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WW1 SIGNAL CORPS PICTURES OF THE VETERINARY CORPS AND REMOUNT SERVICE


This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


VIDEO AND AUDIO: REMOUNT AND VETERINARY ACTIVITIES IN THE AEF

Jim Davis has posted on You Tube Motion Picture footage of the Remount and the Veterinary Corps. This is a must to view! I have been searching so long for information and pictures of the Veterinary Corps and Remount Service and to be able to see footage was beyond believe for me. Jim has posted many other films from the Archives on his You Tube Webpage that is worth checking out. I would like to thank Jim for his help and kindness and along with a few of his friends that he works with. Jim has posted REELS NO 1,2 and 3 on You Tube

Click on the below links:

NOTE: JIM HAS ADDED MUSIC TO THE ORIGINAL SILENT FILM; YOU MAY WANT TO TURN YOUR VOLUME DOWN OR OFF

REEL 1 REMOUNT AND VETERINARY ACTIVITIES IN THE AEF 1918-1919

REEL 2 REMOUNT AND VETERINARY ACTIVITIES IN THE AEF 1918-1919

REEL 3 REMOUNT AND VETERINARY ACTIVITIES IN THE AEF 1918-1919


BRITISH ARMY VETERINARY CORPS (AVC) VIDEO NEWSREEL WW1
Welcome to “British Pathé” Website The world's finest news and entertainment video film archive

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British Pathé


VIDEO AND AUDIO: OTHER POINTS OF INTEREST

HORSE ARTILLERY TRAINING AND ORGANIZATION AT FORT BLISS, TX 1936-1942 PART 1. Jerry Eades oral account of horse artillery organization and training at Ft. Bliss, TX in preparation for WW II. Slide show of photos taken of 82nd Field Artillery Regiment, 61st Field Artillery Battalion and 62nd Field Artillery Battalion Note: This is a wonderful narration of the description of the life in the Field Artillery and Cavalry in the late 1930’s and early 1940. DO NOT MISS THIS ONE!
Jerry W. Eades U.S. Army Horse Artillery Training and Organization at Ft. Bliss, TX 1936-1942

JERRY W. EADES HORSE ARTILLERY AND ADDRESS TO THE 62nd AFA REUNION PART 2 Operations and Training of the Horse Artillery (Part 2) of the 82nd Artillery Regiment, 61st Artillery Battalion, 62nd Artillery Battalion ay Ft. Bliss, TX, 1936 - 1942. Audio recollection of an address to the 62nd Armored Field Artillery Battalion Association Reunion in 1980's. Slides of the WW II soldiers from these units Note: This is a wonderful narration of the description of the life in the Field Artillery and Cavalry in the late 1930’s and early 1940. DO NOT MISS THIS ONE!
Jerry W. Eades Horse Artillery and Address to 62nd AFA Bn Reunion PART 2

BUGLE CALLS AND MILLITARY MUSIC BY JERRY W. EADES Demonstration of Cavalry and Artillery bugle calls by Jerry W. Eades, bugler for the 62nd Field Artillery Battalion from 1936 – 1942
BUGLE CALLS AND MILLITARY MUSIC BY JERRY W. EADES

D DAY LANDING ON OMAHA BEACH ORAL ACCOUNT BY JERRY W. EADES Oral account by Jerry W. Eades of his experiences and memories of landing on Omaha Beach on D Day, June, 6, 1944. Sgt. Eades of the 62nd AFA Bn, landed from an LCT with an M7 Preist self propelled artillery. The accompanying slide show is from photos taken by the 62nd soldiers. From horse artillery training at Ft. Bliss, to the Louisiana Manuvers, North Africa, Sicily, England, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany and Czechoslavakia, the 62nd soldiers endured 424 days of combat. DO NOT MISS THIS ONE!
D DAY LANDING ON OMAHA BEACH ORAL ACCOUNT BY JERRY W. EADES


VIDEO/AUDIO TAPE: LISTEN TO LEONARD SEBASTIAN TALK ABOUT BEING STATIONED AT U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 8, CLAYE SOUILLY, FRANCE, DURING WW1

LEONARD SEBASTIAN, U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 8, FRANCE, A.E.F., WW1
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Leonard Sebastian, U.S. Veterinary Hospital No. 8, France, A.E.F., WW1


WW1 SIGNAL CORPS PICTURES OF THE VETERINARY CORPS AND REMOUNT SERVICE
Images courtesy of the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C

For a long time I have been searching for the Official Signal Corps Pictures of the Veterinary Corps during WW1. I am finally beginning to locate these pictures and I will be sharing them with you in the future.

I have been working with the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, in Washington, D.C for a long time and a lot of information on this website has come from there. I would first like to thank Michael Rhode for all his assistance in making this all possible and then to his assistants Cathy F. Sorge who was the first to assist me in my research and recently Kathleen Stocker. Both Cathy and Kathleen have spent hours going through their archives searching for information for me. And a huge “Thank you “ to Kathleen who is bringing to the light the pictures of the Veterinary Corps and Remount Service from their collection. Kathleen has been kind and gracious in getting these pictures to me and with out their help these pictures would not be coming to us. With these pictures we can get a glimpse of who and what the Veterinary Corps and Remount Service was during the Great World War. I have been very excited in seeing these pictures that have helped me to understand my grandfather Leonard Murphy’s walk in the Veterinary Corps and being in France during the War. I would once again like to thank Michael, Cathy and Kathleen for all they have done to make this possible.

Most Sincerely

Greg Krenzelok – Veterinary Corps Website

I would like to Credit:

Michael Rhode, Archivist
Otis Historical Archives
National Museum of Health and Medicine
Armed Forces Institute of Pathology
Washington, DC

Catherine F. Sorge, Assistant Archivist
Otis Historical Archives
National Museum of Health and Medicine
Armed Forces Institute of Pathology
Washington, DC

Kathleen Stocker, MLS
Assistant Archivist
Otis Historical Archives
National Museum of Health and Medicine
Armed Forces Institute of Pathology
Washington, DC

“Unofficial blog for the National Museum of Health and Medicine”
Click on the below link:
Unofficial blog for the National Museum of Health and Medicine



reeve10802- Sick horses taken to rear for treatment horse are tied in a pickett line. Near Rearcourt, France. 09/26/1918



reeve12448 - Veterinary Hospital No 1 Neufchateau, France. The first of the treatment in treating mange is clipping the animals



reeve14727 - U.S. Army Veterinary Hospital No. 3, La Valdahon, France. Horse is strapped and being lowered in position to be operated upon for gunshot wound.



reeve14734 - Veterinary. Horse. 1st Lt. Lieutenant R.F. Okershauser making a Mallein test for glanders. All animals receive this treatment every 20 days for glanders. La Valdahon, Doubs, France. 01/28/1919



reeve14379 - Veterinary corps. 01/22/1919. Montabaur, Germany. Scraping. General view of artillery horses after a bath composed of sulphur, lime, carbolic acid and creosote. 1st Division.



reeve14378 - Veterinary corps. 01/22/1919. Montabaur, Germany. 1st Division. General view of artillery horses being led to the dipping vat, constructed by the 1st Engineers, for the Veterinary Department. The animals take a plunge in the bath composed of sulphur, lime, carbolic acid and creosote. The bath is kept at a temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit. After the plunge the animals are scraped. This is the method of treating these animals for the mange and cooties. Horses are bathed at the rate of one a minute.



reeve014380 - Veterinary corps. 01/22/1919. Montabaur, Germany. “Ready to plunge.” Artillery horses about to take bath. Dipping vat.



reeve014382 - Veterinary corps. 01/22/1919. Montabaur, Germany. Pulling the horse into the dipping vat using ropes.



reeve014381 - Veterinary corps. 01/22/1919. Montabaur, Germany. “The Plunge.Artillery horse taking bath composed of sulphur, lime, carbolic acid, and creosote. Dipping vat.

VIDEO: MONTABAUR GERMANY "READY TO TAKE THE PLUNGE" A.E.F, 1919

U.S. Army of Occupation, Montabaur, Germany, 1st Division. General view of artillery horses being led into the dipping vat, constructed by the 1st Engineers, for the Veterinary Department. The animals take a plunge in the bath composed of sulphur, lime, carbolic acid and creosote. The bath is kept at a temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit. After the plunge the animals are scraped. This is the method of treating these animals for the mange and cooties. Horses are bathed at the rate of one a minute.

Brought to you by the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group - Greg Krenzelok

Film source: National Archives



reeve015315 - Mallein Test, a process for testing Glanders. Weis, Germany. 63rd Brigade Headquarters, Veterinary Officer



reeve015317 - 32nd Division Veterinary Camp. 02/05/1919. Dierdorf, Rhenish Prussia, Germany. Preparing solution of lime and sulphur for use in dipping vat for horses affected with mange. Every third day 400 gallons of fresh solution are thrown into the vat and every tenth day the vat is entirely emptied and thoroughly cleaned. Note – An elaborate treatment has been inaugurated in the 32nd Division for the treatment of horses suffering from mange. One thousand horses can be accommodated in one vat, each day; and soon two vats will be in operation. Water in vat is kept at 110 degrees Fahrenheit and 11 feet deep at one end, completely submerging animal and tapers to shallow water at the further end. All is enclosed and the horses emerge in a room where they are thoroughly rubbed, thence taken to heated rooms for drying. Blankets are also disinfected in gas chamber. This treatment has been very successful and a statement has been made that the 32nd Division is the first to put this system in use.



reeve015339 - Remount Depot number 31. 02/26/1919. Lux, near Is sur Tille, Cote d’Or, France. Veterinary Corps building at Q.M.A.S. This view is taken from the top of the water tank, which furnishes the water supply for the entire camp



reeve015340 - Remount Depot number 31. 02/26/1919. Lux, near Is sur Tille, Cote d’Or, France. Horses being brought into remount depot at Lux. These horses are brought from Is sur Tille, where they have been used in the A. S. Supply Depot, Quartermaster Corps and are now being treated for mange and different ailments. There are 180 animals in this string.



reeve015346 - Veterinary Hospital at Quartermaster Remount Depot number 7. 12/10/1918. Merignac, Gironde, France. View of the horse and mule operating table in use at the veterinary hospital there. “The Simplicity Equine Operating Table, No. 3 Model, Veterinary Specialty Company, Holland, MICH. USA”



reeve016025 - Remount Depot number 4. 12/07/1918. La Rochelle, France. Horses that have been gassed in the Sulphuration Chamber and just brought from hospital



reeve17407 - Remount Depot number 31. Lux, France. Operating room the veterinarian is operating on horse.



reeve17575 - Above picture description: Taking horses through Liney for veterinary treatment. Lieut. John R. Morse in charge. Mobile Veterinary Section, 7th. Div. Limey, Meurthe et Moselle, France, Nov. 17, 1918

Previous to this time Captain William C. VanAllstyne, assistant division veterinarian, had converted a motor truck into an animal ambulance. The ambulance held five animals placed crosswise and separated by partition boards dropped in grooves. By means of a runway which let down behind it could be fully loaded in ten minutes. This truck ambulance did most excellent work transporting gassed, wounded and debilitated animals to the veterinary hospitals many kilometers to the rear.



reeve17408 - Gas masks. For man and horse


Hayes Otoupalik was co-author of the "World War One Collectors Handbook" which is a classic. Most of the material from the handbook came from Hayes extensive collection. Note the horse bag type gas mask on right image.

U.S. ARMY HORSE GAS MASK BAG TYPE WW1

Note: For some time I have been looking for a bag type gas mask as used by the U.S. Army horses and mules during WW1 and the early part of WW2. As featured in the below accompanying Facebook post. The U.S. Army horse units still used this gas mask in the early 1940's. I have only seen these gas masks in pictures. I believe the Cavalry Museum at Fort Riley, Quartermaster Museum at Fort Lee, and the Chemical Museum at Fort Leonard Wood, may have one on display.

I recently contacted a friend of mine, Hayes Otoupalik, a serious military collector and seller of military collectables. Hayes was co-author of the "World War One Collectors Handbook" which is a classic. Most of the material from the handbook came from Hayes extensive collection. Hayes also has a very nice online store: http://www.hayesotoupalik.com/

Here what I learned:
The horse gas mask of World War I consisted of a large bag that fit over the horse’s nose and mouth. The horse bit into a canvas mouthpiece and the mask was held to the horse’s face by an elastic band. A canvas frame attached to the mouthpiece held the mask away from the nose so the horse couldn’t suck the mask into its nose. The carrier, a waterproof case, was strapped to the bridle or halter.

The United States issued two horse gas masks during World War I. One was a British mask (and the American copy) and the other was the American horse gas mask. The principle difference between the two was the material used for the filter. The British mask, noted for its high breathing resistance, was made of two layers of flannelette impregnated with komplexene. The breathing resistance limited its use in horses used to move supplies and equipment around the battlefield. The carrier was a 5- by 14-inch canvas duck bag. The American horse gas mask was made of multi-layered cheesecloth impregnated with komplexene (six layers of cheesecloth) and simplexene (eight layers of cheesecloth) and had low breathing resistance. Because the horses disliked the flavor of this mixture, oilcloth was inserted between the mouthpiece and the cheesecloth. The American carrier was a 10- by 14-inch burlap bag. The American Expeditionary Forces used the British horse gas mask until enough American masks were supplied. The British mask was standard throughout the war.

During the war, the Fifth Avenue Uniform Company of New York City manufactured 377,881 horse gas masks of all types. Of this total, 351,270 were shipped overseas before Armistice Day.

Source: Military Masks Animals in Chemical Warfare by Major Robert D. Walk.

Major Robert D. Walk produced an excellent webpage on the subject: http://www.gasmasklexikon.com/page/USA-Mil-Animals.htm

These were Hayes's comments:

Greg,
I have only seen two of these in Government Museums (Camp Meade Maryland and US Cavalry Museum Fort Riley, Ks). Also outside the US I have seen these in British, French and Belgium government museums abroad. They are very very rare!

It took me over 30 years and thousands of want ads to find mine which came out of the hands of the estate of a chemical Engineer at MIT. I traded a WW1 Pilot's uniform to get it and the canvas carrying bag that strapped on the front of the horse was given to me by a friend when he ask me what this odd bag was for and I told him he would have me over the barrel when I told him. I told him and he said take it along, who else would have known what it was or would had the nose bag that went into it. They are a rare bird.

I put pictured want ads out and or made referrals to the picture I had in our WW1 Collectors Handbooks that I had taken out of Benedict Crowells book. I offered insane prices of as much as $5000. (Yes, $5 thousand dollars) trying to get one without ever getting one single call or lead. I had absolutely everything of a WW1 Cavalryman by the mid-1970s, but no horse gas Mask. I was obsessed with the acquisition of this piece to complete my Cavalryman outfit.

It is an amazing story of how I eventually got the lead on the mask.....but it was thanks to the picture I put in the handbook.

A fellow that collected WW1 Camo helmets heard of antique dealer that had some painted helmets in Maine, he called the fellow and spoke with him and he happen to ask the fellow if he had a WW1 horse Gas mask as he said he had bought a pile of old chemical WW1 stuff from an estate in Mass. He said he did. The fellow in Rhode Island owed me $85.00 for a item I had sent him on the cuff for a Christmas present for his son and he had yet to pay me... He told me he thought he had located a horse gas mask (99 percent of the time people have M4/M5 WW2 horse gas mask stuff as you know and think it is WW1) and told me if I was able to get it would I cancel the debt of $85.00 as a finder's fee. I agreed. I called the fellow and yes, he said he had a WW1 gas mask and I ask him why he knew this and he said he had a WW1 Collectors Handbook that showed a picture of it, and he got it out the estate of a long deceased MIT Chemical Engineer.

The fellow then asked me my name again, and he then realized I was the author of the book and he then figured he really had something and it was valuable if the author of the book wanted. He told me the only thing he would trade for was a WW1 pilots grouping. (Frankly this was an easy deal as there are lots of WW1 pilot's uniforms around as people have collected and saved air service stuff since even during WW). However, I told him I would have to see what I could do..... I got a uniform with the wings and insignia, boxed it up and shipped it off and back came the WW1 horse Gas Mask! I eventually bought a lot of other chemical stuff from WW1 from this fellow. I still am so happy with this deal....

There has never been a WW1 Horse Gas Mask that I have ever heard of for sale.

Cordially, Your friend, Hayes

Hayes Otoupalik is a serious collector, collecting big items like artillery and that kind of stuff.

- Greg Krenzelok – U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group



reeve33952 - Shell wounds of a horse undergoing treatment at the Veterinary Hospital at St. Omer A.E.F.



reeve017125 - 79th Division. 04/07/1919. Rimacourt, France. Company A. B. & C. clipping horses.



reeve13537 - 101st Field Artillery. Bras, Meuse, France. Horses being watered in a stream near a mill after it had been tested for poison. 10/18/1918; World War I.



reeve17415 - Remount Depot number 7. Bordeaux, France. Spraying stalls and feeding area



reeve33959 - Horse wounded by shrapnel, a scene at a German Veterinary Hospital in the field trying to bring the horse down to the ground so they can operate.



reeve33960 - A Horse undergoing treatment at the dipping vat at Veterinary Hospital St. Omer, A.E.F.



Veterinary Hospital No 11 Headquarters at Gièvres France during WW1



The First Veterinary Hospital was established in Neufchateau France using the few Veterinary Corps Officers available and soldiers from the 3rd Cavalry. The hospital with no equipment or water immediately began receiving patients and had to scrounge for supplies. Soon they had established a hospital with a capacity of 1000 horses staffed with borrowed manpower and ultimately handled 23,000 disabled horses from various evacuation lines.



Aux Remount Station No 319, Camp Zachary Taylor, the above picture is from the archives of the General contractor that built the camp. It was taken right after the camp was completed looking west. The men in the foreground are civilian workers on the last days of construction. The railroad track on the right side is also visible on the map, at the north end of the remount area. The RR runs east to west. Posted by "Camp Zachary Taylor Historical Society, Ken Maguire.



Aux Remount Station No 319, Camp Zachary Taylor is from the Contractors archives. It is a view down the chute to the dipping tank in the remount area. Posted by "Camp Zachary Taylor Historical Society, Ken Maguire. Note: This is a wonderful picture showing the construction of a dipping vat – Greg

Click on the below link to go to the Camp Zachary Taylor Historical Website
Camp Zachary Taylor



Return to the Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1 homepage:

THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
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The Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1



LINKS TO OUR OTHER AREAS OF RESEARCH:

SERGEANT LEONARD MURPHY VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18, A.E.F., WW1
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Sergeant Leonard Murphy Veterinary Hospital No. 18, A.E.F., WW1


POLK COUNTY WISCONSIN THOSE THAT SERVED IN WW1
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Polk County Wisconsin in WW1


FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
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Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2


11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
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11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
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76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion



U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group