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Taylor Family Connections

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Donna Cooper's Family Connections

John & Liscomb (Taylor) Haddock

Pitt County, NC

North Carolina

Taylor Family

 

 William Taylor, Jr. 

In 1762, Pitt County, NC: Taylor, Willm Junr. was taxed on 1, 2 slaves and 3 total, Pitt County, NC -- Haddock, John; Jno. Haddock Junr., reported two taxables and a total of 2. There were no slaves reported.

William Taylor, Jr. was a sworn chain carrier (SCC) in Jan 1763 when his brother Simon Taylor received a Granville grant of 216 acres on the south side of Tar River in Pitt County. And also, William Taylor was a sworn chain carrier in June 1763 on a Granville plat for his brother John Taylor.

These patents help establish names, which are attached to certain places and certain general areas for a specific time. These abstracts read: In 1768, Patent # 7143, Book 23, Taylors Swap was identified in the following patent. Patent # 7136, page 351. John Simpson, 22 Dec 1768, 166 acres in Pitt on the side side of Taylors Swamp, joining (a point) near Franks Branch and the pocoson at the head of Watery Branch (which is) the Corner of Simpsons former Survey. Another patent located in Patent Book 23 was that of John Simpson, Patent # 5929, Page 94. John Simpson, 26 Oct 1767, 640 acres in Pitt on the west side of the West prong of Checode Creek swamp joing the first branch southwest of cross swamp meadow, Suttons bea tree branch, Pachetts well, and the mouth of the thoroughfare pocoson on Clayroot. Chicod Creek and Clayroot are south of Greenville. Clayroot forms a part of the boundary between Pitt and Craven. It runs into Swift Creek. Chicod forms part of the boundary between Pitt and Beaufort, southeast of Greenville. John Simpson, Patent Book 20, #3250, page 708, 14 Nov 1771, 100 acres in Pitt on the east side of Swifts Creek, joining Nasby Mills, John Haddock, John Haddock Jr. and the said Simpson.

Swift Creek is a little somewhat more difficult to locate in Pitt Co. It forms part of the boundary between Pitt and Craven about where Clayroot joins it. Swift Creek forms just south and west of Greenville. Located in Patent Book 20, Patent # 3251, page 708, was John Simpson, who took a patent on 14 Nov 1771, 400 acres in Pitt County, joining Ichabod Simpson, Little Contentney Creek and Col. Palmer. Little Contentena is between Farmville and Greenville and flows into what looks to be Middle Swamp Creek. That name may not be correct but whatever it is it forms part of the boundary between Pitt and Green Co. And also in Patent Book 20, Patent # 3252, Page 709, John Simpson, is mentioned as having filed a patent on 14 Nov 1771, 118 acres in Pitt joining Jas. Albriton, Wm. Dickson, Peter Albriton, Cross Swamp, and Cow Swamp. Cow and Cross Swamp join southeast of Greenville and flow into Chicod.

In Patent Book 22, Patent # 4284, Page 201, John Haddock, took a patent on 25 Jan 1773, 200 acres in Pitt joining the Clayroot, the head of the long Branch, and the courses of the swamp. Patent #4285 in the same book on the same page and dated the same day, is another patent for John Haddock, for 300 acres in Pitt in the Cypress Gade neck and the Cedar Swamp neck, joining the Cypress Gade Swamp at the mouth of the first small drain above Mayo's House.

Another kinsmen was Nasby Mills, who was mentioned in the patent that Andrew Hardy took, which was located in Patent Book 22, Patent #3484, on page 6, Andrew Hardy, 14 May 1772, took 300 acres in Pitt on Swifts Creek, joining Samuel Smith, Travisses Line, and Nasby Mills.

Patent Book 17, indicate that there are records of William Taylor taking a patent on 15 Feb 1764, located on page 35, Patent # 7032, William Taylor took 300 acres in Pitt on the south side of cross swamp, joining Francis Buck on the said swamp. Patent #7033, Patent Book 17, Page 35, William Taylor is located on the same day, 15 Feb 1764, as taking another patent, which is for 248 acres in Pitt on the north side of the Cross Swamp, joining Taylors back line, the swamp and (a point) near the Cross Swamp Pocoson.
 
Pitt County, NC, William Taylor sold 200 acres for L120 to John Haddock, Jr., 22 Jan 1767. John Hadduck (sic), Jr., then sold the 200 acres on the same day for L100 to John Simpson; former owners were given as: Simon Burney, William Taylor, Sen., and son, William Taylor, Jr. (1731). Original record indicates John's name as Haddock and not Hattock as this document has been published elsewhere.

William Taylor, Jr., was granted 200 acres in Oct 1767 in Pitt County on the South West side of Creeping swamp, joining the side of the said swamp above the great branch. He sold the 200 acres granted him in Oct 1767 to his nephew William Taylor, minor son of his brother Simon Taylor in Mar 1769.

William Taylor, Pitt County, NC, land mentioned in Jan 1795: Pitt County, NC, 24 Jan 1795, James Brooks, Sr., sold to James Brooks, Jr., 600 acres adjoining William Taylor, Francis Buck, and Samuel Smith. And also, William Taylor, Pitt County, NC, is mentioned in the following: in a transaction concerning land in Aug 1795. On 20 Aug 1795, Edward Dixon sold 50 acres for 50 pounds to Edward Dixon, Jr; former owners were Simon Burney (Pat.) and Wm. Taylor; wit: William Buck, Lydia Buck.

William Taylor, Pitt County, NC, is mentioned again in Sep 1795: On 9 Sep 1795, Edward Dixson sold 150 acres adjoining Frances Buck for 40 pounds to James Albritton; former owners: William Taylow [sic] (Pat. 1769), Thomas Tuten, John Simpson, William Dixson, Abraham Dixson; wit: Zacra Albritton.

William Taylor of Pitt County, NC, is mentioned in Apr 1799: On 1 Apr 1799, Joseph Tooke (Craven) sold 400 acres for 60 pounds to Abraham Smith; former owner William Taylor (1783); wit: Charles Rooach, John Roach.

William Taylor, Jr., of Pitt County, North Carolina, 18 Apr 1799, Wm. Haddock, Sr., sold 200 acres for 10 pounds to John Haddock, Jr.; former owner William Taylor; wit: Charles Haddock, John Stokes. [Research Note: This John Stokes who witnessed the Taylor deed can not be the same John Stokes of the Edgecombe County, North Carolina, area. Because John Stokes died May 8, 1783, wife was Elizabeth. Children were William, Shadrach, David, Dempsey, William, Marcus, Elizabeth. He died within months of his sons Shadrach and Marcus of yellow fever.]

Letter from Colonel John Simpson, Chairman of Safety Committee in Pitt County, to Colonel Richard Cogdell, Chairman of Safety Committee in Craven County, Reporting an Intended Negro Insurrection. Chatman, July 15th, 1775. Sir: Having leisure I sit down to inform you of the occurrences since my last. Our committee met the ---- Inst, when the Express arrived from Mr. Edward Salter giving us account of a discovery that was made in Beaufort County by one of Mr. Bayner and one of Capt. Respess, Negro men unto Capt. Thomas Respess of an intended insurrection of the negroes against the whole people which was to be put into execution that night. We immediately sent off an Express to Tarborough to alarm the inhabitants there. We then proceeded to business and appointed upwards of one hundred men as patrolers and passed a resolve that any negroes that should be destroyed by them or any person in company with them in apprehending should be paid for by a tax on the negroes in this county. We then separated to sound the alarm thro’ this county and to apprehend the suspected heads. By night we had in custody and the gaol near forty under proper guard. Sunday the Committee sett and proceeded to examine into the affair and find it a deep laid Horrid Tragick Plan laid for destroying the inhabitants of this province without respect of persons, age or sex. By Negro evidence it appears that Capt ---- Johnson of White Haven, who hath just Loaded his Brigg with Navall Stores for that port, in consort with Merrick, a Negro man slave who formerly Belonged to Major Clark a Pilot at Okacock but now to Capt Nath Blinn of Bath Town propagated the contagion. ... The contagion has spread beyond the waters There are five negroes ... were whipt this day by order.

Monday. "The Committee sat. Ordered several to be severely whipt and sentenced several to receive 80 lashes each to have both Ears crapt which was executed in presence of the Committee and a great number of spectators. In the afternoon we rect by express from Coll. Blount ... of ... Negroes being in arms on the line of Craven and Pitt and prayed assistance of men and ammunition which we readily granted. We posted guards upon the roads for several miles that night. Just as I got home came one of Mr Nelson’s sons from Pometo (near Mr Harlan’s mill) and informed me of 250 negroes that had been pursued for several days but none taken nor seen tho’ they were several times fired at. Head he been in Martinborough he would have received pay for his negroes. On Tuesday we sent off two companies of Light Horse, one to Lower and one to Upper Swift Creek Bridge in order to find from whence the report arose and found the author to be a Negro wench of William Taylor’s on Clayroot, with design to kill her master and mistress and Lay it upon those negroes. She has received severe correction. Since that we have remained as quiet as we could expect from the nature of things. We keep taking up, examining and scourging more or less every day; from whichever part of the County they come they all confess nearly the same thing, visit that they were one and all on the night of the 8th inst to fall on and destroy the family where they lived, then to proceed from House to House (Burning as they went) until they arrived in the Back Country where they were to be received with open arms by a number of Persons there appointed and armed by Government for their Protection, and as a further reward they were to be settled in a free government of their own.

Capt Johnson its said was heard to say that he’d return in the fall and take choice of the Plantations upon this River. But as it hath pleased God to discover the plot, It is of the Lord’s mercies that we are not consumed; Let us therefore Beseech Him to continue our very present help in every time of need. I promised myself the pleasure of seeing some of my friends in Newbern this week notwithstanding the Prorogation, but cannot get my family so composed as I could wish, to leave them. This week I expect will compleat our private musters for making choice of their Captains, &c. On Monday next our Committee meets to proceed on real Business. We must find out some plan to circumvent the operation of the aforementioned accursed plan or we shall become an easy prey. My compliments to Coll. Caswell and all enquiring friends. I am with great regard, Your Hum. Serv., John Simpson. P.S. In disarming the negroes we found considerable ammunition.

18 Apr 1799, Wm. Haddock, Sr., sold 200 acres for 10 pounds to John Haddock, Jr.; former owner William Taylor; wit: Charles Haddock, John Stokes.

Blount v. Haddock: Supreme Court Case Files, Number 1028. State of North Carolina, Newbern District, John G. Blount Adm. of Daniel Niale vs. William Haddock: Action of Detinue for a Negro man named George - Pleas, General Issue and Statue of Limitations - The Writ bears test the nineteenth day of September, one thousand, seven hundred and ninety five, is marked "issue" March [illegible] and was returned March Term one thousand seven hundred and ninety six, endorsed, "Executed March 6th by William Eastwood D. S." - The cause was tried at the term of March, one thousand eight hundred in the Superior Court of Law for the District of Newbern and the following special verdict found - viz That the Negro in question was the property of William Taylor who on the twenty seventh day of May, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, made a deed of Gift of the same to his daughter Sarah Taylor in the words following viz - "North Carolina, Pitt County, To all to who these presents shall come: Know ye, that I William Taylor of the County and Province aforesaid, for the love, good will and affection which I have and do bear towards my daughter Sarah Taylor, have given one Negro boy named George, which said Negro boy I do by these presents, fully freely and absolutely, give grant and bequeath unto my said daughter Sarah, to her heirs and assigns forever, reserving the use of said Negro to me my wife Dinah during our natural lives and after our decrease to be her own proper wright and property, which said Negro I promise myself, my executors to warrant and defend to her the said Sarah, against the [second page] the lawful wright, title or claim of any person whatsoever. In witness whereof I the said William Taylor have hereunto set my hand and seal this 27th day of May Anno Dom 1765 - Signed, sealed, and delivered in presence of Martin Nelson, Mary N, Mary Edwards. William Taylor [his T mark]

May Court 1765: Ordered to be registered - that Sarah the daughter afterwards intermarried with Daniel Neale the plaintiff's interstate, that the said Sarah died about the year one thousand, seven hundred and seventy five, and the said Daniel soon afterwards, that William Taylor the donor died in the year one thousand, seven hundred and ninety four, and Dinah the wife of the donor died in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety five, that the said William Taylor and Dinah his wife, continued in the possession of the said Negro until their deaths. - The Jury pray the advice of the Court, if the Plaintiff be intuited to recover, they find the Defendant does detain the Negro described in the Declaration of the value of one hundred and fifty pounds and that the Statute of Limitations does not bar, and assess the Plaintiff's damages to forty two pounds, fifteen Shillings and six pence Costs - But if the Court should be of opinion that the Plaintiff is not entailed to recover, then they find the defendant does not detain - I hereby certify that the foregoing state of the Case is truly extracted from the original papers in this office, & the above & foregoing special Verdict is true Copy from the Records of the Court - In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of the Court this thirteenth day of May in the XXIVth year of American Independence AD 1800 - L. W. Arnell CSCL Newbern District

John G. Blount, Adm'r of Daniel Neal, v William Haddock, Conf, 75 [In NC and until 1875 the high court was known as the Court of Conference.] Slaves to whom the wife has a right in remainder, do not vest in the husband, if he died during the coverture without having reduced them to possession. This was an action of detinet brought in New Bern Superior Court of Law for a Negro man named George. Pleas non det and stat. lim. The cause was tried as March Term 1800, and the following special verdict found: "That the Negro in question was the property of William Taylor, who on the 26th of May 1765, made a deed of gift of the same to his daughter, Sarah Taylor, in the words following, to wit: 'North Carolina, Pitt County: To all who these presents shall come: Know ye that I, William Taylor, of the county and province aforesaid, for the love, good will and affection which I have and do bear towards my daughter, Sarah Taylor, have given one Negro boy named George, which said Negro boy I do by these presents, fully, freely, and absolutely give, grant, and bequeath to my said daughter Sarah, to her, her heirs and assigns forever, reserving the use of said Negro to me, my wife, Dinah, during our natural lives, and after our decrease, to be her own right and property, which said Negro I promise myself, my executors, to warrant and defend to her, the said Sarah, against the lawful right, title, or claim of any person whatever. In witness whereof, I, the said William Taylor, have hereunto set my hand an seal, this 27th day of 1765. William [his x mark] Taylor. Signed, Sealed and delivered in the presence of Martin Nelson, Mary Nelson and Mary Edwards.

May Court, 1765, ordered to be registered

That Sarah, the daughter, afterwards intermarried with Daniel Neal, the plaintiff's interstate: that the said Sarah died about the year 1775, and the said Daniel soon afterwards; that William Taylor, the donor, died in the year 1794, and Dinah, the wife of the donor, died in the year 1795; that the said William Taylor and Dinah, his wife continued in the possession of the said Negro until their deaths. The jury pray the advice of the Court, if the plaintiff be entitled to recover. By the Court. As this property never vested in possession during the coverture of the plaintiff's interstate with his wife, Sarah, he could only have recovered in the event of his surviving the donor and his wife, by taking out administration upon his decreased wife's effects. And even then the property would have been assets in his hands to pay the debts of his wife, contracted while she was sole. Upon his death, his administrator can recover at law only such things whereof he might have acquired the possession in his own right, and not those which he was compellable to pursue in a representative character. The administrator of the wife, therefore, is the proper person to bring this action against the wife, and the residue belongs to the representatives of the husband as her next of kin.

18 Apr 1799, Wm. Haddock, Sr., sold 200 acres for 10 pounds to John Haddock, Jr.; former owner William Taylor; wit: Charles Haddock, John Stokes.


Dinah's father's will was proven in 1734 and she was still unmarried at that time because he referred to her as Dinah Deall.

Dinah Deall had a son John Deall to whom William Taylor made a deed of gift of land and cattle in September of 1751, stating: "for ¼ love & affection which I have & do bear to John Deall a bastard child of Dinah Deall my wife" Pitt County, NC.


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