miller's Forest on Tuesday 13th instant , on the body of James O'BRIEN, aged one year and eight months, who died that morning from scalds received on the Wednesday previous (7th August). It appears that a tin dish with scalding water had been placed on the floor for the purpose of scalding some cabbage-tree, and the child in walking slipped, and its arm coming in contact with the edge of the dish, it upset, and the whole contents were thrown over the unfortunate little fellow. A messenger was dispatched to Raymond Terrace for a medical man, but there being none, and the flood rendering it impossible to reach Maitland, the poor little sufferer lingered until Tuesday morning, when death put an end to its sufferings. Verdict returned, accidental death.

MERRIWA
August 7 - Black Harry seem to baffle the attempts of his pursuers since he committed the shocking affair at Little Creek, near this place. He has twice robbed Messrs MARLAY and HUTCHING's sheep stations. On the afternoon of Thursday last, at two o'clock, he violated the person of a child about eleven years of age, the step daughter of man named MURRAY, who resides on the Liverpool side of M'Donald's Gap. After effecting his purpose, he told the girl he would fetch a knife and cut her throat. He ran off, as if to get a knife, and the little girl ran home. The stepfather, with indescribable apathy, went out and remained with the sheep (the little girl had been shepherding) and it was not until ten o'clock on Friday that night at stranger brought the tidings to this place. Early on Saturday morning Messrs BETTINGTON, WHITE and a few of Mr BETTINGTON's men, with the constables, started off to aid in pursuing the vile wretch. On Sunday a party of some fifteen or sixteen had assembled on the Liverpool Range. These divided into two sections, and stealthily proceeded to search the secluded nooks. About noon one of the parties heard a shot, then another, and another. They now felt convinced the other party had fallen in with Black Harry, and that he was showing fight. They made off in hot haste for the supposed scene of conflict, and after nearly exhausting themselves in a race up the mountain, found the whole affair to be nothing more than a Murrurundi man, who ought to have known better, amusing himself shooting wallabies. After this intimation to the black, if within hearing, to hide well, our gentlemen thought their presence there no longer necessary, and they returned home.
On Tuesday night word was brought into town that nearly twenty miles from MURRAY's he had robbed another hut, a pistol being part of the plunder he had carried off. Afterwards he passed a man on the plains; but the man being unarmed, he feared to attack the black, who carried a double barreled gun and a pistol. Shortly after he approached a hut, and but discharging his gun, summoned those within to appear; none answering his call but a woman, he entered, and ordered the trembling creature to make dinner ready for him, and to lose no time about it. The woman having obeyed his order, Harry sat down, placing his pistol before him and gun beside him. The poor woman, under the pretence of going out for a piece of wood for the fire, ran off, and hid herself in the cedar scrub close by. The woman watched him go away from the hut and make for the mountains. Shortly after leaving the hut he fired four shots, perhaps to deter any one from following him.
As MILLS' little girl has not been seen since the 17th ultimo, I fear much that he has murdered the poor little thing.
The subscriptions to aid the reward the Government may offer for his apprehension amounted, on Saturday last, to £83 10s.
I saw MILLS' little boy last Sunday evening. The boy is quite sensible, but very weak. I think his recovery is very doubtful. The father showed me a piece of the skull about the size of a fourpenny piece, which oozed out from the wound in the back of the neck.
A resident of Merriwa.

EDUCATION
A Lady, long resident in France, a member of the Church of England, who during the last three years has filled the situation of Governess in the families of G ROUSE, Esq., and of William LEWIS, Esq., wishes for another engagement. Address Miss BANFIELD, office of the Western Post, Mudgee.

August 24, 1861

MARRIAGE
On the 13th instant, at St. Thomas' Mulgoa by the Rev A H STEPHEN, assisted by the Rev. G VIDAL, Frederick SAVAGE, fifth son of George COX, Esq., of Wimbourne, Penrith, to Mary Hanna, eldest daughter of the late Thomas Digby MILLAR, Esq., of Mudgee.

POLICE COURT
Friday, August 23
Before the Police Magistrate, His Worship the Mayor, and E MARLAY, Esq.

John COMA, charged with being drunk was fined five shillings or twenty-four hours' imprisonment.

Samuel BOWMAN, a blind man, was charged with stealing a saddle. Mr BRODRIBB appeared for the prosecution. Mr JAMES for prisoner. Constable FARRAND took the prisoner into custody upon virtue of a warrant. When he found the prisoner he was lying in the scrub; he said how could he steal a saddle when he left another in its place. R HEARD: The man in charge was the prisoner referred to in the information; he came to his house on the 6th August and remained until the 10th; he represented he had money in Mr CHARLTON's hands. On the morning he told him that he was going up the town to settle some bills and would be back to breakfast; he borrowed a saddle, left the house, and did not return. The saddle in Court was his property. Thomas HOLMES, groom to Mr HEARD, said about a fortnight ago the prisoner came to him early in the morning and borrowed a saddle, saying he wanted to go up the town for an hour; that on his return to breakfast he should settle, as he was going to start for home; he did not return; had told him that he resided on the Sydney Road, near Blackman's Flat. H FROST: The prisoner and a boy came to his house on Wednesday last and left the saddle and two horses; he said the saddle belonged to Mr HEARD; he gave orders for the stable to be locked. This being the whole of the evidence, the prisoner was acquitted.

David TAYLOR, charged with being illegally on Mr READFORD's premises. Mr BRODRIBB appeared for prisoner. Constable MORAN said on July 19th he was on duty in Market-street, between two and three o'clock in the morning, when his attention was directed by a signal he heard in Mr READFORD yard, upon going up the yard he found the prisoner with a man of the name of WILSON, at an open window which was supported by a stick. The morning was very dark, he lit a match and seized both men, the prisoner swung himself out of his hands, struck him on the face and said what are you doing with my mate? Upon hearing one of Mr CHRISTIAN's men call out, he ran away. Had not he least doubt that prisoner was the man. He searched for him on the morning, but could not find him. He recognized him as soon as he saw him in the dock on the day he was charged with the Guntawang robbery. Cross-examined by Mr BRODRIBB: Did not see the men open the window: it was one belonging to Mr READFORD's bedroom. W READFORD: The window in question was down but not fastened when he went to bed; he was disturbed by the noise, and found the sash propped up with a piece of wood. Did not know the prisoner
Mr BRODRIBB called for the defence George WILSON, a prisoner under sentence, who said he remembered the night he was taken into custody; the prisoner in the dock was not the man who was with him in READFORD's yard; had never seen him, before meeting him in the Mudgee lock-up. The man who was in his company that night he had known three months; would swear positively that he did not know prisoner. James CHRISTIAN: Though he had seen prisoner in company with the other prisoner several times during the previous day READFORD's window was opened. Would not swear positively to the man; when he saw him brought in from Guntawang on the charge for which he stands committed, he told the constable that he thought he had seen him in the company of the man convicted for attempting to enter Mr READFORD's house. The Bench said there was sufficient doubt involved in the case, that they would give the prisoner the benefit of it, and ordered his discharged.

Neil McBRIDE for assault. Mr JAMES appeared for complainant. W L WARREN, in the employ of W BISHOP, said he had a dispute with defendant on Sunday about some meat, when he got into a great rage, flew at him like a wild cat, dragged him out of the house, and struck him upon the head with the butt of a gun which caused the blood to flow very freely; he called out to a man of the name of GORE, who came to his assistance. Defendant ran away towards a heap of stones, howling in a most hideous manner, and commenced pelting them with large stones. Thomas GORE, better known as old Butty, said he was in bed at the time of the row, hearing a noise, he ran out and found WARREN on the ground, who said he was murdered. Upon examining him he found blood flowing from his head all down his back. Defendant had a gun in his hand; he endeavoured to take it away from him; when he ran away, but afterwards returned and pelted them with large stones so that they were glad to seek shelter in the hut. Could not say whether the gun was loaded. There being a cross case, the Bench said that they would prefer hearing it before giving any decision. The parties consequently changed places.
Neil McBRIDE having been sworn, said he went on Sunday morning for his rations, which the "Super" refused to give him, telling him at the same time that if he did not leave he would stick a butchers knife into him. He then left the house, when defendant followed him with a gun and struck him with it upon the shoulder; he then gave him a "prop" or two in the belly; he afterwards followed him with an axe, but not being able to reach him he threw it at him. Cross examined by Mr JAMES: He brought the gun to Mudgee; could not say if "she" was loaded; it belonged to Mr BISHOP, but would not give it up because he did not want to be shot. He did not strike WARREN; it was possible that he gave him "a little tap of the gun on the head". W BISHOP said: hearing that there was a disturbance at the farm, he went to see what it was about, when McBRIDE used very violent language and not only confessed having committed the assault, but said he would repeat it if any man dared take WARREN's part. Mr JAMES said he had other witnesses, but as he had sufficiently proved his case, he would not further trespass upon the time of the Court. The Bench said that they would dismiss the second case, and fine McBRIDE £3 and costs.

W RAY, summoned for wages due. Mr JAMES for defence. Bernard WARD said he hired as a weekly servant to RAY at 15s for the first three weeks, and 20s per week afterwards; he now claimed £8 10s; could not say when he was hired; he only kept an account in his head; when he asked for the money defendant offered to pay him by giving him a bill upon a Chinaman; he left without notice. W RAY having been sworn, said he did not dispute the money, except that the complainant charged for a longer time than he had served. Verdict £7 10s and costs to be paid within fourteen days.

MISCELLANEOUS NEWS

FATAL ACCIDENT - An inquest was held a few days ago on the body of Hugh BOOTH, at the residence of his son, Mount Salem, Kiama. The only evidence procurable was from a neighbour, Mrs WILEY, who said that on Thursday morning she heard a cry of "Wiley, Wiley" and on going out saw deceased lying a few yards from the place on his back, and holding by the reins of the reins of the hors. He exclaimed "My heart is broke". He was taken into the hut and his son sent for, but it appears that he died before medical aid could be procured. It was conjectured that he was thrown from his horse on to a cabbage tree stump, by which death was produced. A verdict of accidental death by falling from a horse was recorded - Corresp, Illawarra Mercury.

SHEEP
For sale, by private contract, 900 (more or less) Hoggets of above equal sexes. These sheep are upwards of twelve months old, and as well bred as any sheep in the Western Districts. The purchaser will therefore obtain immediately a very heavy crop of wool. Delivery will be given immediately at Talloon, Castlereagh River. Application to be made to Mrs McCANN, Talloon.


August 28, 1861
BIRTH
On the 21st instant, at her residence, Cassilis, Mrs William MILLAR, of a son.

POLICE COURT
Tuesday August 27
Before the Police Magistrate, His Worship the Mayor, and T CADELL, Esq.

Edward BULL was fined five shillings for being drunk in Market-street.

Mary McQUIGGAN, charged with being drunk in Perry-street was discharged.

William ANDREWS, out on bail, was charged with a second offence - stealing timber the property of the Mayor. Constable FARRAND said between 7 and 8 o'clock on Friday evening, he saw prisoner in Gladstone-street going in the direction of Mr McQUIGGAN's new building; a few minutes afterwards he heard a noise amongst the timber, and on proceeding towards the spot met the prisoner with the timber now before the Court. Upon asking him where he obtained it, he replied that the Carpenters gave it to him; he then took him into custody; he afterwards searched the prisoner's house, and found more timber, which he took, supposing it to have been stolen. A McCAULEY, was Mayor of Mudgee, he had a contract to finish Mr McQUIGGAN's hotel; the building materials upon the premises were his property; no one had authority to remove any of the timber. W NEWTON, carpenter, was employed by Mc McCAULEY; the prisoner had been assisting the masons; the timber in Court he believed belonged to Mr McCAULEY; he did not give prisoner permission to remove any of it. The prisoner having elected that the case should be decided by their Worships, he was sentenced to six weeks imprisonment.

Alfred JACKSON, charged with stealing £1 19s. Mr CLARKE (for TEMPLETON) appeared for prosecution. Constable MOREN said he took the prisoner into custody, under warrant, for stealing certain monies the property of John CRIMMINS. He died the charge, and said that he won the money "gaffing". John CRIMMINS: Knew JACKSON to his great sorrow. On Friday last he was in his company at the Denison Arms; he was the worse for liquor; having pulled out a note for the purpose of paying for a couple of glasses, JACKSON said he wanted to speak to him, and they went out together into the back yard and commenced gambling. After losing about 'nine bob' he wanted to go away when JACKSON said he wanted money more than he (CRIMMINS) did, and that if he went away he would make him look like a blackfellow, so that no one should again recognize him as Mr CRIMMINS. He then collared him, and took out of his pocket a one pound note, half a sovereign, and eight or nine shillings in silver, in doing which, he tore his trousers; he was drunk at the time, but when drunk he never lost his wits, and could swear that he was robbed of the money. George PERCY, hostler to Mr FOREMAN, saw both parties in his master's yard on Friday. They were gambling; CRIMMINS required to half crowns for the purpose of tossing up; having only one in his pocket, he had to pick one up which was on the ground; JACKSON could not have committed the robbery without his having seen it; JACKSON won; after all was over he gave him a shilling, and went away.
JACKSON, in defence, told an unvarnished tale of his innocency, industry and youth; his having to support a wife and two children. He confessed to the gambling transaction, but was invited into it by complainant, who, after losing his money, cried like a school boy for it to be given back. He thought the fellow as more manly, else he would not have played with him. He was so well known that no one would believe him guilty of the charge, and confidently placed himself in their Worships hands. Not guilty.

Patrick M'GRATH for assault. Mr CLARKE (for TEMPLETON) for complainant. W GORE, of Cudgegong, was in the road near Stoney Pinch on Sunday fortnight; he was in the act of yoking his bullocks, when defendant came up with his team, and drew up so close to his dray as to upset it; he afterwards struck him with his bullock whip, which cut his eyes and arm, and damaged his hat. He had a case in Court some short time since, as he was leaving the Court on that occasion, defendant said "never let me meet you on the road". For the defence. John PRICE said he was in company with M'GRATH on the day in question; he was in charge of a bullock tem which was ahead of defendants; hearing that something was the matter, he turned round and saw the M'GRATH's dray had caught a pole that was fixed to the wheels of complainant's dray which caused it to upset; defendant was trying to turn his bullocks; complainant was behind him; if the whip struck him it was by accident. It happened about half a mile this side of Stoney Pinch; the road is not more than about seven feet wide. Mr CLARKE having addressed the Bench, M'GRATH was fined 20s and costs.

Edward COOK, of Cooyal, was summoned for £5 for wages due. T WALTHAM was a mason; had hired with Mrs COOK as a weekly servant for four weeks at 20s per week, and double rations; he served five weeks, when he asked for his money, and was told if he did not leave the place he would be kicked out. Cross-examined by Mr COOK: Had previously worked for defendant for thirteen weeks; he was paid regularly every month; had engaged the last time to build a chimney. Defendant said the man had represented to him that he was a master builder; that he had erected a light house, and was able to build a chimney; he consequently engaged him to put two up; when the one in question was completed he wished to put in a fire to see how it would draw, to this the master mason objected, saying, "Wait till the other is finished'. On Sunday evening two gentlemen called at his house, and wishing to make them comfortable, the little girl thought she would put a fire in the "big" parlour, when, lo! and behold, such a smother was made as was never seen. The smoke come pouring down in such clouds that it was full two hours before any one could remain in the house; he then examined the chimney and objected to it because there was not flue, and informed the master mason that he would not pay him until he put the work into order; he was still willing to pay; he must, however, have the job finished in a workmanlike way, besides the man, according to his own showing, owed him three days. Mr COOK not having any witnesses to contradict complainant, he was ordered to pay the amount and costs.

CROWN LANDS SALE, MUDGEE - COUNTRY LOTS
B GAWTHORN, 20a 2r
N P BAYLY, 51a, 69a, 79a, 25a 2r, 29a 2r, 22a 1r, 30a x 2
H W BLOOMFIELD, 36a, 35a, 40a x 5, 30a, 20a, 63a, 41a
T J HAWKINS, 26a
M H LYONS 34a, 24a
W COLEMAN 23a 3r, 20a
J DOUGLAS 81a 1r
W RITCHIE 20a 3r 24p
E COVER 30a
R CROSSING, 26a 1r, 44a
J A H PRICE, 48a 3r
J KNOX 32a
E RICHARDS 20a

MISCELLANEOUS NEWS
FATAL ACCIDENT - On Friday afternoon, John FITZWARREN, a small settler, residing at Lake George, was returning home from Goulburn, when his horse ran him against a tree, and knocked his brains completely out. The deceased was about forty years of age and leaves a wife and four children - Goulburn Herald.
DEATH FROM EXCESSIVE DRINKING - An inquest was held before the Coroner on Monday at the Butchers Arms Inn, Dunmore, on the body of Mary NELAN, aged 62. The jury found that she had died from excessive drinking, and not from any hurt, injury, or violence done, or committed to her - Maitland Mercury.
SUDDEN DEATH AND INQUEST - On Saturday night last about ten o'clock, Mr Frederick Hall BARNETT, Innkeeper, of Queanbeyan, was attacked with apoplexy, which resulted in his death, about two hours and half afterwards. An inquest was held. The Jury returned the following verdict - That Frederick Hall BARNETT died on Sunday morning, the 18th August, 1861, from apoplexy, produced by intemperance. A most distressing circumstance accompanied this occurrence: about two hours after deceased's death, Mrs BARNETT took ill, and at 9 o'clock was confined of a daughter. As to Mr BARNETT he was man who possessed a large amount of talent, had received a liberal education, and would have been a useful member of society had he refrained from drink. But this was his ruin, and closed his career in the prime of life. - Goulburn Chronicle.

August 31, 1861

SERIOUS ACCIDENT
An accident occurred to the infant daughter of Mr OSBURNE. The child, who is but 19 months old, was holding some small sticks for her brother, who is about three years of age, to chop at with an old axe they had picked up, when unfortunately he struck her on the right hand, completely severing the index finger and cutting the next finger so badly that it was merely retained by a small portion of the flesh. Mr HAYLES dressed the wound for the little sufferer, who seems at present to be unconscious of pain. - Armidale Express.

POLICE COURT
Friday August 30
Before the Police Magistrate and his Worship the Mayor.

William LYONS was fined 5s for being drunk in Market-street.

Margaret JOHNSON, charged with stealing a water cask. Constable MILLER said he apprehended the prisoner upon warrant, and found the cask in a bed room, the door of which was nailed up; prisoner confessed that she had put it there. Edward BAYLY said the cask was stolen, with a quantity of wood, form the Cudgegong Council Chamber; from information he received he went with the constable to prisoner's residence and found it in a bedroom, the door of which was nailed and the window covered with a thick piece of canvas; he valued the cask at ten shillings. The prisoner pleased forgiveness on account of her child and her husband being away from her upwards of four years, during which time he had only sent her money once. This being her first offence, and taking into consideration her previous conduct, the Bench sentenced her to fourteen days' imprisonment.

SUDDEN DEATH
An inquest as held on Friday morning, by W KING, Esq., M.D. Coroner for this District, at the Fountain of Friendship, on the body of Francis McNAMARA, alias HILL, better known as "Frank the Poet".
Robert WELSH having been sworn, said that the deceased had resided with him on the Pipe Clay Creek diggings. They came into Mudgee together on Wednesday, deceased left him, and promised to meet him by a certain time at Mr McQUIGGAN's. He then went to PHILLIPS', and found him in bed; he asked for some water; he was half drunk. He advised deceased to get up; he replied "Put your hand in my pocket and take out what is there". Had known him for eight years. He had a complaint which caused him to spit blood. He earned a great deal of money, and spent I very freely; had known him to obtain "hundreds a week" at Tambaroora. The wind used to annoy him very much in the hut in which he resided. He was no better for his visit to Mudgee. The day before they had been drinking together all day off and on.
John McDERMID deposed: That he had been working with previous witness since the end of last month; he came into Mudgee on Thursday to see what was keeping him and deceased. He met WELSH, who was nearly tipsy, in PHILLIPS' tap-room and said "You promised not to get drunk" He replied how can I help it, Frank is very bad. He then went to see deceased, who made no reply to a question he put to him respecting his health. Shortly after, he called WELSH and told him to get some money owing to him in Mudgee, and to give him (witness) half, and died directly after. He used to complain of a pain in his shoulder. During the time he resided with them his appetite was good. He had no effects, excepting some papers. He never cared for clothes. Arthur Thomas Piggott CUTTING, being duly sworn, stated that he was a duly qualified medical practitioner; he had viewed and examined the body and it was opinion that the deceased came to his death by the effects of cold and inanition. The jury found a verdict accordingly.

DUBBO COURT OF REQUESTS
From our Correspondent
Wednesday, August 21
Before J M MARSH, Esq., P.M., J RYRIE, and W TIBBITS, Esq., J.P.'s.

Benjamin LEACH v J A IRVINE - Plaintiff claimed £6 10s for a saddle. No appearance on the part of defendant. Verdict for plaintiff, costs 7s.

J M'INTYRE v James FRAZIER - This was a case of horse hire. Plaintiff claimed £5 for the use of a horse for fifteen days. It was proved the horse was not returned in the same condition as when delivered. Verdict for plaintiff to be paid within a fortnight.

COURT OF PETTY SESSIONS
John DUNN was charged with having made use of profane and obscene language on Sunday, 11th instant, at his house at Dubbo and on divers other occasions within public hearing. Defendant pleaded guilty. Sir Frederick POTTINGER having been duly sworn, said he did not wish to press the charge against the defendant, but to effect a proper caution and an example to others. The defendant was a hard-working man, but unfortunately was apt to take a drop too much. Fined £1.
Ann COONAN v Marianne GOOD - Plaintiff in this case brought a bill to defendant for dressmaking, with a dress partly finished; she did not feel disposed to give up the dress till the account was settled. It appears that an attempt was made on the part of the defendant to gain possession of the dress, high words were exchanged, and the bill for the time being duly paid by a blow producing a black eye. The Bench decided that there being no witnesses to the assault, the case must be dismissed.
Sexton M'CAULEY v constable COONAN - This was a case of slander against plaintiff's wife. The Bench decided they had no jurisdiction.
J RYRIE v LAMP - Defendant was a shepherd boy in the service of plaintiff, and had absconded from his service. Plaintiff would not press the charge, and spoke in high terms of the boy, who had ran away in consequence of some difference he had had with his parents. The Bench, taking into consideration the prisoner's youth and the punishment he had already undergone (having been in the black hole for five or six days) fined him 10s.
J RYRIE v BROWN and wife. - The defendants had agreed in Sydney as general useful servants. It was proved by a respectable witness that the wife could neither cook nor wash, and had refused on several occasions to do her work. £18 expenses had been paid for the conveyance from Sydney. The husband's conduct during the proceedings were such that he had to be locked up. Verdict wages and agreement cancelled.

These pages contains transcripts of newspapers, a postal directory and a register that have been typed up from the original. 
I have no further information than what is on these pages.  You may find microfische of the originals at your local or state library

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