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A Chronological Listing of Events In the Lives of

Andrew Harrison, Sr. of Essex County, Virginia

Andrew Harrison, Jr. of Essex and Orange Counties, Virginia

Lawrence Harrison, Sr. of Virginia and Pennsylvania

Compiled From Secondary Sources

Covering the time period of 1640 through 1772


compiled by

Daniel Robert Harrison

Milford, Ohio

November, 1998

Andrew Harrison, Sr. ancestry available in our online database.

Andrew Harrison, Jr. ancestry available in our online database.

Lawrence Harrison ancestry available in our online database.

1640 Just how early Andrew1 Harrison first appeared in the Rappahannock Valley, has not been discovered. However, he must have been born as early as the year 1640. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 312]
1650-60 Andrew1 Harrison was probably born between 1650-60, as in 1710 his sons William2 and Andrew2 were of age to hold land he deeded them and his daughter Elizabeth2 had married a Munday (Essex D. & W. 13, p. 365). ... We have no knowledge of Eleanor Harrison's maiden name nor date of death. [Genealogies of Virginia Families From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, 4 volumes (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1981), 2: 527.]
ca. 1667 Andrew2 Harrison, Jr. was born circa 1667. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 317]
1684 In 1684 (Old Rappahannock O. B. 1683-86, p. 18) Andrew1 Harrison makes his first appearance in the county as a headright for Cadwallader Jones. [Genealogies of Virginia Families From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, 4 volumes (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1981), 2: 527.]
Apr, 1684 In April, 1684, the Rappahannock Court recognized a headright claim by Jones (Cadwallader Jones) for the transportation of 24 men from England. Included in the list were Andrew1 Harrison and John Battaile. While this 1684 claim is the first record of either man in Virginia, it should be noted that both were freemen, with no headright restrictions or limitations. A lawsuit some years later revealed that Andrew1 Harrison had leased land in Virginia in 1683, and other records show that he served as a juryman shortly after this claim on him as a headright. [Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]
- After coming to the Rappahannock Valley, he (Andrew1) had settled on Golden Vale Creek in an area that, by the time of his death, became St. Mary's Parrish of Essex County. It subsequently became part of Caroline County, and today lies with Fort A.P. Hill. 

Golden Vale Creek was named by the earliest settlers, and still carries the name today. It flows into the southern side of the Rappahannock River about two miles below Port Royal.

[Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]

- As noted previously, neither Torrence nor JEH (James Edward Harrison) identified the family name of the wife of Andrew1 but identify her as Eleanor; Ray (Worth Ray) maintains she was Eleanor Elliot/Ellit; Hutton gives her name as Eleanor Ellitt, and Meynard identifies her as Elinor Long, without any comment as to the source of her information. All concur that Andrew1 and Eleanor Harrison had two sons, Lawrence2 and Andrew2, and two daughters, Elizabeth2 and Margaret2. [Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]
- The maiden name of Andrew1 Harrison's widow is unknown. It has been noted by other descendants in this family that the name Eleanor does not appear in later generations. Eleanor was the last wife to Andrew1 Harrison. For some years, it has seemed doubtful that she was the mother of his children. Compiler believes the mother of the children was Andrew1 Harrison's first wife, Elizabeth (Palmer). [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 27.]
1686 In 1686, Andrew1 Harrison purchased from the junior John Prosser 130 acres of land on Golden Vale Creek, adjacent to John Haslewood. Consideration for the deed was 3,000 pounds of "good sound Arenoco Tobb. in Caske," and cancellation of a debt for an additional 20,000 pounds of tobacco. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 26.]
1699 Andrew1 served as constable for Essex County for a number of years, beginning in 1699. [Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]
1704 In 1704, Andrew1 Harrison, Richard Long, and Samuel Elliot (possibly the father or brother of Eleanor?) received a land grant of 813 acres in the Golden Vale for the purpose of bringing headrights from England. Nothing is known specifically as to their success in this venture, but subsequently they received patents for nearly 2,000 acres. [Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]
1704 In the 1704 Quit Rent Roll for Essex he (Andrew1 Harrison, Sr.) owned 300 acres. [Genealogies of Virginia Families From Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, 4 volumes (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1981), 2: 527.]
before 1708 The connection between Andrew1and John Battaile as headrights to Cadwallader Jones has been established. Joseph Battaile, Under-Sheriff for the south side of the Rappahannock, had married first Catherine Taliaferro, who had been a ward of Cadwallader Jones following her father's death. Following her death, Battaile married Elizabeth Smith, daughter of Lawrence Smith. [Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]
1708 In 1708, Andrew1 Harrison was appointed guardian for Elizabeth, daughter of John Battaile, deceased. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 27.]
1708

1710

After John Battaile died, his daughter Elizabeth became the ward of Andrew1 Harrison in 1708; two years later, she married Andrew2 Harrison. At that time Andrew1 conveyed to Andrew2 a deed for 130 acres that constituted Andrew's1 "home place", retaining a life right for himself and his wife. [Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]
Aug 10, 1708 According to published records, Andrew2 Harrison, Jr., first acted as guardian for Elizabeth Battaile. The date of the guardian bond was August 10, 1708. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 306]
Aug 10, 1708 Essex Order Book, 1708-14, ... on page 47, August 10, 1708, we can read that "Elizabeth Battaile chose Andrew1 Harrison as her guardian." [Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1981), 1: 40-41.]
Jan 2, 1710 A deed, made January 2, 1710, by Andrew2 Harrison and his wife Elizabeth Battaile, shows that she is the Elizabeth Battaile for whom he was guardian, and who later became his wife. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 307; State of Virginia, County of Richmond, Deed Book No. 5, page 278]
1710 By 1710, Elizabeth (Battaile) had married her former guardian's son, Andrew1 Harrison the younger, of Essex County. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 27.]
1710 In 1710, the senior Andrew1 Harrison of Essex conveyed to his son, Andrew2 Harrison, 130 acres of land "whereon I now live which I purchased of John Prosser." Andrew1 Harrison, Sr. reserved to himself, and his wife, a life estate in use of the land, perhaps meaning pasture and wooded area, the plantation, the housing on the property, and an orchard next to the dwelling house. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 27.]
Oct 9, 1710 On October 9, 1710, Andrew1 Harrison, Senior, of Essex County, conveyed to his son Andrew2 Harrison, land whereon the said Andrew1 Harrison, Senior, lived, containing 130 acres in Essex County, purchased of John Prosser, on the south side of the Rappahannock River, in the freshes thereof; the said Andrew1 Harrison, Senior, & Elinor, his wife, to live on the said land during their lives.

On October 9, 1710, Andrew1 Harrison, Senior, conveyed to his son, Andrew2 Harrison, Junior, 200 acres, part of 400 acres proportionable part of a patent granted to the said Andrew1 Harrison, Senior, Richard Long & Samuel Elliot; being forest land on the south side of Rappahannock River, bounded by land of my son William2 Harrison, John Buckner, Richard Buckner, Larkin Chew & Richard Long. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 316; Essex County, Virginia Records, Deed Book No. 13 (1707-1711): 365]

May 7 & 8, 1712 Essex County, Virginia, Wills and Deeds, 1711-1714, p. 45. Lease and Release. 7 and 8 May 1712. Richard Long of St. Marys Par. Essex Co., sells Thomas and John Powell of same Par. and Co., 316 acres, Long's part of 1149 acres in Essex Co., granted to said Long, Andrew1 Harrison Sen'r and Samuel Elliot. Signed Richard Long, his mark. Wit: Geo Loyde, A Somervell, Salvatore Muscoe. Rec. 8 May 1712. [Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, The Original 34 Volumes Reprinted in 3, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1988) 2: 10.]
Jan 11, 1713/14 Essex County, Virginia, Wills and Deeds, 1711-1714, p. 179. Lease and Release. 11 Jan'ry 1713/14 [only one date shown] Nathaniel Vickers, planter, of St. Marys Par. sells Andrew2 Harrison the younger, planter of same Par., 100 acres, bounded: beginning at the mouth of John Catlett Junr Spring branch x to Edward Evans line x over the top of a hill where Robert Waite did design to build his house x to land w'ch Thomas Hilliard lives on x to Golden Vale Run x x. Signed Nathaiel N Vickers sign. Wit: Robert Jones, Robert Parker. Rec. 11 Feb. 1713/14. [Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, The Original 34 Volumes Reprinted in 3, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1988) 2: 25.]
Feb 8 & 9, 1713/14 Essex County, Virginia, Wills and Deeds, 1711-1714, p. 180. Lease and Release. 8 and 9 Feb. 1713/14. Andrew2 Harrison, Junr., of St. Marys Par., sells Nathaniel Vickers of same Par., 100 acres being part of a patent granted John Prosser, dec'd., on Golden Vale Creek, adj. the land of Richard Long, etc. Signed Andrew2 Harrison. Wit: Robert Jones, Robert Parker. Rec. 11 Feb. 1713/14. Elizabeth harrison, wife of Andrew2 harrison, by John Battaile her attorney, relinq. he dower rights. Signed Elizabeth x Harrison. Wit: jno Row, Michael Lawless. Rec. 11 Feb. 1713/14. [Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, The Original 34 Volumes Reprinted in 3, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1988) 2: 25.] 
Jun 9 & 10, 1713 Essex County, Virginia, Wills and Deeds, 1711-1714, p. 125. Lease and Release. 9 and 10 June 1713. Nathaniel Vickers, planter, of St. Marys Par., Essex Co., sells Andrew2 Harrison the younger, planter, of the same Par. and Co., 100 acres in St. Marys Par., adj. land of Richard Long where he now lives, Edward Evans corn field, etc. Signed Nathaniel Vickers. Wit: Richard x Long, Edward x Evans, Augt Smith. Rec. 11 June 1713. [Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, The Original 34 Volumes Reprinted in 3, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1988) 2: 20.]
Jun 9 & 10, 1713 Essex County, Virginia, Wills and Deeds, 1711-1714, p. 127. Lease and Release. 9 and 10 June 1713. Andrew2 Harrison the younger, planter, of St. Marys Par., Essex Co., sells Nath'll Vickers of same Par., 200 acres, adj. land of Mr. Buckner and that of Richard Long. Signed Andrew2 Harrison. Wit: Richard x Long, Edward x Evans, Augt Smith. Rec. 11 June 1713. [Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, The Original 34 Volumes Reprinted in 3, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1988) 2: 20.]
Feb 11, 1714 "... and later (Essex W. & D. 14, 1711-16, p. 181) this same Elizabeth, now Elizabeth Harrison, wife of "Andrew2 the younger," appoints Mr. John Battaile her Att'y, Feb. 11th, 1714." This John Battaile was her brother. [Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1981), 1: 41.]
1714 In 1714, Andrew2 Harrison, Jr. became a Constable for Essex County. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 51.]
1718 Whatever his origins, Andrew1 Harrison died in Essex County in 1718. [Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]
1718 An Andrew1 Harison's will, made April 28, 1718, was proved in Essex County, VA, on November 18, 1718 by one witness, proved again on December 16, 1718 by two other witnesses, and finally on March 17 by Andrew's widow, Eleanor. [Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]
1718 King and Queen County: Records Concerning 18th Century Persons. Will of Andrew1 Harrison. 1718. Essex county, Virginia. W. B. 3. p. 84. Dated 28 April 1718. Pro. 18 Nov. 1718. Being grown very aged and at this time very sick and week. Wife Eleanor ex'trx. Son Andrew2 and son-in-law Gabriel Long my trustees and overseers. Have already settled three of my children viz William2, Andrew2 and Elizabeth2 on lands on which they now live, viz. son William2 270 acres, son Andrew2 200 acres and dau.l Elizabeth2 200 acres. Have put in the hands of Wm. Stanard L 65, 12, 06 to buy negroes for the use of my wife during her lifetime and at her decease to dau. Margaret2 Long's three youngest sons, viz. Gabriel3, Richard3 and William3 as soon as they shall attain to the age of 21 yrs. Certain personality after wife's death to my four children, William2, Andrew2, Elizabeth2 and Margaret2. Wit: John Ellits, Wm Davison and Mary x Davison. [Beverley Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, The Original 34 Volumes Reprinted in 3, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1988) 2: 326.] 
June 2, 1719 The inventory of his (Andrew1) estate made on June 2, 1719, was valued at L113, 10s, and 10p, and covered bedding, household furniture and equipment, farm equipment, cattle, one white servant (indentured?) and two negroes (slaves?). [Abner Harrison, Andrew Harrison and other early Harrisons, Harrison Genealogy Repository, online <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~harrisonrep/ABNERH/ANDRTOC.HTM>, data downloaded 18 August 1997]
Apr 6, 1725 April 6, 1725, Harry Beverley, of Spottsylvania County, sold to Andrew2 Harrison, of Essex County, for 4600 pounds of tobacco, 600 acres in Spottsylvania County, being a part of a patent granted to sd Beverley. Recorded June 1, 1726. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 316; Spottsylvania, Virginia County Records, 1721-1800, Vo. 1, p. 94, Will Book A, 1722-48]
1725 In 1725, Harry Beverley sold 600 acres of land on Pamunkey River to Andrew2 Harrison of Essex County. The tract was near Spotswood's Germanna patent, in an area that generated interest in mineral wealth. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 51.]
1727 Andrew2 Harrison's home was in St. Mary's Parish in the upper part of Essex County, and there he died in the year 1718. The section of Essex County in which Andrew2 Harrison lived and died, became in 1727, a part of the newly-erected County of Caroline. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 313]
1727 In 1727, a colorful comment that tells us something about the man, and about the time in which he lived, was entered in Essex County Order Book 7, "Andrew2 Harrison being arrested at the suit of James Gillison in debt and he having rescued himself by a superior force out of the sheriff's custody, order is granted to the said plaintiff against the daid defendant for what shall appear due at next Court unless the defendant then appear and answer the said suit." [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 51-52.]
Dec 31, 1728 December 31, 1728, Andrew2 Harrison, of Spottsylvania County, Virginia, to Richard Fitz William, Esq., in trust for himself, the Honble Wm. Gooch, His Majesties Lieut. Governor, Captain Vincent Pearse, Dr. Geo. Nicholas & Charles Chiswill, L70 currency; 600 acres in Spottsylvania County and sd land purchased by sd Harrison, of Harry Beverley, the sd land having been granted by patent to the sd Beverley. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 316; Spottsylvania, Virginia County Records, 1721-1800, Vo. 1, pp. 2-3, Will Book A 1722-48, p. 104]
1728 In 1728, Andrew2 Harrison, describing the property as "where I now live," sold the 600 acres that he had bought from Harry Beverley to Richard fitzWilliams, Esquire, as Trustee for a group headed by His Majesty's Lieutenant Governor, The Honorable William Gooch, Shortly before he sold the Pamunkey land, Andrew Harrison obtained a thousand acre patent in St. George's Parish of Spotsylvania County, on branches of Wysell, also called Terry's Run, about twelve miles from Germanna. The patent was adjacent to land of the Knight of the Golden Horseshoe, Capt. Jeremiah Clouder, and land of Thomas Chew, and was centered on the present village of Tatum, in southeast Orange County, close to the Spotsylvania County line. For Spotsylvania and Orange County planters, Fredericksburg on Rappahannock River was the major tobacco market. Fredericksburg road ran along the east line of Andrew Harrison's plantation. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 52.]
Aug 5, 1729 Capt. Thomas Chew & his officers, Andrew2 Harrison & Thomas Waren, took ye oath August 5, 1729. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 316; Colonial Militia of Spottsylvania County, Virginia, Order Book, 1724-1730: 514]
1729 In 1729, Andrew2 Harrison became an officer of Spotsylvania County militia, under Capt. William Johnson. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 52.]
1736 - 1747 In 1736, Thomas Chew and his wife, Martha (Taylor), sold 200 acres of land on the east side of Wysell Run to Andrew2 Harrison. Five years later that tract was conveyed to Battaile3 Harrison. By 1747, Andrew2 Harrison had assembled a plantation of 1,800 acres, plus the adjoining 200 acres held by his son. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 52.]
Jan 11, 1750/51 On January 11th, 1750-51, the last will of Sarah Battaile was "presented to the court by ffrancis Thornton, gen., one of its Exc'rs, and further proved by the oath of Nicho. Battaile." ... At this same court "it is ordered that ... appraise her estate ... in Orange County, Geo. Taylor, Erasmus Taylor, Ruben Daniel & Andrew2 Harrison...." [Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 5 volumes (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1981) 1:44.]
Nov 28, 1751 On November 28, 1751, Andrew2 Harrison, Jr., of St. Thomas' Parish, Orange County, Virginia, planter, conveyed to his son, Lawrence3 Harrison, of the same County and Parish, planter, as a gift, 157 acres, being the land the said Lawrence3 Harrison now lives on, in the aforesaid Parish and County. The deed in connection with this conveyance is recorded in Deed Book 12, page 50, Orange County Records. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 320]
1751 As political jurisdictions evolved, Terry's Run fell within St. Thomas' Parish of Orange County. In 1751, Andrew2 Harrison, planter, wrote five deeds that are now recorded in series in Orange County Deed Book 12. Three of those deeds conveyed land to his sons, Lawrence3, Charles3, and John3. The other grantees in 1751, Samuel Kercheval and Richard Cousins, were also conveyed land within Andrew2 Harrison's plantation. It is the compiler's thought that Elizabeth3, wife of Richard Cousins, and Margaret3, wife of Samuel Kercheval, were daughters of Andrew2 Harrison. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 52.]
fall 1752 Andrew2 Harrison died in the fall of the year 1752. At Orange County Court, November 22, 1753, on motion of William Johnson, certificate was granted him for obtaining letters of administration on the estate of Andrew2 Harrison, deceased, Elizabeth, widow of the said Andrew2 Harrison, and Battaile3 Harrison, the heir-at-law, having refused. William Johnson's bond was placed at two hundred pounds currency. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 317; Orange County, Virginia Records, Order Book, 1747-1754: 509]
Feb 22, 1753 The last record found for Andrew2 Harrison, during his lifetime, appears in Orange County Order Book 5, dated 22 February 1753, "Andrew2 Harrison is discharged from being overseer of the road down to the Spotsylvania County line." [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 52.]
Jul 13, 1753 Because most Virginian burial markers from 18th century have disappeared, it is a little unusual to learn a date of death from that time. Virginia Genealogist, Volume 4 Number 1, published an item from the Journal of John Mercer, dated 13 July 1753, "Andrew2 Harrison, overseer, died." Andrew2 Harrison had served Orange County as overseer of a road, probably Fredericksburg road along the east line of his plantation. He may have been overseer of John Mercer's Orange County interest. John Mercer, of Stafford and Prince William Counties, had lived for a time in Caroline. Whatever the reason, John Mercer's acknowledgment of Andrew2 Harrison's death is not without meaning. The two men had known each other from before 1736. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 53.]
Nov 22, 1753 On 22 November 1753, William Johnson was granted letters of administration in the estate of Andrew2 Harrison, deceased. At that time, Andrew2 Harrison's plantation amounted to 1,300 acres. His personal estate was appraised at 27 pounds 15 shillings. His inventory included household goods and furnishings, cattle and farming implements, but it listed neither weapons nor slaves. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 52-53.]
Nov 30, 1753 Inventory and appraisement of the Estate of Andrew2 Harrison, deceased, made November 30, 1753. Returned & Recorded, March 1, 1754. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 317; Orange County Records, Will Book 2, p. 191]
1754 In 1754, Lawrence3 Harrison became a Constable for Orange (County). Later in that year Lawrence3 Harrison, joined by his wife, "Catherine", sold his Orange County land to William McWilliams, the younger, of Fredericksburg, who had married Rachel, daughter of Lawrence Battaile. Rachel McWilliams was a first cousin to Lawrence3 Harrison. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 58.]
Jul 24, 1754 On July 24, 1754, Lawrence3 Harrison and his wife Catherine, of Orange County, Virginia, conveyed for currency, to William McWilliams, the younger, of Fredericksburg, merchant, 157 acres of land in Orange County, on the south side of Wysel Run, which is a part of a patent granted to Andrew2 Harrison, September 28, 1728, and by the said Andrew2 Harrison conveyed by deed, November 28, 1751, to his sone, the said Lawrence3 Harrison. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 322; Orange County Records, Deed Book 12, p. 243.]
1757 By 1757 Lawrence3 Harrison had lived long enough in Frederick County, Virginia, to become overseer of a road from Worthington's marsh to Thomas Lindsay's. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 58.]
1758 In 1758, Lawrence3 Harrison purchased land in Frederick County from Jacob Hite, son of Jost Hite, who had led the first German settlers into Shenandoah valley. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 58.]
Jun 5, 1758 After the sale of the (157 acres on July 24, 1754) property, in Orange County, Virginia, Lawrence3 Harrison and his wife Catherine removed to Winchester, Virginia, where they purchased 346 acres of land from Jacob Heit, of the County of Frederick, Colony of Virginia. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 322; Winchester, Virginia, Deed Book No. 4: 409.]
Aug 2, 1762 In the year 1762, Lawrence3 Harrison and his wife Catherine sold the (346 acres in Winchester, Virginia) property to Moses Tullis. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 323]
1763-1767 In 1762, Lawrence3 Harrison sold the Frederick County property he had bought from Jacob Hite. After the sale there is a gap in what is known of Lawrence3 Harrison.

In 1763, Pontiac's War disrupted frontier settlement. In Britain, the government issued a proclamation that forbade settlement west of the mountain, and that policy stirred resentment among the frontier Virginians. Pontiac's War came to an end in 1765. Thereafter, with not much regard for the Royal prohibition, Virginian settler crossed the mountains.

Lyman Draper obtained statements [Wisonsin Historical Society, Draper mss. 3S 53 and 5S 1] that are useful to this study. Samuel Murphy was reared in the home of William Crawford's half-brother, John Stephenson. Samuel Murphy remembered that John Stephenson, William Crawford, and the brothers Lawrence3 Harrison and Charles3 Harrison, crossed the mountains at the same time. William Crawford later deposed that he made homestead improvements on Youghiogheny in 1765, and that he brought his family there in the spring of the following year. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 58.]

1767 Lawrence3 Harrison, in right of George Washington, located 267 acres in Augusta County, Virginia, embracing Fort Necessity, in 1767. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 323; Franklin Ellis, History of Fayette County, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia: L.H. Everts and Company, 1882), 831]
Mar 30, 1767 ...regarding the Monongahela, Youghiougheny, and Redstone valleys in territory disputed between Virginia and Pennsylvania: ... This commission visted Redstone, March 22, 1767, and had a meeting with the settlers on the 24th, and again on the 30th. On this date, a meeting with 30 or 40 representative settlers was held at Gist's plantation....

Among the names of those who met with this commission, were Lawrence3 and Richard Harrison. "many severe things were said of Mr. Crogan, and one Lawrence Harrison, who treated theLaw of our Government with too much respect." [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 310-311; Franklin Ellis, History of Fayette County, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia: L.H. Everts and Company, 1882), 61.]

Mar 1768 In March 1768, a delegation representing the colonial government of Pennsylvania met with Youghiogheny settlers at Christopher Gist's home. The delegation meant to persuade the settlers to abandon their lands, because their settlement was illegal. Lawrence3 Harrison, typical of the Virginian settlers, resisted Pennsylvania's claim to sovereignty. Lawrence3 Harrison lived on a tomahawk claim. He did not intend to give up his home. The Indian trader George Croghan noted in his journal that during the 1768 meeting at Gist's, Lawrence3 Harrison "treated the law and our government with too much disrespect." [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 58-59.]
Jun 2, 1769 ...William Jacobs ... owned land at the mouth of the Redstone Creek. In 1769, he sold his property to Lawrence3 Harrison and Prior Theobald. William Jacobs applied for a survey on April 24, 1769. Having sold the tract to Lawrence3 Harrison and Prior Theobald, he executed a deed to them dated June 2, 1769. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 324; Ellis's History of Fayette County, Pa., pp. 614-615.]
Jun 13, 1769 At Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in the Land Grants Office, there is a record of a Patent, June 13, 1769, for 300 acres granted to Lawrence3 Harrison, adjoining the lands of Colonel William Crawford. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 324]
Jul 10, 1769 Lawrence3 Harrison transferred his right to Theobald, July 10, 1769 (the land he bought from William Jacobs, deed dated June 2, 1769). [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 324; Ellis's History of Fayette County, Pa., pp. 614-615.]
- Both Lawrence3 Harrison and Charles3 Harrison lived near Stewart's Crossings in the frontier country that Pennsylvania first placed under the jurisdiction of Cumberland County, then Bedford County, later Westmoreland County, and finally Fayette County. Virginia considered Stewart's Crossings to be within Augusta County, later West Augusta District, and finally Yohogania County.

Pennsylvania land patents were obtained by Lawrence3 Harrison, and by his sons, William4, Benjamin4, Lawrence4, and Battle4. The senior Lawrence3 Harrison's home, Mount Pleasant, was located on both sides of Braddock's Road, in its approach to Youghiogheny river at Steart's Crossings. The land surveyed as Mount Pleasant is now within the west bank development of the City of Connellsville in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 59.]

1770 In 1770, Lawrence3 Harrison appears in Bedford County, Pennsylvania records, as is evidenced by a bond signed by Alexander Moreland, of Hamilton Bann Township, York County, Pennsylvania, who was bound to pay fifteen pounds currency to Lawrence Harrison. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 325]
Jul 16, 1771 Lawrence3 Harrison was township Supervisor of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, July 16, 1771. [Robert Torrence, Torrence and Allied Families (Philadelphia: Wickersham Press, 1938), 325; Israel Daniel Rupp, History and Topography of Dauphin, Cumberland, and Bedford Counties (Lancaster, Pennsylvania: G. Hills, 1846), 490.]
1771 Lawrence3 Harrison became the first Supervisor for Tyrone Township, in the newly created Pennsylvania County called Bedford. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 59.]
1771-1772 A money dispute in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, is useful to this study. In 1771, Jacob Hite of Virginia brought suit against William Crawford and Lawrence3 Harrison. In 1772, Jacob Hite pursued his claim against Crawford and the executors of Harrison's estate. Jacob Hite thought of Lawrence3 Harrison's widow as Katharina. Papers recorded in later years in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, support Jacob Hite's idea. Although she sometimes appeared in the record as Catherine, Lawrence3 Harrison's widow called herself Katherina. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 59.]
Jan 14, 1772 Lawrence Harrison died before 14 January 1772. On that date, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, court granted letters of administration to Catherine Harrison and William Harrison, widow and son of Lawrence Harrison, deceased. [James Edward Harrison, A comment of the family of ANDREW HARRISON who died in ESSEX COUNTY, VIRGINIA in 1718 (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: privately printed, no date), 59.]
Jan 14, 1772 Bedford County was erected in 1771 and from it, later Fayette County was erected in 1783. While the lands which he (Lawrence3 Harrison) and his children owned are in what is known as Fayette County now, they were during his lifetime in Bedford County, where "Letters of Administration were granted to Catherine Harrison, his wife, and son, William4 Harrison, January 14, 1772." (The Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, Publications, Vol 10, p. 66.) Research has, so far, failed to disclose the family name of Catherine, wife of Lawrence Harrison. Sometime following her husband's death, Catherine Harrison, went to Kentucky and was residing with her sister, Mary (Harrison) Moore, wife of Captain Thomas Moore, where she died in 1836. (Deposition of John Cord, of Bedford County Pennsylvania. (Ibid.) [Genealogies of Virginia Families, From the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 5 volumes (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1981), 3: 951.]

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