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Easley Families

Written by Darla Marbut, published with her permission

 

Green Berry and Evaline (Johnson) Easley 

Green Berry (or Greenberry) Easley was born September 30, 1805 in KY the son of William and Sarah (Graham) Easley. William’s full name may have been William Franklin and he was born in South Carolina between 1770 and 1774. William Easley was listed in the 1800 census for Greenville District, SC.

Sarah Graham Easley’s family had come from North Carolina.

Green Berry Easley lived in South Carolina but by 1804 had moved to Warren Co, Kentucky. In 1815 Allen Co., KY was formed from parts of Warren and Barren Counties and in the 1820 census the family is in Allen Co., KY. In 1830 and 1840 the family is in the census of Boone Co., MO. William and Sarah Easley and their children were the first branch of the Easley family in American to pioneer in Missouri.

"The First 150 Years In Cassville, Missouri, by Senator Emory Melton" page 47: The earliest settlers in Barry County came either one of two routes to arrive here. Three principal roads served virtually all of the extreme southwest part of Missouri. The roads converged on what would shortly be the town of Springfield. They were the Sarcoxie road, which ran west to Sarcoxie; the Bull Creek road running south into Taney County; and the Ozark Trail, which ran from Springfield in a southwesterly direction through Cassville to Fort Smith, Arkansas. The first settlers here using the road characterized it as little more than an Indian trail. It remained so for a decade. One of the first duties of the newly form county in 1835 was to develop a transportation system. It is a safe assumption they either came by way of the Ozarks Trail (later to be known as the "wire road") or they came by way of the White River. Later arrivals seemed to prefer the "wire road", but a sizeable number of families came to the Mississippi River, boarded a boat down to where the Arkansas River empties into the Mississippi, up the Arkansas to White River and then up the White River to Barry County. "

Ref: Reprint of Goodspeed’s 1888 History of Barry Co., MO,  Navigable Streams, page 114. In 1851-1852 the county granted some money to be expended on improving the navigation of White River, James M. Mague being superintendent.

During the session of the Legislature in 1854-55 a bill was introduced by John Gullett, from this district, the title of which was "A Bill for the Improvement of the Navigation of White River," asking an appropriation of $10,000 out of the state treasury; passed the Senate and was rejected by the House. A motion to reconsider was carried, the bill called up a week or two after, and passed. The sum was expended on said river."

A Living History of the Ozarks, by Phyllis Rossiter, page 51, "Beginning in the mid-1800s, steamboats that drew only about a foot of water were built especially for the shallower Ozarks rivers. And because the river meandered in looping bends, the boats were also shorter than steamboats elsewhere." Phyllis Rossiter states further down the page that the White River was one of the rivers that was navigated by these steamboats.

This description of the country in the area where Green Berry Easley homesteaded came from James Tucker when interviewed in his later days. "When I came here it was a wild country, and very thinly settled. There were about ten houses on Roaring River and none on the side borders nearer than Butler Creek and Rock Creek and Washburn and Cassville, were our only trading points in the county. There was one weekly horse mail from Cassville to Carrollton, AR and no post office between Cassville and Berryville, AK at the time. There was one voting place on White River at what is known as the Green Easley place. We had a little Baptist Church here held under a shed. We had plenty of game of all kinds – bear, deer, turkey and all sorts of small game. There was one little pole school house in the township just high enough to walk in and not reach too high, and every man paid for all his own scholars as we had no school money and we did not have much school." (How conditions were in the spring of 1849.)

Green Berry Easley married Apr 23, 1837, Boone Co., MO, Evaline Johnson. Evaline was born Feb 15, 1818 in Tennessee and died January 31, 1864 in Barry Co., MO. They were married by Nelson A. Davis.

Green Berry and Evaline Easley became significant landowners in Barry Co near the White River. It is told that their home was near where Roaring River joined White River. Part of their land is now covered by the Table Rock Lake. Green Berry and Evaline were recorded in the 1840 census for Barry Co., MO. According to the probate of his estate when he died, Green Berry Easley, left 667 acres of real estate, almost $600 worth of person property and almost $1000 worth of notes due to him.

Green Berry Easley was a Union sympathizer during the Civil War. This is from an account found in the History of Barry Co., Mo published by the Goodspeed Publishing Co. of Chicago in 1888:

"On Oct 14, 1862, the Seventh Missouri Cavalry was at Cassville (Federal Troops) where several skirmishes took place. The operations about Cassville and Keetsville (Washburn) Nov 17 and 18, 1862, were reported Nov 20 to Lt. Col. C. W. March, A. A. G., Frontier Army. It appears that on the 17th a loyal woman advised him that a small Confederate force was encamped on Roaring River. Lt. Gibson and 10 men were sent out, going as far as Easley's Ford on White River. Lieut. Gibson and his men ran four men out of Easley’s house, killing one and capturing one, and at their camp close by, two tents, three saddles, three horses and two mules were captured. William McMurty, the captured man, belonged to Dixon’s Company of "Provos," whose business it was to confiscate the property of Union men. It appears they were there robbing Green Berry Easley when the Federal troops arrived."

During the summer of 1863, Green Berry Easley was visited by "bushwhackers". During the Civil War bushwhackers roamed the countryside robbing and killing. Most of the young men were at war and the bushwhackers found the old people, widows and children easy prey. Bushwhackers had heard rumors of Green Berry’s gold, so they rode up to his home one day to try to force the information of where the gold was hidden from him. There are several versions of this incident. In the newspaper, Eureka Springs, Times-Echo, appeared at the time of the death of Robert Easley, Green Berrys youngest son, an article in which the reporter told Robert’s version of this incident.

"When the Civil War broke out the family lived on a homestead near White River, which was a borderland between the North and the South. The country was infested with a band of terrorists called Bushwhackers who pillaged and confiscated for their own use, everything belonging to the settlers, which could be used. "Uncle Bob" was eight years old at this time. His father was robbed by the invaders and in trying to escape with his life his side was pierced by a rail, causing his death.

A Reprint of Goodspeed’s 1888 History of Barry County, page 115: In February 1860 a ferry license was granted Green B. Easley to operate a ferry on White River at the crossing of the Cassville and Carrolton roads."

Cassville Democrat – August 5, 1911 – Historical Boat: Ned (Edward Easley) (One of Green Berry Easley’s sons) of near Eagle Rock has portion of barge used during Civil War.

A portion of the old Ferry Boat used during the Civil War to carry Federal Soldiers across White River at Easley Ford and is now being used as a sidewalk in a barn lot in time of wet weather. This is what one will see on visiting the home of Edward Easley an old and respected citizen of near Eagle Rock on Roaring River, if a request is only made to do so.

The historical timbers were taken from White River by Mr. Easley two years ago after a few days of very high water, which brought the old timbers up from their resting place on the bottom of the river at the old historical ford. The boat is said to have been used by Federals in crossing the river during the time of General Sterling Price’s Raid.

The old story of the boat is that two or three boats were constructed for the soldiers to ferry the river. When an army had safely reached the other side, holes were bored in the bottom of the boats, which was weighted and sent to the bottom of the river as a final resting place until they might be brought up by high water or human hands. (End of article)

According to a story told by Edward Everett Easley, (Boone Co., Edward Easley, the name "Green Berry" came into the Easley family in the following manner. "Long ago in Kentucky a man named Greene or Green Berry went hunting with another man and they shot a bear. Thinking it dead, Mr. Green Berry went up to it and started to skin it. However, it was only wounded and mauled him severely, breaking his leg. He managed to crawl back to the camp and his partner fixed him up as well as he could. He then, thinking that Mr. Green Berry would die soon, left the camp and when he reached the settlement said that Mr. Green Berry had been killed by a bear."

"But Mr. Green Berry lived. It was winter, and the two men had hung a deer up on the edge of the camp to let the meat freeze. Mr. Green Berry lived through the winter on this. He once broke his jaw trying to chew the frozen meat. When spring came he was well enough to travel and went back to the settlement, where he was welcomed by all the relatives. It was then that he expressed a desire that the name be kept in the family in memory of his experience." (Story by Virginia Easley DeMarce)

Note from Virginia DeMarce: Attempts to verify this story by consulting old histories of Kentucky have not proved successful. A "Greenberry Manson Easley" has been located in Tennessee, and a "Greenberry Easley" in Texas by family genealogists. It is not known if or how they were related to this branch of Easley family. Other early Kentucky families also used "Greenbury or Granberry".

E. E. Easley also recalled that this Green Berry Easley who moved to Barry Co., MO., had been subject to epilepsy. His grandfather recalled that it came upon him as a point of light, which he perceived coming through the air directly at his forehead. If he was able to "duck" the point of light, he would escape having a seizure. If it hit him, however, a seizure would follow.

A copy of Green B. Easley’s signature (his own writing) is on page 78 of Virginia DeMarce’s book on the Easley family.

Evaline Johnson born February 15, 1818 in Tennessee and her parents were ______Johnson and Mary Johnson. After Mr. Johnson’s death about 1837, Mary Johnson married a Mahon or Mahan.

Green B. Easley and Evaline Johnson Easley are buried in the "Old Easley Cemetery". Addah Longley Matthews states in her book, History – Early Barry County, that the oldest cemetery of which any record is known is the Easley Cemetery that was established in 1852. Some say Green Berry established this cemetery. Others say it was called the Hickam Prairie Cemetery. Jacob Hickam married Green Berry’s sister Elizabeth Easley. According to the Barry Co., MO 1840 Census they were in Barry Co., MO. Jacob Hickam died in 1854 in Cole Co., MO. The Easley Cemetery is located on a hilltop overlooking the lake near Golden, Missouri. There were several graves outlined with rock but had no markers. In one place there were two graves with a small rock wall built completely around them. Others were covered with large slabs of stone. There were many that were marked with only a field stone to show where the graves were. There were many people buried here. One stone that could be easily read was for Green Berry and Evaline’s oldest son Christopher Columbus "Lum" Easley born Mar 18, 1838 died Feb 2, 1886. They say there was a blizzard the night Lum died. The snow was so deep they couldn’t get the wagon up the hill to the cemetery. The men had to carry the coffin for quite a distance. The estate papers indicated that it cost $9 for burial. So they must have still been using the cemetery in the late 1880’s. "Lum" would have been an ancestor of Virgie Easley who married Leonard Prier and Mary Easley who married Warner Prier and Sue Sparks, Coley Robb. Greenberry Easley child of Edward and Mary Easley born August 18, 1866 and died October 3, 1866 is buried in this cemetery. Descendant of Edward and Mary Easley – Darla Ball Marbut and many others. Another Green Berry Easley is buried there, a child of Green Berry and Evaline’s, born Sep 4, 1839 and died Sept 25, 1853. Also, Martin Vanburen Easley born Sep 19, 1942 and died January 30, 1864, child of Green Berry and Evaline Easley is probably buried there.

The location of this oldest Easley Cemetery is off Highway 86 take Highway J, Farm Road 2260 near Golden, MO. Probably the homestead property of Green Berry Easley is in this location of which was all in Township 21, Range 26, included: part of NE Section 10, 80 acres; part of SE Section 10, 40 acres; Part of SW Section 11, 39 75/100 acres; part of SE Section 11, 67 acres; part of NW Section 14, 36 90/100 acres; part of NE Section 14 and Lot Nr. 8 of NW Fractional Section 132, 59 10/00 acres, half of SW gr of Section 24, 80 acres; part of NW Section 14, 42 acres; NBW gr of NE section 14, 37 10/100 acres; SE fractional Section 26, 25 45/100 acres; SE gr of Section 23, 40 acres; Land Warrant No. 92204, 120 acres. Some of this may be under Table Rock Lake.

As can be seen by the death dates of both Green Barry Easley and Evaline Johnson Easley, that they both died before the Civil War was over. They left Hulda who was 12 and two small children, Robert and Mary who were still at home. They were cared for by a Mammy who was stolen by bushwhackers and left to care for themselves. The family story is told that they nearly starved to death before their brothers returned from the war and took care of them. Their oldest brother Christopher Easley was guardian of Mary and Robert.

 

Green Berry and Evaline Johnson Easley’s children:

Christopher Columubs "Lum" Easley was born March 5, 1838, died Feb 2, 1886, burial in Old Easley Cemetery.

William Easley was born Sep 4,1839, died Sept 25, 1853, burial in Old Easley Cemetery

Edward "Ned" Easley was born Dec 28, 1840, died Dec 20, 1932, burial in Newer Easley Cemetery

Martin Van Buren Easley was born Sep 19, 1842, and died Jan 30, 1864, burial probably in the Old Easley Cemetery

Sarah Jane Easley was born Feb 5, 1844, and Died Feb 25, 1864, burial probably in the Old Easley Cemetery

John Easley was born Feb 6, 1846, died May 10, 1922, burial in Newer Easley Cemetery.

Green Berry "Tip" Easley was born Nov 24, 1849, died Jul 29, 1932, burial in Roach Cemetery

Hulda Jane Easley was born May 3, 1851, died Dec 18, 1926, burial in the country near Fulbright, Texas

Mary Elizabeth Easley was born Dec 13, 1853, died Mar 1929, burial in the newer Easley Cemetery

Robert Easley was born Feb 6, 1855, died Aug 10, 1948, burial in the Roach Cemetery

 

References:

 

A Living History of the Ozarks, by Phyllis Rossiter, page 51

 

Our Easleys, by Faye Maloney Ball and Darla Ball Marbut, 1972 by Litho Printers, 904 West Street, Cassville, MO 65625

 

Volume 1. The Family and Connections of Edward Everett Easley, page 79, by Virginia Easley DeMarce, 5635 North 25th Road, Arlington, VA 22207, 1990, published by The Anundsen Publishing Co., 108 Washington Street Box 230, Decorah, Iowa 52101

 

A Reprint of Goodspeed’s 1888 History of Barry County, printed by Litho Printers, 904 West, Cassville, MO 65625, Fax (417) 847-4523, Phone: 847-3155, soft cover, 195 pages, a few pictures. $6.95, Reprint published in 1995.

 

The First 150 Years In Cassville, Missouri - 1885-1995, by Senator Emory Melton, $17.95, 265 pages with pictures. Can be ordered from the Litho address, published in 1995. 


Descendants of Edward Easley -  by Darla Marbut

Edward Easley by the old car, Barry Co., MO, from the photo files of Darla Marbut

1 Edward Easley 1840 - 1932 b: December 25, 1840 in Boone Co., Missouri d: December 20, 1932 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Easley Cemetery, Barry Co., MO +Mary Elizabeth Russell 1845 - 1923 b: December 28, 1845 in Barry Co., Missouri d: February 20, 1923 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Easley Cemetery, Barry Co., MO m: October 18, 1865 in Barry Co., Missouri

2 Greenberry Easley 1866 - 1866 b: August 18, 1866 in Barry Co., Missouri d: October 03, 1866 in Barry Co., Missouri

2 Julia Easley 1867 - 1907 b: September 24, 1867 in Barry Co., Missouri d: May 06, 1907 in Mountain View, Kiawa Co., OK Burial: Easley Cemetery, near Eagle Rock, Barry County, MO + William Williams 1867 - b: Abt. 1867 m: February 21, 1886 in Barry County, MO

2 Marvelena Easley 1869 - 1954 b: October 28, 1869 in Barry Co., Missouri d: February 24, 1954 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Munsey Cemetery, below Roaring River State Park, Barry County, MO +Samuel Skelton 1858 - 1936 b: October 25, 1858 in Barry Co., Missouri d: November 30, 1936 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Munsey Cemetery, below Roaring River State Park, Barry County, MO m: January 20, 1889 in Barry County, Missouri

2 Joseph Easley 1871 - 1873 b: December 25, 1871 in Barry Co., Missouri d: May 03, 1873 in Eagle Rock, Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Eagle Rock Cemetery, Eagle Rock, Barry Co., Missouri 

2 Arizona Easley 1874 - 1960 b: February 07, 1874 in Barry Co., Missouri d: August 21, 1960 in Golden, Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Viney Cemetery, Golden, Barry Co., MO +William C. Tucker 1871 - 1952 b: September 21, 1871 in Barry Co., MO d: March 14, 1952 in Golden, Barry Co., MO Burial: March 1952 Viney Cemetery, Golden, Barry Co., MO m: September 11, 1898 in Barry County, MO

2 Charles Easley 1877 - 1964 b: March 08, 1877 in Barry Co., Missouri d: June 16, 1964 in Eagle Rock, Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Easley Cemetery, near Eagle Rock, Barry County, MO +Mary E. Lewis 1877 - 1900 b: Abt. 1877 in Barry County, MO d: Abt. 1900 in Eagle Rock, Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Easley Cemetery, near Eagle Rock, Barry County, MO m: October 29, 1898 in Barry County, MO *2nd Wife of Charles Easley: +Lillie Mae Farwell 1881 - 1920 b: October 29, 1881 in Barry County, MO d: March 26, 1920 in Eagle Rock, Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Easley Cemetery, near Eagle Rock, Barry County, MO m: January 06, 1901 in Barry County, MO

2 Finis Walter Easley 1879 - 1971 b: October 13, 1879 in Barry Co., Missouri d: May 23, 1971 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Easley Cemetery, near Eagle Rock, Barry County, MO +Edna Josie Curry 1885 - 1964 b: February 07, 1885 in Barry County, Missouri d: May 16, 1964 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Easley Cemetery, near Eagle Rock, Barry County, MO m: January 26, 1902 in Barry County, MO

2 Mary Elizabeth Easley 1883 - 1935 b: October 13, 1883 in Barry Co., Missouri d: September 22, 1935 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Easley Cemetery, near Eagle Rock, Barry County, MO  +Henry Edward Maloney 1892 - 1965 b: August 21, 1892 in Barry Co., Missouri d: April 09, 1965 in Cassville, Barry County, MO Burial: Munsey Cemetery, below Roaring River State Park, Barry County, MO m: July 03, 1916 in Barry County, MO

2 Edward A. Easley 1885 - 1903 b: May 30, 1885 in Barry Co., Missouri d: December 20, 1903 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Easley Cemetery, near Eagle Rock, Barry County, MO

2 Floid E. Easley 1890 - 1965 b: December 29, 1890 in Barry Co., Missouri d: December 24, 1965 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Mano Cemetery, Barry County, MO +Vineta May Holman 1894 - 1936 b: August 16, 1894 in Barry Co., Missouri d: November 18, 1936 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Mano Cemetery, Barry County, MO m: August 14, 1912 in Barry County, MO *2nd Wife of Floid E. Easley:  +Mable C. Utter 1903 - 1982 b: August 29, 1903 d: July 14, 1982 in Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Clio Cemetery, Barry Co., MO m: Aft. 1933 in Barry County, MO


Descendants of William C. Tucker

1 William C. Tucker b: September 21, 1871 in Barry Co., MO d: March 14, 1952 in Golden, Barry Co., MO Burial: March 1952 Viney Cemetery, Golden, Barry Co., MO +Arizona Easley b: February 07, 1874 in Barry Co., Missouri m: September 11, 1898 in Barry County, MO d: August 21, 1960 in Golden, Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Viney Cemetery, Golden, Barry Co., MO

2 Joseph Dinnen Tucker b: December 07, 1898 in Barry Co., Missouri d: March 04, 1979 in Golden, Barry Co., Missouri Burial: Viney Cemetery, Barry Co., Missouri +Rosie May Allen b: Abt. 1898 m: Abt. 1918 in Barry County, MO

 

 

Arizona is buried at Viney Cemetery, Barry Co., MO, Golden, MO. Also buried there at Viney, besides Wm. C. and Arizona Tucker were Joe D. Tucker, Garland G. Tucker, Richard Tucker, Martha P. Tucker, James Tucker, Emma S. Tucker and an infant who died in 1901 and who was the child of J. C. and E. S. Tucker.

Bill and Arizona Easley Tucker lived in the Golden Community of Barry Co., Missouri on what is now Highway J. Arizona was very skilled at raising cattle. She didn't believe in banks and keep her money hidden in the house. When she got mad at Bill she'd throw dishes at him. They said there was quite a pile of broken dishes back of the house. They were considered well off for the times they lived in. They are buried in the Viney Creek Cemetery near where they lived all their lives. Bill Tucker was the son of Richard and Martha Lewis Tucker. Richard was the son of James and Catharine Bradley Tucker, early Barry Co., Missouri settlers. [Ref: From the family research files of Darla Marbut] 


 

Descendants of John Harmon Easley

1 John Harmon Easley b: August 26, 1886 in Barry County, Missouri d: June 01, 1970 in Eagle Rock, Barry Co., Missouri  +Rebecca Tucker b: December 1887 in Barry County, Missouri m: November 20, 1905 in Barry County, Missouri d: 1967 in Eagle Rock, Barry Co., Missouri

Their children were Bertie, Juanita, Christopher Columbus, Violet, and Roman. Darla thinks that they were all born sometime between 1909-1915.

 

 

Pictured is John Easley and his wife Rebecca Tucker, from the photo files of Darla Marbut

 

 

 

 


 

PHOTOS

 

 

 

Easley Cemetery

 

Photo is from the photo files of Darla Marbut. She stated that from left to right starting with the little boy who is probably Floid Easley (Ed and Mary's youngest son), Young lady - Mary Magaline Williams, daughter of William and Julia Easley Williams. Julia was Ed and Mary's daughter who died young. Ed and Mary raised several of her children. The one turned side ways is Mollie and her name was Mary Elizabeth Easley Maloney, Then Nora Arizona Williams, sister to Mary Magaline Williams (another of Julia's daughters). Nora got her middle name from her Aunt Arizona Easley Tucker. I'm not sure who the little boy is who is next, except he is probably Julia's little son who Ed and Mary also raised - Hiram Edward Williams. Then there is Mary Elizabeth Russell Easley.

The two little boys were never positively identified. There were 3 possibilities and that would be Floid (I'm almost certain it is him as I've seen other young pictures of him.) But the other little boy could have been either of Julia's two young boys Hiram or Perry. As he is smaller than Floid. I sort of think it would be Hiram as he was the youngest one. Perry was two years older.  Hiram Williams could have a ? by his name. If Floid was age 10 years old in the photo then Hiram would have been age 5. Floid was a small man as many of the Easleys were.  

 

Below is Edward and Mary (Russell) Easley, from the photo files of Darla Marbut

 

 

There are two Easley Cemeteries, one near Eagle Rock and one nearer to Golden, MO. The reason for this is explained here to follow: Edward, Mary and several of their children are buried in the Easley Cemetery near Eagle Rock, MO. The cemetery had been started when some Civil War soldiers were buried there. Edward said White River was so hard to cross to get to the older Easley Cemetery (Green Berry's) that he would bury his family with the soldiers. Another reason why Edward decided that he and his family would be buried with the soldiers was when Edward's brother, Christopher Columbua "Lum" Easley died January 2, 1886 the ground was covered with ice. The ice caused the funeral party to have a very difficult time getting Lum's coffin up the hill to bury him in the Older Easley Cemetery. From the photo and research files of Darla Marbut


 

    


 

 

                

 

   

 

 


For more reading go to:

Barry County Stories - Page One  - by Darla Marbut

The Tucker Family -  by Darla Marbut - Barry Co., MO

The Tucker Family of AR and MO - by Darla Marbut - Barry Co., MO

Ball Family -   by Darla Marbut - Barry Co., MO

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