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Sacred to the Memory of
ROBERT KING WILSON
Born in Mecklenburg County NC
About the year 1775
Died
February 24, 1856
Farewell my wife and children all
From you a father Christ doth call
Mourn not for me it is in vain
To call me to your sight again.

This tombstone inscription, located in the old Concord Baptist Church Cemetery near Bostic, Rutherford County, North Carolina, begins the mystery of Robert King Wilson. Did he really come from Mecklenburg County? Who were his parents? Why can't we learn more of his origin? Circumstantial evidence suggests that his parents were Mumford Wilson and Angelico Battle, but I have found no direct proof so far.

An examination of Rutherford County records tells us much about the man. He was a Justice of the Peace from 1812 through 1840. He owned a moderate amount of land and was referred to in one deed as a planter—this designated him as a man of means. Family members also say that he was for a long time secretary of the Cane Creek Baptist Church in northern Rutherford County (although I think this may have been his grandson, Robert Knox Wilson, who was secretary of the Sunday School). He could read and write, so he was well educated for his time—clearly a man who should have been, and apparently was, a leader in his community.

Following is a chronological look at his life as gleaned from public records. I use the following abbreviations for sources:

RCNC—Rutherford County North Carolina
HeritageThe Heritage of Rutherford County, vol. I, 1984
BridgesBridges to the Past, vol. I and II, Roy Brooks and Mrs. Ernest Newton

Interestingly, the first public record in which he appears is the only one I have found that is not from Rutherford County—it is from York County SC. A probate record in case 66, File 3117 for Elizabeth Beaty contains one document, a marriage bond that reads as follows:

                                                                                                                                    "Yorkville
"May 28th 1801
"I do hereby Certify that I am entirely satisfied & content that Robert K. Wilson should Marry my Daughter Nancy Beaty.

                                                                        her
                                               "Teste Elizabeth X Beaty
"J. Moore                                                      mark

"May 28th 1801                                                                                                         Yorkville
"I do hereby certify that I am willing to Marry Miss Nancy Beaty & wish so to do without any repugnance.

"Teste                                                 s/ Robert K. Wilson
"J. Moore"

Why this record appears in an estate file is not clear. Elizabeth did not die until 1821, and the file is dated 1801. ["Tombstone Inscriptions, Sharon Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, York County," The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research, vol. 3, p. 105.]

Robert King next appeared in the Rutherford County records two years later, in April 1803. The County Court minutes for that term of court show that he was appointed overseer of the public road leading by his house from Withrows Branch to the Burke line. [RCNC Road Docket, 1803-1820, CR 086.925.1] He and his brother-in-law William Beaty bought a 200 acre tract on Cain Creek of Second Broad River on April 15 from James Withrow. [RCNC Deed Book 32-33, p. 486] Perhaps this is where he was living when he was appointed road overseer, although he may have inherited land from his father in the Withrow neighborhood.

Only one mention of Robert King is found for 1804. He was sued by the administrator of James Shanks (Schenk's) estate in October. [RCNC Trial Docket, 1799-1804, CR 086.308.5] In January 1805 the Schenk's case was docketed again. The plaintiff's claim was "case", which is a shortened version of "trespass on the case". Robert King entered a defense of payment and notice of set off and the case was continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6] The case was also continued in April, [Ibid.] but came on for trial in July. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1803-Jan 1806; CR 086.301.7] The jury entered a verdict of £ 33:9:0 for the plaintiff, having found the "note to be the act and deed of the defendant" and that there were no payments or set off. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6] At the October 1805 session of County Court, the plaintiff sought to execute his judgment against 200 acres of land, two yearlings and four cattle. [RCNC Execution Docket 1805-1813; CR 086.304.2] On 5 Nov 1805 Robert King was identified as owning land adjoining a 36-acre tract granted to Benjamin Adams on Cain Creek. The land also adjoined Andrew Spratt, Patrick Watson and Andrews' own land. [RCNC Land Entries 1804-1826, p. 46; CR 086.404.5]

Under execution issued by John Hall, administrator of Schenk's estate, the sheriff levied on four cattle and one colt of Robert King in January 1806. [RCNC Execution Docket 1805-1813; CR 086.304.2] An April record entry shows that the property was sold to Gloud Long. [Ibid.] By July, following partial payment, the balance of the judgment was down to £ 8:17:0. [Ibid.] It is reasonable to assume that the cattle and colt brought roughly £ 29 at the sale.

Robert King saw his first jury service at the July 1806 session of County Court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1806-Jan 1810; CR 086.301.8] At that same term he was also appointed along with James Withrow and Benjamin Freeman as commissioners to settle the estate of Mary Hanes, deceased, with the administrator, Jesse Burnett. [Ibid.] In addition, he brought suit against Michael Tanner in case, but Tanner was not found and the court order that judicial attachment issue. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6] This was a method to secure persons or property under control of the court. In October the sheriff levied on a still of Robert King's under Schenck's judgment, but he did not sell it "for want of bidders". [RCNC Execution Docket 1805-1813; CR 086.304.2] Robert King also served on the jury at the October term. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1806-Jan 1810; CR 086.301.8] In Robert King's suit against Michael Tanner the court entered an order of default and inquiry and levied on a dark bay colt ("cault") with a blaze face. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6]

Robert King obtained judgment against Tanner in the amount of £ 85:17 plus 6 pence costs in January 1807. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1806-Jan 1810; CR 086.301.8] Execution issued but the property was not sold for want of bidders. [RCNC Execution Docket 1805-1813; CR 086.304.2]

By April 1807 Robert King had satisfied Schenk's judgment. [Ibid.] He had execution issued against Tanner, but nothing was done under that process and an alias execution was issued. [Ibid.] Finally in July the sheriff sold property of Tanner, but it was sold under the elder execution of Marvel Mills against Tanner. [Ibid.] Robert King again served on the jury at the July term of court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1806-Jan 1810; CR 086.301.8]

In October 1807 Robert King was noted as a member of the jury. [Ibid.] In a case I have been able to identify later as Robert King Wilson vs. George Ross, Israel Pickens made a motion that Robert King file his affidavit. [Ibid.] This entry tells very little, but from the next record of the case it appears to relate to the entry of final judgment.

Again in January 1808, Robert King was on jury duty. [Ibid.] In April he and Johnstone Ledbetter signed a £ 250 bond for William Danforth on the charge of perjury. [RCNC Recognizance Docket 1808-1821, p. 4; CR 086.319.1] His case against George Ross was before the court under a sci fa (scire facias) that required Ross to show why final judgment should not be entered, but the case was continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6] The order was made known to Ross and he filed his answer. [Ibid.]

On 21 Jul 1808 Robert King bought his second tract of land, 100 acres from Daniel Johnson situated on both sides of McCaslins Branch of Second Broad River. [RCNC Deed Book 27-28, p. 63] Robert King was listed as a juror at the July court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1806-Jan 1810; CR 086.301.8] The Ross case was calendared and continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6]

At the October 1808 term of court Robert King was discharged of his duty under the bail of William Danforth by delivering Danforth for trial. [RCNC Recognizance Docket 1808-1821, p. 14; CR 086.319.1] Danforth was apparently convicted of perjury, since his punishment was described as having his ears nailed to the pillory and cut off. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 26; CR 086.311.1] Meanwhile in County Court Robert King’s case against Ross was continued again. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6]

Again in January 1809 Robert King served on the jury. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1806-Jan 1810; CR 086.301.8] The Ross case was continued once more. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6] Another suit that Robert King brought, but which I have no prior record of, resulted in judgment in his favor against William Jones. Jones appealed the case and Benjamin Johnston posted the appeal bond, but Jones failed to prosecute his appeal. [Ibid.] At the same term of court, Robert King sought to revive the Tanner case under the issuance of alias process. [Ibid.]

April 1809 was a busy month for Robert King His case against Ross was continued. [Ibid.] The court entered judgment against Tanner according to the sci fa. [Ibid.] Robert King had execution issued against William Jones, but nothing was collected. [RCNC Execution Docket 1805-1813; CR 086.304.2] Finally, Robert King, Benjamin Freeman and James Withrow, Esquire, gave their report of the settlement of the Mary Hanes estate to the court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1806-Jan 1810; CR 086.301.8]

July 1809 was also a busy month. His judgment against William Jones was satisfied. [RCNC Execution Docket 1805-1813; CR 086.304.2] The sheriff found no property of Michael Tanner, so the court issued a sci fa to Burke County. [Ibid.] Robert King sat on the jury again. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1806-Jan 1810; CR 086.301.8] And once more, the Ross case was continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6] One reason Robert King had so much difficulty with Michael Tanner is addressed in an article in Bridges. [Part 2, p. 83] According to an article about Tanner, he moved from Rutherford County to Buncombe County and later to Union County GA. The Ross case was continued again in October. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6]

Assistant Marshall Leonard Daniel was responsible for taking the census in Rutherford County in 1810. He wrote at the end of the census that "I do further Certify that from the Local and Mountainious Situation of the County it was with much difficulty Toil and Expence that I have Been thus able to Complete the Enumeration of the inhabitants living within the County. By Law they being Scattered over a County upwards of Sixty Miles in Length and Nearly thirty in width encompassing Enumerable Lofty mountains amongst which are a part of the Blue Ridge Sugar Loaf Mountain Pacolet Mountain Tryon mountain White Oak Mountain Biggerstaff Mountain flint hill Mountain Cane Creek Mountains. And Broad River Mountains and to add to the Difficulty a false Report having Some Means gone a broad that Every Species of Manufactories and Manufacturers if given in Were to be Taxed, which prevented a number of the good Citizens from Coming forward at public places and public times to make return of their families and even caused Some to refuse to give in and others to Endeavor to Avoid me and my assistant which rendered very difficult for me to procure the Numbers of their families all of which facts are Submitted."

These comments are supplied to help explain the state of the 1810 census. The census is claimed to be set out alphabetically, although it is not completely alphabetical. The surnames are grouped together under the first letter of the surname, but that is the extent of the alphabetical nature of the listings.

Robert K. is the only Wilson found on page 454 of the census; he is listed as age 26-45 (born 1765-1784). There are three females in the home—one age 45 or over and two under age 10. [RCNC Census, 1810, p. 454] The older female could be his wife, but I think the age is too old for her. She may have died and this may be his mother, but I don't believe Nancy was dead by 1810. The younger females were his daughters Eliza R. and Cynthia D.

Page 459 contains another entry for Robert K.—the only Robert K. in Rutherford County at that time, so this must be a duplicate entry. (This census once made me think that there were two Robert K. Wilsons in the area, but further research has shown otherwise.) However, this entry has different and more understandable information. Robert K. and one female are both age 26-45, and this fits for him and his wife. There are two females and four males under age 10. Again, the females were Cynthia D. and Eliza R. The males were probably Jonathan Beaty, William Alonzo, Orville McKee and Samuel P. or James L.

Immediately after Robert King's listing is Hartwell Wilson, age 26-45 and after him is Angeline Wilson, age 45 or older. Mumford Wilson had married Angelico Battle in old Tryon County in 1778, and Angeline is surely his widow. County court minutes show that Mumford had died between October 1806 and January 1807. Angelico had a brother named Hartwell, so Hartwell Wilson must be her son. He is in the same age range as Robert K. and could be his brother. Hartwell married Nancy Gear in 1807 and his entry shows two males under age 10. Other Wilsons are scattered throughout the "W" listing of the census, so I believe that this group belongs together. There was another entry for Hartwell on page 456, so it seems clear that this census was taken somewhat haphazardly. I believe that the first Robert K. entry shows his mother and two daughters and that the second correctly shows his family, with his brother and mother living nearby. Perhaps further research will solve this puzzle.

In January 1810 the Ross case was again continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1805-1810; CR 086.308.6] The same thing occurred in April, July and October. [RCNC Trial Docket 1810-1818; CR 086.308.7]

January 1811 saw Robert King back on jury duty. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1810-Oct 1813, p. 39; CR 086.301.9] The Ross case was continued at both the January and February terms of court. [RCNC Trial Docket 1810-1818; CR 086.308.7] Robert King was also serving on the jury in July, [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1810-Oct 1813; CR 086.301.9] but he sat at the plaintiff's table when the Ross case was finally called for trial. [Ibid.] After so much delay, the jury found in favor of Ross. [RCNC Trial Docket 1810-1818; CR 086.308.7] Robert King was ordered to pay the £ 11:12:9 costs, and he had paid all but the witness fees by the October term. [RCNC Execution Docket 1805-1813; CR 086.304.2]

At the County Court session of January 1812, Robert King began what would become a long period of public service. He, John Harrill, Josiah McEntire, Richard Harrill, James Chitwood, Robt. H. Taylor, William Edwards, Saml. S. Ross, Richd. Allen, Isaac Craton and James Baber took the oath of public office to serve as justices of the peace. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1810-Oct 1813; CR 086.301.9] In this capacity they were responsible for the operation of the County Courts and much of the county government—they acted much as our district courts and county commissioners do today. Sitting in panels of seven or more, they ruled on motions and entered judgment in cases decided by the jury. They elected officials such as sheriff and county surveyor. They voted on taxes and performed marriages.

As soon as Robert King was sworn in, he was called on to join in the annual election for sheriff. [Ibid.] In April he served a term on Superior Court jury. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 103; CR 086.311.1] The County Court during that month appointed him to list taxable property in Capt. Welch's district. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1810-Oct 1813; CR 086.301.9]

On 20 Feb 1813 Robert King signed as bondsman the marriage bond of Ephraim Heart and Lucy Freeman. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] In April he was present to attend to his duties as a justice. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1810-Oct 1813; CR 086.301.9] On 10 Jun 1813 he was bondsman for John Carson and Betsey Thompson. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

The court in July 1813 appointed Robert King to list taxable property in Capt. Green's district. [RCNC County Court Minutes Apr 1810-Oct 1813; CR 086.301.9] The court also received for probate the deed by which Robert King bought 100 acres from Daniel Johnson in 1808. [Ibid.] On 4 Oct 1813 Robert King was the witness on the marriage bond of Theophilus Weeks and Winney Johnston. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] This entry may indicate that he performed the marriage, because many times the person who officiated the ceremony signed the bond as witness.

Again in January 1814, Robert King was present for court and voted for sheriff. [RCNC County Court Minutes Oct 1813-Oct 1819, p. 13; CR 086.301.10] On 20 Feb 1814 he witnessed the marriage bond of George Early and Nancy Liles. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] In April he was appointed to list taxable property in Capt. Green's district. [RCNC County Court Minutes Oct 1813-Oct 1819, p. 31; CR 086.301.10] The court in July named him to serve on the jury at the next term of Superior Court. [Ibid., p. 45] At the same term of court, he and James Cook signed a £ 250 bond with John Olaver (Oliver) to keep the peace with Elijah Patton. [RCNC State Docket County Court 1800-1813; CR 086.307.2] Oliver had married Mary Ann Withrow in 1795 and they lived on land they bought from her father James Withrow on Cane Creek. [Heritage, #676]

Robert King attended court as a justice in October 1814. [RCNC County Court Minutes Oct 1813-Oct 1819; CR 086.301.10] He also served on the Superior Court jury. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 147; CR 086.311.1]

The Oliver peace bond was renewed in January 1815 [RCNC State Docket County Court 1800-1813; CR 086.307.2] and Robert King signed another peace bond with Robert Smith and John Oliver for his son James. [Ibid.] James was named James Withrow Oliver after his grandfather. [Heritage, #676] In July Robert King, Adam Whiteside, and James McFarland Esqrs. were appointed commissioners to settle with James Thompson, guardian of the orphans of John Sterling, deceased. [RCNC County Court Minutes Oct 1813-Oct 1819; CR 086.301.10] The two peace bonds toward Elijah Patton were also renewed. [RCNC State Docket County Court 1800-1813; CR 086.307.2] In October Robert King again sought to recover on his judgment against Michael Tanner, but again he was not found. [RCNC Trial Docket 1810-1818; CR 086.308.7]

Robert King began 1816 by serving as bondsman for the 1 Jan 1816 marriage of Jonas Wassom and Catharine Weaver. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] He also attended County Court and voted for sheriff. [RCNC County Court Minutes Oct 1813-Oct 1819; CR 086.301.10] The Elijah Patton peace bonds were discharged by the defendant John Oliver's payment of costs. [RCNC State Docket County Court 1800-1813; CR 086.307.2] On 24 Mar 1816 he bought from Elisha Weeks 100 acres on the north side of Second Broad River and adjoining the Speculation line and his own land. [RCNC Deed Book 32-33, p. 114]

The Speculation line refers to land owned by the Speculation Land Company, which obtained a number of immense grants that reached through several counties. Sadie Smathers Patton wrote in Buncombe to Mecklenburg—Speculation Lands (1955) that the land totaled nearly a half million acres and reached from Buncombe County to Union County. Patent No. 1022 is the one that was in this area. It contained 8,960 acres and began "on top of a ridge that divides Burke and Rutherford Counties on the road that leads from Morganton to Whitesides Settlement." Adjoining landowners and waterways identified in the grant were Walker, Martin's (Marlin's) Creek, Robert Smith, Osborn, Osborn's Creek, Daniel McGaughy, Lincolnton-Rutherfordtown road, Robertson's Creek, Swaford, Thomas Yardley, Huddleston, Patterson's Mill Creek, Samuel Andrews and John Scott.

In April 1816 Robert King was appointed to list taxable property in Capt. Allen's district. [RCNC County Court Minutes Oct 1813-Oct 1819; CR 086.301.10] On 25 Jul 1816 he was witness for the marriage bond of Joseph Taylor and Elizabeth Hunt, and on 15 Sep 1816 he witnessed the marriage bond of William Fortune and Clary Smelly. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] (An article on the Fortune family in Heritage, p. 177, states that William Fortune Jr. was hanged in Lincoln Co NC in late November 1822 for the murder of his second wife, Clarissy Smalley.) He served on the Superior Court jury in October [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 189; CR 086.311.1] and also attended County Court as a justice. [RCNC County Court Minutes Oct 1813-Oct 1819; CR 086.301.10] In December he witnessed two more marriage bonds—James Witherow McGaughey and Elizabeth Megahey on the 11th and Green Crow and Jinsy Street on the 17th. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

Robert King was on hand to vote for sheriff at the January 1817 term of County Court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Oct 1813-Oct 1819; CR 086.301.10] He, William McFarland, James McFarland, Jabus Murry and Littleton Sims were appointed commissioners to divide the real estate of John Melton deceased among his legatees at the court session. [Ibid.] In 21 Feb 1817 he was the witness for the marriage bond of John C. Burnett and Susanna Eliot. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] In April he was chosen to list taxes for Capt. Allen's district. [RCNC County Court Minutes Oct 1813-Oct 1819; CR 086.301.10] He, George Watson and George Flack were appointed commissioners to settle the estate of John Carson Jr. [Ibid.] This is very likely the same John Carson whose marriage bond he had signed as bondsman just a few years before.

Again in April 1818, Robert King was named to list taxable property in Capt. Allen's district. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1818-Oct 1819, p. 132; CR 086.301.11] In October he served as a justice in the County Court [Ibid.] and he served on the jury for Superior Court. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 223; CR 086.311.1] On 10 Dec 1818 he was the witness for the marriage bond of Felix W. Carson and Polly J. Carson. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

Robert King voted for sheriff in his capacity as a justice of the peace in January 1819. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1818-Oct 1819, p. 196; CR 086.301.11] On 26 Jan 1819 he was the witness for the marriage bond of John Cochran and Sally Johnston, and on 25 Feb 1819 he witnessed the bond for Hugh Watson Long and Martha Burnett. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] A 22 Mar 1819 land entry by Peter Freeman for 200 acres on McCaslins Branch and the head of Bobs Branch of Second Broad identified adjoining landowners as Robert King, Dugger Freeman and Jacob Deck. [RCNC Land Entries 1804-1826, p. 268; CR 086.404.5] In April he served as a grand juror for Superior Court. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 230; CR 086.311.1]

On 27 Apr 1819 Robert King was the witness for the marriage bond of James Guffey and Anny Freeman, and on 6 May 1819 of Robert Barnett and Rachel Black. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] The July session of County Court selected him as a juror for the next term of Superior Court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1818-Oct 1819, p. 265; CR 086.301.11] He witnessed the marriage bond of Benjamin Freeman and Nancy Pope on 19 Aug 1819 and on 30 Sep 1819 he witnessed two marriage bonds—James Campbell and Polly Guffey, and Thomas Guffey Sr. and Polly Griggs. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

Robert King was named a road hand for the public road from new ford on 2nd Broad River below M. Logan's plantation to Robert Smith's in October 1819.[ RCNC Road Docket 1803-1820; CR 086.925.1] Benjamin Johnston was overseer and the other road hands were Joseph Milligan, Dugger Freeman, John Freeman, Jesse Smiley, and Robt. Johnston. He sat as a justice for County Court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1818-Oct 1819, p. 281; CR 086.301.11] His deed from Elisha Weeks was presented for probate. [Ibid., p. 290] He also served on the Superior Court jury in October. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 241; CR 086.311.1] On 1 Dec 1819 he witnessed the marriage bond of James Guffey and Fanny Guffey. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

The 1820 census was more straightforward for Robert King than 1810 had been. [RCNC Census, 1820, p. 361] He was again listed between ages 26 and 45 (born 1775-1794) and there was a female aged 45 or older with him (born 1775 or before). There were two males aged 16-26, one of whom was in the 16-18 age range. These would be Jonathan Beatty and William Alonzo. Two females and one male were in the 10-16 age range—probably Cynthia D., Eliza R. and Orville M. In the under age 10 range were three females and two males. Adaline was one of the females and one of the males was probably James L. He had three persons engaged in agriculture and one in manufactures. Robert King was still listed in the Cane Creek, 2nd Broad River area.

Robert King attended County Court in January 1820 and voted for sheriff. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1820-Jun 1821, p. 15; CR 086.301.12] On 9 Jan 1820 he witnessed the marriage bond of William J. Smith and Elisabeth Moris. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] Then on 13 Apr 1820 he witnessed the marriage bond of John Sellers and Polly McGaughy. [Ibid.]

In July 1820 he and Moses Logan were judges for the election held in Rutherfordton. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1820-Jun 1821, p. 74; CR 086.301.12] He also sat as justice at the July County Court. [Ibid., p. 78] On 23 Jul 1820 he and his brother-in-law William Beaty sold their 200-acre tract on Cane Creek to William Uptergroves. [RCNC Deed Book 32-33, p. 357] I have doubted the correctness of this surname, and many old records refer to persons such as Jesse U. Groves and William U. Groves, but I have located this name and several variations in current phone directories. (In fact it appears to be a very good German name.) On 30 Sep 1820 he was witness for the marriage bond of Lenoyr McGaughy and Peggy Burnitt. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] His case against Michael Tanner resurfaced in October with the sci fa being made known to Tanner. [RCNC Trial Docket 1819-1821; CR 086.308.8] He was also named with Andr. Hudloe, Joseph Good and James Baber as commissioners to allot the years allowance to Zeruiah Carpenter, widow of David Carpenter, and her children. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1820-Jun 1821, p. 87; CR 086.301.12] These children are identified as Elizabeth, Mary, Barbara, Phoebe, Frances, Peter A., Jacob D., Minerva, Martha and Nancy. [Heritage, #172] Zeruiah's maiden name was Johnson, according to that article. On 15 Nov 1820 he was the witness for the marriage bond of John S. Guffey and Eliza Moorehead. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

The Tanner case again came before the court in January 1821, but the record does not indicate any action. [RCNC Trial Docket 1819-1821; CR 086.308.8] Robert King participated in the vote for sheriff. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1820-Jun 1821, p. 112; CR 086.301.12] Robert King, William Edwards and Moses Logan were appointed commissioners to settle the Joseph Mitchell estate. [Ibid.] He was also appointed commissioner to settle the Elias Webb estate with William Green, the executor. Other commissioners were William Toms and James Baber. [Ibid., p. 124] This is the first apparent record of Robert King and William Toms serving together. In 79 years, their great-grandchildren Robert McCamie Wilson and Elizabeth [Bessie] Toms would marry.

On 22 Mar 1821 Robert King witnessed the marriage bond of Francis Price and Jinny Guffey. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] In April the Tanner case came before the court and process issued again to Burke County. [RCNC Trial Docket 1819-1821; CR 086.308.8] Robert King also sued William Beaty, his brother-in-law, resulting in a levy on land. [Ibid.] The Trial Docket contains a notation of "error" that bears no further comment; this may have been claimed on behalf of Beaty. At any rate, the court ordered that publication be made in the Western Carolinian for three months. [Ibid.] Also in April Robert King was named as executor of the will of Cornelius Melton, along with John and Pleasant Fortune. [RCNC Will Book C, p. 151] Records show that he also attended County Court as a justice. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1820-Jun 1821, p. 135; CR 086.301.12]

The records do not indicate why Robert King sued his brother-in-law. Subsequent records show that he had no qualms about suing family members, because he also sued two of his children. The order of publication tends to show that Beaty had left the area and that publication was used to provide him notice of the suit.

The April 1821 session of County Court also received the deed from Robert King and Beaty for probate. [Ibid., p. 161] On 7 Apr 1821 Robert King witnessed the George Tanner and Elizabeth Wood marriage bond. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] His qualification as executor of Cornelius Melton's will occurred in May after Benjamin Freeman Sr. proved the will. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1820-Jun 1821, p. 162; CR 086.301.12]

The suit against Beaty came to court in July 1821 and a verdict was rendered. [RCNC Trial Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.308.9] The court entry indicated that original attachment had occurred, publication had been made, and that the plaintiff was to recover $100 with interest. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 20; CR 086.301.13] During the same court term, Robert King, Andrew Logan and John Bell were named commissioners to settle the estate of Adam Mooney, deceased, with John Morrison and Robert Patton, administrators. [Ibid., p. 24] Further, a return from the Tanner case indicated that the sheriff found no goods, chattels, lands or tenements. [RCNC Execution Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.304.4] On 10 Jul 1821 Robert King bought a 289-acre plantation on Second Broad River from Robert Johnston. [RCNC Deed Book 34, p. 153] The deed referred to Robert King as a planter.

Robert King's suit against William Beaty was before the October 1821 County Court under a claim of error. [RCNC Trial Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.308.9] He was named to replace Abram Crow to serve with Joseph Taylor to settle the estate of John Melton, deceased. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 41; CR 086.301.13] The Beaty case was finalized as land was sold to Robert King for $100, the amount of the judgment. [RCNC Execution Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.304.4] Robert King tried again to collect from Michael Tanner by having execution issued. [Ibid.] On 25 Oct 1821 he witnessed the marriage bond of Felix Logan and Cinthia Bagwell and on 2 Dec 1821 he witnessed the marriage bond of James McHan and Milly Hicks. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

In January 1822 Robert King and the other commissioners returned their report of the settlement of the John Melton estate to court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 70; CR 086.301.13] He was present at court to vote on a tax to repair public buildings, but the justices could not proceed for lack of a majority. [Ibid., p. 72] Apparently they were able to elect county officers. [Ibid., p. 73] His execution against Michael Tanner was returned with the report that no goods were found. [RCNC Execution Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.304.4] In April he has appointed to list taxable property in Capt. Deck's district. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 105; CR 086.301.13] The County Court appointed Robert King, John Bell and Moses Logan to settle James Thompson's estate with his executors, John Carson and William Groves. [Ibid., p. 126] James and his wife Nancy are thought to have come from Brunswick County VA, to Rowan County, then to Rutherford, along with the Tanner and Freeman families. They all settled in the Cane Creek region. [Heritage, #608] Their daughter Betsy, or Elizabeth, is the same person who married John Carson and had Robert King as bondsman.

In January 1823 Robert King attended County Court and voted in the election for sheriff. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 149; CR 086.301.13] In March he, Moses Logan and William Edwards were named to settle David Carpenter's estate with the administrator, Joseph Green Esqr. [Ibid., p. 165]

Robert King served on the Superior Court jury in April 1823. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 335; CR 086.311.1] He was also in attendance at County Court [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 169; CR 086.301.13] and was called on to list taxable property in Capt. Deck's district. [Ibid., p. 172] He was a witness to a deed from Felix Walker and Joseph Smith to Moses Logan for 60 acres, dated 19 Apr 1821 [Ibid., p. 175] and to another deed from Benjamin Johnston to Moses Logan for 140 acres dated 24 Feb 1823. [Ibid., p. 176] He and Leonard Deck signed the bond for Henry Deck on a charge of bastardy. [RCNC State Docket County Court 1800-1813; CR 086.307.2] Henry Deck had been listed for taxes in Rockingham County VA in 1792. [Bridges, vol. II, p. 84] Finally for April, he presented his deed from Robert Johnston for probate. [Ibid., p. 176; CR 086.301.13]

In July 1823 Robert King attended to his duties at County Court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 180; CR 086.301.13] He was appointed in September with Joseph Green and Moses Logan to settle Drury Allen's estate with David and Charles Allen, the executors. [Ibid., p. 205] He was again present at court in October [Ibid., p. 209] and November. [Ibid., p. 217] On 21 Dec 1823 he witnessed the marriage bond of Obediah Blanton and Judy Wardin. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

Robert King attended County Court in January 1824 to vote for county officers. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 231; CR 086.301.13] At that term he was also elected to serve as a Justice of the Bench for Jury Courts for a three-year term. [Ibid., p. 232] He attended County Court in February [Ibid., p. 245] and March. [Ibid., p. 246] April saw him on jury duty in Superior Court, [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 356; CR 086.311.1] again trying to locate property of Michael Tanner, [RCNC Trial Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.308.9] being named to list taxable property in Capt. Deck's district, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 255; CR 086.301.13] being named along with General John Carson, Amos Wall and Joseph Green to allot the year's allowance to Mary Wells, widow of Humphrey Wells, and her family, [Ibid., p. 259] and witnessing the marriage bond of Adam Upchurch and Betsy Freeman on April 17. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

In July 1824 a sci fa was issued to Burke County for Michael Tanner. [RCNC Trial Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.308.9] Robert King attended County Court during the month. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 264; CR 086.301.13] The Court appointed him and B.H. Bradley to serve as inspector of the polls for an election at Rutherfordton. [Ibid., p. 276] He and Moses Logan signed as sureties a £ 300 bond for Sarah and Hamlin Freeman, administrators of the Dugger Freeman estate, in September. [Ibid., p. 286] Since the amount of the bond was twice the estimated value of the estate, the estate should have amounted to £ 150. At the same session of court he, Joseph Milligan, Moses Logan and Joseph Bell were appointed to allot the year's support for the widow Sarah Freeman. [Ibid.]

In October 1824 Robert King was busy. He saw his execution against Michael Tanner returned without endorsement. [RCNC Execution Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.304.4] He attended County Court as a justice. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 294; CR 086.301.13] He, Joseph Milligan and Joseph Green Sr. were sureties on the £ 3000 bond of Nancy, Andrew and Francis Logan on the James Logan estate. [Ibid.] Nancy was his widow, Nancy Egerton. [Heritage, #423] Moses Logan was appointed guardian of the orphans John and James Jefferson Logan and he filed a £ 1500 bond, payable to Robert King, William Grant and Andrew Logan. James Cherry was surety on the bond. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 294; CR 086.301.13] Robert King, Theodorick F. Birchett, Joseph Milligan, John Long, John Bell, Sherwood Upchurch, Robert Cochran, William Bell, John Freeman, William Wallace, Adam Hampton and Jacob Michal were named to lay off the widow's dower and to partition the real estate. [Ibid., p. 296.] Robert King stood as bail for Charles Bayles in a suit by Jos. Goode. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1816-1825, p. 498; CR 086.322.2] Goode had been born in Amelia County VA. [Heritage, # 282] Robert King attended County Court in November [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 299; CR 086.301.13] and on 24 Dec 1824 he witnessed the will of Joseph Eakins Sr. [RCNC Will Book D, p. 45]

Robert King was present for County Court in January 1825 [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 303; CR 086.301.13] and he voted in the election for county officials. [Ibid., p. 311] The Court also selected him to serve on the April Superior Court jury. [Ibid., p. 321]

On 14 Feb 1825 Robert King bought a tract of land on Bobs Branch that adjoined the speculation line. The deed was from Sheriff William Carson, who sold the land under execution against William Beatty. [RCNC Deed Book 35, p. 75] This may be the land that was reported sold to Robert King in October 1821 under his judgment against Beatty. Many people were not as careful as they might be about obtaining or recording deeds to land.

Robert King was present for County Court in March 1825 [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 331; CR 086.301.13] and April. [Ibid., p. 346] In April he was called on to list taxable property in Capt. Tomlin's district. [Ibid.] He also sat on the jury in Superior Court. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 372; CR 086.311.1] He attended County Court in May [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1821-Jun 1825, p. 352; CR 086.301.13] and June. [Ibid., p. 353]

Finally in July 1825 Robert King saw the sheriff levy on two tracts of land on Crooked Creek under his execution against Michael Tanner. [RCNC Execution Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.304.4] I can find no such creek in Rutherford County, but a Crooked Creek is in southeastern Buncombe County. Since Tanner had moved to Buncombe, this may be the location of the land.

Robert King was at court in July 1825, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 1; CR 086.301.14] where he presented his deed from Sheriff Carson for probate. [Ibid., p. 18] In October the Tanner execution sale was reported to court. Jos. Noblet purchased 30 acres and Robert King bought 150 acres. [RCNC Execution Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.304.4] In October he proved the will of Joseph Eakins, which he had witnessed the previous December. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 27; CR 086.301.14]

Robert King brought suit against John H. Alley in case in January 1826. Alley entered a plea of general issue with leave and the matter was reported to John Moore, merchant, John Mills and T.F. Birchett. [RCNC Trial Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.308.9] He also sat as a justice at the session of court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 35; CR 086.301.14] He was elected to hold special bench court for two years. [Ibid., p. 43]

The April 1826 minutes show that his suit against Alley had been referred, but not decided. [RCNC Trial Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.308.9] He sat as a justice during the court session. [Ibid., p. 47] He, Moses Logan and Solomon A. Ross were appointed to settle the Dugger Freeman Estate with Sarah and Hamlin Freeman. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 63; CR 086.301.14] He also voted on the appointment of the entry taker. [Ibid., p. 64] The court chose him to list taxable property in Deck's district. [Ibid., p. 66]

Robert King, Moses Logan and Robert McAfee were appointed in June 1826 to settle the estate of Leonard Hamlin with Harbert Harton, the administrator. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 72; CR 086.301.14] In July the records show that the Alley suit was still before the referees. [RCNC Trial Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.308.9] Robert King was attending County Court in that month. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 74; CR 086.301.14] On 11 Aug 1826 he was bondsman on the marriage bond of William Thompson and Elizabeth Dicus. [RCNC Marriage Bonds]

As Robert King sat at County Court in October 1826 [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 105; CR 086.301.14] he saw that the Alley case was still not resolved. [RCNC Trial Docket 1821-1826; CR 086.308.9] He and John Bell were sureties on the £ 200 bond of Moses Logan as administrator of Elias Stafford's estate. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 107; CR 086.301.14] He was named with John Bell, John Freeman and Peter Freeman to allot the year's support to the widow Lucinda Stafford. [Ibid.] He was also appointed to settle the Humphrey Wells estate with the administratrix, Mary Wells. Others serving with him were Richard Harrell and John Harrell. [Ibid.]

In January 1827 the Alley case came back to court and the rule of reference was set aside; in other words, one of the parties objected to the decision of the referees. Alley pled general issue, accord and satisfaction and statute of limitations and the case was continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] Robert King was in attendance at court as a justice, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 115; CR 086.301.14] where he voted in the election of county officers. [Ibid., p. 122] He also attended court in April, [Ibid., p. 142] when the Alley case was continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] He served on the April Superior Court jury. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 428; CR 086.311.1] In May he attended County Court, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 155; CR 086.301.14] as he also did in June [Ibid., p. 157] and July. [Ibid., p. 158] Alley asked for and received a continuance in July. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] On 14 Aug 1827 Robert King signed Joseph Goode’s will as a witness. [RCNC Will Book D, p. 78]

In Ocotber 1827 he served on the Superior Court jury. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 436; CR 086.311.1] The Alley case came up on the docket in October, but was not reached. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] Robert King served as a justice at that term, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 186; CR 086.301.14] and he also testified to the authenticity of Joseph Goode's will. [Ibid., p. 191]

Again in January 1828 the Alley case was calendared but not tried. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] Robert King attended County Court [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 202; CR 086.301.14] and voted in the election of county officers. [Ibid., p. 210] He was again elected to hold jury courts for two years, along with Robert McAfee and Moses Logan. [Ibid., p. 211]

Robert King served as a justice at the February 1828 County Court. [Ibid., p. 226] On 9 Feb 1828 he witnessed a deed from John and Philip Canselor to James W. Carson for 206 acres on both sides of Robertson’s Creek, adjoining Depriest. [RCNC Deed Book 36 p. 377; CR 086.401.19] He attended County Court in March [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 232; CR 086.301.14] and April. [Ibid., p. 236] During the April session he was appointed to list taxes in Capt. Wilson’s district. [Ibid, p. 238] I believe this was Samuel P. Wilson, who may have been one of Robert King’s sons. There are records that place Samuel P. in the same neighborhood as Robert King during this period.

In July 1828 the Alley case bore the notation that plaintiff (Robert King) had continued the case for James L. Wilson's deposition. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] I believe that James L. was one of Robert King's sons. Robert King attended County Court in July. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 253; CR 086.301.14] He was also appointed with William Wells and Solomon A. Ross to settle the Humphrey Wells estate with the administrators, Mary Wells and Elias Padgett. [Ibid., p. 259] In his service as a justice during this term, Robert King granted order of sale on judgments and executions. [Ibid., p. 266] He was appointed to allot the year's support to Susan McArthur, widow of John McArthur, serving in this function with David McBrayer, Abner Green and John Burge. [Ibid.] Also in July he and Andrew Eaves were named inspectors of the polls in Rutherfordton, [Ibid., p. 274] and he was named to the next Superior Court jury. [Ibid.]

Robert King and John Mills as justices (apparently) to the use of O.C. McAfee brought suit against Samuel McBrayer et als for a debt in October 1828. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] Robert King attended County Court that month. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 290; CR 086.301.14] In Superior Court, he served as a juror. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1807-1830, p. 391; CR 086.311.1] His suit against John H. Alley did not come up for trial.

The Alley case did come up in January 1829 and resulted in a mistrial. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] The McBrayer case came up and was referred to the clerk of court to report at the April session. [Ibid.] Robert King was in attendance as a justice when these cases came up. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 297; CR 086.301.14] He participated in the vote for county officers [Ibid., p. 299] and was appointed along with William Davis, Leonard Deck and Aaron Bickerstaff to allot the year's allowance to Margaret Horton, widow of William Horton. [Ibid., p. 310] His widow was Margaret Moore and they are buried in the family cemetery near Sunshine. [Heritage, #371] He also witnessed a deed offered for probate from John Crowder, Philip Cansler to James W. Carson dated 9 Feb 1828 for 206 acres. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 315; CR 086.301.14]

Robert King was present for County Court in February 1829. [Ibid., p. 316] On 11 Feb 1829 he witnessed the will of Joseph Carpenter. [RCNC Will Book E, p. 253] The Alley case came up in April but was continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] In the McBrayer case, the report of the clerk was delayed until July. [Ibid.] Robert King attended County Court [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 321; CR 086.301.14] and was appointed to list taxable property in Capt. Hill's company. [Ibid., p.323] Robert King also attended the court session in May [Ibid., p. 329] and July. [Ibid., p. 331]

In July 1829 the order in McBrayer was renewed. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] The Alley case was still on the docket with the notation "mistrial". [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 334; CR 086.301.14] He signed as surety the £ 300 bond of Samuel Biggerstaff as administrator of Isabella Eakins, deceased. [Ibid., p. 335] She was Isabella Walkup Eakins, widow of Joseph Eakins. [Heritage, #103] Robert King and Benjamin H. Bradley were appointed inspectors of elections for Rutherfordton. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 343; CR 086.301.14] In the Alley case the parties agreed that the deposition of James L. Wilson would be taken (on Thursday) at John Logan's. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10]

The notation accompanying the Alley case in October 1829 was that James L. Wilson's deposition would be taken and read by consent. [Ibid.] The report in McBrayer was filed with the court in October. [Ibid.] Robert King, Daniel Watson and Samuel P. Wilson were appointed to settle the estate accounts for the estate of Elias Stafford with Moses Logan, administrator. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 355; CR 086.301.14] Court was held in November, and Robert King attended. [Ibid., p. 359]

The 1830 census, Cane Creek district, listed Robert K. as between ages 40 and 50, thus indicating years of birth between 1780 and 1790. [RCNC Census, 1830, p. 465] In his household were one female age 20-30 (Cynthia or Eliza), one female 15-20 (Adaline), one male 15-20 (James L.?), and two females 10-15. Also on the same page were Orvile Wilson, age 20-30, Daniel Wilson, age 40-50 (or 90-100, unless this was someone else in the household), and William A. Wilson, age 20-30. Taken together with the two previous censuses, it appears that Robert King was not born as early as 1775 as his tombstone suggests, but that he was born between 1780 and 1784. I tend to think he was born in either 1780 or 1781.

The Alley and McBrayer cases came to court in January 1830 and were continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] Robert King attended to his duties in County Court in January, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 363; CR 086.301.14] including electing county officers. [Ibid., p. 364] The court elected him to hold jury terms of County Court along with Robert McAfee and Moses Logan. [Ibid., p. 366] It also chose him and Littleton Sims, Reuben Proctor and Greene Crow to allot the year's support to Anner Grayson, widow of Benjamin Grayson. [Ibid., p. 370] He was surety on the £ 200 bond of Joseph C. Grayson, administrator of Benjamin Grayson deceased. [Ibid.]

In April 1830 the Alley suit was continued for Alley by The. Birchett. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] McBrayer had been referred to the Clerk for an account, and the parties filed exceptions. [Ibid.] Robert King, Moses Logan and William Davis were appointed to settle the John Cansler estate with James W. Carson, the administrator. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 394; CR 086.301.14] On 2 May 1830 Robert King sold 340 acres on both sides of Bobby Branch of Second Broad River to Orville McK. Wilson. [RCNC Deed Book 37-38, p. 200] On 6 May 1830 he witnessed the marriage bond of William Guffey and Delila Philbeck; on 10 Jun 1830 he was witness for the marriage bond of James McHan and Anna Wood, [RCNC Marriage Bonds] and on 11 Jun 1830 Robert King performed the marriage for Tolivar Davis and Katharine Logan, a daughter of Moses Logan. [NC Spectator]

Robert King served as justice in County Court in July 1830. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 403; CR 086.301.14] Among his actions as justice, he exempted Andrew Harmon from road duties due to infirmity. [Ibid., p. 422] His deed to Orvill M. Wilson was presented to court for probate in July. [Ibid., p. 429] Once more, the Alley case and the McBrayer case did not reach a jury. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10]

On 1 Aug 1830 Robert King performed the marriage ceremony for William Moorehead and Betsy Fortune and was bondsman for Wily Norvill and Fanny Cawhorn. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] At County Court in September 1830, Robert King, Joseph Taylor and David Mooney were chosen to settle the Rachel Grayson estate with the executors Joseph C. Grayson and Louis Vanzant. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jul 1825-Oct 1830, p. 432; CR 086.301.14] At court in October he was involved in the election for sheriff [Ibid., p. 434] and saw the Alley case continued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] On 29 Oct 1830 Rev. Alfred Webb performed a marriage between Robert King and Susanna McArthur, daughter of Thomas Roberts. [RCNC Marriage Bonds] She was the widow of John McArthur, and Robert King had been one of the justices chosen to allot her year's support in July 1828.

Robert King attended County Court in January 1831, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 1; CR 086.301.15] where he helped elect the sheriff, [Ibid., p. 2] was appointed along with Moses Logan and William Davis to settle the accounts of the Gloud Long estate with Hugh W. Long, the executor, [Ibid., p. 6] and saw his case against Alley "continued for want of Nathl. Wallis". [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] In February he was appointed with John Wall and Housen Harrill to settle the administration accounts of the William Horton estate. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 6; CR 086.301.15]

Robert King participated in the election for clerk of court in April 1831. [Ibid., p. 22] During that term of court the Alley case was on the docket but not tried. [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10] In July he attended County Court, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 36; CR 086.301.15] where he was appointed to settle the estates of Isabella Eakins and Joseph Eakins with Samuel Biggerstaff, who was executor of Joseph's will and administrator of Isabella's estate. Others who served with Robert King were William Davis and Solomon A. Ross. [Ibid., p. 37] The Alley case came on for trial and the jury found for Robert King in the amount of $60. Alley appealed to Superior Court. [Ibid., p. 40; RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10]

The Alley case was noted as on appeal in October 1831. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1826-1833, #151; CR 086.322.3] Robert King was on hand that month for the election for sheriff and solicitor. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 56; CR 086.301.15] He also posted bail for his son Orville Wilson, who had been sued by Burton P. Bagwell. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1826-1833, #111; CR 086.322.3]

When Robert King attended County Court in January 1832 [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 68; CR 086.301.15] he was on hand to vote for county officers. [Ibid., p. 74] The court named him guardian of his second wife's children, Walter S., Wm G., Eleazer, Thomas, David & Mary McArthur, orphans of John McArthur; he was required to file a £ 1000 bond. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1824-1840, p. 52; CR 086.510.1] In March the court called on Robert King, Moses Logan, Robert G. Twitty, Leonard Deck and Theo. F. Birchett to divide and partition land in dispute in the case of Daniel Coleman v. John Logan. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 86; CR 086.301.15]

Robert King sued Daniel Johnston and obtained judgment against him on 23 Apr 1832 for a debt of $1.50 and costs of $.70. The court entered an order of sale and the sheriff levied on the interest of Robert Baber in the land of John Baber, deceased, as the property of Johnston. [Ibid., p. 95] In Alley's appeal, Jon. Hampton and John Bradly posted the appeal bond for Alley. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1826-1833, #127; CR 086.322.3]

Robert King was about his duties as a justice at the July 1832 term of County Court. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 105; CR 086.301.15] He brought suit against his son Orvill M. Wilson for two notes amounting to $92 and $93, respectively. The first case bore the following notation: "Judgment and execution were returned to the court at the suit of Robert King Wilson against Orvill M. Wilson for the sum of $92.00 dated 8 Feb 1832 with the following indorsement thereon towit ‘July the 7th 1832 no goods or chattels to be found in my County nor the defendant found, then levied this execution on the following lands and tenements towit 150 acres of land on Knob Creek joining lands of Elias Lynch the widow Bagwell and others. Also on lots no. 6 & 7 included in the landed estate of Lunsford Bagwell decd. as the property of Orvill M. Wilson. W. Carson Shff.’" The following entry was identical except that the amount of that judgment was $93.00. [Ibid., p. 114] Robert King also received payment in full from Daniel Johnston in July. [RCNC Execution Docket 1826-1838; CR 086.304.5]

The vote for sheriff occurred at the January 1832 County Court session, and Robert King took part in the vote. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 130; CR 086.301.15] The Alley appeal was noted but no further entry was provided. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1826-1833, #122; CR 086.322.3] Having obtained judgment against his son Orville, Robert King collected by purchasing 150 acres and two town lots at the execution sale. [RCNC Execution Docket 1826-1838; CR 086.304.5] Another case seems to have appeared from nowhere; in James L. & Orvill Wilson vs John H. Alley, Robert King signed a statement that the judgment had been satisfied. [Ibid.] Whether this case is somehow related to Robert King's suit against Alley does not appear, but it is probably a separate case, since there continue to be later entries concerning the earlier case.

In January 1833 Robert King filed his first annual report as guardian of the McArthur orphans, reporting an estate of $1144.43¾. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1824-1840, p. 64; CR 086.510.1] A very interesting entry shows that Robert King obtained the court's permission to withdraw the original papers in his suits against Orvile M. Wilson, although execution had issued and property had been sold. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 167; CR 086.301.15] His suit against John H. Alley was continued in April 1833, [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1826-1833, #107; CR 086.322.3] August, [Ibid., #95] and October. [Ibid., #92] Also in October, a suit entitled Governor to the use of Robert King Wilson v. John Hardin was filed to recover a debt. Hardin pled payment and set off (that is, he had already paid the debt or if not, he was entitled to offset against it money that Robert King owed him). [RCNC Trial Docket 1827-1833; CR 086.308.10]

Robert King's January 1834 report as guardian of the McArthur orphans shows an estate valued at $1219.58¾. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1824-1840, p. 69; CR 086.510.1] When the Court held its vote for county officers, Robert King was present and voting. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 220; CR 086.301.15] In that election, the Court chose Robert King to hold Probate Courts for the next two years together with John Bradley and M.R. Alexander. [Ibid.] The Hardin case was on the January docket, but did not come on for trial. [RCNC Trial Docket 1834-1843; CR 086.308.11] The County Court session in March saw Robert King present and carrying out his duties as justice. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 233; CR 086.301.15] He also served as justice in April. [Ibid., p. 237]

The Court in April 1834 appointed Robert King to list taxable property in Capt. Smith's district. [Ibid., p. 239] The Alley case was indicated to be on appeal with John Bradley and Jonathan Hampton standing Alley's appeal bond. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #78; CR 086.322.4] In April Robert King sued John Hardin for slander. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #153; CR 086.322.4; RCNC Trial Docket 1834-1843; CR 086.308.11] Robert King attended County Court in June [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 246; CR 086.301.15] and July, [Ibid., p. 254] where he voted in an election to fill a vacancy in the office of entry taker. The Court named him to serve on the jury for October Superior Court. [Ibid., p. 256] John Hardin came into court, withdrew his pleas in the debt case, and confessed judgment in open court for $130.25. [RCNC Trial Docket 1834-1843; CR 086.308.11]

At September 1834 County Court Robert King was again about his duties as justice. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 269; CR 086.301.15] He was listed as a debtor to the Jacob Michal estate; a note in the amount of $13.52, due and payable on 26 Nov 1833, now amounted to $14.60. [RCNC Record of Estates 1831-1835, p. 174; CR 086.501.1] The election for sheriff took place in October and Robert King voted. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 272; CR 086.301.15] The Alley appeal was still pending in October, [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #58; CR 086.322.4] as was the Hardin slander suit. [Ibid., p. 124]

When Robert King arrived for jury duty at the October 1834 Superior Court, he was assigned to be on the Grand Jury, which elected him foreman. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1831-1849; CR 086.311.2] The Grand Jury met again in November with Robert King as foreman. [RCNC State Trial Docket 1831-1840, p. 112; CR 086.321.1] He attended a December session of County Court, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 279; CR 086.301.15] where he and Housen Harrell were commissioned to take the privy exam of Elizabeth Reavis and Mary Burge, feme coverts. [Ibid.] This quaint language, which existed well into this century, meant that the wife was privately questioned whether she had voluntarily signed a deed with her husband or whether she had signed under duress.

In January 1835 Robert King renewed his bond as guardian of the McArthur orphans in the amount of £ 2000. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1824-1840, p. 81; CR 086.510.1] He attended County Court and voted in the election for county officers. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 281; CR 086.301.15] He attended County Court at its March term [Ibid., p. 296] and filed his return as guardian for his step-children, showing an estate worth $1226.74¾. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1824-1840, p. 84; CR 086.510.1] He also attended County Court in April. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 298; CR 086.301.15] His suit against John H. Alley had been sent to a referee, and at this term the court set aside the rule of referee. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #41; CR 086.322.4] Again this term, the Hardin slander case was not reached. [Ibid., #74]

Robert King attended the County Court sessions in June 1835 [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 301; CR 086.301.15] and September 1835. [Ibid., p. 320] The Alley case [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #28; CR 086.322.4] and Hardin case [Ibid., #53] were noted on the docket, but no further action was taken. He was at Court again in October, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 322; CR 086.301.15] where he voted in the renewal of the sheriff's bond [Ibid., p. 323] and the election for solicitor. [Ibid., p. 324] Again in December he attended court. [Ibid., p. 332]

His January 1836 return as McArthur orphans guardian showed an estate of $1196.55½. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1824-1840, p. 91; CR 086.510.1] Robert King was on hand at the January term of Court to conduct county business. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 335; CR 086.301.15] In April 1836 the Alley case made no progress, [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #26; CR 086.322.4] but the Hardin slander case was dismissed at defendant's costs. [Ibid., #49] Robert King was on hand to serve as a justice at that term. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 359; CR 086.301.15]

In July 1836 Robert King, Reuben Hill Jr. and Daniel Tanner were sureties on the £ 4000 bond of Constable William A. Tanner. [Ibid., p. 382] The Alley appeal was noted but not tried in October 1836. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #22; CR 086.322.4] Also in October, Robert King and Henry Dogget brought suit against Thomas Jefferson in case and obtained judgment by default. [Ibid., #3] At the same term, Spencer Eaves sued Robert King and Reubin Hill in case. [Ibid., #8]

Robert King was in attendance at the October 1836 term of County Court, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 388; CR 086.301.15] where he participated in the qualification of the sheriff. [Ibid.] He also proved the handwriting and signature of Daniel Johnston on the 30 Jul 1803 deed from Johnston to John Dowell or Dowdle for 10 acres. The witnesses to the deed, John and Leanna Johnston, had removed from the state and were believed to be dead. [Ibid., p. 394] Robert King served on the Superior Court jury in October as well. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1831-1849; CR 086.311.2] Robert King was a witness for the State in its suit against Andrue Eaves in November 1836. [RCNC State Trial Docket 1831-1840, p. 166; CR 086.321.1] Other prosecution witnesses were Abel Gooch and Reuben Hill. Eaves was born in 1777 and married Polly Carpenter in 1799. [Heritage, #238]

In January 1837 the case of Governor to use of James Richardson v. Andrew Hudlow, William Wood, Reuben Hill Jr., Robert King Wilson & Andrew Danner was filed for a debt on a bond. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 414; CR 086.301.15] Andrew Tanner was not found and the defendants entered pleas of general issue, payment and set off, accord and satisfaction, statute of limitations, and conditions performed. The court entered an order of nolle prosequi (no prosecution) as to A. Tanner nunc pro tunc (now as then). Defendants moved to nonsuit since the writ was in the name of the Governor to use of James Richardson instead of in the name of the State to use of James Richardson. The plaintiff moved for leave to amend the writ on his paying costs. The court overruled the motion to nonsuit and granted leave to amend. The jury found for the plaintiff damages of $112.54 with interest from 14 Jan 1837.

In April 1837 Robert K's judgment against John H. Alley was upheld. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #21; CR 086.322.4] The Wilson & Dogget v. Jefferson case was again noted as a default by the defendant. [Ibid., #122] Spencer Eaves' case was on the docket as well, but no action was taken. [Ibid., #126] Robert King was in attendance for County Court in April 1837. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1831-Dec 1837, p. 424; CR 086.301.15] The May Superior Court minutes confirm that Robert King's judgment against Alley was upheld on appeal. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1831-1849; CR 086.311.2] Robert King served on the jury during that same Superior Court term. [Ibid.] The Eaves suit ended in a mistrial. [Ibid.]

The next entry regarding Robert King was five months later, in October 1837. The Wilson and Henry Dogget suit against Thomas Jefferson was scheduled for a hearing on default. The docket contains the notation "death of R.K. Wilson suggested." [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #78; CR 086.322.4] This was a claim by the defendant that Robert King had died and that the suit could not be maintained in his name. The Eaves case had also been scheduled for October court, but it was continued. [Ibid., #81] The records are silent as to the basis for Jefferson's claim. Robert King was present and active in May 1837, but the next evidence of his activity was not until the January 1838 County Court. Perhaps he had been seriously ill for a while. He may have been away from the county attending to some other business. All we can do is speculate.

Robert King was clearly alive in January 1838, because he filed his report as guardian of the McArthur orphans that term, showing and estate of $1302.46. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1824-1840, p. 124; CR 086.510.1] He also attended County Court [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1838-Dec 1844, p. 1; CR 086.301.16] and voted for county officers. [Ibid., p. 7] His health was sufficient for him to be elected to hold jury sessions for the court. [Ibid., p. 8] He was present for the "spring" term of County Court, where he voted to elect county officers. [Ibid., p. 28]

Again at the April 1838 court, the docket indicated that in the Jefferson suit the death of Wilson had been suggested at the Fall term. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #56; CR 086.322.4] The Eaves case was tried, with Robert King and Reubin Hill having a verdict entered against them in the amount of $400 and costs. [Ibid., #59; RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1831-1849; CR 086.311.2] Robert King also attended County Court in July 1838 [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1838-Dec 1844, p. 44; CR 086.301.16] and at the "fall" term, where he voted for sheriff. [Ibid., p. 64] He, John Mills and John Logan were elected to hold jury sessions for the year, for which they would be paid $2 per day. [Ibid.]

In October 1838 the Jefferson case came up again with the suggestion that Wilson had died, and the court ordered that the suit stand in the name of the surviving partner. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #29; CR 086.322.4] The Eaves case was continued in October. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1831-1849; CR 086.311.2] Robert King closed out 1838 by attending County Court in December. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1838-Dec 1844, p. 82; CR 086.301.16]

In January 1839 Robert King again filed his report as guardian of the McArthur orphans, showing an estate of $1149.13. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1824-1840, p. 138; CR 086.510.1] He attended County Court that month as a justice [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1838-Dec 1844, p. 84; CR 086.301.16] and voted in the election of county officers. [Ibid., p. 88] At the spring term (probably April) he voted in the election for a replacement for the Clerk of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, who had died. [Ibid., p. 108] He was also appointed along with Housen Harrill, William Harrill and Boswell Bostick to allot dower to Mary Baber, widow of William Baber. George Moore was appointed administrator of the estate. [Ibid., p. 112] He was also a witness to a deed from Abraham & Elizabeth Green to John Mills for 240 acres, dated 13 Mar 1839, that was presented for probate. [Ibid., p. 120] Abraham was born in 1760 to Joseph Green and Mary McIntyre, who lived on Buffalo Creek. [Heritage, #300] He and Reuben Hill were sued by Jesse Sullins in April. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1834-1839, #151; CR 086.322.4]

At the fall (October 1839) term of court, Robert King attended [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1838-Dec 1844, p. 156; CR 086.301.16] and helped conduct county business. [Ibid., p. 157] The Sullins case was continued in October 1839. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1839-1844, #106; CR 086.322.5]

Robert King Wilson does not appear in the 1840 census. I have examined the RCNC census and have looked in nearby states as well, but I have found no trace of him in that year.

Once again in February 1840, Robert King filed his £ 1000 bond as guardian of the McArthur "heirs". [RCNC Guardian Docket 1824-1840, p. 155; CR 086.510.1] Signing as surety were Abel Hill, William A. Wilson, James H. Carpenter and John Bradley. He filed his annual account, which amounted to $946.72. [Ibid., p. 158] The declining balance of the estate may indicate that one or more of the children had attained majority and had received their share of their father's estate. Robert King attended the February County Court session [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1838-Dec 1844, p. 166; CR 086.301.16] and served as surety for Frances Alexander, County Surveyor. [Ibid., p. 169] Others who served as surety on the £ 2000 bond were John Bradley and James Logan.

February Court may have been the beginning of the end of Robert King's public service. After having been elected by the Court to hold special courts, probate courts and jury trials for several years, he placed himself as a candidate to hold Special County Courts in February and came in fifth among seven candidates. [Ibid., p. 176] He seems to have been stung by his defeat, because in March he tendered his resignation as a Justice of the Peace. However, the Court objected that he had to tender his resignation to the Governor, not the Court. [Ibid., p. 183] He must have submitted his resignation to the Governor, because there are no more entries that relate to his service as a justice. He was about 60 years old at this time, and he may have resigned due to his age, but I can't help but think that he may have stepped down due to hurt feelings.

Jesse Sullins’ case against Robert King and Reubin Hill was continued in May 1840 [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1839-1844, #58; CR 086.322.5] and October 1840. [Ibid., #48] That ended his public activity for 1840. This may also indicate the extent of the hurt he felt in defeat, since his last action was in February.

Robert King filed another annual return for the McArthur orphans in February 1841, showing a balance of $850.32. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1840-1850, p. 8; CR 086.510.2] He again served as surety for county surveyor Francis Alexander, along with Joseph McD. Carson, John H. Alley and Samuel S. Gidney. [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1838-Dec 1844, p. 223; CR 086.301.16] On 26 Jan 1841 he had witnessed a mortgage from Hamblin Freeman to Edward Freeman and W.A. Wilson for land Burke County on Muddy Creek and personal property; the mortgage was offered for probate in February. [Ibid., p. 241]

The Sullins case against Robert King and Reuben Hill was tried in April 1841 and Sullins won a judgment for $200 and costs. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1831-1849; CR 086.311.2] By May Wilson and Hill had paid $91. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1839-1844, #39; CR 086.322.5] Also in May, Spencer Eaves brought suit to the use of William Tanner against Robert King and Reubin Hill and sci fa was issued. [Ibid., #19] The case came up again in October 1841, but was not reached. [Ibid., #126]

In February 1842 Robert King was still shown as guardian of the McArthur orphans, but there was no indication of the amount of the estate. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1840-1850, p. 29; CR 086.510.2] Robert King attended the estate sale for James Harrell and bought a one-quart measure for $.06 and two tin buckets for $.28. [RCNC Record of Estates 1840-1847, p. 164; CR 086.501.3] The Eaves case worked its way up the court docket in May 1842, but was continued. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1839-1844, #96; CR 086.322.5] On 4 May 1842 Robert King obtained a land grant for 50 acres on McCaslin Branch of Second Broad River adjoining land of Moses Logan, Edward Freeman and W.A. Wilson (his son). [RCNC Land Entries 1838-1856, p. 50; CR 086.404.6] He again sat on the jury for County Court in July 1842, [RCNC County Court Minutes Jan 1838-Dec 1844, p. 346; CR 086.301.16] a fact that could enforce the theory that he felt he had enough of that body for quite a time. In September he bought a coffee pot for $.19 at another sale of the James Harrell estate. [RCNC Record of Estates 1840-1847, p. 210; CR 086.501.3] Finally for 1842, the Eaves case was continued again. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1839-1844, #76; CR 086.322.5]

In February 1843 Robert King resigned his guardianship of Mary McArthur. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1840-1850, p. 82; CR 086.510.2] This probably indicates that she had married. During February court he sued George Moore and Thomas Moore for a debt, but when Thomas was not found, the case was dismissed at Robert King's cost. [RCNC Trial Docket 1834-1843; CR 086.308.11]

During March 1843 Robert King filed a $200 bond as guardian for David McArthur, who was probably the last of the orphans who was still a minor. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1840-1850, p. 84; CR 086.510.2] Also in March Robert King obtained partial payment on his judgment against John H. Alley. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #4; CR 086.318.1] Robert King and Reuben Hill had paid $254.47 of the $200 judgment and $97.21 costs due to Jesse Sullins. [Ibid., #41]

In April 1843 a case against Robert King by A.G. Logan was appealed, then dismissed at Logan's cost. [RCNC Trial Docket 1843-1866; CR 086.308.12] The Eaves case was again on the docket for May, but not reached. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1839-1844, #56; CR 086.322.5] Robert King served on the Superior Court jury in May. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1831-1849; CR 086.311.2]

The Eaves case came to court in July 1843 and resulted in judgment for Eaves of $11.04 and costs. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1839-1844, #42; CR 086.322.5] Robert King's case against George Moore was noted on the execution docket, but was dismissed at the plaintiff's costs. [RCNC Execution Docket 1839-1844; CR 086.304.6] A similar notation was made in reference to the A.G. Logan case against Robert King. [Ibid.] In November Robert King and Reuben Hill collected $10.45 from William A. Tanner. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #102; CR 086.318.1]

Robert King reported $108.18 on hand for his ward, David McArthur, in February 1844. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1840-1850, p. 121; CR 086.510.2] During that month he was sued by B.M. Edney; he was called but failed to appear and judgment ca sa on the bond of Robert King and his surety was issued. [RCNC Trial Docket 1843-1866; CR 086.308.12] The term ca sa refers to a writ ordering the arrest and detention of someone until the person paid the sum due under a judgment. By March 1844 Robert King and Reuben Hill had paid the judgment and costs due to Spencer Eaves to the use of Wm. A. Tanner. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #111; CR 086.318.1] Robert King had execution issued against John H. Alley, but no goods were found to levy on. [Ibid., #125]

In April 1844 B.M. Edney's case against Robert King (and Jacob Magness) resulted in execution being issued and partial payment on a $20 cash bond. [RCNC Execution Docket 1839-1844; CR 086.304.6] Robert King's judgment against A.G. Logan was satisfied by August 1844. [Ibid.] In November Robert King sought to recover against John H. Alley by levying on 200 acres on the waters of Henry's Creek adjoining lands of John Lattimore. As a result, $26.40 was paid into court. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #90; CR 086.318.1] On 12 Dec 1844 Robert King obtained his final parcel of land, a grant of 28 acres on McCaslin Branch of Second Broad River. [RCNC Deed Book 45, p. 473]

The judgment against Alley was finally paid in March 1845. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #18; CR 086.318.1] In June E. Toms, H. Harrill and James McBrayer Esqrs were chosen to settle with Robert King as guardian for David McArthur. [RCNC Guardian Docket 1840-1850, p. 167; CR 086.510.2] This entry tends to confirm that David was the youngest of the McArthur children. The settlement occurred in August and included an allowance to Robert King "for boarding and clothing 3 years at $25 when afflicted with rheumatism pains." [Ibid., p. 169.] I assume the person suffering from rheumatism was Robert King; it is more likely that he had arthritis than his ward.

In the spring of 1846, suit was filed by the State to the use of W. Harry v. Robert K. Wilson et al for debt. [RCNC Appearance Docket 1843-1868; CR 086.303.2] The suit was executed as to Robert King, James H. Carpenter and Abel Hill on 9 Mar 1846. On 1 May 1846 it was executed as to W.A. Wilson. The case was on the docket for August [RCNC Trial Docket 1843-1866; CR 086.308.12] and October [Ibid.] but was not tried.

In February 1847 the Harry case had been referred to M. Beam and others after the report of the clerk was set aside. [Ibid.] In May the case resulted in judgment for the plaintiff of $149.86 plus interest from 10 May 1847. [Ibid.; RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1844-1850, #68; CR 086.322.6] Execution issued for the amount of the judgment and $32.47 costs, and in November the defendants paid $186.82. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #42; CR 086.318.1]

An entry in the estate of D. Dobbins (Drury, no doubt) shows that Robert Wilson received payment from the estate of $1.83 on a proven account. [RCNC Record of Estates 1847-1854, p. 124; CR 086.501.4] I have doubts that this is Robert King Wilson, since either his middle initial or middle name was almost always used in references to him. William Wilson of the Sandy Run Creek area that later became Cleveland County had a son named Robert, and this may be him. There was one confirmed record in 1848 that relates to Robert King—in October he sued his son (and my great-great grandfather) William A. Wilson for a debt. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1844-1850, #1; CR 086.322.6]

The suit against William A. (Lindsay) Wilson came to court again in May 1849. Lindsay entered a defense of general issue, payment and set off, accord and satisfaction, and statute of limitations—the normal boilerplate. [Ibid., #23] In October there had been an entry of judgment as of nonsuit, but nonsuit was set aside and the case was continued on payment of costs by the defendant. [Ibid., #13]

Robert King's last census was to be 1850. [RCNC Census, 1850, p. 912, #1528] He was in the Roberson's Creek District and was a farmer. His age was given as 69, indicating that he was born about 1781. He and all his family were born in North Carolina. Susanah was age 56 and their children were P. K. (actually Perry R.) age 19, Joseph age 16, Jane age 14, George age 12 and Martin age 10.

Robert King was released from paying the 1849 poll tax, payable in 1850, for one white poll. [RCNC County Court Minutes Sep 1850-Apr 1862, p. 4; CR 086.301.18] His son W.A. had paid the costs of Robert King's suit against him by March 1850. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #98; CR 086.318.1] The docket indicates that one of the witnesses was P.R. Wilson, who was a son by Robert King's second wife. This fits with the idea of my cousin, John Drury (Jack) Wilson, who believes that a split occurred between Robert King's two sets of children and that as a result, the later set knew little of the background of the former set.

The trial docket for May 1850 shows two suits by Robert King. One was against William A. Wilson [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1844-1850, # 5; CR 086.322.6] and the other was against Thomas R. McArthur. [Ibid., #26] Thomas was probably one of his step-children—one of his wards had been Thomas McArthur. A jury consisting of Ross Alexander, John Green, Joseph Head, Richard Smith, John Davis, Achillis Baber, Henry Deck, James B. Allen, Jonathan Mooney, William Flinn, Edison Linch and William G. Mills heard the evidence in Wilson and decided "the bond declared on to be the act and deed of the defendant, that there is no payment or set off, accord or satisfaction, and assess the plaintiff damages ninety one dollars for interest. Therefore it is considered by the Court, that the principal of the bond declared on is two hundred dollars, & that plaintiff recover said sum with the damages by the said jury assessed and his costs in this behalf incurred." [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1850-1859, p. 14; CR 086.311.3] The McArthur suit was brought in case, as the October docket showed. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1850-1859, #52; CR 086.322.7] The record of execution in Robert King's suit against his son W.A. lists the costs and identifies his witnesses: W.B. Wilson, N.B. Wilson, P.R. Wilson, J.C. Grayson, Abel Hill, Jas. N. Carpenter, and Lucinda Upchurch. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #5; CR 086.318.1]

In February 1851 Robert King received a payment of $1.30 from the estate of James L. Walker on an account. [RCNC Record of Estates 1847-1854, p. 381; CR 086.501.4] In March he sought to execute on his judgment against W.A. Wilson of $291, but the sheriff could find no property. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #47; CR 086.318.1] At the May court Robert King's suit against Thomas R. McArthur was called and he failed to appear, so he was nonsuited. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1850-1859, #44; CR 086.322.7; RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1850-1859, p. 73; CR 086.311.3]

The costs in the McArthur case were $9.35, which Robert King was to pay. In March 1852 he had paid $5.35. [RCNC Execution Docket 1843-1852, #55; CR 086.318.1] The suit against William A. Wilson was continued in October 1852, even though the defendant had failed to appear in court. [RCNC Trial and Appearance Docket 1850-1859, #46; CR 086.322.7] He also failed to appear in May 1853 [Ibid., #29] and October 1853, [Ibid., #19] after which judgment fi fa was entered. [Ibid.] In November Robert King brought another suit against William A., but his motion for judgment on the pleadings was refused and he was nonsuited. [RCNC Minute Docket Superior Court 1850-1859, p. 170; CR 086.311.3] A March 1854 entry indicates that judgment for the costs of the case was entered in favor of William A. One notation stated that tax and attorney fees were improperly charged and returned. [RCNC Execution Docket 1852-1860, #44; CR 086.318.2]

The last recorded act during Robert King's life was his receipt of $10.97½ from the estate of Jesse J. Webb in February 1856. [RCNC Record of Estates 1855-1863, p. 93; CR 086.501.5] On the 24th of that month, he was dead. However, he was far from through with appearances in the public records. In February 1856 Walter S. McArthur and Perry Wilson qualified as his administrators and filed a $400 bond with William A. Wallace as security. [Ibid., p. 148]

The month following his death, a suit was filed entitled Robert K. Wilson v. Robt. Magness et al. [RCNC Equity Trial Docket 1839-1868; CR 086.317.1] Advertisement was made in the Western Eagle as to nonresident defendants. Once again, an entry read "Death of Robert K. Wilson suggested."

On 23 May 1856 the widow's allowance was made for Susanna [RCNC Record of Estates 1855-1863, p. 155; CR 086.501.5]:

The following property was given to the widow Susannah Wilson by the commissioners appointed to lay off said widow's years allowance out of the following property, that is to say, Sixty bushels corn, by estimation, 11 bushels wheat on hand and all the crops of growing after Joseph Wilson gets his fifth part out of it, and all the bacon on hand 438½ lbs., all the lard on hand, and the two jars it is in, eight hogs and one sow and 9 pigs on hand, one cow and calf, pne heifer her choice, 6 head of sheep and all poultry of every description on hand, all the soap and soap grease on hand, and all the vessels that holds it, all the potatoes on hand three bushels, one hundred twelve pounds cotton on hand, all the fodder on hand, one pair of gears, one hoe, one axe, one mattock her choice, one iron wedge, one spinning wheel and pair of cards, one loom and gearing, nine chairs, her choice, four beds and bedsteads and furniture, one cupboard, in the dwelling house and all the ware in it. One looking glass, one trunk, all the kitchen furniture of every description, one wash pot, one Bible, and all school books, and one hundred twenty five dollars in cash to be paid by the administrators to cover other deficiencies.

Received of the Administrators all the above named property.

May 23rd day 1856.

          her
Sarah X Wilson
         mark

Three days later, a list of the inventory of his estate was given [Ibid., p. 154]:

The following contains a true statement of all the personal property belonging to the estate of R.K. Wilson Decd., to wit,

Cash on hand seven dollars 37½ cents, Doubtful notes, 1 on B.W. Davis twenty six dollars 50 cents, due Oct 23rd 1855, 1 do [ditto] on W.A. Baber eight dollars & 6 cnts, due Oct. 29th 1855. 1 do on J.W. McBrayer one dollar & 60 cnts due Feb. 14th 1856. 1 very bad judgment on R. Brooks five dollars 54¼ cts, due Nov 16th 1842. 1 very bad judgment in the Superior Court against W.A. Wilson for $291.00 with interest on $200.00 from the 13th of May 1850. 4 beds and furniture, 2 bureaus, 1 clock, 1 cupboard and furniture, 1 rifle gun, 1 shot gun, 2 spinning wheels, 1 reel, 18 chairs, 3 tables, 1 loom & gearing, 1 slab, 1 chest, 1 trunk, 1 looking glass, some books, 3 pots, 2 ovens, 2 pans, 1 skillet, 2 pot-racks, about sixty bushels of corn, eleven bushels of wheat, 1,500 bundles of fodder, 438½ lbs. of bacon, 2 jars lard, 112 lbs. of cotton, 2 head horses, 5 head of cattle, 6 head sheep, 8 year old hogs, 1 sow & 9 pigs, some poultry consisting of chickens and geese, 1 two horse wagon, some gears, 1 set of blacksmith tools, 1 cotton gin, 1 windmill, 1 grindstone, 1 lockchaine, one crosscut saw, 1 handsaw, 5 augers, 1 --- knife, 1 iron square, 1 crowbar, 1 roundshare, 3 chisels. Farming tools consisting of plows, mattocks, hoes, 6 axes, 3 iron widges, two sythes & cradles, 1 cutting knife, 3 saddles, two pickling tubs, 3 jugs, 1 frow, 2 waggon wheels. On account in Jacob L. Livan--r good $1.55. On account on Wm. A. Baber doubtful $5.00. Sworn to in open court as to W.L. McArthur May 26th, 1856.

W.L. McArthur } Adm.
P.R. Wilson       }

R.L. Gilkey Clk.

On 26 May 1856 the administrators conducted a sale of the estate. [RCNC Record of Estates 1855-1863, p. 156; CR 086.501.5]

In November 1856 the Magness suit provided the names of further parties: Robert Magness, Wm. Chitwood and wife Sarah, Wm. McArthur and wife Eliza and Benjamin Magness. [RCNC Equity Orders and Decrees 1839-1868, p. 180; CR 086.314.1] Benjamin and Robert Magness were sons of Perrygreen Magness and Sarah Hamrick, and Robert Magness had married Mary Wilson. [Bridges, Vol. I, p. 143] His administrators were added as named plaintiffs. [RCNC Equity Trial Docket 1839-1868; CR 086.317.1] In March 1857 the adults were allowed to file their answers by 20 June 1857 and the case was continued. [RCNC Equity Orders and Decrees 1839-1868, p. 188; CR 086.314.1; RCNC Equity Trial Docket 1839-1868; CR 086.317.1]

The case was continued again in March 1858. The attorneys were (Bartlett) Shipp for the plaintiff and (G. W.) Logan for the defendants. [Ibid.] In November 1858 the Court ordered that a master take and state an account of plaintiff's debt and report next term. [Ibid.; RCNC Equity Orders and Decrees 1839-1868, p. 209; CR 086.314.1] The report of the Master was filed in March 1859 and the defendants filed their exceptions. [Ibid.]

Robert King's estate was settled in May 1859. [RCNC Record of Estates 1855-1863, p. 456; CR 086.501.5] In November of that year the Magness case was continued under the former order. [RCNC Equity Trial Docket 1839-1868; CR 086.317.1] By consent of the parties, the case was sent to the Supreme Court in March 1860. [Ibid.] In November the case was reported "Judgment nunc pro tunc as of Spring 1856. Certified to Supreme Court." [RCNC Equity Orders and Decrees 1839-1868, p. 244; CR 086.314.1; RCNC Equity Trial Docket 1839-1868; CR 086.317.1]

Magness was continued in March 1861 [RCNC Equity Trial Docket 1839-1868; CR 086.317.1] but in November 1862, the notation indicated that judgment was entered against plaintiffs according to the decree of the Supreme Court. [RCNC Equity Orders and Decrees 1839-1868, p. 251; CR 086.314.1]

With this case concluded, Robert King's estate was fully settled in June 1863. [RCNC Record of Estates 1863-1868, p. 45; CR 086.501.6] Walter S. McArthur, administrator had received $181.61¼ and had disbursed $191.87½—a deficiency of $10.26¼. The final record related to the Magness case—judgment was entered against Wilson for $65.80 costs. However, no property was found from which to satisfy the judgment. [RCNC Equity Execution Docket 1843-1868; CR 086.316.1]

I have looked through several volumes of the North Carolina Reports that span the period this case was before the Supreme Court to find its decision, but could not find any record of it.

Robert King Wilson has an impressive tombstone, but it is one that he deserves. These 500-plus public record entries that refer to him show that he was educated, respected, a leader, and a man of action. If ever the phrase fit, it does for this man: may he rest in peace.