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Rev WarBenjamin Harrison (1750 - 1808)
William Hinkson

Orange Co., VA > Harrison Co. KY Abt 1783 > Washington Co. MO

Surnames Mentioned: see INDEX

Benjamin Harrison Repository ID #3468 - extensive ancestry available in our online database.

William Hinkson Repository ID #11567 - ancestry available in our online database.


SOME RECORDS OF BENJAMIN HARRISON,
A REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIER,
AND HIS SON-IN-LAW,
WILLIAM HINKSON

Compiled by
Isabel Stebbins Giulvezan
Affton, Missouri
1973


These records were compiled for Dorothy Cresswell Lottes, a prospective member of John Sappington Chapter DAR, for the purpose of getting to know her Revolutionary War ancestor, Benjamin Harrison, his son-in-law William Hinkson, and their families.

The next three generations in her lineage are covered in biographical sketches in the Washington County section of Goodspeed's History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford and Gasconade Counties, Mo. (l888): Margaret Hinkson married Noah Martin, Sarah Martin married Thomas Nicholson.

We do not pretend to have all records available on Benjamin Harrison and William Hinkson but we have acquired a sufficient amount of data to prove where they lived, names of their wives, etc.

We thank everyone who was involved in this effort, especially applicant's husband, J. Otto Lottes, M.D., who went from courthouse to courthouse in Missouri searching for Harrison/Hinkson records on Thursday, his day away from the office and hospital.

We trust these chronologies will be of assistance to future researchers and we hope someone will carry the project further and write a book about these interesting men - Capt./Maj./Lt. Col./Col./Brig. Gen. Benjamin Harrison and his son-in-law, Maj./Lt. Col./Sgt./Pri. William Hinkson.

(Mrs.) Isabel Stebbins Giulvezan
Registrar
John Sappington Chapter DAR

9525 Radio Drive
Affton, Missouri 63123


CONTENTS

BENJAMIN HARRISON

Westmoreland County, Penn. And Yohogania County, Va.

Fayette County, Penn

Fayette County, Ky.

Bourbon County, Ky

Harrison County, Ky

New Madrid District, Mo

Ste. Genevieve District, Mo

WILLIAM HINKSON

Bourbon County, Ky

Harrison. County, Ky

New Madrid District, Mo

Ste. Genevieve District, Mo

Washington County, Mo

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX


CHRONOLOGY

BENJAMIN HARRISON

Westmoreland County, Penn. And Yohogania County, Va.

Lawrence Harrison, Sr., father of Benjamin, settled near Stewart's Crossing, now Connellsville, Fayette County, Penn., prior to Mar. 30, 1768. Lawrence owned land adjoining Col. William Crawford who settled there on the west bank of the Youghiogheny River about 1767. (Veech, pp. 90-93, 118-19)

Crawford made surveys in the vicinity of Stewart's Crossing for Benjamin, William, Battle and Lawrence, Jr., Sons of Lawrence Harrison. (Veech, p. 119)

This area in Pennsylvania where the Harrisons lived was claimed for awhile by Virginia. Therefore, records of Benjamin Harrison are found in Westmoreland County, Penn., as well as in Yohogania County, Va. until boundary disputes were finally settled in September l780.

Westmoreland County was created by Pennsylvania in 1773 from Bedford County, with the seat of justice at Hannastown. Westmoreland took in the entire southwestern portion of Pennsylvania.

Yohogania County, which was created by Virginia in 1776 from West Augusta District, took in what are now the Pennsylvania county seats of Washington, Fayette, Westmoreland and Allegheny.

* * *

1770 - Benjamin Harrison settled on the Youghiogheny River in what is now Franklin Township, Fayette County, Penn. (See items dated Feb. 4, 1780 and Aug. 11, 1785)

1775 - Feb. 7 - Benjamin Harrison headed a party of Virginia partisans who broke open the jail at Hannastown and released the prisoners. Harrison had orders from William Crawford to "press Horses, Raise men, &c, Go to Hanna's Town, open the Gaol Doors and Set the Prisoners at Liberty." (Pennsylvania Archives, 1st Series, v. 4, pp. 603-608)

1776 - Dec. 16 - Benjamin Harrison was commissioned Captain in the 13th Virginia Regiment, Regiment designated as 9th Virginia, Sept. 14., l778. He was in service in 1780 and retired Feb. 12, 1781 with rank of Major. Awarded 4,000 acres. (Gwathmey, p. 354)

1776 - Dec. 23 - Commission of the Peace and Commission of Oyer and Terminer were directed to Benjamin Harrison and 30 others at a Court held for Yohogania County, Va. (Loveless, p. 78)

1778 - May 26 - A new Commission of the Peace and Commission of Oyer and Terminer were directed to Benjamin Harrison and 39 others at a Court held for Yohogania County, Va. (Loveless, p. 224)

1780 - Feb. 4 - Surveyor's Office, Yohogania County, Va.: Benjamin Harrison produced a Certificate from the Commissioners appointed to grant lands in the Counties of Yohogania, Monongahela and Ohio - 400 acres on the Youghiogheny River "to include his settlement made in the year 1770." (Survey Bk. C, v. 176, p. 236, Pennsylvania Dept. of Community Affairs, Harrisburg; see "Virginia Entries in Western Pennsylvania 1779-1780," Pennsylvania Archives, 3rd Series, v. 3, p. 513)

1782 - Benjamin Harrison was Lieutenant Colonel of the 4th Battalion of the Militia of Westmoreland County, Penn.; number of men, 123. (Pennsylvania Archives, 2nd Series, v. 14., p. 695)

1782 - Benjn. Harrison served as Colonel on a tour of active duty in the Militia of Westmoreland County during September 1782 for which certificate of public debt #2641 in the amount of £10.5.l0 was issued under the Militia Loan of Apr. 1, 1784 (pay £9.7.6, bounty £0.l8.4). (Interest Register, v. A, p. 89, Militia Loans of 1784 and 1785, "Public Debt," Records of the Comptroller General, at Division of Archives and Manuscripts, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg)

1783 - Benjamin Harrison was enumerated in the census of Franklyn Township, Westmoreland County: 300 acres, 1 horse, 1 cattle, 1 sheep, 4 white inhabitants. (Pennsylvania Archives, 3rd Series, v. 22, p. 384)

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Fayette County, Pennsylvania

created Sept. 26, 1783
from Westmoreland County

1785 - Aug. 11 - By orders of the Board of Property (Sept. 15, 1784 and Mar. 7, 1785), a survey was made for Benjamin Harrison pursuant to a Certificate granted by the Commissioners from the State of Virginia, entered Feb. 4, 1780 - 290-3/4. acres and 6% allowance for roads, etc., on the Youghiogheny River below the mouth of Dickinson's Run in Franklin Township, Fayette County, Penn.

On Aug. 10, 1785, the day before the land was surveyed, Benjamin Harrison assigned to James Rankin, all his right, etc. in and to the "within land" (400 acres entered Feb. 4., 1780) "with a general warrantee the Lord of the soil accepted." (Survey Bk. C, v. 176, p. 236; Warrant #22, Fayette County; Patent Book F, v. 4, p. 60; Pennsylvania Dept. of Community Affairs, Harrisburg)

* * *
Traditions of Batteal Harrison,
son of Benjamin Harrison

Batteal Harrison was born in Sweetbryer? County, Va. in 1780. About 1783 or 1784, he was left by his parents at Wheeling, Va. with an uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. William Vance.

Benjamin Harrison planned to descend the Ohio River and go into what became Bourbon County, Ky. Because the Indians were on the warpath, the party would travel at night and it would be dangerous to take Batteal along since he had the whooping cough.

Benjamin Harrison went back for his son six years later but the boy did not know him and did not want to go to Kentucky. The uncle, William Vance, said he would keep him and educate him.

After he grew to be a man, Batteal removed to Belmont County, Ohio where he and his uncle built a mill in Ming's Bottom, etc. (Harrison, p. 13)

* * *

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Fayette County, Kentucky

part of Virginia until 1792 when
Kentucky was admitted to the Union

ca. 1785 - Benjamin Harrison signed a petition to the Speaker and Gentlemen of the House of Delegates of Virginia - Request of the inhabitants of the County of Fayette for a division of the county. (Robertson, p. 85)

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Bourbon County, Kentucky

created 1785 from Fayette County
to commence May 1, 1786

Benjamin Harrison, for whom Harrison County, Ky. was named, served as a Colonel in the Revolution from Pennsylvania. He came early to Ruddles Station* and was one of those appointed to select the location of the Bourbon County Court House. He represented Bourbon County in all the early conventions; was senatorial elector; member of the Legislature, 1793. His wife was Mary and although there is an inventory of his estate filed in Harrison County, Ky., it is believed he died in the State of Missouri. (Drake etc., p. 145)

*Ruddles (also called Hinkston's and Licking) Fort was built in 1779 by Isaac Ruddell, one mile from Lair Station near the Bourbon County line, now in Harrison County, about seven miles from Paris, Ky. (Drake etc., p. 193)

1786 - May 16 - The first Court of Bourbon County convened at Col. James Garrard's. First Justices, commissioned Jan. 12, 1786: James Garrard, Thomas Swearingen, John Edwards, Benjamin Harrison, John Hinkson, Alvin Mountjoy, Thomas Warring, Edward Waller, John Gregg. Benjamin Harrison was the first Sheriff, his securities were John Edwards and John Hinkson. (History Bourbon etc., p. 40)

1786 - May 17 - On the second day of Court, Sheriff Benjamin Harrison protested that he would not be answerable for the escape of any prisoner for want of a gaol. (History Bourbon etc., p. 41)

1786 - June 12 - Higgins' block-house was attacked by a large party of Indians and several of the inmates were severely wounded. On arrival of help from Hinkston and Harrison's Stations, the Indians fled without capturing the blockhouse. (History Bourbon etc., p. 34)

Harrison's Station, 2 miles from Higgins' Fort, was about 3 miles from where Cynthiana, Harrison County, Ky. now stands. (Collins, v. 2, p. 19)

1787 - James Garrard, John Edwards, Benjamin Harrison, Edward Lyne and Henry Lee represented Bourbon County at the Kentucky Convention held in Danville. (Drake etc., p. 137)

1787 - Oct. 2 - Benjamin Harrison and Mary Allison witnessed Will of Charles Allison of Bourbon County. The Will was proved by the witnesses Dec. 18, 1787. Benjamin Harrison, Esqr. was security on £500 bond for Jane Allison, Executrix. (Bourbon County Will Bk. A, p. 5)

1787 - Dec. 12 - Surveyed for Benjamin Harrison, 1,000 acres on a branch of Stoner's in Bourbon County. (Jillson, p. 57)

ca. 1788 - Benjamin Harrison signed a petition to the Speaker and the Gentlemen of the House of Delegates of Virginia - Protest of the inhabitants of Bourbon County against a division of the county. (Robertson, p. 119)

1788 - James Garrard, John Edwards, Benjamin Harrison, John Grant and John Miller represented Bourbon County at the Kentucky Convention held in Danville. (Drake etc., p. 137)

ca. 1789 - Benjamin Harrison signed a petition to the Speaker and General Assembly of Virginia - Protest of sundry inhabitants of Bourbon County against a division of the county. (Robertson, p. 131)

1789 - Benjamin Harrison entered 200 tracts in New Madrid District, Upper Louisiana. Lawrence Harrison, William Harrison, etc. applied for land between the road leading from New Madrid to Ste. Genevieve and St. George's River - subject to the rules and regulations that his most Catholic Majesty hath thought proper to direct for the settling of his territory on the Mississippi. (New Madrid Archives #l30lA)

1789 - June 27 - The Spanish Governor refused to grant any of the land marked out by Colonels George Harrison* and Benjamin Harrison, which they gave notice they reserved for themselves and their friends, extending 20 miles north of New Madrid and embracing 200 separate tracts, exclusive of lakes and marshes. (Houck, v. 2, p. 125)
*Was George Morgan intended? - ISG

1791 - Feb. 15 - Samuel Anderson made a deposition before Benjamin Harrison a Justice of Bourbon County. (Chalkley, v. 1, p. 406)

1791 - June 22 - Benjamin Harrison of Bourbon County, Va. conveyed to Jonathan Morton of Fayette County, Va., 200 acres in Bourbon County on Stoner's fork of Licking, part of a 1,000 acre tract granted to Benjamin Harrison on preemption warrant entry. Consideration £60. Mary Harrison, wife of Benjamin, relinquished her dower. Witnesses - Horatio Hall, Thos. Hughs, Rob. Harrison. Acknowledged Bourbon Court June 1791 by Benjamin Harrison. (Bourbon County Deed Bk. B, p. 113)

1791 - Sept. 19 - William Anderson, Thomas Ravenscraft and Thomas Hinkson, for themselves and as guardians of John Hinkson and Agnes Stevenson, infants and co-heirs of John Hinkson, deceased, for themselves and for their wards, gave power of attorney to their brother, Robert Hinkson, and their friend, Benjamin Harrison - to do all and every business respecting obtaining deeds for lands due the heirs of John Hinkson, deceased, by bargains, contracts and agreements entered into by deceased within the District of Kentucky; to employ one or more attorneys learned in the law should the case require it; to make division of such lands among the heirs of deceased as directed by law. Ratifying and confirming, etc. Acknowledged Bourbon Court September 1791 by William Anderson, Thomas Ravenscraft and Thomas Hinkson. (Bourbon County Deed Bk. B, p. 158)

1792 - John Edwards, James Garrard, James Smith, John McKinney and Benjamin Harrison represented Bourbon County at the Convention in Danville which framed the first Constitution of Kentucky. (Drake etc., p. 138)

1792 - John Edwards, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Jones, Andrew Hood and John Allen were Senatorial Electors from Bourbon County under the First Constitution of Kentucky. (Drake etc., p. 139)

1792 - June 24 - Benjamin Harrison was commissioned Brigadier General of the 4th Brigade, 2nd Division, Kentucky Militia, commanding the 12th, 13th, 14th and 15th Regiments from Scott, Bourbon and Mason Counties. (Clift 2, PP. viii, 1)

1793 - July 15 - Benjamin Harrison and wife Mary of Bourbon County conveyed to Jane Allison (widow and relict of Charles Allison) and John Allison, Executors to Last Will and Testament of Charles Allison, late of Bourbon County, all their right, title, etc. to 400 acres in Bourbon County on the north side of the south fork of Licking Creek, in trust, to be disposed of and applied to the uses as directed in the recited Will. Beginning at the lower corner to a tract belonging to Hinkston on said South Fork, etc., by other land of Harrison, etc., which said land Jane and John Allison are in actual possession of. Consideration 5 shillings. Witnesses - Thos. Moore, Wm. Garmny. Acknowledged Bourbon Court July 1793 by Benjamin Harrison. (Bourbon County Deed Bk. B, p. 367)

1793 - Benjamin Harrison was a member of the Kentucky Legislature in 1793 representing Bourbon County. (Drake etc., P. 145; History Bourbon etc., p. 220)

1793 - Dec. 10 - By act of the General Assembly, the town of Cynthiana was established on the east side of the South Fork of Licking opposite the mouth of Gray's Run, on land of Robert Harrison in Bourbon County. Trustees: Benjamin Harrison, Morgan Van Matre, Jeremiah Robinson, John Wall, Sr., Henry Coleman. (History Bourbon etc., p. 247)

1793 - Dec. 19 - An act for opening navigation in the South Fork and Stoner's Fork of Licking was approved by the General Assembly. Benjamin Harrison, John Wall and Isaac Riddle were appointed Commissioners to receive subscriptions in money, labor and property to raise a fund for clearing and opening navigation of the South Fork, from the mouth thereof to the junction of Hinkston and Stoner. (Littell, v. 1, p. 193)

1793 - Dec. 19 - Benjamin Harrison was appointed Brigadier General of the 4th Brigade, 2nd Division, Kentucky Militia, commanding the 12th, 13th, 14th and 15th Regiments from Scott, Bourbon and Mason Counties. (Clift 2, pp. ix, 15)

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Harrison County, Kentucky

created 1793 from Bourbon and Scott Counties
to commence Feb. 1, 1794

Harrison County was named for Col. Benjamin Harrison, an early resident of Bourbon, the first Sheriff of that county, and its representative in the State at the time of the formation of Harrison County. He was a native of Pennsylvania and removed to Bourbon prior to its formation as a county in 1785, where he held many prominent positions, etc. (History Bourbon etc., p. 220)

1794 - Feb. 4 - At the first Court of Harrison County, new Justices were sworn: Benjamin Harrison, Hugh Miller, Henry Coleman, Samuel McIlvain, Nathan Rawlings, Charles Zachary. Henry Coleman was the first Surveyor with Benjamin Harrison as Deputy. At that session of Court, a ferry was granted Benjamin Harrison across Licking River; he was also appointed Commissioner of Tax. (History Bourbon etc., p. 220)

1794 - Feb. 4 - Surveyed for Benjamin Harrison, 2,000 acres on Licking in Harrison County. (Jillson, p. l85)

1794 - Mar. 4. - The first Court of Quarter Sessions was convened by Magistrates Benjamin Harrison, Hugh Miller and John Wall at the house of Morgan Van Matre. (History Bourbon etc., p. 249)

1794 - Aug. 5 - Benjamin Harrison and wife (not named) of Harrison County, conveyed to William Hall of same, 201 acres on Second Lick Run in Harrison County. Beginning on William Harrison's line, etc. Consideration £66. Witnesses - Saml. McIlvain, Thomas Rankin, Geo. Reading. Proved Harrison Court September 1794 by the three witnesses. (Harrison County Deed Bk. 1, p. 16)

l794 - Sept. 1 - Mary Rawlings of Harrison County, gave power of attorney to her friend Benjamin Harrison, to transact all business regarding suit brought by William Rankin for land whereon Mary Rawlings lived. Witnesses - Edwd. Doyle, Sr., James Curry. Acknowledged Harrison Court of Quarter Sessions March 1795. (Harrison County Deed Bk. 1, p. 32)

1795 - Jan. 26 - Clerk of the Harrison County Court issued license for marriage of William Hinkson and Jenny Harrison. Benjamin Harrison was surety for William Hinkson on the marriage bond. (Harrison County Marriage Bond #55, Margaret I. King Library, University of Kentucky, Lexington)

1795 - Mar. 4 - Benjamin Harrison, Morgan Van Matre, Jeremiah Robinson, John Wall and Henry Coleman, Trustees of Cynthiana, sold lots in the town to Hugh Stevenson, Benjamin Harrison, Robert McBride, John McLaughlin, Lewis Marshall, William Rankin. (History Bourbon etc., p. 250)

1795 - Mar. 4 - Benjamin Harrison and wife Mary conveyed to Christian, John, Robert and Elizabeth Scott, 230 acres in Harrison and Bourbon Counties. Morton's? line, corner to said Harrison, etc. Consideration £81. Witness - W. Moore, C.H.C. Acknowledged Harrison Court March 1795 by Benjamin Harrison. (Harrison County Deed Bk. 1, p. 31)

1795 - June 7 - John Stephenson, Marcus Stephenson and John Massey of Harrison County, conveyed to Benjamin Harrison of same, 500 acres in Harrison County, part of 1,000 acre tract granted to heirs of Hugh Stephenson in consequence of an entry made on a Military Warrant entered by said Harrison on June 24, l780, etc. Consideration £100. Acknowledged Harrison Court July 1795 by grantors. (Harrison County Deed Bk. 1, p. 72)

1795 - Indenture between Benjamin Harrison, Morgan Vanmeter, Jeremiah Robinson, John Wall, Sr. and Henry Coleman, Trustees of Cynthiana, and George Hamilton. (McAdams, p. 47)

1796 - June Court - Deed from Benjamin Harrison to Robert Griffith. (McAdams, p. 47)

1796 - Dec. 4? - Anna Stubbs of Bourbon County, Ky. gave power of attorney to her friend Benjamin Harrison - to demand and receive from a certain John Cook all monies due from Cook to the Estate of William Stubbs of which she was administratrix, to transact all and every business, etc. Witnesses - Robert Scott and (illegible). (Harrison County Deed Bk. 1, p. 209)

1796 - Dec. 6 - Benjamin Harrison, Morgan Vanmatre, Jeremiah Robinson, John Wall, Sr. and Henry Coleman, Trustees of Cynthiana, conveyed Lot 10 in Cynthiana to George Reading. Consideration $10 paid to Robert Harrison, proprietor of said town. Acknowledged Harrison Court December 1796 by Wall, Robinson and Coleman. (Harrison County Deed Bk. 1, p. 209)

1798 - Dec. 22 - By act of the General Assembly, Harrison Academy at Cynthiana was incorporated. Trustees: Benjamin Harrison, William E. Boswell, Henry Coleman, Hugh Miller, Sr., John Wall, Samuel Lamb, Samuel McMullin, Samuel Cook, Robert Hingston. (Smith, p. 78)

1800 - Benjamin Harrison was taxed in Harrison County. (Clift 1, p. 127)

1800 - Dec. 2 - Deed of Sale at New Madrid, Upper Louisiana: George Ruddell to Benjamin Harrison. Two large tracts with buildings, Spanish grants to Ruddell. (New Madrid Archives #926)

1800 - Dec. 4 - Slave Sales at New Madrid, Upper Louisiana: Benjamin Harrison to George N. Reagan. Two women named Charlotte and Betty. (New Madrid Archives #928)

1801 - Mar. 12 - Benjamin Harrison, Gent., of Harrison County, Ky. conveyed to Jenny Curry, widow, of same,. 100 acres in Harrison County. Beginning at Nailer's corner, east to Samuel Rawlings' northwest corner, etc. Consideration $l. Witnesses - Michael Rawlings, Samuel Rawlings, Robert Rankin. Proved Harrison Court Sept. 1801 by the three witnesses. (Harrison County Deed Bk. 1, p. 646)

1801 - Mar. 12 - Benjamin Harrison, Gent., of Harrison County, conveyed to Samuel Rawlings of same, 100 acres in Harrison County. Beginning on Nailor's line at the northeast corner of Widow Curry's land, etc. Consideration £20. Witnesses - Michael Rawlings, Robert Rankin, John Boney. Proved Sept. 7, 1801 by Rawlings and Rankin. Acknowledged in Harrison County Sept. 3, 1804 by Benjamin Harrison. (Harrison County Deed Bk. 1, p. 825)

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New Madrid District, Upper Louisiana

Gen. Benjamin Harrison was among the most prominent men of the New Madrid settlement. He came from Kentucky where he had distinguished himself in the border wars. He was a man of property, a slave owner, and had a large family. He fully entered into the plans of Col. George Morgan* and proposed to bring a large number of settlers into the country. His sons, Lawrence and William, were among Morgan's followers. Another son, Benjamin, Jr. was also at New Madrid. With Gen. Harrison came Benjamin Hinkston, his son-in-law and son of the celebrated John Hinkston (or Hinkson) who himself came to New Madrid from Kentucky. In 1802 while Gen. Harrison was absent on a trip to Kentucky, George N. Reagan forced his son to surrender a negro slave, claimed as part payment of land bought of Reagan, but afterward Harrison recovered the slave by suit. (Houck, v. 2, p. 125)

*The influence of Col. George Morgan in bringing many of his old companions in arms from Pennsylvania to the Spanish province of Louisiana induced Gen. Benjamin Harrison, of Pennsylvania, and Col. John Harrison, who had settled in Kentucky to come to the new country with him. Both the Harrisoris afterwards removed from New Madrid to the Ste. Genevieve District. (Houck, v. 3, p. 83)

1801 - May 2 - Deed of Sale at New Madrid:
Pedro Safray to Benjamin Harrison. A plantation with some structures. Plantation heavily mortgaged by Safray's creditors among whom were Gabriel Cerre, Jean Baptist Gobeau and Pierre Derbigny, Laforge and Company. (New Madrid Archives #956)

1801 - June 28 - Slave Sales at New Madrid:
Barthelemi Tardiveau by public sale to George N. Reagan for Benjamin Harrison who sold them to Claude Thiriet. Two named Jacob and Marguerite. (New Madrid Archives #966)

1801 - Nov. 9 - Benjamin Harrison, formerly of Harrison County, Ky., now an inhabitant of the Spanish Province of Louisiana, conveyed to James Mullen and Patrick Griffith of' Harrison County, Ky., 250 acres in Harrison County, part of tract granted to Thomas Logwood by the State of Virginia and deeded to Harrison in August 1795 by Thomas Veatch and ----- Foster. Corner to Scott, etc. Consideration £50. Acknowledged Nov. 9, 1801 in Harrison County by Benjamin Harrison. (Harrison County, Ky. Deed Bk. 1, p. 658)

1802 - Jan. 4 - Benjamin Harrison of the Province of Louisiana, conveyed to Robert Scott of Harrison County, Ky., 200 acres in Harrison County. Corner to Jane Curry and Samuel Rawlings, Scott's line, corner to Samuel Anderson, etc. Consideration £60. Acknowledged in Harrison County, Jan. 4, 1802 by Benjamin Harrison. (Harrison County, Ky. Deed Bk. 1, p. 803)

1802 - Apr. 3 - Henri Peyroux, Commandant of New Madrid District, gave permission to Messrs. Benjamin Harrison, Benjamin Douglass and Benjamin Dosson (Dawson) to cultivate each one a farm of 200 arpents on the vacant lands on the River Pemiscon near Little Prairie while waiting for the titles and the survey. (New Madrid County Deed Bk. 1, p. 27, translated by Anton J. Pregaldin)

1802 - Apr. 9 - Litigation at New Madrid:
Benjamin Harrison, Sr. vs. George N. Reagan. Suit re sale of two pieces of land by Reagen to Benjamin Harrison, Jr. Matter arbitrated and Harrison, Sr. ordered to pay expenses Dec. 6, 1804. (New Madrid Archives #1340)

1802 - Dec. 6 - Acknowledgment of Debts at New Madrid:
Benjamin Harrison, Sr. to Richard Jones Waters - for William Hinkson, his son-in-law, Benjamin Harrison, Jr. and Lawrence Harrison, his sons, and Peter Lewis. The debts amounted to $l,428.50 which Harrison, Sr. agreed to pay in two installments in 1803. As security he mortgaged a tract on Lake St. Francois purchased from George Ruddell, a negro man Joe, negro man Tom, negro woman Lucey (two last have for some time past been in the custody of William Hinkson and live in his family), 1 dun horse, 1 yoke of work oxen 3 years old, 1 walnut desk. (New Madrid Archives #1082)

1802 - Dec. 6 - Mortgage at New Madrid:
William Hinkson to Benjamin Harrison, Sr. To cover his share of the above debt, due on or before Dec. 6, 1803, Hinkson mortgaged to Harrison, 2 horses, 4 cows with their calves, 2 heifers, 20 hogs, a weaver's loom, 1 chest, 2 beds, bedsteads and furniture, 1 gun. (New Madrid Archives #1083)

1803 - Mar. 10 - Agreement at New Madrid:
Richard Jones Waters and Jean Baptiste Olive. Mutual agreement by which Waters transferred to Olive an obligation of Benjamin Harrison, Sr. as payment for values received by Waters from Olive. (New Madrid Archives #1109)

1803 - Summer - Litigation at New Madrid:
Negro men, Tom and Joe, property of Benjamin Harrison, Sr. were taken in execution under a mortgage from Harrison to Richard Jones Waters. (New Madrid Archives #1356)

1803 - Dec. 22 - Benjamin Harrison, Sr. cancelled power of attorney given Richard J. Waters* and revoked his Will:
To all those who will see these presents, greetings. Let it be known that I, Benjamin Harrison, Senior, domiciled in the Province of Louisiana in the District of New Madrid, disavow and annul by these presents a general power (of attorney) given by me to Richard J. Waters, also domiciled in the aforesaid District, as well as a Will which is thereto annexed, hereby declaring of no value all other acts or writings, etc. which he may have made in the meantime in virtue of the aforesaid Power, or in case of my death, I declare also, my last wishes, or the Will which is attached to the said power, to be nul and without effect or value, and as a thing that never happened. In virtue of which I have affixed my seal and signed by hand this 22nd day of December, 1803.

Before me. Benj. Harrison, Sr.
Juan Lavallee
(New Madrid Archives #1153, translated by Anton J. Pregaldin)

*Richard Jones Waters settled at New Madrid about 1790. He was a doctor, trader, mill owner, land speculator. (Douglass, p. 97)

1804 - Feb. 1 - Letter, Charles Dehault Delassus to Henry Peyroux. Have received suit of Messrs. Waters and Olive vs. Benjamin Harrison, Sr. but pressing current work has prevented paying any attention to it. (New Madrid Archives #1429)

1804 - Apr. 25 - Litigation at New Madrid:
James Ashworth vs. Thomas, slave of Benjamin Harrison, Sr. Prosecution for robbery. Verdict rendered against Thomas, May 24, 1804. (New Madrid Archives #1359)

1804 - Apr. 30 - Litigation at New Madrid:
Richard Jones Waters vs. William Hinkson and Benjamin Harrison, Jr. Petition to take negro slave Joe, formerly property of Benjamin Harrison, Sr., into protective custody. Judgment rendered in favor of Waters, May 2, 1804. (New Madrid Archives #1356)

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Ste. Genevieve District, Territory of Louisiana

Gen. Harrison moved from New Madrid District to Ste. Genevieve District and had a grant on which is now located the town of Altenberg in southeast Perry County. (Douglass, p. 66)

1805 - June 26 - Benjamin Harrison, Sr. signed a petition - Inhabitants of Ste. Genevieve District to General James Wilkinson, Governor of the Territory of Louisiana - recommending that Moses Austin, at present Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions for the District, be continued in that place. They also asked the Governor to be cautious in making choice of Associate Justices, that such men only be appointed who could render assistance to the Chief Justice in the discharge of his arduous and highly responsible situation. (Territorial Papers, v. 13, pp. 141-42)

1806 - Benjamin Harrison, Sr. signed a Memorial at Ste. Genevieve, to the President of the United States, but he signed "with an Exception in favour of Col Hammond": Citizens of the Territory of Louisiana said they had learned with regret that a petition was in circulation in the Territory for the appointment of a person to succeed General Wilkinson as Governor, who they believed would not give satisfaction. Without intending to dictate, they wanted the President to know they had the fullest confidence in Col. Return J. Meigs, Jr. and Col. Samuel Hammond, either of whom, should they meet with the President's approval, etc. (Territorial Papers, v. 13, pp. 468, 480)

1806 - July 18 - A writ was issued from the Court of Common Pleas of New Madrid District against the goods, chattels, lands and tenements of Benjamin Harrison, to satisfy a $50.50 debt he owed Richard Jones Waters.

July 22 - George Wilson, Sheriff of New Madrid District, seized 100 arpents of land (part of 700 arpents on River Pemiscon near the old village of that name), property of Benjamin Harrison, Sr. and granted to him.

Aug. 26 - At a public sale the land was struck off to the highest bidder - Richard Jones Waters for $20.00. Witnesses to the deed - George Ruddell, J. Culbertson. Acknowledged Dec. 19 (1806?) by George Wilson, Sheriff. (New Madrid County Deed Bk. 2, p. 85)

1807 - Aug. 3 - Benjamin Harrison, Sr. and Benedict Reiley? witnessed a release from John May to Henry Reiley, both of Ste. Genevieve District. The land transferred was on the Mississippi River immediately above the grand tower in said District.

Nov. 13 - Benjamin Harrison, Sr. brought the above release to the office of the Recorder for Ste. Genevieve District in behalf of Henry Reiley, said he saw John May execute the deed to Henry Reiley, etc. (Ste. Genevieve County Deed Bk. A, p. 203)

1808 - Feb. 23 - On the 23rd of February last I perform'd a ceremony of Matrimony between Benjamin Harrison son of Benjn. and Mary, whose maiden name was Newel, of the one part, and Polly Stephenson daughter of Marcus Stephenson and Nancy, whose maiden name was Hinkson, of the other, both of the settlement of Obrasoe - Given under my hand this 6th day of March 1808.
Isidore Moore J P
(Ste. Genevieve County Marriage Bk. A, p. 2)

ca. 1808 - Benjamin Harrison "died sometime about 1808 leaving certain children," etc. (Deposition Sept. 9, 1817, National Archives Record Group No. 49, v. 11, p. 516; see Hinkson section, p. 24.)

When heirs sold his land Aug. 3, 1819, they said Benjamin Harrison was late of Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri Territory, that the land conveyed was on the Mississippi River in Ste. Genevieve County, which Benjamin Harrison in his lifetime inhabited, etc. (Washington County, Mo. Deed Bk. B, p. 14; see Hinkson section, p. 25)

The above deed was recorded on Apr. 12, 1821 in Perry County, Mo. where the land was located. (Perry County Deed Bk. 1, p. 6)

Perry County was created Nov. 16, 1820 from Ste. Genevieve County, effective Jan. 1, 182l.

1811 - January Court - The County Court of Harrison County, Ky. ordered that John Wall, John Miller and George -----, being first duly sworn before Magistrates of the County, appraise in current money the slaves if any and personal estate of Benjamin Harrison, deceased, and return an inventory and appraisement thereof to the Court at some future time if any be found. (Harrison County, Ky. Order Bk. B, p. 192)

1812 - Mar. 5 - Robert Harrison of Harrison County, Ky., one of the heirs at law of Benjamin Harrison, deceased, appointed his brother and co-heir, Battle Harrison of Belmont County, Ohio, his attorney-in-fact to obtain warrants due to their deceased father for his services as a Captain in the 13th Virginia Regiment. (Burgess, V. 3, p. 1397)

1812 - Mar. 5 - Before John Miller and L. Robinson, Justices of the Peace for Harrison County, Ky., Hugh Newell, Robert Newell and Thomas Moore deposed that they were well acquainted with Benjamin Harrison, deceased, from time of. his marriage, until his death; that Battle Harrison of Belmont County, Ohio, and Robert Harrison of Harrison County, Ky. were acknowledged by Benjamin Harrison as his legitimate children. Thomas Moore further declared that Benjamin Harrison and himself were both Captains in the 13th Regiment. (Burgess, v. 3, p. 1397)

1812 - Apr. 20 - The representatives of Benjamin Harrison entitled to land allowed a Captain of the Continental Line for three years. Virginia Council Chamber, Apr. 20, 1812, James Barbour, Governor. Received of Register, Warrant 6014 for 4,000 acres issued 20 April 1812.

Attest: Battle Harrison
John Davenport (for myself and as attorney for Robert Harrison)
(Burgess, v. 3, p. 1397)

1812 - Apr. 20 - Land Office Military Warrant 6014 (our soldier's name was misspelled!):
To the Principal Surveyor of the Land set apart for the Officers and Soldiers of the Commonwealth of Virginia:
THIS shall be your WARRANT to survey and lay off in one or more surveys, for Representatives of Benjamin Harris, their heirs or assigns, the quantity of Four Thousand acres of Land, due unto the said Representatives in consideration of the said Benjamin Harris services for three years as a Captain of the Virginia Continental line agreeably to a certificate from the Governor and Council, which is received into the Land Office.
Given under my hand, and the seal of said Office, this twentieth day of April in the yearone thousand Eight hundred and twelve -

  Chas. Blagrove
4000 Acres Regr - Land Off

For value received I do hereby assign unto William Fulton. Eight Hundred acres of the within Warrant Number Six Thousand and fourteen -

June 16th 1812. Batteal Harrison
Witness present the legal Representative of
Eliza Fulton Benjamin Harrison
John A. Fulton  
(National Archives Record Group No. 49, v. 14, p. 153)

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CHRONOLOGY

WILLIAM HINKSON

Bourbon County, Kentucky

created 1785 from Fayette County
to commence May 1, 1786

part of Virginia until 1792 when
Kentucky was admitted to the Union

ca. 1786 - William Hinkson signed a petition to the Speaker and Gentlemen of the House of Delegates of Virginia - Protest of the inhabitants of Bourbon County against a division of the county. (Robertson, p. 91)

ca. 1790 - William Hinkson signed another petition to the Speaker and Gentlemen of the House of Delegates - Request of sundry inhabitants of Bourbon County for the establishment of tobacco inspection on land of Lawrence Protzman. (Robertson, p. 152)

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Harrison County, Kentucky

created 1793 from Bourbon and Scott Counties
to commence Feb. 1, 1794

1794 - July 9 - Thomas Hinkson, John Hinkson, William Anderson, Marcus Stephenson of Bourbon County, Ky. and William Hinkson of Harrison County, Ky. conveyed to Robert Hinkson of Harrison County, Ky., their whole claims in the tract of John Hinkson,* deceased, known by the name of Hinksons Old Station in Bourbon County on the south fork of Licking. Consideration - Thomas Hinkson £30, John Hinkson £28, William Anderson £30, Marcus Stephenson £49.l0, William Hinkson £28. Witnesses - Morgan Vanmater, Robert Harrison, Nichl. Harrison, Jeremiah Robinson. Proved Bourbon Court November 1794 by Morgan Vanrnater, Robert Harrison, Nicholas Harrison. (Bourbon County Deed Bk. C, p. 145)

*John Hinkson was born in Ireland, came to America young, located in Westmoreland County, Penn., to Kentucky 1775, etc. (Johnson, V. 3, pp. 1445, 1587)

1795 - Jan. 26 - Clerk of the Harrison County Court issued license for the marriage of William Hinkson and Jenny Harrison. Benjamin Harrison was surety for William Hinkson on the marriage bond. (Harrison County Marriage Bond #55, Margaret I. King Library, University of Kentucky, Lexington)

1795 - Dec. 16 - William Hinkson was commissioned Major in the Kentucky Militia, 20th Regiment from Harrison County. (Clift 2, p. 20)

1798 - Dec. 20 - William Hinkston was commissioned Lieutenant Colonel and Commandant in the Kentucky Militia, 20th Regiment from Harrison County. (Clift 2, p. 38)

1799 - Dec. 21 - An act for the relief of certain spies was approved by the General Assembly of Kentucky: John Stephenson, James Pickins, William Hinkson and Jacob Vanmeter, having been called on by the executive, in the year 1793, to act as spies on the frontier of Bourbon, were by this act allowed five shillings per day out of the treasury for that service. (Littell, v. 2, p. 358)

1800 - William Hinkson was taxed in Harrison County, Ky. (Clift 1, p. 137)

1801 - Mar. 30 - William Hinkson of Harrison County, Ky. gave power of attorney to his trusty friend, Humphrey Lyon of Bourbon County, Ky. - to do all & Every my Business which does relate to the Collecting all moneys due me on private Account and publick Debts that I was authourised to Collect as Sheriff of the County of Harrison afsd to pass Receipts for Said Moneys And to discharge all Debts I may owe agreable to my Direction heretofore Given to Claim for me All Lands I may be intituled unto as Heir at Law of John Hinkson Decd. to Make Sail of the same & to Make Deeds thereto, etc. to do all and singular my business specially & particularly with respect to suits instituted vs.? me by acertain Dills? & others if any and he is hereby impowered to imploy one or more Councils learned in the Law for me & in my behalf Revokeing all other powers, etc. Witnesses - Nathan Rawlings, Law. Harrison, James Rule, Jno. Miller, Daniel Isgrig. Proved Apr. 8, 1801 in Harrison County by Nathan Rawlings and Lawrence Harrison. (Harrison County Deed Bk. 1, p. 613)

New Madrid District, Upper Louisiana

1802 - Feb. 2 - William Hinkson, with Benjamin Dawson as surety, entered into an agreement with George N. Reagan at New Madrid. They agreed to pay Reagan at New Madrid, 4,000 pounds of good cotton in the seed on or before Dec. 25, 1802. (New Madrid Archives #1384)

1802 - Dec. 6 - Acknowledgment of Debts at New Madrid:
Benjamin Harrison, Sr. to Richard Jones Waters - for William Hinkson, his son-in-law, Benjamin Harrison, Jr. and Lawrence Harrison, his sons, and Peter Lewis. The debts amounted to $l,428.50 which Harrison, Sr. agreed to pay in two installments in 1803. As security he mortgaged a tract on Lake St. Francois, a negro man Joe, negro man Tom, negro woman Lucey (two last have for some time past been in the custody of William Hinkson and live in his family), 1 horse, 1 yoke of oxen, a desk. (New Madrid Archives #1082)

l802 - Dec. 6 - Mortgage at New Madrid:
William Hinkson to Benjamin Harrison, his father-in-law. To cover his share of the above debt due on or before Dec. 6, 1803, Hinkson mortgaged to Harrison, 1 bay gelding called the Humming Bird, 1 sorrel horse purchased from Harrison, 3 red and white cows with their calves, 1 black cow with her calf, 1 red heifer with a white back and belly, 1 red and white heifer, 20 hogs consisting of barrows, sows and shoats, a weaver's loom and its apparatus, 1 large cherry tree chest with till and draws, 2 beds, bedsteads and furniture, 1 rifle gun. (New Madrid Archives #1083)

1802 - 1803 - Guillaume (William) Hinkson was sergeant of the garrison at New Madrid. (Houck, v. 2, p. 153)

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Ste. Genevieve District, Upper Louisiana

1803 - Spring - When William Hinkson settled on Obrazeau Creek in Ste. Genevieve District in the Spring of 1803, he had a wife, three children, and two slaves. (American State Papers, Public Lands, v. 2, p. 562)

Brazeau bottom and creek, also known as "Obrazo" creek, is in the southeast corner of present Perry County, Mo. The first settler in Brazeau bottom was George A. Hamilton who opened a farm in 1797 fronting on the Mississippi River. Adjoining and west of Hamilton, William Hinkston had a grant in the uplands and also not far from him, Gen. Ben. Harrison who moved into the district from New Madrid. Other settlers in Brazeau bottom and at Brazeau creek were Robert Hinckson, Samuel Hinch, Charles Duncaster, etc. (Houck, v. 1, pp. 385-86)

1803 -- Sept. 16 - Benjamin Dawson assigned to William Henkson, his right to 200 arpents on River Pemiscon near Little Prairie. Witnesses - John McIntire, Henry Groslin. (New Madrid County Deed Bk. 1, p. 27)

1804 - Apr. 30 - Litigation at New Madrid:
Richard Jones Waters vs. William Hinkson and Benjamin Harrison, Jr. In his complaint to the Commandant, Waters said that Hinkson and Harrison had lately arrived in the neighborhood, their business was not known nor had their arrival been announced to the Commandant as by law and custom it ought to be. He said they had come from a distance on no lawful business and went about the neighborhood in a suspicious manner. Further, when two negro men, Tom and Joe, property of Benjamin Harrison, Sr., were taken last summer in execution under a mortgage from Harrison to Waters, there were strong circumstances to induce Waters to believe that attempts were made to convey the negroes away and that they were actually secreted by Hinkson or Harrison or both of them. Waters prayed that negro Joe be continued in safeguard until it could be discovered wherefore Hinkson and Harrison lurked in the neighborhood. (New Madrid Archives #1356)

Apparently Waters did not ask that negro Tom be safeguarded because he was probably already in custody. Litigation at New Madrid, Apr. 25, 1804, James Ashworth vs. Thomas, slave of Benjamin Harrison, Sr., prosecution for robbery. Verdict May 24, 1804 against Thomas. (New Madrid Archives #1359)

1804 - May 2 - Litigation at New Madrid:
Richard Jones Waters vs. William Hinkson and Benjamin Harrison, Jr. Waters petitioned that negro Joe be again put in his care and custody, he still protested the unlawful behavior of Hinkson and Harrison and prayed they be ruled to answer for their threats, etc. Judgment rendered in favor of Waters. (New Madrid Archives #1356)

1804 - June 16 - Litigation at New Madrid:
Richard Jones Waters for himself and as agent for George N. Reagan vs. William Hinkson. Waters said in his petition that Hinkson, late an inhabitant of this place and now present, was indebted to him by an obligation entered into Dec. 6, 1802 with Benjamin Harrison, surety; that the amount due Dec. 6, 1803 had not been paid. As agent for Reagan, Waters also asked for satisfaction of an obligation entered into Feb. 2, 1802 whereby Hinkson with Benjamin Dawson, surety, agreed to pay Reagan by Dec. 25, 1802, 4,000 pounds of good cotton in the seed, which obligation remained unpaid except what might be recovered from Jacob Myers for a certain horse, etc. Hinkson was declared out of jurisdiction and the suit was transferred Sept. 30, 1806 from the Court of Common Pleas at New Madrid to the General Court of the Territory. (New Madrid Archives #1384)

Ste. Genevieve District, Territory of Louisiana

1805 - June 25 - William Hinkson signed a petition - Inhabitants of Ste. Genevieve District to General James Wilkinson, Governor of the Territory of Louisiana - recommending that Henry Dodge be appointed Sheriff of the District. (Territorial Papers, v. 13, pp. 138-39)

1805 - Dec. 25 - William Hinkson wrote the Governor of Indiana Territory:
To His Eccellency William H Harrison Esqr Governor. Sir about Twelve months ago I Inclosed Three Commishons to You in Letter Directed by Judge Griffin Which I Requested You to Inclose to me by Some Conveniant Oppertunity They have never Yet Come to hand, If you would (do) the Favour to Inclose them in Letter and Send them by the Post to St Ginivieve You would do me a Singular Favour the Papers aluded to is one Commishon for a Sherriff one for Majr one for Colo if the(y) are not Fell into Your hands be so Kind as to inform me by the Poste - (MS illegible) Sir with Esteem your Obt Hle St
Will: Hinkson
(Territorial Papers, v. 13, p. 326)

1806 - Jan. 13 — Surveyed for William Hinkson, 1,037 arpents on Obrazeau Creek in Ste. Genevieve District. Survey certified Feb. 26, 1806. (American State Papers, Public Lands, V. 2, p. 562)

1806 - Mar. 21 - Robert Hinkson assigned to William Hinkson his interest in Charles Duncaster's right to land by virtue of settlement and improvements according to the custom of the Spanish government. Witness - Geo. A. Hamilton. Duncaster of New Bourbon District had conveyed his headright to Robert Hinkson of the same District, Feb. 2, 1806, for $40. (Ste. Genevieve County Deed Bk. B, p. 524)

1806 - Apr. 2 - Charles Duncaster of New Bourbon District, Territory of Louisiana, appointed William Hinkson of the same place, his lawful attorney, to transact all business in securing land he might be entitled to by virtue of an improvement in the District, to sell the same, etc., William Hinkson holding an obligation given by Duncaster to Robert Hinkson for the said tract. Witnesses - Geo. A. Hamilton, Saml. Hinch, John Todd. Proved Nov. 5, 1806 by Hamilton and Todd before Saml. Hinch, Justice of the Peace for Ste. Genevieve District. (Ste. Genevieve County Deed Bk. B, p. 525)

1806 - June 26 - William Hinckson appeared before Commissioners Penrose and Donaldson claiming 1,037 arpents on Obrazeau Creek in Ste. Genevieve District. He produced the survey dated Jan. 13, 1806, certified Feb. 26, 1806. Camille Lassus testified that he was present when permission was granted Hinckson to settle on vacant lands. George Hamilton testified that Hinckson settled the tract in the Spring of 1803, and did prior to Dec. 20, 1803 actually inhabit and cultivate the same, and had then a wife, three children, and two slaves. The Commissioners granted Hinckson 390 arperits on Obrazeau Creek provided so much be found vacant there, but on. Sept. 1, 18l0, Commissioners Lucas, Penrose and Bates were of the opinion the claim ought not to be granted. (American State Papers, Public Lands, v. 2, p. 562)

1806 - William Hinkson signed a Memorial at Ste. Genevieve, to the President of the United States: The subscribers Citizens of the Territory of Louisiana, respectfully represent; That they have learned with regret, a Petition is now in circulation, in this Territory, for the appointment of a person, to succeed General Wilkinson, in the Office of Governor, whom we believe will not give satisfaction to the people in general. - Without intending to dictate to The President, we beg leave to observe, that we have the fullest confidence, in the talents, and integrity of both Colo Return J Meigs Junior, and Colo Samuel Hammond, either of whom, should they meet your approbation, etc. (Territorial Papers, v. 13, pp. 468, 480)

1807 - July 29 - William Hinkson subscribed $20 for the building of an Academy at Ste. Genevieve. (Territorial Papers, v. 14., pp. 177-78)

1808 - Mar. 2 - Conditional Bill of Sale at New Madrid:
William Hinkson of Ste. Genevieve District, Territory of Louisiana, for $550 conveyed negro man Tom (then in his possession, lately in possession of administrators of Estate of Richard Jones Waters, deceased), to Stephen Ross of New Madrid District. The negro was security for Ross who was security for Hinkson's appearance bail at the March term of New Madrid Court of Common Pleas. Witness - B. Olive. (New Madrid County Deed Bk. 2, p. 66)

Ca. 1809 - William Hinkson signed a petition - Inhabitants of the Territory of Louisiana to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, in Congress assembled:
... the undersigned ... Most Respectfully Sheweth. That they have waited with anxious but silent expectation for the arrival of that period, when in pursuance of the treaty by which Louisiana was ceded to the United States, they are to be admitted "according to the principles of the federal constitution, to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages and immunities of Citizens of the United States." These rights they do humbly conceive cannot be enjoyed while the judicial and legislative powers are vested in the same persons ... they most respectfully ask, that a law may be passed for enabling the inhabitants of this territory to have and enjoy the rights and privileges consequent upon a second grade of territorial government, and that the same may be established in this territory (Territorial Papers, v. 14., pp. 357-58)

ca. 1812 - William Hinkson signed another petition, similar to the one above - Inhabitants of the Territory of Louisiana to the Senate and House of Representatives. Added to this petition: A large Majority of your Petitioners depend on Agriculture for support whose claims to lands form the Principal hope of themselves and families and more than two thirds of their Just Claims have been Rejected by the board of Commissioners from whose official Representations they have little to hope.
For these reasons which are all important to your Petitioners they now most Respectfully ask of your Honorable body, the Passage of a Law which will admit them into what is denominated the Second grade of Territorial Government, which will entitle them to a Delegate in Congress by whom they can make Known their unfortunate Situation (Territorial Papers, v. 14, pp. 471-72, 474)

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Washington County, Territory of Missouri

created Aug. 21, 1813 from Ste. Genevieve County
effective Nov. 1, 1813

1814 - Aug. 12 - During the War of 1812, William Hinksori was enrolled for 60 days in Capt. Jacob Pettit's Company of Mounted (Drafted) Militia from Washington County, Missouri Territory, Lt. Col. Dodge's Command. The Company was mustered, inspected and received at St. Louis, Aug. 12, 1814. Hinkson was a private, his place of residence Washington County.

Oct. 11 - William Hinkson was discharged at St. Charles. The Company was mustered out at St. Louis the next day.

The Pay Roll shows that William Hinkson was due $8 a month for 2 months service $15.99
Travel pay - from residence to rendezvous 70 miles,
from place of discharge to residence 70 miles.
Time allowed for 140 miles - 9 days
@ 25¢
2.25
Rations allowed - 9 days @ 14¢ 1.26
Allowance for horse - 61 days @ 40¢ 24.40

(Company Muster and Pay Rolls, National Archives)

1815 - Nov. 27 - William Harrison, Julius Harrison, Mary Harrison, William Hinkson and wife Jane, late Jane Harrison, and Catherine Miller, late Catherine Harrison, all of Washington County, Missouri Territory, gave power of attorney to their trusty friend, Andrew Miller of the same county, to convey their rights as heirs of Benjamin Harrison, deceased, to Land Warrant 6014. issued to the heirs and representatives of Benjamin Harrison for his services as Captain in the Revolutionary War. Witness - S(olomon) Dolly (J.P.). Acknowledged in Washington County on Nov. 27, 1815 by William Harrison, Mary Harrison, William Hinkson, Jane Hinkson and Catherine Miller, on Nov. 30, 1815 by Julius Harrison. (National Archives Record Group No. 49, v. 11, p. 516)

1816 - Jan. 5 - Andrew Miller of Washington County, Territory of Missouri, by power of attorney Nov. 27, 1815 from William Harrison, Julius Harrison, Mary Harrison, William Hinkson and wife Jane, late Jane Harrison, Catherine Miller, late Catherine Harrison, heirs of Benjamin Harrison, deceased, late of said Territory, and Andrew Miller for himself and his wife Catherine, conveyed to Battle Harrison of Fayette County, Ohio, their rights to Land Warrant 6014 issued to the heirs and representatives of Benjamin Harrison for his services as a Captain in the Revolutionary War, together with all their rights to the land located in Fayette County, Ohio, by virtue of said warrant. Consideration $1. Witnesses - W. and Saml. Loofborrow? Acknowledged by Andrew Miller in Fayette County, Ohio, Jan. 5, 1816. (National Archives Record Group No. 49, v. 11, p. 5l6)

1816 - Dec. 13 - William Hinkson and wife Jane of Washington County, Territory of Missouri, conveyed to John Jones of Mine a Burton in Washington County, 290 acres on River Brazeau in Ste. Genevieve County in said Territory, part of 640 acres confirmed to William Hinkson.* The whole of said 640 acre tract bounded on the east by lands late of Robert Hinkson, on the west by lands now or late of Benjamin Harrison, Jr., on the other two sides by lands supposed to be vacant. Consideration $290. Witnesses to signatures on deed and receipt for $290 - Andrew Henry and L. Browne for William Hinkson, Jesse Wiley for Jane Hinkson. Acknowledged Feb. 8, 1817 in Washington County by William and Jane Hinkson. (Ste. Genevieve County Deed Bk. B, p. 442)

*We have been unable to locate date of this grant. According to American State Papers, Public Lands, v. 3, p, 348, "Grants of claims founded on settlements under the several acts of Congress, commencing with that of 13th June, 1812, and ending with that of 12th April, 1814," William Hinkson was granted 640 acres, he claimed 1,037 arpents on Aux Vases in Ste. Genevieve County, survey dated Jan. 13, 1806, etc.

1817 - Sept. 9 - William Vance and James Hays made a deposition in Fayette County, Ohio and stated that Benjamin Harrison, to whom the lands in Land Warrant 6014 accrued, died sometime about 1808 leaving certain children: Batteal Harrison, William Harrison, Julius Harrison, Mary Harrison, Jane Harrison intermarried with William Hinckson, Catherine Harrison intermarried with Andrew Miller, and Aristhedes Harrison; that all are of age except the son Aristhedes who is now a minor under the age of 21, that the above named persons are the only heirs of Benjamin Harrison, deceased. (National Archives Record Group No. 49, v. 11, p. 516)

1817 - Sept. 13 - William Hinkson of Washington County, Missouri Territory, gave power of attorney to John Perry, Sr. of same, to ask, demand and receive from the United States all money due and owing for his service as private in Capt. Jacob Pettit's Company of Mounted Militia of the County aforesaid, on a tour of duty by order of the Executive of said Territory but in service of the United States from Aug. 12, 1814 until Oct. 11, 1814, together with pay for travelling to and from place of rendezvous, etc. Acknowledged same day in Washington County by William Hinkson. (National Archives, no citation)

1817 - Nov. 24 - William Hinkson of Washington County, Territory of Missouri, attorney in fact for Charles Duncaster, conveyed to Jacob Pettit of Washington County, 640 acres on Obrazo Creek, 5 or 6 miles from the Mississippi River in Ste. Genevieve County (settlement or headright of Charles Duncaster and confirmed to him). Consideration $800. Acknowledged Nov. 29, 1817 in Washington County by William Hinkson. (Ste. Genevieve County Deed Bk. B, p. 525)

1818 - June 12 - William Clark, Governor of the Territory of Missouri and Commander in Chief of the Militia thereof, commissioned William Hinkson a Justice of the Peace for four years in Liberty Township, Washington County: Reposing special trust and confidence in the integrity, abilities and diligence of William Hinkson I do appoint him a Justice of the peace within and for the Township of Liberty in the County of Washington ... to administer oaths of office ... for said County and empower him to discharge the duties of said office according to law. To have and to hold the said office ... for four years unless sooner removed. In testimony whereof, I have caused the seal of the Territory to be hereunto affixed. Given under my hand at St. Louis the 12th day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen and of the Independence of the United States the forty second. William Hinkson took oath June 17, 1818 to faithfully support the Constitution of the United States and to execute the duties of his office according to the best of his skill and understanding without fraud or partiality. (Washington County Deed Bk. A, p. 247)

1819 - Aug. 3 - William Harrison, William Hinkson and wife Jane, Andrew Miller and wife Catherine, Julius Harrison, Mary Harrison and Aris Harrison of Washington County, Missouri Territory (William Harrison, Jane the wife of William Hinkson, Catherine the wife of Andrew Miller, Julius Harrison, Mary Harrison and Aris Harrison being children and legal heirs of Benjamin Harrison, deceased, late of Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri Territory), conveyed to William Burns of Ste. Genevieve County, their interest in a tract of land on the Mississippi River in Ste. Genevieve County, which Benjamin Harrison in his lifetime inhabited, cultivated and improved, etc. Consideration $150. Acknowledged in Washington County on Aug. 3, 1819 by William Harrison and William Hinkson, on Apr. 9, 1821 by Catherine Miller, on Apr. 10, 1821 by Ginney Hinkson, on Apr. 11, 1821 by Andrew Miller, Julius Harrison and Mary Harrison. (Washington County Deed Bk. B, p. 14)

Aris Harrison did not sign or acknowledge; he was a minor born ca. 1806.

The above deed was recorded on Apr. 12, 1821 in Perry County, Mo. where the land was located (Deed Bk. 1, p. 6). Perry County was created Nov. 16, 1820 from Ste. Genevieve County, effective Jan. 1, 1821.

1819 - Aug. 3 - Whereas William Harrison, William Hinkson and wife Jane, Andrew Miller and wife Catharine, Julius Harrison, Mary Harrison and Aris Harrison (which said Cathrine, Jane, Julius, Aris and William Harrison are children and heirs of Benjamin Harrison, deceased, late of Ste. Genevieve County) have conveyed to William Burns of Ste. Genevieve County their interest in a tract of land on the Mississippi River in Ste. Genevieve County, which Benjamin Harrison in his lifetime inhabited, etc., and whereas Aris Harrison by reason of his minority is by law incapable to make such conveyance, William Harrison covenanted with William Burns that Aris Harrison, when out of his minority, would make a deed of conveyance, etc. (Recorded Apr. 12, 1821, Perry County, Mo. Deed Bk. 1, p. 8)

1819 - Nov. 16 - A petition was presented to the Washington County Court praying for establishment of a public road from Potosi to Fouche Courtois Creek in Washington County to the plantation of Mr. Fulbright. Ordered by the Court that Martin Fulbright, John Fulbright and William Hinkson be appointed Commissioners to view and mark said road, etc. (Washington County Court Bk. 1-A, p. 94)

1819 - Nov. 17 - A petition was presented to the County Court praying for establishment of a public road from Potosi to the County line on the route to Boonsville and Franklin in Boonslick settlement. Ordered by the Court that William Hinkson, William Harrison, John Swan and Lewis Morrison be appointed Commissioners to view and mark said road, etc. (Washington County Court Bk. 1-A, p. 96)

1820 - Apr. 21 - William Hinkson and wife Jane of Washington County, Territory of Missouri, conveyed to Walter Wilkinson of Ste. Genevieve County, same Territory, 350 acres on River Brazeau in Ste. Genevieve County, part of 640 acres confirmed to William Hinkson. The whole of said 640 acre tract bounded, same as Dec. 13, 1816 deed to John Jones. Consideration $700 paid by Jones and Dunklin of Mine a Burton. Acknowledged in Washington County on Apr. 21, 1820 by Ginney Hinkson, on Apr. 22, 1820 by William Hinkson. (Ste. Genevieve County Deed Bk. C, p. 328)

1820 - July 19 - The Washington County Court appointed William Hinkson, Esquire, Justice of the Peace in Liberty Township, to lay off said township into road districts and to apportion lands in said township among the several road districts. (Washington County Court Bk. 1-A, p. 116)

Washington County, State of Missouri

1820 - Nov. 16 - Alexander McNair, Governor of the State of Missouri, commissioned William Hinkson, a Justice of the Peace for four years in Liberty Township, Washington County: Whereas the General Assembly of the State of Missouri have nominated and appointed William Hinkson a Justice of the peace for the Township of Liberty in the County of Washington Now therefore I do hereby commission the said William Hinkson a Justice of the peace for the Township and County aforesaid ... for four years unless sooner removed according to law. In testimony whereof I have hereunto affixed my private Seal (there being no Seal of State yet provided) Given under my hand at St. Louis the Sixteenth day of November AD 1820 and of the Independence of the United States the forty fifth. William Hinkson took oath Nov. 22, 1820, in Liberty Township, to support the Constitutions of the United States and the State of Missouri and faithfully to demean himself in his office of Justice of the Peace. (Washington County Deed Bk. A, p. 518)

1820 - Dec. 7 - The Register of the Land Office at St. Louis certified that William Hinkson of Washington County, Mo., on that day purchased of the Register of that Office the West half of the Northeast quarter of Section 35 of Township 38 North in Range 1 East containing 80 acres, at the rate of $1.25 per acre, amounting to $100, for which William Hinkson had made payment in full as required by law; that on presentation of the Certificate to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, William Hinkson would be entitled to receive a patent for the lot above described. (National Archives Record Group No. 49, St. Louis Cash Entry 77; entry date recorded as Dec. 6, 1820 in Washington County Tract Book North, p. 12)

1821 - Feb. 6 - The Washington County Court appointed William Hinkson, Andrew Miller and Louis Morrison, appraisers of slaves and personal estate of Samuel Silvers, deceased.

On the same day, the County Court approved of William Hinkson and Walter Watson as securities for Brittle Hill, Constable of Liberty Township. (Washington County Court Bk. 1-A, p. 122)

1821 - Feb. 8 - William Hinkson, Esq. presented to the County Court an account of $35 for fees and services in the cases of the United States against Isaac Sallon? and others, account audited and allowed. (Washington County Court Bk. 1-A, p. 126)

1821 - Apr. 13 - William Hinkson of Washington County, Mo. conveyed to Samuel and James F. Perry of same, 80 acres on the waters of Fourche Arno where William Hinkson now lives (W 1/2 NE 1/4 S35 T38N R1E). Consideration $200. Witness Abraham Brinker (J.P.). Acknowledged same day in Washington County by William Hinkson. (Washington County Deed Bk. B, p. 30)

Samuel and James F. Perry were merchants in Potosi (Hist. Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, etc., p. 516) The above appears to be a mortgage on the 80 acres which was released on Aug. 30, 1821 and re-mortgaged on Apr. 15, 1823.

1821 - Aug. 30 - Samuel and James F. Perry of Washington County, Mo. conveyed to William Hinkson of same, 80 acres on the waters of Fourch Arno where said Hinkson now lives (same description as Apr. 13, 1821 deed). Consideration $200. Acknowledged same day in Washington County by grantors. (Washington County Deed Bk. B, p. 36)

1821 - Sept. 24 - Patent for 80 acres - W 1/2 NE 1/4 S35 T38 R1E - was issued to William Hinkson:
Certificate No. 77
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting. WHEREAS William Hinkson of Washington County, Missouri, has deposited in the General Land Office of the United States, a certificate of the Register of the Land Office at St. Louis, in the State of Missouri whereby it appears that full payment has been made by the said William Hinkson, according to the provisions of the Act of Congress of the 24th of April 1820, entitled "An act making further provision for the sale of the Public Lands," for the West half of the North East quarter of Section number thirty five, in Township thirty eight of Range One (East) in the State of Missouri, containing Eighty acres, according to the official plat of the survey of the said Lands, returned to the General Land Office by the Surveyor General, which said tract has been purchased by the said William Hinkson NOW KNOW YE, that the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, in consideration of the Premises, and in conformity with the several acts of Congress, in such case made and provided, have Given and Granted and by these presents do give and grant unto the said William Hinkson the said tract above described: To have and to Hold the same, together with all the rights, privileges, immunities, and appurtenances of whatsoever nature, thereunto belonging, unto the said William Hinkson and his heirs and assigns forever.
In Testimony whereof, I, James Monroe, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, have caused these Letters to be made PATENT, and the Seal of the General Land Office to be hereunto affixed
Given under my hand, at the City of Washington, the twenty fourth day of September in the Year of our Lord, One thousand eight hundred and twenty-one and of the Independence of the United States the forty sixth.
By the President, James Monroe
Josiah Meigs, Commissioner
of the General Land Office
(Original of this patent is in possession of Paul T. Johnson, Potosi, Washington County, Mo., great-great-grandson of William Hinkson. Patent was not recorded in Washington County.)

1823 - Apr. 15 - William Hinkson of Washington County, Mo. conveyed to Samuel and James F. Perry of same, 80 acres on the waters of Fourche Arno where William Hinkson now lives (same description as Apr. 13 and Aug. 30, 1821 deeds). Consideration $200. Witnesses - Alexander Selkirk, John Hinkson. Acknowledged same day in Washington County by William Hinkson. (Washington County Deed Bk. B, p. 112)

1823 - May 13 - The Washington County Court appointed William Hinkson and Charles Springer, Commissioners of School Lands in Liberty Township. (Washington County Court Bk. B, p. 7)

1824 - Apr. 28 - William Hinkson of Washington County, Mo. gave power of attorney to his trusty friend, Napoleon B. Coleman of Harrison County, Ky. - having a variety of business to transact in the sd. State of Kentucky particularly the institution & prosecution of a suit against Humphrey Lyon, on a bond or obligation from sd. Lyon to me, and the prosecution of a suit already brought against Richard Henderson both of Harrison County Kentucky Now by these presents I do hereby constitute ordain & appoint, etc. Acknowledged by William Hinkson Apr. 28, 1824 in Harrison County. (Harrison County Deed Bk. 9, p. 156)

1825 - Oct. 20 - The Washington County Court ordered that an attachment issue against William Hinkson, Commissioner of School Lands in Liberty Township, and Joseph G. Rayburn, Commissioner of School Lands in Belleview Township, to show cause why they failed to obey the notice served on them from the Clerk's office of the County Court dated Oct. 1, 1825. (Washington County Court Bk. B, p. 65)

1827 - Apr. 11 - John Miller, Governor of Missouri, commissioned William Hinkson a Justice of the Peace for four years in Liberty Township, Washington County: Whereas the County Court for the County of Washington in the State of Missouri has recommended William Hinkson to be appointed a Justice of the peace, for the Township of Liberty, etc. In Testimany Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the great seal of the State of Missouri to be affixed. Done at the City of Jefferson this Eleventh day of April A.D. 1827 of the Independence of the United States the fifty First and of the State the seventh. William Hinkson took oath May 11, 1827 to support the Constitutions of the United States of America and the State of Missouri and faithfully to demean himself in his office without partiality, favor or affection. (Washington County Court Bk. B, p. 103)

1827 - Aug. 11 - The Washington County Court appointed Charles Springer and William Hinkson, Esquires, Justices of the Peace in Liberty Township,. to lay off the roads in Liberty Township into road districts and apportion lands to the same. (Washington County Court Bk. B, p. 113)

1827 - Oct. 9, 10, 11 - William Hinkson and Andrew Goforth, Justices of the Peace in Washington County, Mo., took depositions at the house of Andrew Goforth in Bellevue Township. (American State Papers, Public Lands, v. 8, pp. 93-94; Washington County Deed Bk. B, pp. 316-18)

1829 - Sept. 29 - Thomas Long and wife Susan, Joseph Pinson and wife Mary of Washington County, Mo., acknowledged a deed before William Hinkson, Justice of the Peace. (Washington County Deed Bk. B, p. 468)

1830 - Mar. 16 - William Harrison and wife Ann, Andrew Miller and wife Catharine, John Swan and wife Mary, Julius Harrison and Aristides Harrison, heirs at law of Benjamin Harrison, deceased, of the one part, and William Hinkson of the other part, all of Washington County, Mo. In consideration of $320 paid by William Hinkson to Benjamin Harrison before his death, first parties conveyed to Hinkson the undivided half of 640 acres on the waters of Brazeau in Perry County, Mo., being the same confirmed to Benjamin Harrison, Survey 2179, said tract being ündivided as yet. Beginning at a post on the south boundary line of Joseph James' survey, etc. Witness - Israel McGready. Acknowledged in Washington County on Mar. 16, 1830 by Andrew and Catharine Miller, John and Mary Swan and Julius Harrison, on Mar. 17, 1830 by Ann Harrison and Aristides Harrison, on July 14, 1830 by William Harrison. (Perry County Deed Bk. 1, p. 265)

1830 - Mar. 16 - William Harrison and wife Ann, Andrew Miller and wife Catharine, William Hinkson and wife Jane, John Swan and wife Mary, Julius Harrison and Aristides Harrison, all of Washington County, Mo. conveyed to Jacob Shaner of Perry County, Mo. the undivided half of 640 acres on the waters of Brazeau in Perry County, being the same confirmed to Benjamin Harrison, Survey 2179, said tract being undivided as yet. Same description as above deed. Consideration $640. Acknowledged in Washington County on Mar. 16, 1830 by Andrew and Catharine Miller, John and Mary Swan and Julius Harrison, on Mar. 17, 1830 by Ann Harrison, William and Jane Hinkson and Aristides Harrison, on July 14, 1830 by William Harrison. (Perry County Deed Bk. 1, p. 267)

1830 - Mar. 17 - William Hinkson and wife Jane (no place of residence) conveyed to Jacob Shaner of Perry County, Mo. the undivided half of 640 acres on the waters of Brazeau in Perry County, being the same confirmed to Benjamin Harrison, Survey 2179, said tract being undivided as yet. Same description as above two deeds. Consideration $320. Witness - Israel McGready. Acknowledged Mar. 17, 1830 in Washington County, Mo. by William Hinkson and his wife Jane "who signs her name Ginney." (Perry County Deed Bk. 1, p. 250)

1831 - Mar. 29 - Ann M. Perry and John Brickey, Executrix and Executor of Estate of Samuel Perry, deceased, and James F. Perry and wife Emily M. of Washington County, Mo. Conveyed to Noah Martin of same, 80 acres on the waters of Fourch Arno, the W 1/2 NE 1/4 S35 T38N R1E, being the same whereon William Hinkson formerly lived and conveyed by said Hinkson to Samuel and James F. Perry by deed Apr. 15, 1823. Consideration $150. Acknowledged in Washington County on Mar. 30, 1831 by Ann M. Perry and John Brickey, on Apr. 23, 1831 by James F. Perry and wife Emily M. (Washington County Deed Bk. C, p. 296)

* * *

According to family tradition, William Hinkson and wife Jane left Washington County and went to live with children in Southeast Missouri (Cape Girardeau, New Madrid or Sikeston) and died there.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

American State Papers, Public Lands. Vol. 2: 1809—1815. Vol. 3: 1815-1824. Vol. 8: 1835-1837. Washington: Gales & Seaton, 1834, 1861.

Burgess, Louis A. Virginia Soldiers of 1776. 3 vols. Richmond: Richmond Press, Inc., 1929.

Chalkley, Lyman. Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia. 3 vols. Rosslyn, Va.: Commonwealth Printing Co., 1912.

1 Clift, G. Glenn. "Second Census" of Kentucky 1800. Frankfort, 1954.

2 Clift, G. Glenn. "Corn Stalk" Militia of Kentucky, 1792-1811. Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 1957.

Collins, Lewis, History of Kentucky. 2 vols. Covington, Ky.: Collins & Co., 1882.

Douglass, Robert Sidney. History of Southeast Missouri. Cape Girardeau, Mo.: Ramfre Press, 1961 (reprint).

Drake, Mrs. William Preston; Wilson, Judge Samuel M.; and Ardery, Mrs. William Breckenridge. Kentucky in Retrospect. Sesquicentennial Commission, Commonwealth of Kentucky, 1942.

Gwathmey, John H. Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution. Richmond: Dietz Press, 1938.

Harrison, William. A Partial History of the Harrison Family. Marshall, Mo.: Progress Print, 191-.

History of Bourbon, Scott, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Ky. Chicago: O. L. Baskin & Co., 1882.

History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford and Gasconade Counties, Mo. Chicago: Goodspeed Publishing Co., 18~8.

Houck, Louis. History of Missouri. 3 vols. Chicago: R. R. Donnelley & Sons Co., 1908.

Jillson, Willard Rouse. Kentucky Land Grants. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1971 (reprint).

Johnson, E. Polk. A History of Kentucky and Kentuckians. 3 vols. Chicago-New York: Lewis Publishing Co., 1912.

Littell, William. Statute Law of Kentucky. 5 vols. Frankfort, 1809-1819.

Loveless, Richard W. Records of the District of West Augusta, Ohio County, and Yohogania County, Va. Columbus: Ohio State University, 1970.

McAdams, Mrs. Harry Kennett. Kentucky Pioneer and Court Records. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1967 (reprint).

New Madrid Archives, 1791-1804, Index to. St. Louis: Missouri Historical Society, 1940 (typed).

New Madrid Archives were deposited with the Missouri Historical Society in February 1908 by order of the New Madrid County Court. Most documents are in French or Spanish. Indexed under supervision of Brenda Richard, Assistant Archivist, Missouri Historical Society.

Pennsylvania Archives and Colonial Records. 138 vols. Philadelphia-Harrisburg, 1851-1935.

Robertson, James Rood. Petitions of the Early Inhabitants of Kentucky to the General Assembly of Virginia 1769 to 1792. Filson Club Publication 27. Louisville: James P. Morton & Co., Inc., 1914.

Smith, William Townsend. Complete Index to the Names of Persons, Places and Subjects Mentioned in Littell's Laws of Kentucky. Lexington: Bradford Club Press, 1931.

Territorial Papers of the United States. Vol. 13: Territory of Louisiana-Missouri, 1803-1806. Vol. 14: Territory of Louisiana-Missouri, 1806-1814. Compiled and edited by Clarence Edwin Carter. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1948, 1949.

Veech, James. The Monongahela of Old; or Historical Sketches of South-Western Pennsylvania to the Year 1800. Pittsburgh, l858-1892.

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INDEX

Allen, John [1]
Allison, Charles [1] [2]
Allison, Jane [1] [2]
Allison, John [1]
Allison, Mary [1]
Anderson Samuel [1] [2]
Anderson, William [1] [2] [3]
Ashworth, James [1] [2]
Austin, Moses [1]

Barbour, James [1]
Blagrove, Charles [1]
Boney, John [1]
Boswell, William E. [1]
Brickey, John [1]
Brinker, Abraham [1]
Browne, L. [1]
Burns, William [1] [2]

Cerre, Gabriel [1]
Clark, William [1]
Coleman, Henry [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]
Coleman, Napoleon B. [1]
Cook, John [1]
Cook, Samuel [1]
Crawford, William [1] [2]
Culbertson, J. [1]
Curry, James [1]
Curry, Jane [1]
Curry, Jenny [1] [2]

Davenport, John [1].
Dawson, Benjamin [1] [2] [3] [4]
Delassus, Charles Dehault [1]
Derbigny, Pierre [1]
Dodge, Henry [1]
Dolly. Solomon [1]
Douglass, Benjamin [1]
Doyle, Edward [1]
Duncaster, Charles [1] [2] [3] [4]

Edwards, John [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

Fulbright, John [1]
Fulbright, Martin [1]
Fulton, Eliza [1]
Fulton, John A. [1]
Fulton, William [1]

Garmny, William [1]
Garrard, James [1] [2] [3] [4]
Gobeau, Jean Baptist [1]
Goforth, Andrew [1]
Grant, John [1]
Gregg, John [1]
Griffith, Patrick [1]
Griffith, Robert [1]
Groslin, Henry [1]

Hall, Horatio [1]
Hall, William [1]
Hamilton, George A. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]
Hammond, Samuel [1] [2]
Hays, James [1]
Henderson, Richard [1]
Henry, Andrew [1]
Hill, Brittle [1]
Hinch, Samuel [1] [2]
Hood, Andrew [1]
Hughs, Thomas [1]

Isgrig, Daniel [1]

James, Joseph [1]
Jones, John [1] [2]
Jones, Thomas [1]

Lamb, Samuel [1]
Lassus, Camille [1]
Lavalle, Juan [1]
Lee, Henry [1]
Lewis, Peter [1] [2]
Logwood, Thomas [1]
Long, Susan [1]
Long, Thomas [1]
Loofborrow, Samuel [1]
Loofborrow, W. [1]
Lyne, Edward [1]
Lyon, Humphrey [1] [2]

McBride, Robert [1]
McGready, Israel [1] [2]
McIlvain, Samuel [1] [2]
McIntire, John [1]
McKinney, John [1]
McLaughlin, John [1]
McMullin, Samuel [1]
McNair, Alexander [1]

Marshall, Lewis [1]
Martin, Noah [1] [2]
Martin, Sarah [1]
Massey, John [1]
May, John [1] [2]
Meigs, Josiah [1]
Meigs, Return J. [1] [2]
Miller, Andrew [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Miller, Catherine [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]
Miller, Hugh [1] [2] [3]
Miller, John [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]
Monroe, James [1]
Moore, Isidore [1]
Moore, Thomas [1] [2]
Moore, W. [1]
Morgan, George [1] [2]
Morrison, Lewis [1]
Morrison, Louis [1]
Morton, Jonathan [1]
Mountjoy, Alvin [1]
Mullen, James [1]
Myers, Jacob [1]

Newe1, Mary [1]
Newell, Hugh [1]
Newell, Robert [1]

Olive, Jean Baptiste [1] [2] [3]

Perry, Ann M. [1]
Perry, Emily M. [1] [2]
Perry, James F. [1] [2] [3] [4]
Perry, John [1]
Perry, Samuel [1] [2] [3] [4]
Pettit, Jacob [1] [2] [3]
Peyroux, Henry [1] [2]
Pickins, James [1]
Pinson, Joseph [1]
Pinson, Mary [1]
Protzman, Lawrence [1]

Rankin, James [1]
Rankin, Robert [1] [2]
Rankin, Thomas [1]
Rankin, William [1] [2]
Ravenscraft, Thomas [1]
Rawlings, Mary [1]
Rawlings, Michael [1] [2]
Rawlings, Nathan [1] [2]
Rawlings, Samuel [1] [2] [3]
Rayburn, Joseph G. [1]
Reading, George [1] [2]
Reagan, George N. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]
Reiley, Benedict [1]
Reiley, Henry [1] [2]
Riddle, Isaac [1]
Robinson, Jeremiah [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]
Robinson, L. [1]
Ross, Stephen [1]
Ruddell, George [1] [2] [3]
Ruddell, Isaac [1]
Rule, James [1]

Safray, Pedro [1]
Sallon, Isaac [1]
Scott, Christian [1]
Scott, Elizabeth [1]
Scott, John [1]
Scott, Robert [1] [2] [3]
Selkirk, Alexander [1]
Shaner, Jacob [1] [2]
Silvers, Samuel [1]
Smith, James [1]
Springer, Charles [1] [2]
Stephenson, Hugh [1]
Stephenson, John [1] [2]
Stephenson, Marcus [1] [2] [3]
Stephenson, Polly [1]
Stevenson, Agnes [1]
Stevenson, Hugh [1]
Stubbs, Anna [1]
Stubbs, William [1]
Swan, John [1] [2]
Swan, Mary [1] [2]
Swearingen, Thomas [1]

Tardiveau, Barthelemi [1]
Thiriet, Claude [1]
Todd, John [1]

Vance, William [1] [2]
Vanmater, Morgan [1]
Van Matre, Morgan [1] [2] [3]
Vanmeter, Jacob [1]
Vanmeter, Morgan [1]
Veatch, Thomas [1]

Wall, John [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Waller, Edward [1]
Warring, Thomas [1]
Waters, Richard Jones [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12]
Watson, Walter [1]
Wiley, Jesse [1]
Wilkinson, James [1] [2] [3] [4]
Wilkinson, Walter [1]
Wilson, George [1] [2]

Zachary, Charles [1]

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Source: 
Original article by Isabel Stebbins Giulvezan written in 1973 printed here with permission.
Submitted by Dan Harrison.


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