Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1


This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1

A archive of the Army's Veterinary Corps Service and related animal units during WW1.

“More horses and mules in the U.S. Army in 1918 did not mean more transportation in France for the Army but it meant more waste of animals, time of men and money. The needs of the army could never be met unless animals were returned to service by good medical care and recovery. We could not continue to have such a great loss and waste of animals due lack of care and poor management and keep the Army going”.

Veterinary Military History of the United States by Merillat, Louis A. & Delwin M. Campbell, Volume II, page 751.


BELOW IS A TRIBUTE TO "CORPORAL FRANK W. BUCKLES" LAST U.S. SURVIVING VETERAN OF WORLD WAR I
Click on the below link:
Tribute to "Corporal Frank W. Buckles" Last U.S. Army Surviving Veteran of World War I


Contact me at:

This website is dedicated to my grandfather Sergeant Leonard Patrick Murphy who was in the US Army Veterinary Corps in WW 1, Leonard was with the 18th Veterinary Hospital stationed at Sougy, France. It is also dedicated to all those that served in the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and the Cavalry and to their relatives that wish to keep their memories alive during WW1. And to all of the horses and mules who served and gave up their lives too.

NOTE: PLEASE LOOK FOR THE LINKS TO OTHER WEBSITES AND PAGES ON THIS WEBSITE. THERE ARE MANY LINKS KIND OF HIDDEN IN THE WEBSITE. THIS IS BECOMING A VERY LARGE WEBSITE SO WATCH IT, IT IS GETTING EASY TO GET LOST.

WORD FROM THE EDITOR: Also, please note that there was no one source of information to create this website, that would have been too easy. For years I have been gathering reports, visiting archives, digging up bits and pieces from so many sources it would be impossible to list, literally stitching this website together to get a complete picture of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service, Cavalry, Horse-drawn Field Artillery and every other organizations that had horses, mules and even pigeons in their command during WW1. And those of you who have contacted me with your family’s treasures of unique pictures and information of loved one’s who served in these units, you have made this website special. So, please be understanding when you find information that may not be totally correct. In most cases you will find the information accurate and interesting, I strive for this. I will continue to gather new information and work on correcting and updating this website, making it the best possible source of information. - Greg Krenzelok


The above picture is of my grandfather Sergeant Leonard Murphy who was assigned to Veterinary Hospital No 18 during WW1. This is one of the long lost pictures that has been found recently. This picture is of Leonard on his horse taken at Veterinary Hospital No 18 at Sougy France or in the area. In the pictures that we now have Leonard is anyways riding this horse.

This webpage is a work in progress and I hope to share with you things that I have been collecting on the Veterinary Corps during WW1 in memory of my Grandfather. If you would like to share anything please e-mail me by click my name in the upper left hand corner. In my research of the Veterinary Corps during WW1 it has been very hard finding any information and pictures are very rare. Because of this it is my desire to keep the memory of the Veterinary Corps during WW1 alive. Please feel free to use anything that I have put up on my Webpages for personal use. Please e-mail me for any use other than personal use and I will be glad to approve if reasonable. I only ask that I be given credit for the years of hard work that it has been to find information. Thank you,yours sincerely Greg Krenzelok. I could not have done this without the help of Leonard's daughter and my mother Geraldine Murphy Krenzelok


Base Veterinary Hospital No. 2 Headquarters Office in France during WW1


THOSE THAT SERVED IN THE US ARMY VETERINARY CORPS IN WW1

I would also like to dedicate this website to all that served in the Veterinary Corps. If you would like to add your relative to this website that was in the Veterinary Corps, Quartermaster Corps or Remount Depots and Squadrons during WW1 and would like to share any pictures and information please contact me. The more information that is collected helps each of us to better understand the role our relatives played in the Veterinary Corps. You can post just a name or as much as you would like. Please get involved, I am getting e-mails from people looking for information and maybe the information that you post will help someone else out in their research. You will always be able to add or remove any information that you post. The information that you post may help someone else who is searching for information on their relative or help us all learn more


VIDEO/AUDIO TAPE: LISTEN TO LEONARD SEBASTIAN TALK ABOUT BEING STATIONED AT U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 8, CLAYE SOUILLY, FRANCE, DURING WW1

Video: Interview with Leonard Sebastian U.S. Veterinary Hospital No. 8, A.E.F., WW1

LEONARD SEBASTIAN, U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 8, FRANCE, A.E.F., WW1
Click on the below link:
Leonard Sebastian, U.S. Veterinary Hospital No. 8, France, A.E.F., WW1


Click on the below link to go to the WW1 US Army Veterinary Corps Post
The US Army WW1 Veterinary Corps Post page


THOSE THAT SERVED IN VETERINARY CORPS OF THE OTHER NATIONS

Note: I will not be able to go in depth on the Veterinary Corps of other nations like I have done on this website, because I have about all I can handle in my research of the US Veterinary Corps but if those of you that have a interest in one of these Veterinary Corps, Remount and Cavalry units and if you would like to do a write up I will do the set up and do the posting. This way we can cover those that have not been able to find information and a place to post their relatives and love ones in a more personal way. I do run across information in my research of other nations and I will try to post this material as I have time. I am starting to build up a much larger database thanks to those that have sent me information and I hope to share this on the website in the future. The database is growing and growing everyday.

Click on the below Link for the British Army Veterinary Corps (AVC) during WW1
British Veterinary Corps in WW 1


Click on the below Link for the Germany Army Veterinary Corps during WW1
German Veterinary Corps During WW1


Click on the below Link for the French Army Veterinary Corps during WW1
French Veterinary Corps during WW1


Click on the below link for the Canadian Veterinary Corps (RCAVC)
Royal Canadian Army Veterinary Corps WW1 (RCAVC)


THE US ARMY VETERINARY CORPS DURING WW1
It should first be noted that at the start of the War before the Veterinary Corps was under the jurisdiction of the Medical Corps the Veterinary Corps was detached to the Remount Service and the Remount Service was part of the Quartermaster Corps

It's hard to believe today that back during WW1 horses and mules still played a major role in the armies of the world. And because like a man, horses required a large inner structure with the army to transport, feed and care for them. And unlike a machine that can be left in the battlefield something had to be done with a horse that was dead or alive.


THE HISTORY OF THE U.S. VETERINARY SERVICE, A.E.F., DURING WW1 REPORT
Note: A must to read
Click on the below link:
The History of the U.S. Veterinary Service, A.E.F., During WW1


U.S. VETERINARY TRAINING SCHOOLS IN THE STATES DURING WW1
Source: From the office of the Surgeon-General of the Army, Washington, D.C., Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Index Vol. LV, Vol. VIII, 1919, pgs. 330-334

The Veterinary Corps organized three training school for its personnel during this war (WW1) - one for enlisted men at the Medical Officers' Training Camp, Fort Riley, Kansas; one for officers at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., where enlisted men were also trained, and one for organizing, equipping, and training veterinary units for overseas service at Camp Lee. Va.

The school at Fort Riley, Kansas, was established February 4, 1918, by Major Robert J. Foster, V.C. At that time authority had been given to allow men to enlist in the Veterinary Corps who were under and over the draft age. Practically all men who enlisted west of the Mississippi River were sent to Fort Riley for training. This school was in operation from February until September 1918, and 540 men were trained, most of whom were sent to Camp Lee for overseas service.

The school at Camp Greenleaf was established by Major D. S. White (later colonel), and it was contemplated to train there both officers and enlisted men. Major W. J. Stokes, V.C., assumed command of this school in March. At the time the armistice was signed, about 200 enlisted men had been trained; approximately 490 officers had been graduated; 240 officers were in training, 655 enlisted Medical Reserve Corps men (graduate veterinarians) had reported for duty, of whom 86 had been commissioned and the rest were candidates for commissions.

The training school at Camp Lee, Va., was organized in April 1918, with the purpose in view of organizing, equipping, and training oversea units.

Everyone must bear in mind the fact that the Veterinary Corps as a military organization was entirely new and was developed during the stress of war days, when haste meant everything. Everybody had to go forward, not backward, and if mistakes were made, there was no time to stop, but to move on with definite objects in view.

From the beginning of the Camp Lee school it was called upon to exceed its estimated capacity to send units oversea. The object of this school, as had been stated, was to organize, equip, and train veterinary units for overseas service. At the time the armistice was signed, there was a schedule prepare for the shipment of overseas units to include June 30, 1919.

The Veterinary Corps had to provide officers for these units and had to have a constant supply officer the units to be organized as fast as men were supplied from the draft. There was not an abundance of veterinary officers to fill this want. It was also found necessary to send officers overseas with either hospital or replacement units only.

The demand made for veterinary units by the War Department was of course known to the Veterinary Division, Surgeon General's Office, and on this plan the organization of units was worked out. To some officers it might have seemed a waste of time to be kept at Camp Lee and not be sent overseas immediately, but the pleasure of a few individuals could not be considered when it involved schedules affecting thousands of men.

It must be kept in mind that the Veterinary Corps prior to the war consisted of less than 75 officers who had seen service of line organizations. Then, these officers had never had any regular military training. It was only what each individual had picked up for himself that marked his ability in purely military affairs. Many of these officers had been sent overseas and were not available for assignment to this school. When the establishment of the school was authorized by the General Staff, it was decided that it would be necessary to send line officers to the school as instructors until such time as the Veterinary Corps could supply the necessary trained officers. There was no other alternative.

Lieutenant Colonel Gerald E. Griffin, V.C., was probably the most experienced man in the regular army veterinary corps, and he was made senior instructor, with the idea of his eventually being made Commandant. Veterinary officers were placed as understudies to other line officers on duty, and, had the school not been broken up by the armistice, all line officers would undoubtedly have been relieved shortly and their places taken by the veterinary officers acting as understudies.

The Camp Lee Veterinary Training School was in active operation from April 12, 1918, to November 11, 1918, and during that time a total of 393 officers and 7,968 enlisted men passed through the school. There were organized, equipped, trained and send to France 15 veterinary hospitals (Nos. 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21), each consisting of 7 veterinary officers and 300 enlisted men; 1 base veterinary hospital of 4 officers and 144 enlisted men; 6 Corps Mobile Veterinary Hospitals of 2 officers and 35 enlisted men each; 3 Army Mobile Veterinary Hospitals of 4 officers and 144 enlisted men each, and 4 Veterinary Replacement Units of 13 officers and 200 men each.

There were organized, equipped and trained ready for overseas service, when the signing of the armistice caused all shipments to stop, 3 veterinary hospitals, 1 base veterinary hospital, 1 corps mobile veterinary hospital, with personnel similar to units above mentioned, and 1 veterinary replacement unit, consisting of 40 officers and 200 men. There was also in process of organization at this time, but not completed, 5 veterinary hospitals, 5 corps mobile veterinary hospitals and 2 veterinary replacement units.

Starting with absolutely nothing – not even a building – this record is not to be despised, even though a few individuals were not pleased. There was time only, under this extreme emergency, to consider units, organizations and results obtained as a whole and not by individuals.

It would be an unpardonable mistake were the Veterinary Corps not to profit by the experience gained in these schools. It is believed that the Corps will be able to use to the utmost advantage the experience gained in conducting these schools in any system of instruction that may be established in the future.

OUTLINING THE FUTURE
It may be of interest here to outline the plan for schools proposed in the reorganization of the Army Veterinary Service.

Candidates entering the Army Service hereafter will be given a year's training before being assigned to duty with troops. After passing the prescribed physical and profession examination, they will be commissioned as 1st lieutenants, Veterinary Reserve Corps. The training will be divided into a post-graduate theoretical course at the Veterinary Department, Army Medical School, Washington, D.C., followed by a practical course at a veterinary training center, yet to be decided upon. Each course will be from five to six months in length.

The theoretical course at the Army Medical School is planned to provide instruction in veterinary bacteriology and pathology; diagnostic and biologic laboratory methods; meat and milk hygiene; military veterinary medicine, with special attention to communicable and parasitic diseases; military veterinary hygiene, and regional surgery. Research work in animal diseases will also be undertaken here, where the opportunities for laboratory work will be unexcelled.

Officers who successfully complete the theoretical course at the Army Medical School will immediately be assigned to the practical veterinary training school to complete their training.

The practical veterinary training center will have to be conducted at a post or camp where a very large mounted command is located and a general veterinary hospital can be maintained to provide enough clinical material for teaching purposes. Here, it is also contemplated to teach enlisted men in the special branches needed for the veterinary service.

For officers, the practical training will consist of instruction in veterinary hospital administration, equipment and duties (including veterinary evacuation companies and veterinary evacuation hospitals); surgical and medical clinics; communicable diseases - handling of, diagnosis of, etc.; horseshoeing instruction (practical and lectures) ; equitation; equipment of military animals (cavalry, field artillery, draft and pack animals, including instruction in packing) ; conformation; examination for soundness and horse-judging; breeding; military animal management; manual of small arms (pistol); map reading, and such military training as is necessary.

It must be understood that the course of training proposed are contingent upon enactment of legislation and reorganization of the veterinary service by Congress as a part of the Army reorganization contemplated. These plans are all in the hands of the General Staff.

The old Veterinary Corps, as it existed at the beginning of the war (WW1), consisted of 2 officers for each horsed regiment and 17 officers as inspectors of animals and meats. This limited and inflexible personnel is entirely inadequate. The Corps is now greatly expanded and is functioning along broad general lines, similar to the other closely-related professional branches of the Medical Department and in general is organized similar to the veterinary service of foreign armies.

The main advantages of the Veterinary Corps of the Army, as now organized, are: 1st – It provides the Army for the first time in its history with a modern, scientific service. 2nd – By demanding the highest professional qualifications of the men entering it and offering adequate inducements in promotion, responsibility commensurate with grade, opportunity for research and original investigation, etc., it will quietly but persistently encourage a raising of the standard of the professional of the entire country. The second reason above stated is a paramount one why every member of the civilian profession, who has the real interests of his science and its advancement at heart, should be a staunch supporter of the Army Veterinary Corps. The Corps can only be as strong as the men who enter it from civilian life can make it. There is no reason why it should not present an attractive career to the very best type of young professional men, but the desirable degree of excellence can only be developed by personnel with the loyal assistance of the great mass of civilians.

Once the Veterinary Corps is soundly established by legislative enactment – a result devoutly hoped for in the near future – the system of instruction as described above can go forward and develop along the general lines laid down for it.


VETERINARY CORPS COMMENDED BY GENERAL PERSHING
The Commander in Chief, American Expeditionary Forces, France, has recently commended the veterinary service through the Chief Veterinarian, Office of the Chief Surgeon, A.E.F., and expressed his appreciation as follows:

"Now that active operations have ceased, it gives me a great deal of pleasure to express my thanks, in the name of the American Expeditionary Force, to the officers and men of the Veterinary Corps, for their efforts and accomplishments during the war.

Starting as you did, with insufficient personnel, and laboring under severe handicaps, you nevertheless have overcome many obstacles and achieved results.

The care of our animals was one of the most important duties in the American Expeditionary Force. It required skill, foresight, patience and perseverance. You and your predecessors had successfully created an organization for care and supply of animals that is a credit to our Army.

It is indeed praiseworthy that the efforts of all did not cease at caring for and fulfilling demands for animals. Your zeal happily led you into research and as a result, you have made many valuable discoveries concerning the nature of and cures for equine diseases. That by itself will be a lasting monument commemorating your unselfish and patriotic labor."


CAMP LEE VIRGINIA VETERINARY TRAINING SCHOOL WW1
A Veterinary Training School also opened at Camp Lee in early May(1918) with one thousand six hundred white and Negro enlisted men from every section of the U.S. as students. Lt. Col. Edward A. Sturgess from the 155th Depot Brigade 80th Div. was appointed commandant. The students were housed in 400 tents pending completion of 52 buildings.(Page 131 of the History)From your above listings a great many men were trained here. The 80th Div. started their embarkation to France in late May 1918. The Training school remained at Camp Lee after the 80th departed. The History indicates the 37th Nat'l guard Div. came to Camp Lee after the 80th left.

Bruce Smith
Historian,
Descendant of 80th Division Veterans.

Click on the below link of Camp Lee
Camp Lee Virginia during WW1


CAMP GREENLEAF, GA DURING WW1


Veterinary Company No 1 Truck at Camp Greenleaf, GA 1918

Click on the below link for Camp Greenleaf:
Camp Greenleaf, GA during WW1

Note: coming as soon as I can get around to it. I just purchased a wonderful book "AS YOU WERE, Veterinary Company No 1, CAMP GREENLEAF ,GA December 1918" It has the roster and is a very interesting read. Those that may have had a relative in this unit can email and I will check to see if their name in on the roster - GREG

The below link to The Forgotten Army is a wonderful website that deals with the role of Horses and Mules during WW1 with the British Army. The story was about the same for life of the US horses and mules
The Forgotten Army Website


Below this are very rare WW1 Veterinary Collar Disks. A US Collar Disk will be on the right collar and the above collar disk is on the left collar. It was quite common to have a regular Medical Collar Disk instead of the above disk with a V. The insignia on the right is posted by G.A. SOUSA. I believe this is a pre WW1 Artillery Officer's Veterinary Corps insignia. If you go to WW1 Army Insignia Identification link below I have post other pre WW1 Veterinary Corps insignias


Left to right: VC Officer's Collar Type insignia used during WW1, the next two are post WW1 VC Officer's collar insignia. The fourth over from the left I cannot tell you anything about and I question if it is a genuine WW1 or post WW1 VC insignia. The last VC Insignia on the right is posted by Melinda Yantis who is stationed in Germany and writes: I am sending you a picture of the VC Shabrique badge it was placed on the rear, lower corner of the officer's saddle blanket. It measures about 2 1/2 inches long, I am not sure if they were used in both wars or not.

Sometimes I wonder if the other above examples may look a little too new unless they were new stock and never used. As of this date I am not aware of any VC insignias being reproduced for sale. As Veterinary Corps collar insignias become more and more valuable I THINK WE NEED TO WATCH OUT. If there is not a nice patina it should be questioned. If you go to Leonard Murphy Website you will see Leonard wearing an officer's insignia with just a single V. There is no doubt that this was the type used by the Veterinary Corps during WW1.

During WW1 there were many places like the Sears Catalog and many other company's where an enlisted man or a Officer could buy uniforms, equipment and even insignias for their uniform and a lot of the times there were slightly different variations in insignias. I think we need to start watching out for reproduction WW1 insignias. Look for a nice patina such as the above first two images on the left (these come from my collection), the first one over from the left is what a WW1 officer's collar insignia should look like. There were many variations of the Veterinary Corps enlisted men's disk.


ARMY INSIGNIA IDENTIFICATION WW1
Click on the below link:
WW1 Army Insignia Identification.


WHAT MADE UP A U.S. DIVISION DURING WW1?
Click on the below link:
What made up a Division in WW1


This war was like no other the world had seen in size and death. In the short time that the US was in the war the Veterinary Corps of WW1 was overwhelmed and stretched to its limits. The horse and mule was a very loved and cherished member of the army force. And it was in this war that a new horse entered. The iron horse, cars, truck and tanks still had to be serviced but could be left if need be, in the battle field without any inhumanity. The horse and mule would never again have such an honor role as it always had before this war. And war would never be the same.


INTERESTING LINKS
Click on the below links:
Society of the Military Horse
The role of the horse in World War One Website


These are the only WW1 Veterinary Corps patches or patches related to Veterinary Corps units that I have ran across in my research. I have been told that the diamond shape was common but I am sure that there are many different types of VC patches. If you go to the Leonard Murphy in WW1 at the top of the page you will see a diamond shape patch on his left should with what looks like a cross in the middle. If anyone out there can help us with WW1 Veterinary Corps patch identification we would really appreciate it or if you have a patch that you would like to post please e-mail me.

ABOVE PATCH CORRECTION UPDATE JUNE 2007:
I received this email from Rodney Ploessl.

Rodney has made the following corrections: The patch you have identified as a Veterinary Corps patch is actually the patch of the 13th (Infantry) Division, "The Lucky 13th", of World War I. The black cat, the number 13, and the up-turned horseshoe; all are luck symbols. The horse shoe on the 13th Div patch was a good luck symbol, the same as folks used to nail them on their barn or shed open end up, so the luck didn't run out. NOTE: I have taken this patch down but decided to leave Rodney's information on the 13th Div patch up because I thought it was very interesting.

The diamond-shaped patches are for Army Remount Depots.

I would like to thank Rodney Ploessl for help on the above corrections and I welcome anyone who can help me out with corrections.


OVERSEAS TROOP TRANSPORTATION MAP
Click on the below click for a Overseas Troop Transport Map and other information
Troop Transport Map and information


The Veterinary Service represents to the animals of the army, what the Medical Service is to the troops. The first duty is to keep animals fit, and when no longer fit, to evacuate them from the field forces as quickly as possible

The Veterinary Corps is made of Veterinary Officers with the field formations, Mobile Veterinary Sections, attached to formations. Veterinary Hospitals. Veterinary Convalescent Depots and Veterinary Supply Depots.

The above picture is titled "Their last trip" I would like to thank Kelvin MacQuarrie at Ontario Veterinary College for connecting me with Ian Barker who send me this WW1 picture that shows the reality of the battle field and the horses and mules that died in service of their nations. This picture is on page 69 of a book called "The Horse in War, and Famous Canadian War Horses", published privately c.1932 (printed by The Jackson Press, Kingston, Ontario) by Lt. Col. D.S. Tamblyn of the Royal Canadian Army Veterinary Corps. Note: Dead horses were inoculated by a special serum to prevent decay and shipped to French buyers.

Mobile veterinary Sections are assigned to collect all sick or wounded animals within the formation, and to clear them from the fighting zone as quickly as possible. If the force is stationary, they will establish hospitals for the care of animals, which are likely to recover soon. Severe cases should be evacuated from the field for treatment.


Beasts of burden WW1


THE BUYING OF ANIMALS BY THE US ARMY WW1
The US Army's six classes of animals:
Active horses from 950 to 1,200 pounds for cavalry
Strong active horses from 1,150 to 1,300 pounds for light artillery
Powerful horses from 1,400 to 1,700 pounds for siege batteries
And draft mules, wheelers above 1,150 pounds, leaders above 1,000 pounds and those suitable for pack mules.

The Veterinary Hospitals are established on the lines of communication for the care of sick and wounded animals. They are capable of accommodating 1,000 animals. They will be situated at such points on the lines of communication.

During World War 1 the Veterinary Corps of the Army, established the preceding year of 1916 was not completely organized. This accounts for the fact that, when General Pershing's headquarters sailed for France in May of 1917, it included no personnel for a veterinary service, nor did it carry plans pertaining one; none were existent. Veterinary officers were soon sent abroad in small numbers as requested, but the calls for them did not become urgent until shipments of animals in considerable numbers began in October of the same year

The above WW1 Felt Flag is from Leonard Murphy's collection that he picked up during his service in the Veterinary Corps. We have not been able to figure out why he has a First Cavalry insignia but we know that sometimes the Veterinary Corps was assigned to different units and were part of those units during the war. It is possible that he was assigned to the First Cavalry for a very short time, but it still a mystery and it is possible that it is something he just picked up along the way. The next felt flag is a Veterinary Corps Son in the Service flag. The red and white felt flag with the Blue Star the one that Leonard's mother had in her window back on the farm.

HISTORY OF THE SON IN THE SERVICE FLAG
The "Sons in Service" flag was used during World War I and World War II. Each family was entitled to hang a small Son In Service flag in their window, the blue star in the center of the red-bordered white rectangle signified a family member in active service. The star was replaced (or covered) with a gold star (in practice, yellow or dark yellow) if the family member died in action. (Hence the name of the organization "Gold Star Mothers" of women who had lost sons in the war.) There were other variations to the star for missing in action, injured, captured, etc, etc, but flags of that sort are rarely, if ever, seen.

Sons in Service flags made and used by families usually were no larger than about one foot long. They were always hung vertically, a stick being sewn into the top heading of the flag and a piece of string attached to both ends of the stick - the string suspended at its midpoint from a hook or some other feature of a front window of the home.

If a family had a husband and a son, or multiple family members in the service of their country, then additional blue stars were set into the white rectangle. Organizations and corporations extended this practice to fly flags incorporating stars for each of their members/employees who were off to war and, of course, would change/overlay the blue stars with gold ones when the news came back that one of theirs had died in action. These larger flags (I have one with some 50 stars in a circle, a quarter of them in gold, measuring about 8 feet long overall) were sometimes flown outside on a pole, but most often were suspended from the ceiling of the factory / meeting hall indoors.

It is not always easy to determine a date for these flags, though I believe that WW I era flags were more likely to be made of wool, and WW II flags usually were sewn of cotton bunting. However, they are definitely no older than 1917, the date of entry of the USA into WW I. Some WW II era flags with one or two stars were printed on silk and sold retail for those who didn't feel like sewing their own.
Nick Artimovich, 2 May 1997

RESEARCH INFORMATION
During this time there was a lot of decisions being made in who would run the Veterinary Service. And if you are interested you can go to the below links and do the research. The AMEDD Websites have a lot of wonderful material online. I have decided to keep it as simple as I can and deal in the most interesting facts of the Veterinary Corps during the war. For further research please go to the below links:


U.S. ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE WEBSITE "Still Keeping the Tradition alive"
Click on the below link to go to their website:
U.S. Army Veterinary Service Website


U.S. ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OFFICE OF THE SURGEON GENERAL Has many wonderful pages of information on their webpage's, make sure you take a look!
Here is their website:
U.S. Army Medical Department Office of the Surgeon General


Click on the below link for a great resource of the History of the Veterinary Corps 1916-1945 at AMEDD's Website
History of the Veterinary Corps 1916 to 1945


Please click on the below links, the first link goes to the WW1 Medical Front's Website (Great Website) on WW1 Veterinary Service and Administration and the next link is their Veterinary Service during WW1 (UK) page, and the third link is AMEDD website page: THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE U.S. ARMY IN WW1 "Volume II Administration American Expeditionary Forces" (Note: Go to Chapter XX "The Veterinary Service".
The Medical Front WW1 Website
WW1 Veterinary Service
The Medical Department of the U.S. Army in WW1 "Volume II Administration American Expeditionary Forces"


SPECIAL REGULATIONS, NO. 70, WAR DEPARTMENT 1918

Click on the below click:
Special Regulations, No. 70

On August 27, a Veterinary Corps officer was made chief veterinarian, A. E. F., and was assigned to the chief surgeon's office, and, on August 29, a veterinary division of that office was organized It was through no fault of its own that the veterinary service, A. E. F., had not been properly organized at an earlier period of its history, but defects yet were such that they were not overcome until March, 1919

The adoption of Special Regulations, No. 70, War Department, 1917, marked the real beginning of the veterinary service, A. E. F. This new organization provided a simple, direct, and efficient mechanism for the evacuation of sick and inefficient animals from combatant forces to veterinary hospitals in the Services of Supply, where organized and specially trained units cared for them. From these Services of Supply hospitals the animals that were free from disease were evacuated to remount depots and thence returned to service. Animals which were not considered fit for treatment and eventual reissue were sold to butchers and civilians or killed to terminate their suffering. Some were employed in the Services of Supply


1st platoon at Veterinary Hospital No. 9 in France during WW1 Captain Twitchell in command.

The veterinary hospitals were placed under command of veterinary officers, and steps were taken immediately to collect scattered companies and half companies of such hospitals into whole working organizations. The issue of convalescent animals from veterinary units back to organizations was stopped, and the policy of passing all convalescent animals through remount depots for reissue was instituted. The prompt rendition of weekly animal sick reports and their accurate compilation was insisted upon. Requirements were anticipated and reinforcements from the United States, already overdue, were cabled for. Further hospital accommodation was sought, and, with difficulty, an insufficient amount procured.

The chief veterinarian, A. E. F., exercised direct jurisdiction over the activities of the veterinary service only in the Services of Supply; in the zone of the armies, administrative contact effected this through a veterinary officer with the fourth section of the general staff, G. H. Q. Through arrangements with the British and the French missions, an officer of the veterinary service of the British and French Armies was secured for liaison work These officers were assigned to the office of the chief veterinarian, A. E. F.


World War One Veterinary Corps Ambulance. "Image courtesy of the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C."


OFFICIAL SIGNAL CORPS PICTURES OF THE VETERINARY CORPS AND REMOUNT SERVICE TAKEN DURING WW1
Click on below link:
(Images courtesy of the National Museum of Health and Medicine)
Signal Corps Pictures of the Veterinary and Remount Service WW1


HORSE-DRAWN VEHICLES
Although the purchases of horse-drawn army wagons, amounting to approximately $21,000,000 in value by the date of the armistice, seem small in comparison with the enormous requisitions of motor vehicles, they were enough to engage practically the entire wagon making industry of the United States and to bring in some of the largest furniture factories and automobile wheel makers as additional sources of supply. It was seen at the outset that it would take every bit of the wagon-making capacity of the country to supply the Army's needs. The gasoline motor was unable to oust the warhorse completely from his time-honored occupation. For many sorts of military transportation it was impossible or impracticable to use mechanical power. The Army had to have escort wagons, combat wagons, drinking water wagons, dump wagons, buckboards, ration carts, horse ambulances, and other indispensable conveyances, all of which were horse drawn, besides a goodly equipment of carts to be pushed or pulled by human hands. Contemplating the purchase of such vehicles by tens of thousands, the procurement officers in Washington did not attempt to apportion the work themselves, but called to their assistance the foremost representatives of the wagon-making industry. Messrs. R. V. Board, of the Kentucky Wagon Company; A. B. Thielens, of the Studebaker Corporation of America; E. E. Parsonage, of the John Deere Wagon Company; and R. W. Lea, of the Moline Plow Company, became an advisory committee which thereafter assisted the Government in purchasing horse-drawn vehicles. One outstanding innovation in wagon manufacture resulted from the war pressure. In his ordinary work no wagon maker would think of putting into vehicles hickory or other woods that had not seasoned and weathered under long exposure to sun, wind, and rain.

The Army's very first order for escort wagons, however for 34,000 wagons, which, with spare parts, were the equivalent of 50,000 wagons, exhausted the visible supply of air-dried wagon lumber, making it certain that, unless new processes were adopted, the army wagon program would languish. Consequently the industry turned to kiln-drying. But the wagon-making industry possessed no equipment of kilns adequate to such a project. The War Department therefore agreed to pay half the cost of dry-kilns, reimbursing the manufacturers for their outlay gradually by adding $10 to the price of each wagon delivered and a similar amount to each payment of $185 for spare parts. Even with kiln-drying it required six months to prepare a log for the saws; yet so well did the industry respond to the Army's call that it turned out nearly 90,000 vehicles before the armistice. This output included several classes of vehicles specially designed after the declaration of war. To make this record the industry turned to the makers of automobile wheels for large quantities of wheels for army escort wagons. The War Service Committee of the Furniture and Fixture and Light Wood Industry arranged for the furniture makers of the United States to produce 75 per cent of the spare parts for the new army horse-drawn vehicles. In all, about 250 manufacturers engaged in the enterprise.


TRANSPORTATION OF U.S. HORSES TO ITALY BEFORE 1917


Horses aboard the animal transport SS SAMLAND (top deck) ready to be unloaded at Remount Depot No. 1, St. Nazaire, Loire Inferieure, France, 1918.

U.S. ARMY ANIMAL TRANSPORT SERVICE: “THE INNOCENT ABROAD”
Editors Note: A little remembered fact is that before the U.S. entered World War 1 in 1917, we sold horses and mules to Italy. In this interesting article written in the American Veterinary Medical Association magazine, July 1918 issue, 2nd Lieutenant David McAuslin, U.S. Army Transport Veterinarian shares his experiences transporting animals from several voyages. This article gives us an invaluable insight to what it was like on those ships.

Click on the below link:
U.S. Army Animal Transport Service: “The Innocent Abroad”


SHIPMENT OF ANIMALS TO FRANCE FROM HOBOKEN OCTOBER 1918 TO NOVEMBER 1918


The shipment of animals from the port of Hoboken, New Jersey was abruptly inaugurated in October of 1918 with practically no opportunity for assembling the required personnel and supplies. An officer was detailed as acting port veterinarian on October 25 1918 and he was directed to utilize the personnel of veterinary units that were being routed overseas for transport veterinarians and veterinary detachments. He was advised to place the necessary supplies on board each ship and to make requisition for the same on the proper supply officers. The Central Union stockyard were to be utilized as a makeshift animal embarkation depot and a veterinary officer with four assistants and an enlisted detachment of 30 men was sent to organize the veterinary service. The stock yards were found to be grossly overcrowded and the surplus animals were recommended by the veterinarians to be sent to Camp Dix, from whence they were delivered as required for embarking. This detachment and that of the port veterinarians cooperated to a commendable degree and materially added to the efficiency of a short but strenuous shipping campaign.

A total of 18,834 animals were transported at this time with a loss of 149 .79 percent and 33 were landed sick or injured in France

Below is a list of Animal Transports ships loaded at Hoboken New Jersey and dates of Embarkation and Debarkation and the number of animals with their losses and the name of the Transport Veterinarian.

SS PANAMA
Embarked October 19 1918, disembarked location unknown, 686 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 1, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 1 st Lt. Joseph M Hafey Veterinary Hospital No. 13

SS WESTERDYK OR WESTERDIJK
Embarked October 19 1918, disembarked at St Nazaire, 648 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 2, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 1 st Lt. Eugene L Hannon, Veterinary Hospital No. 13

SS RAPPAHANNOCK
Embarked October 23 1918, disembarked November 16th at St Nazaire, 364 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 1 st Lt. Harry F Seymer , Veterinary Hospital No. 13

SS OREGONIAN
Embarked October 26 1918, disembarked November 27th at Bordeaux, 500 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian Captain Leo F Conti , Veterinary Hospital No. 13

SS ARTEMIS
Embarked October 26 1918, disembarked November 11th at St Nazaire, 1740 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 12, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian Major Henry E Torgensen , Veterinary Hospital No. 16

SS KENTUCKIAN
Embarked October 27 1918, disembarked November 9th location unknown, 728 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 2, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian Captain Fred C Kneup , Veterinary Hospital No. 16

SS SIAMESO PRINCE
Embarked October 27 1918, disembarked November 15th at St Nazaire, 728 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 1st Lt.C.F. Neis , Veterinary Hospital No. 16

SS TJISENBANG
Embarked October 27 1918, disembarked November 17th at Base No 2, 902 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian Captain Leslie E Smith , Veterinary Hospital No. 13

SS NANSEMOND
Embarked October 30 1918, disembarked November 15th at Base Remount Depot No 1 St Nazaire , 1730 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 42, sick or injured 10, Transport Veterinarian Captain Arnold E Hasselbalsh , Veterinary Hospital No. 18

SS OHIAN
Embarked November 1 1918, disembarked November 14th at La Pallice , 647 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 1, sick or injured 6, Transport Veterinarian 2nd Lt.(cannot read first name)M White , Veterinary Hospital No. 18

SS ROEPAT
Embarked November 1 1918, disembarked November 20th at Bordeaux , 468 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 2, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian Captain Edward R Steel , Veterinary Hospital No. 18

SS MANCHURIAN PRINCE
Embarked November 4 1918, disembarked November 21th at St Nazaire , 588 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 1, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 1st Lt Alfred F Murray , Veterinary Replacement No 1

SS MOORISH PRINCE
Embarked November 4 1918, disembarked November 19th at St Nazaire , 805 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 1, sick or injured 1, Transport Veterinarian 1st Lt Ross C Bailey , Veterinary Replacement No 1

SS CHARLTON HALL
Embarked November 9 1918, disembarked November 25th at unknown , 484 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 3, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 2nd Lt Lloyd A Burlingam, Veterinary Replacement No 1

SS IOWAN
Embarked November 9 1918, disembarked November 26th at La Pallice Base Remount Depot No 7 , 688 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 2nd Lt Earl J Van Zandt, Veterinary Replacement No 1

SS BUITENZORG
Embarked November 15 1918, disembarked December 1 at St Nazaire , 637 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 1, sick or injured 5 , Transport Veterinarian 2nd Lt Ward C Scotten , Veterinary Replacement Unit

SS LIBERATOR
Embarked November 12 1918, disembarked November 26th at Bordeaux , 891 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 2, sick or injured 1, Transport Veterinarian 2nd Lt R.E.Selememt , Veterinary Replacement Unit

SS ZUIDERDIJK
Embarked November 12 1918, disembarked November 29th at St Nazaire , 338 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 2nd Lt Geo T Smith , Veterinary Replacement Unit

SS NEPONSET
Embarked November 13 1918, disembarked November 30th at Bordeaux , 550 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 5, Transport Veterinarian 2nd Lt Carl C Keller, Veterinary Replacement Unit

SS SAMLAND
Embarked November 18 1918, disembarked December 6th at St Nazaire , 1500 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 8, sick or injured 10, Transport Veterinarian 1st Lt C T Beechwood, Veterinary Hospital No 18

SS VEENDIJK
Embarked November 21 1918, disembarked December 9th at St Nazaire , 556 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 2nd Lt Ernest Woodridge, Veterinary Hospital No 14

SS FRANIS L. SKINNER
Embarked November 27 1918, disembarked December 27th at La Pallice , 539 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 17, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 1st Lt Alfred G Hutton, Veterinary Hospital No 18

SS KERESASPA
Embarked November 27 1918, disembarked December 16th at La Pallice , 400 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 54, sick or injured not listed here, Transport Veterinarian Major Daniel C Martin, Veterinary Hospital No 18

This vessel encountered a storm on December 6 1918, which continued for 6 hours. The ship’s rudder became damaged and as a result the vessel listed on several occasions to an angle of approximately 45 degrees. The fixtures in the compartments gave way to the weight of the animals, which were thrown, in every conceivable position resulting in the deaths of 54 animals.

SS TJISONDARI
Embarked November 28 1918, disembarked December 11th at not listed here , 691 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 1st Lt Laurence D Pot, Veterinary Hospital No 18

SS FEDERAL
Embarked November 29 1918, disembarked December 17th at Bordeaux , 479 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian 2nd Lt John D Phelan, Veterinary Replacement Unit No 5

SS BALI
Embarked November 30 1918, disembarked December 16th at Bordeaux , 547 animals on board, animals destroyed or died 0, sick or injured 0, Transport Veterinarian e-mail me for the name of Transport Veterinarian , Veterinary Replacement Unit No 5


A grand total of 66,071 horses and mules were exported from Newport News and Hoboken to France with a loss from all causes of 660, or practically 1 percent constituting an excellent record

The shipment of animals to the Philippines, via the transport Dix necessitated the assignment of a veterinary detachment. As a result of this correspondence a transport veterinarian and 2 enlisted assistants were detailed but no reports covering shipments have come to hand.


Typical US Supply Ship During WW1


SHIPMENT OF ANIMALS TO FRANCE FROM NEWPORT NEWS AUGUST 1918 TO NOVEMBER 1918

Animal shipments from Newport News were divided into 2 phases. The first phase extended from October 15 1917 to May 4 1918. During the period 28,473 animals were shipped with a total loss from all cases of 463 animals or 1.6 percent. The second phase of the shipments from Newport News extended from August 11 1918 to November 30 1918. By this time the plan of a permanent transport veterinarian and veterinary detachment was in operation. The return of the detachment made it possible to retain in use the fittings, which had been formerly thrown aside on arrival in France and also ensured a well cleaned boat for the next cargo. At the same time more complete and reliable reports of conditions were received.

NOTE: I AM SORRY TO REPORT I AM MISSING PART OF THE LIST OF SHIPS OF THE FIRST PHASE FROM NEWPORT NEWS AND I AM WORKING VERY HARD TO LOCATED IT. I DO HAVE THE SECOND PAGE OF THE SHIPS AND AS TIME PERMITS I WILL POST THIS LIST. ANYONE WHO CAN PROVIDE US WITH THE FIRST PART OF THIS LIST WOULD BE VERY MUCH APPRECIATED. BUT BECAUSE THESE LISTS WERE VERY BURIED AND I HAVE NEVER SEEN THEM ANYWHERE BEFORE IT MAY TAKE SOMETIME TO UNCOVER THEM. I BELIEVE THAT ONCE THE FIRST PART OF THIS LIST IS UNCOVERED WE WILL THEN HAD A COMPLETE LIST OF THE SHIPS THAT CARRIED THE HORSES AND MULES OVERSEAS DURING WW1 FOR THE US ARMY.


NEWPORT NEWS (PORT) ANIMAL TRANSPORT SHIP LIST TO FRANCE WW1
Click on the below link to go to the Newport News Animal Transport ship List overseas to France during WW1
Newport News Animal Transport ship List overseas to France during WW1


AUDIO CLIP ON WW1 TRANSPORT SHIPS
Click on the below link to go to a audio clip on WW1 transport ships. Very interesting!
A audio interview about transport, ammunition and hospital ships during WW1


Postcards like this were handed out when the troops were going overseas to France and when coming back to the US. The soldier would fill out the card before he got on board the ship and if the ship arrived safely they would be send the card to who ever he addressed the card to by the Red Cross or one of the many organization that handed out these type of cards.


ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL, MOBILIZING THE US ARMY VETERINARY CORPS OVERSEAS

PHASE 1

VETERINARY HOSPITALS NO 1,2,3,4,5,6
CORPS MOBLIE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 1
BASE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 1
MOBILE VETERINARY SECTIONS NO 1,2,101,102, 103,104

The enlisted men for these units including five mobile veterinary sections had been assembled and partly equipped at Camp Devens, Camp Upton and Camp Lee. Officers were assigned by this office

The long interval elapsing between the date of orders to form the units of Phase 1, December 31 1917 and their date of departure in April and May was due to delay in getting Tables of Organization to the Camp Commanders and to the fact that the units were new and little understanding by either veterinary of line officers and also to the slowness in obtaining supplies. Instructions having been given that they should leave completely equipped. The ambulances could not be secured and the units were authorized to proceed without them. Colored and white enlisted men were mixed in the veterinary hospitals No 3, 4 and 5 and a general shift became necessary to eliminate the white men who were in the minority and fill up the units with colored.


PHASE 2

VETERINARY HOSPITALS NO 7,8,9,10,11
CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 2
ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 1 (1/2 STRENGTH)

Their formation was closely involved with the establishment of the veterinary training school at Camp Lee at which they and all succeeding units were organized. The training school were asked for on January 5 1918 and authorized March 22 1918. The men for the Phase 2 units were not supplied until the middle of June. Additional information may be found under the subject of training schools. The men for this Phase were obtained by a special draft and were practically all ranch men from the western part of the country. They were of an exceptionally high class and ideally qualified for duty with the veterinary units. The delay was unfortunate but undoubtedly resulted in securing a much more desirable lot of men.


PHASE 3

VETERINARY HOSPITALS NO 12, 13, 14, 15 AND 16
BASE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 2
CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 3

The units were to have been ready September 1 1918 and actually were complete as to personnel but were delayed by the miscarriage of the quartermaster part of the hospital equipment and did not sail until the middle of October 1918

The following routine was followed in equipping these and succeeding units, on receipt of the shipping schedule the officer in charge of the Supply Division, S.G.O. was informed of the designation of the units and the probable data of sailing in order that the hospital equipment might be assembled, it being understood that all individual equipment would be obtained at the training camp, he then furnished the Medical Supply Officer, St Louis, the quartermaster General and the Chief of Ordnance with a list of the required articles, and requested shipment to Newport News the Port of Embarkation. The Commandant of the veterinary training school was then informed by this office of the action taken.

It was therefore contemplated that the supplies would accompany the organizations overseas. This seldom came to pass nor was the equipment assembled at Newport News in time to accompany the unit. The net result was that hospital units were held pending the arrival of their supplies and then failed to receive the supplies on debarking in France. Another contingency developed through the requirement of the Quartermaster General that whenever supplies for a unit were available at a camp they should be secured there by the unit. Consequently the units requisitioned for and obtained a few articles which they packed and shipped to the Port. It was necessary to deduct these from the complete list from the S.G.O the shortage abstracted and obtained from the supply depots elsewhere. This arrangement invited confusion and delay and was not a success. Orders were later issued by the War Department directing that no equipment accompany units overseas.

SGO (Surgeon General's Office)


PHASE 4

VETERINARY HOSPITALS NO 17, 18, 19, 20 AND 21
ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 2 (2 ND SECTION)
CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 4
VETERINARY REPLACEMENTS NO 1, 13 OFFICERS AND 200 ENLISTED
VETERINARY REPLACEMENTS NO 2, 12 OFFICERS AND 200 ENLISTED
VETERINARY REPLACEMENTS NO 3, 13 OFFICERS AND 200 ENLISTED
VETERINARY REPLACEMENTS NO 4, 12 OFFICERS AND 195 ENLISTED

The enlisted men for the hospital units were requested July 8 1918 and reported at Camp Lee in September. They were recommended to be ready for shipment October 1 but this date was advanced by 2 weeks by the War Department. In consequence the men left with no training

The four replacement units were based on a request fro General Pershing for 50 officers and 796 enlisted men.


PHASE 5

VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 22, 23, 24 AND 25
CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 5
VETERINARY REPLACEMENT UNIT 5 WITH 40 OFFICERS AND 210 ENLISTED

The men for the hospital units were requested August 20 1918 but were received so late that the organization of Veterinary Hospital No 25 and Corps Mobile Veterinary Hospital No 5 were the only ones completed.

Veterinary Replacement unit No 5 was the outcome of a special request from General Pershing but the personnel was assembled so slowly that the armistice was signed before the unit was prepared. It was ordered to Hoboken and part of the unit performed excellent service on board animal transports after which they were returned to Camp Lee for demobilization.


PHASE 6

CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 6
BASE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 3

The former was never organized while the latter although organized did not leave the training camp


OCTOBER PHASE

ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 2
CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 7, 8 AND 9

The small size of these units and the availability of some surplus men at the training school rendered possible their organization and they were the last units to leave the training school, which reached France.


NOVEMBER PHASE

VETERINARY HOSPITALS NO 26 AND 27
CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITALS NO 10, 11 AND 12
VETERINARY REPLACEMENT UNIT NO 6 WITH 2 OFFICERS AND 200 ENLISTED

Units not organized, no personnel available


DECEMBER PHASE

VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 28, 29 AND 30
CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 13

These Units were not organized, no personnel available


JANUARY PHASE

VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 31
VETERINARY REPLACEMENT UNIT NO 7

No action taken


On November 21 1918 the following cablegram was submitted to the War Department for transmission to General Pershing

VETERINARY ORGANIZATIONS of third and fourth phases and first five replacement units are enroute. Corps Hospitals No 7, 8 and 9 and Army Hospital No 2 now at port. Personnel will probably be used as casuals on animal transports. Corps Hospital No 5, Base Hospital No 3, awaiting orders at training school. Veterinary Hospitals No 22, 23, 24 and 25, fifth phase, organized, personnel about fifty percent complete. Formation of other units suspended. If you will need these four hospitals of the fifth phase please inform at once so personnel maybe completed, Ireland

This returned to this office informally November 30 1918, disapproved by the Chief of Staff.

It was inevitable that veterinary hospitals units raised and sent forward under the conditions above described should be far from satisfactory. There was no opportunity to study and perfect the organization, there was no assurance that the personnel was adequate in numbers or grades or that the equipment was suitable for the number of patients proposed. Worst of all was the inexperience of officers and men in the multitudinous duties required, the lack of definite training and the deficient teamwork. It is expected that the experiences of these units in the field will be made a matter of permanent record elsewhere in order that they maybe utilized in the future development of veterinary organizations.

END OF REPORT


TABLES OF ORGANIZATION, NO. 331M DECEMBER 31M 1917
Prescribed for a veterinary hospital (capacity 1,000 patients) 7 veterinary officers, 1 medical officer, and 311 enlisted men. Tables of Organization, No. 109, February 12, 1918, fixed the strength of a corps mobile veterinary hospital at 2 officers, and 35 enlisted men. Tables of Organization, No. 330, March 10, 1918, prescribed for a mobile army (or for a base) veterinary hospital (capacity 500 animals) 4 officers and 144 enlisted men. Tables of Organization, No. 43, January 14, 1918, provided for each Infantry division 3 veterinary field units and 1 mobile veterinary section, the total personnel of this service for a division being placed at 12 officers and 51 enlisted men. Each division leaving the United States was to be accompanied by this contingent, part of whose members composed the units above mentioned while the others were assigned to division headquarters, brigades, Artillery regiments and trains.


Officers of Veterinary Hospital No. 9 in France during WW1


OVERSEAS US ARMY VETERINARY CORPS IN FRANCE DURING WW1
Adapted from: Merillat, Louis A. & Delwin M. Campbell. VETERINARY MILITARY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, Vol. II. Veterinary Magazine Corp. 1935.

Merillat, Louis A., Sr., Orrville. Commissioned major from civil life. Oct. 5, 1917. Div. Veterinarian 41st Div. Oct. 5 to Jan. 6, 1918. Overseas, Dec. 11, 1917; Jan. 6, 1918 to April 20, commandant 1st Veterinary hospital at Neuchateau; April 20-Aug. 1 Executive officer Franco- American Veterinary Liaison Mission. requisitioning 100,000 horses from French civil population. Aug. 18-Feb. 23, 1919, Chief Veterinarian 1st. army; Feb. 23 - June 30, detached to write reports. May 9, 1918, commissioned Lt. Col. Jane 20 1919, received Chevalier of Legion of Honor. Discharged July 25, 1919.

Note: In the below information I have sometimes copied the material just as I found it from the source. Sometimes this is from several sources and the information on a unit is repeated. I just wanted you to be a where of this so you will not be confused when you find several listings for the unit that you are interested in. An example of this is sometimes the unit had several commanders and there is two listing. In the future I will try to make the material on each unit easier to read, as my understanding is better. Like I have stated many times that this is a learning lesson for me too.

CHIEF VETERINARIANS
Major William P Hill - Headquarters S.O.S. Tours France
Lt Colonel D.S. White - Headquarters S.O.S. Tours France
Lt Colonel B.T. Merchant Q.M.C. - Headquarters S.O.S. Tours France


ARMY VETERINARIANS
Lt Colonel L. A. Merillat - First Army
Major John H Gould - Second Army
Major N. L. Nelson - Third Army


CORPS VETERINARIANS
Major M. E. Knowles - 1 Corps
Major Charles H Jewell - I, III and IX Corps
Major Burton A Seeley - I Corps
Major R. H. Power - I Corps
Major N. L. Nelson - III Corps
Major W. Reid Blair IV Corps - Click on the link: Major W. Reid Blair DVM


Major C. E. Clayton - V Corps
Major Burt English - VI Corps
Major F. E Butler - VIII Corps
Captain Ross A Greenwood (Acting) - I Corps
Major John L. Wells - I Corps


GENERAL VETERINARY INSPECTORS
Major George B McKillip - Base Section S.O.S. St Nazaire
Major Jules H Uri - Intermediate Section S.O.S. Nevers (Nievre)
Major Reuben Hilty - Advance Section S.O.S. Neufchateau (Vosges)
Major L. A. Merillat - Franco - American Veterinary Liaison Mission, Paris
Major Walter Fraser - General Headquarters, Chaumont


VETERINARY HOSPITAL COMMANDERS
Advance Veterinary Hospital L.O.C. - Location, Neufchateau (Vosges), - APO# 731 - Commander Major L. A. Merrillat. NOTE: This was the first A.E.F. hospital. It was later called Veterinary Hospital No 6

Veterinary Hospital No 1 - Location, Neuilly l'Eveque, APO# - Commander Lt. N.S. Nutty

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 2 - Location, Triconville (Meuse) APO# - Commander Captain W.C. VanAllstyne

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 2A - Location, Treveray, APO# - Commander Lt Colonel Reuben Hilty

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 2B - Location, Triconville (Meuse), APO# - Commander Captain H. B. Balthaser

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 2B - Location, Triconville (Meuse), APO# - Commander Major D. H. Udall

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 3 - Location, Valdahon, APO# 704 - Commander Lt Colonel H. E. Bemis

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 3 - Location, Valdahon, APO# 704 - Commander Major Thomas H Edwards

Veterinary Hospital No 4 - Location, Carbon Blanc, May 4, 1918; No. 4, Camp de Souge (detachment from hospital) May 12, 1918, and Bayonne, APO# - Commander Captain R. M. Buffington. NOTE: A detachment of the hospital served with horse purchasing boards on the Spanish border at Bayonne. NOTE: I have made a few correction on VC No 4 first I believe the spelling is Souge instead Souges. And the main location may have been at Carbon Blanc with an attachment going to Camp de Souge. Sometimes I run across conflicting information and I hope in the future to clear this up.

Veterinary Hospital No 5 - Location, Toul, APO# - Commander Major W Reid Blair - Click on the link: Major W. Reid Blair DVM

Veterinary Hospital No 6 - Location, Neufchateau (Vosges), APO# 731 - Commander Major George B McKillip

Veterinary Hospital No 6 - Location, Neufchateau (Vosges), APO# 731 - Commander Major J. H. Blattenberg

Veterinary Hospital No 6 - Location, Neufchateau (Vosges), APO# 731 - Commander Major Robert Vans Agnew

Veterinary Hospital No 9 - Location, St Nazaire APO# 701 - Commander Major William J Ratigan

Veterinary Hospital No 10 - Location, Bourbonne Les Bains APO# 720 - Commander Major M.E. Knowles

Veterinary Hospital No 11 - Location, Gievres, Loir Et Chere, APO# 713 - Commanding; Major John A. Summerville

Veterinary Hospital No 14 - Location, Lux (Cote d Or) APO# - Commander Major Henry W Peter

Veterinary Hospital No 15 - Location, Gievres, Loir Et Chere, APO# 713 - Captain Eugene Ferron Note: Major John A. Summerville was Commanding VC No 11 at Gievres and may have also been Commanding VC No 15, further research in needed.

Veterinary Hospital No 16 - Location, Epinal APO# - Commander Major H.E. Torgersen

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 17 - Location, Triconville (Meuse), APO# - Commander Major Harry G Beauman

Veterinary Hospital No 18 - Location, Sougy (Nievre)APO# 908 - Commander Major Daniel C Martin

Veterinary Hospital No 21 - Location, Lux (Cote d Or) APO# - Commander Major Joseph E Morris


Base Veterinary Hospital No 1 - Location, Nevers (Nievre) APO# 708 - Commander R. P. McComb


My grandfather on the right at the time Corporal Leonard Murphy and one of his commanding officer somewhere in the area of Veterinary Hospital No 18 at Sougy France just south of Nevers. There was also a Remount Depot at Sougy. This is one of the recently found pictures of my grandfather


VETERINARY HOSPITALS OF THE A.E.F. OF RECORD AT THE HEADQUARTERS OF THE FIRST ARMY. (Organized in the United States)
Veterinary Hospital No 1 - Location , Neuilly l Eveque - Commander Lt N. S. Nutty

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 2A - Location , Treveray - Commander Major Reuben Hilty. An attachment was send to Triconville VC 2B

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 2B - Location , Triconville (Meuse), - Commander Captain H. B. Balthaser

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 3 - Location , Valdahon - Commander Major H. E. Bemis

Veterinary Hospital No 4 - Location , Carbon Blanc, May 4, 1918; No. 4, Camp de Souge (detachment from hospital), May 12, 1918 - Commander Captain R. M. Buffington

Veterinary Hospital No 5 - Location , Toul - Commander Major W Reid Blair - Click on the link: Major W. Reid Blair DVM

Veterinary Hospital No 6 - Location , Neufchateau - Commander Major L. A Merillat

Veterinary Hospital No 6 - Location , Neufchateau - Commander George B McKillip

Veterinary Hospital No 6 - Location , Neufchateau - Commander Major J. H. Blattenberg

Veterinary Hospital No 6 - Location , Neufchateau - Commander Major Robert Vans Agnew

Veterinary Hospital No 8 - Location ,Claye Souilly, APO# 702 - Commander Captain A. C. Wight. I would like to thank Michael Sebastian for providing us with the APO #702 for Veterinary Hospital No 8. His grandfather Leonard Sebastian was stationed at VC No 8 in France during WW1

Veterinary Hospital No 10 - Location , Bourbonne Les Bains - Commander Captain John R Stifler

Veterinary Hospital No 10 - Location , Bourbonne Les Bains - Commander Major M. E. Knowles

Base Veterinary Hospital No 1 - Location , Nevers APO #708 - Commander Lt R. P. McComb

Veterinary Evacuation Hospital No 8 - Second Army - Captain F. C. Hershberger


DIVISIONAL MOBILE SECTIONS (Organized in the United States)
Section No. 1 - 1st Lt I. O. Gladish - 1st Division

Section No. 2 - 1st Lt H. P. Flowe - 2nd Division

Section No. 3 - 1st Lt A. J. Walsh - 3rd Division

Section No. 4 - 1st Lt R. B. McCord - 4th Division

Section No. 5 - 1st Lt M. C. Smith - 5th Division

Section No. 101 - 1st Lt O. J. Conzelmann - 26th Division

Section No. 102 - 1st Lt G. W. Swanger - 41st Division

Section No. 103 - 1st Lt J. S. Youmans - 42nd Division

Section No. 104 - 2nd Lt B. H. Dunkley - 32nd Division

Section No. 105 - 1st Lt G Goubead - 27th Division

Section No. 106 - 1st Lt C. J. McAnulty - 28th Division

Section No. 107 - 1st Lt P. H. Hudgins - 29th Division

Section No. 108 - 1st Lt J. H. Gillmann - 30th Division

Section No. 110 - 1st Lt H. H. Harz - 33rd Division

Section No. 112 - 1st Lt C. F. Bennett - 35th Division

Section No. 114 - 1st Lt R. I. Lovell - 37th Division

Section No. 302 - 2nd Lt D. J. MacLeod - 77th Division

Section No. 303 - 1st Lt Charles P Bishop - 78th Division

Section No. 305 - Captain J. L. Wells - 80th Division

Section No. 307 - 1st Lt George W Hunter - 82nd Division

Section No. 308 - 2nd Lt E. F. Meyer - 83rd Division - Click on this link: U.S. 308 Mobile Veterinary Section WW1

Section NO 314 - 1st Lt C. W. Likely - 89th Division


VETERINARY FIELD UNIT CHEST U.S. ARMY
Issued to mobile veterinary units during WW1, very rare. We are pleased to find and add this chest to the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group's Mobile Display Collection. – Greg Krenzelok


Veterinary Field Unit Chest WW1.


CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 1 - Captain John B Lentz - III Corps A.E.F.


ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 1
Lt Walter D Jensen - First Army, A.E.F. - Lt Walter D Jensen veterinary officer and later the rank of captain during the war served as Commanding Officer of Army Mobile Hospital No 1, a unit that operated at Chateau Thierry, St. Mihiel and the Argonne, under Major M.E. Knowles, commanding evacuation stations of the 1st Army. These organizations evacuated 23,000 wounded and disabled horses and mules from the battlefields from September 25th to November 11th, and convoyed them safely to advanced and base hospitals.

Click on the below link:
Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital No 1




I would like to thank Willy Perrier and his son for providing the pictures of TRICONVILLE in France (Meuse 55). Willy is originally from the village call TRICONVILLE and has provided us with some old postcard pictures of TRICONVILLE and what it looked like during WW1. Veterinary Corps Hospital No 2B and Advance Veterinary Hospital No 17 were stationed here during WW1

Click on the below link to view the old postcard of TRICONVILLE
TRINCONVILLE France (Meuse 55) during WW1



Above picture is of TREVERAY, France (Meuse 55) posted by Willy Perrier of Verdun, France. Advance Veterinary Hospital No 2A was station here under the command of Lt Colonel Reuben Hilty

Click on the below link to view the old postcards and pictures of TREVERAY, France (Meuse 55)
TREVERAY France (Meuse 55) during WW1


Click on the below link for: Continuing research of Willy Perrier in France
TOUL France during WW1


THE 21 US ARMY VETERINARY HOSPITALS THAT ARRIVED IN FRANCE BETWEEN APRIL 16 1918 TO JANUARY 1 1919

VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 1
Organized at Camp Devon Mass on February 1918, Point of Embarkation Hoboken NY, Stationed in France Neuilly l Eveque, Overseas dates April 16 1918 to June 21 1919, Demobilized at Camp Devon, Number of Officers 6, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No. 1 arrived Home from the war at New York June 17 1919 on the Transport Liberator sailing from Brest

Click on the below link:
Veterinary Hospital No 1 at Neuilly l’Eveque France in WW


ADVANCED VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 2A AND 2B
Organized at Camp Upton NY, Point of Embarkation Hoboken NY, Stationed in France 2A at Treveray and 2B Triconville (Meuse), Overseas dates March 28 1918 to June 20 1919, Demobilized location at Camp Upton NY, Number of Officers 6, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: An attachment was send to Triconville which became Advance VC Hospital No 2B

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 2A and 2B arrived Home from the war at New York June 17 1919 on the Transport Liberator sailing from Brest . Note: I need to confirm that 2A was also on this Transport

Click on the below link:
Veterinary Hospital No 2A and 2B at Treveray and Triconville


I would like to thank G.A. SOUSA for posting this very rare patch from Advance Veterinary Hospital No 2B that was located at Triconville (Meuse). This patch is for sale on ebay (August 2007) this is truly a very rare find and I cannot thank G.A. SOUSA enough for this addition to the website


ADVANCED VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 3
Organized at Camp Lee VA January 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News VA, Stationed at Valdahon, Overseas dates May 15 1918 to June 12 1919, Demobilized location at Camp Lee VA, Number of Officers 5, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Click on the below link.
Veterinary Hospital No 3 at Valdahon

Advance Veterinary Hospital No. 3 arrived Home from the war at Newport News June 11 1919 on the Transport Orizaba. Veterinary Hospitals No 3, 5. 19 and 20 were on this transport returning home.

NOTE: It is likely that the information on VC No 3 sailing home with VC No 5, 19 and 20 is a mistake made by the newspaper at the time in came out and it may have sailed at another time. Further research is needed, if you have information please contact me - GREG

Click on the below links Please read the first part of this report on Veterinary Hospital No. 5
Veterinary Hospital No. 5


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 4
Organized at Camp Lee VA on January 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News VA, Stationed in US at Camp Hill VA, Stationed in France at Carbon Blanc, May 4, 1918; No. 4, Camp de Souge (detachment from hospital), May 12, 1918, Overseas dates April 29 1918 to June 18 1919, Demobilized location at Camp Upton NY, Number of Officers 6, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No. 4 arrived Home from the war June 18 1919 at New York on the Transport Scranton

Click on the below link:
Veterinary Hospital No 4 at Carbon Blanc and Camp de Souge


Hi Greg, I thought this would be of interest to you.
From; Brenda Barbian

TWO MORE WILDCAT SHIPS ARE COMING, ORIZABA AND SIBONEY BRINGING UNITS OF EIGHTY FIRST DIVISION HOME

Daily Press, June 11, 1919

This morning at 7:30 the transport Orizaba, bringing more units of the Eighty-First, or Wildcat Division, will unload her men at Pier 4, having been delayed a day in her schedule. She passed the capes last night at midnight, and was anchored in Hampton Roads until last morning.

The Siboney, which sailed from France with the Orizaba, has also been delayed, and is expected to pass through the Capes sometime today, and may dock here late this afternoon. She has units of the Wildcat Division, also on board.

The Orizaba brings the following units: 312th Engineers, 48 officers and 1,548 men; 17th Machine Gun Battalion, 26 officers, 601 men; 345th Military Police, 1 officer and 154 men; Veterinary Hospitals, No. 4, 5, 19 and 20, with approximately 1,200 colored men; 4th Corps; Mobile Veterinary Section, 1 officer and 34 men; Bakery Company No. 345, 1 officer and 63 men; Veterinary Evacuation Section No. 8, five officers and 147 men; Base Hospital No. 113, 4 officers and 65 men; Evacuation Ambulance Company No. 12, 1 officer and 34 men; 6th Mobile Ordinance Repair Shop, 3 officers and 38 men; Special Casual Company No. 840, 1 officer and 23 men; 3 casual officers and 3 civilians.

Note: the above information is one of the most complete reports of transport ships coming home from the war that I have seen, it gives us a lot of great information. I will be posting the newspaper articles on the main pages of the website under the listed VC Hospitals. Further research is needed on what transport VC No 4 came home on because I have newspaper articles that state VC No 4 came home on the Transport Scranton, I feel Brenda's information is correct.

Thank you Brenda

Greg

THE ABOVE RETURN INFORMATION ALSO COVERS VETERINARY HOSPITALS NO 5, 19 AND 20
Click on the below link please read the first part of this report on Veterinary Hospital No. 5
Veterinary Hospital No. 5


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Organized at Camp Lee VA on January 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News VA, Stationed in US at Camp Hill VA, Stationed in France at Toul, Overseas dates, May 9 1918 to June 12 1919 Demobilized location at Camp Lee VA, Number of Officers 6, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Advance Veterinary Hospital No 5 arrived Home from the war at Newport News June 11 1919 on the Transport Orizaba. Veterinary Hospitals No 4, 5. 19 and 20 were on this transport returning home

Click on the below link.
Veterinary Hospital No. 5


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 6
Organized at Camp Upton NY on February 1918, Point of Embarkation Hoboken NY, Stationed in France at Neufchateau (Vosges), Overseas dates March 28 1918 to June 19 1919, Demobilized location Camp Upton NY , Number of Officers 6, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No 6 assign to early convoy Home on May 27th 1919. Arrived Home from the war at New York on June 19 1919 on the Transport Agamemnon. Sailed from Brest on June 10 1919

Click on the below link:
Veterinary Hospital No. 6 at Neufchateau


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 7
Organized at Camp Lee on June 18 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed in France at Coetquidan, Overseas dates July 26 1918 to June 25 1919, Demobilized location Camp Stuart VA, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No 7 May 16 1919 this section was assigned to early convoy Home (APO 711) arrived Home from the war at Boston July 5 1919 on the Cruiser Huntington

Click on the below link:
Veterinary Hospital No. 7 at Coetquidan


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 8
Organized at Camp Lee VA June 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed in France at Claye Souilly, Overseas dates July 26 1918 to June 26 1919, Demobilized location Camp Upton NY, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No 8 arrived Home from the war at New York June 3 1919 on the Transport Frederick from Brest

U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 8, CLAYE SOUILLY, FRANCE, A.E.F. WW1
Click on the below link:
U.S. Veterinary Hospital No 8 Claye Souilly, France, A.E.F., WW1


YOU CAN NOW LISTEN TO PART OF LEONARD SEBASTIAN ON TAPE. Listen to Leonard Sebastian describe what it was like in being part of a Veterinary Hospital. Do not miss listening to this!

Click on the below link to read Leonard Sebastian's account of being with Veterinary Hospital No. 8 in France during WW1
Leonard Sebastian in WW1


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 9
Organized at Camp Lee VA June 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed in US at Camp Jackson SC, Stationed in France at St. Nazaire, Overseas dates July 26 1918 to June 24 1919, Demobilized location Camp Grant Ill, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No 9 assign to early convoy Home from the war on May 31 1919. Arrived home from the war at Charleston on June 23 1919 on the Transport Princess Matoika from St Nazaire left June 12

Click on the below link for Veterinary Hospital No. 9
Veterinary Hospital No. 9


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 10
Organized at Camp Lee VA June 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed in US at Camp Morrison VA, Stationed in France at Bourbonne-les-Bains, Overseas dates July 26 1918 to June 22 1919, Demobilized location Camp Grant Ill, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Arrived home from the war at Newport News on June 22 1919 on the Battleship Nebraska came from Brest. Sailed from Brest June 10 1919


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 11
Organized at Camp Lee VA June 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed at Gievres Note: General Intermediate Supply Depot was stationed in Gievres , Overseas dates July 26 1918 to June 19 1919, Demobilized location Camp Devon Mass, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No 11 arrived Home from the war at Boston June 9 1919 on the Transport President Grant

Click on the below link for Veterinary Hospital No. 11
Veterinary Hospital No. 11


ADVANCE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 12
Organized at Camp Lee VA August 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed at Commercy until Veterinary Hospital No 13 took over on December 15 1919. VC Hosp No 12 then went to Treves Germany on Dec 24 1918 and became part of the Occupation of Germany force , Overseas dates July 26 1918 or October 1918 to June 19 1919 or July 1919, Demobilized location Camp Grant Ill, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops. The 12th Veterinary Hospital Sailed home from St. Nazarene, France and arrived on 7/9/1919 at Hoboken NY on the USS Hansemond (Information from Joe Hartwell website)

Veterinary Hospital No 12 arrived Home from the war at New York July 9 1919 on the Transport Nansemond from Brest France

Click on the below link for Veterinary Hospital No 12
Veterinary Hospital No. 12


ADVANCE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 13
Organized at Camp Lee VA August 1918, Point of Embarkation Hoboken NY, Stationed in US at Camp Upton NY, Stationed at Commercy France , Overseas dates October 4 or November 1918 to June 28 1919, Demobilized location Camp Dix NJ, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Arrived home from the war at New York on June 26 1919 on the Transport Zeppelin

Click on the below Veterinary Hospital No 13 main page link:
Veterinary Hospital No 13

Click on link:
Veterinary Hospital No.13 and No.16 Demobilized at Camp Dix


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 14
Organized at Camp Lee VA August 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed in France at Lux (Cote d' Or), Overseas dates October 8 to June 28 1919, Demobilized location Camp Grant Ill, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No 14 Washington assign to early convoy Home from the war on May 25th 1919

Veterinary Hospital No 14 arrived home from the war at Newport News on June 28 1919 on the Transport Kansas from Brest on June 16 1919


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 15


Posted by John English, this is the shoulder patch worn by my grandfather William Aaron English when he was with Veterinary Hospital No 15 during WW1

Organized at Camp Lee Van August 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed, Overseas dates October 14 1918 to June 29 1919 or July 1919, Demobilized location Camp Pike Ark, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

VETERINARY HOSPITAL No. 15 due at New York on July 14 1919 on the transport Pueblo sailing from Brest on July 3 1919

Click on the below link:
Veterinary Hospital No 15 in WW1

According to the Table of Organization No 18 they arrived home July 29 1919. Note: I found a reference for Early Convoy Canceled for VC Hosp No 15 June 18 1919 from Washington

Click on link:
Veterinary Hospital #15 Demobilized at Camp Pike


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 16
Organized at Camp Lee VA August 1918, Point of Embarkation Hoboken NY, Stationed in US at Camp Upton NY, Stationed in France at Epinal, Overseas dates October 28 1918 to June 26 1919, Demobilized location Camp Dix NJ, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No 16 arrived Home from the war at Philadelphia on June 26 1919 on the Transport Santa Barbara. Came from St Nazaire left June 14 1919

Click on link:
Veterinary Hospital #13 and #16 Demobilized at Camp Dix


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 17
Organized at Camp Lee September 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed in France at Triconville, Overseas dates October 28 1918 to July 6 1919, Demobilized location Camp Devens Mass, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops, In the Advance sector

Veterinary Hospital No 17, Arrived Home from the war at Boston Harbor July 5 1919, On the Cruiser Huntington originally scheduled to go to NY lost one of its propellers at sea. Had been in Germany

Click on the below link to view a picture of Veterinary Hospital No. 17
Veterinary Hospital No 17


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18
Organized at Camp Lee September, 1918 Point of Embarkation Hoboken NY, Stationed in US at Camp Mills, Stationed in France at Sougy, Overseas dates October 29 or November 1918 to July 1919, Demobilized location Camp Dodge Iowa, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops. My grandfather Leonard Murphy was assigned to this Veterinary Hospital.

USS Pretoria, from Brest: came into port today at Hoboken, New York on July 12, 1919 on board and coming home are the; 122d engineers, hq. 1st bn., A, B, and C; 219th M.P.; 515th engineers, hq. Med., A; 140th and 145 transport corps; 18th Veterinary Hospital; 1st motor truck co.; 337th ambulance co; 1st censor and press co. (Staff of the "STAR AND STRIPES" the official newspaper for the American Expeditionary force) ; 34th depot service co.; 321st mobile laundry co.


Click on the first below link, I have posted a picture of Leonard there in the uniform that the above shoulder patch was taken from

CLICK ON THE BELOW VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 18 MAIN PAGE LINK:
Veterinary Hospital No 18


THE BELOW LINKS ARE VERY SPECIAL REPORTS
April 1 1919 Report on Veterinary Hospital # 18 Sougy France
Transport ship SS Keresaspa and the Veterinary Hospital 18 Journey overseas 1918


CLICK ON THE BELOW LINKS FOR VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 18 ROSTERS.
Veterinary Hospital No 18 Roster
Veterinary Hospital No 18 Roster Platoon No 3


NOTE: MY GRANDFATHER LEONARD PATRICK MURPHY WAS AT VETERINARY HOSPITAL No 18 AT SOUGY FRANCE AND THE BELOW LINK IS TO A WEBSITE THAT I HAVE MADE IN HIS MEMORY
Leonard Patrick Murphy in WW1


CLICK ON THE BELOW LINK TO VIEW VETERINARY CORPS HOSPITAL NO 18 CAMP ART BY D.C. HITES
Veterinary Corps Hospital No 18 Camp Art in WW 1


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 19
Organized at Camp Lee VA September 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed , Overseas dates October 21 1918 to June 19 1919, Demobilized location Camp Lee VA, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Click on the below link:
U.S. Veterinary Hospital No. 19, Verdun, France WW1

Veterinary Hospital No 19 arrived Home from the war at Newport News June 11 1919 on the Transport Orizaba. Veterinary Hospitals No 4, 5. 19 and 20 were on this transport returning home.

NOTE; PLEASE LOOK UNDER VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 4 FOR MORE INFORMATION


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 20
Organized at Camp Lee VA September 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed , Overseas dates October 21 1918 to October 21 1918 to June 19 1919, Demobilized location Camp Lee VA, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No 19 arrived Home from the war at Newport News June 11 1919 on the Transport Orizaba. Veterinary Hospitals No 4, 5. 19 and 20 were on this transport returning home

NOTE; PLEASE LOOK UNDER VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO 4 FOR MORE INFORMATION


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 21
Organized at Camp Lee VA September 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed in France at Lux (Cote d'Or), Overseas dates October 21 1918 to July 5 1919, Demobilized location Camp Gordon GA, Number of Officers 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks: Part of the SOS Troops

Veterinary Hospital No 21 - Washington assign to early convoy Home from the war on May 25th 1919

Veterinary Corps Hospital No 21 is due home from the war at New York on June 27 1919 on the transport Santa Clara


U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL AT LA ROCHELLE, FRANCE WW1
Click on the below link:
U.S. Veterinary Hospital La Rochelle France WW1

Note: At this time I do not have a number for the veterinary hospital at La Rochelle

U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL AT BORDEAUX, FRANCE WW1
Note: At this time I do not have a number or information on the veterinary hospital at Bordeaux


BELOW VC HOSPITALS DID NOT GO TO FRANCE

VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 22
Organized at Camp Lee VA November 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed, Overseas dates October 1918 to January or June 1919, Demobilized location Camp Lee, Number of Officers 6 or 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks:


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 23
Organized at Camp Lee VA November 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed, Overseas dates October 1918 to January or June 1919, Demobilized location Camp Lee, Number of Officers 6 or 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks:


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 24
Organized at Camp Lee VA December 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed, Overseas dates October 1918 to January or June 1919, Demobilized location Camp Lee, Number of Officers 6 or 7, Number of enlisted men 300, Remarks:


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 25
Organized at Camp Lee VA November 1918, Point of Embarkation Newport News, Stationed, Overseas dates October 1918 to January 26 or February 1919, Demobilized location Camp Lee, Number of Officers 6, Number of enlisted men 141, Remarks:


Note: Do to conflicting information sometimes I have tried to put both dates in.


BASE SECTION

SERVICE OF SUPPLY
Services of Supply (SOS) - formerly known as the Line of Communications. The Service of Supply was responsible for the supply of all troops of the army. Services of Supply's territory embraced the whole of France outside the zone of active military operations and was divided into nine Base Sections (six in France), which included the ports of arrival and the large rest camps in their vicinity, and one Intermediate Section, across which ran the lines of communication and in which were located the main storage depots of the A E F, a number of great industrial plants engaged in the production of war materials, and training camps for the air force, artillery, and other technical services. The District of Paris was a separate administrative area, the seat of the Headquarters Organization and its several bureaus, within the same territory. In the Base Sections were quartered about one-third of the entire A E F 550,000 men, forever preparing and passing forward the materials essential to the combat divisions.

BELOW TAKEN FROM JOHN J. RIORDAN'S BOOK: HORSES, MULES AND REMOUNTS. The memoirs of a World War 1 Veterinary Officer, story told my John Riordan

THE S.O.S. (U.S. SERVICE OF SUPPLY)
A brief description is in order with respect to the organization established to service and the supply the A. E. F. The S.O.S had been established and charged with the responsibility of processing the delivering replacements of men and animals, weapons, ammunition, rations and multiplicity of equipment and supplies to the combat units at the front. For purposes of administrations the S.O.S was divided into six base sections in France Numbers 1, 2, 4, 5 6 and 7. One in England, No. 3 and intermediate and advance sections in France. Bordeaux was headquarters for the Base Section No. 2. Remount depots were located at Bayonne, Besancon, Bourbonne Les Bains, Carbon Blanc, Commercy, Gievres, Hendaye, La Pallice, La Rochelle, Lux, Marseillie, Merignac, Montiers Sur Saulx, Nancy, Selles Sur Cher, Souge Champ De Tir, Sougy and St. Nazaire. Veterinary Hospitals were located at Boubonne Les Bains, Carbon Blanc, Claye Souilly, Coetquidan, Commercy, Gievres, Nevers, Sougy, Toul and St Nazaire.

INTERMEDIATE SECTION
The Intermediate Section, which occupied a great area in the central part of France extending from northwest to southeast, served as a storehouse for supplies and the connecting link between the base ports and the fighting troops in the Advance Section. Along the Stations lines of communication which traversed it in three main highways were located a series of great storage centers and industrial plants whose operations gave employment to thousands of members of the A E F, as well as camps where other activities essential to the conduct of the war at the front were carried on, such as the supplying of replacements to combat divisions, the reclassification of troops for various reasons, and the training of men for aviation, artillery, and other technical services. 71 stations along the lines of communication, at such centers as the Headquarters of the S 0 S at Tours, the storage depot at Gievres, and the casual camps at Blois and St. Aignan, 20 stations at the artillery camps, such as Valdahon, Mailly, and Coetquidan, 10 in the newly organized aviation centers at Issoudun and elsewhere, 12 serving detached units of engineers and foresters, and, by arrangement with the Red Cross, 11 at ambulance headquarters and military hospitals - total 204 in the S 0 S, an equipment which increased later. In general, the work done in the Intermediate Section was similar in character to that done in the Base Sections


WW1 MEDICAL AND VETERINARY CORPS POSTERS
Click on below link:
WW1 Medical and Veterinary Posters.


ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITALS

ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 1
Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital No 1, Active Service June 1918 to September 1919, Unit B-1, Active Service, September 1918 to December 1918, Unit No 2, Active Service, November 1918 to December 1918

Lt Walter D Jensen - First Army, A.E.F. - Lt Walter D Jensen veterinary officer and later with the rank of captain during the war served as Commanding Officer of Army Mobile Hospital No 1, a unit that operated at Chateau Thierry, St. Mihiel and the Argonne, under Major M.E. Knowles, commanding evacuation stations of the 1st Army. These organizations evacuated 23,000 wounded and disabled horses and mules from the battlefields from September 25th to November 11th, and convoyed them safely to advanced and base hospitals.

Click on the below link:
Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital No 1


BASE VETERINARY HOSPITALS


Nevers France at Base Veterinary Hospital No 1. We would like to thank Gerald Carvin who has posted his grandfather Porter W. Carvin's pictures of Base Veterinary Hospital No 1 taken at Nevers France where he was stationed during WW1. I have posted more of his pictures. Please click on the link in the below BASE VETERINARY HOSPITAL No 1 section.

BASE VETERINARY HOSPITAL No 1
Organized at Camp Devens, Mass, January 16 1918, Point of Embarkation Hoboken New Jersey, Stationed: Nevers, France, Overseas dates April 16 1918 to June 20 1919, Demobilized location ,Commanding Officer, 1st Lt. Thompson, Number of Officers 4, Number of enlisted men 144, Remarks: Location , Nevers APO No.708, France

Base Veterinary Hospital No 1 arrived home from the war at Boston on June 9 1919 on the Transport President Grant

Click on the below link:
Base Veterinary Hospital No 1 Nevers France

BASE VETERINARY HOSPITAL No 2
Organized at Camp Lee, VA, August 3 1918, Point of Embarkation Norfolk, VA, Stationed: St. Nazaire, France, Overseas dates October 28 1918 to July 5 1919, Demobilized location ,Commanding Officer, Captain Albert L Beverly, Number of Officers 4, Number of enlisted men 144, Remarks:

Base Veterinary Hospital No 2 arrived Home from the war at Newport News June 25 1919 on the Transport Eten which came from St Nazaire. Note: Perri's grandfather talks about this in this diary and I have been able to confirm this also.

Click on the below link to go to the Roster of Base Veterinary Hospital No 2. This Roster has been posted by Perri Harper who's grandfather James Otto Harper, was part of Base Veterinary Corp No. 2 during WW1 and was stationed in France. Perri is posting the Roster and there will be a link later to a website that she will be creating on her grandfather. Perri wrote a book about her grandfather that has his diary that covers his time in France during WW1 and other interesting things in the book. The book is available for sale by clicking the link.
James Otto Harper in WW1

Now this is a find, I would like to thank Perri Harper for posting the Base Veterinary Corps No 2 patch that her grandfather wore on his uniform in France during WW1. What a wonderful addition to the website.

BASE VETERINARY HOSPITAL No 3
Organized at Camp Lee, VA, November 1 1918, Point of Embarkation, did not go overseas, Demobilized January 12 1919 ,Commanding Officer, 1st Lt. Hall, Number of Officers 4, Number of enlisted men 144, Remarks:


CORPS MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITALS
Very important note: A system for the evacuation of animals was adopted. Animals were evacuated by the Division Mobile Veterinary Section (Units) overland to the Corps Mobile Hospitals. From the Corps Mobile Veterinary Hospitals the animals were transferred either overland or by rail to the S.O.S. Veterinary Hospitals. Later Army Evacuation Stations were installed at points near railroads and in such a situation that they were easily accessible to all Divisions in a specified area. Animals were convoyed overland from Division Mobile Veterinary Hospitals to these Army Evacuation Stations and from the the latter place to S.O.S. Veterinary Hospitals by rail. To assist in the evacuation of animals that were unable to travel overland, motor trucks were used as ambulances. These ambulances were constructed so as to accommodate five animals.

Unit No. 1, Active Service February 1918 to September 1919, Unit No. 2 June 1918 to July 1919, Unit No. 3 August 1918 to December 1918, Unit No. 4 July 1918 to December 1918, Unit No. 5 November 1918 to December 1918, Unit No. 6 Never organized, Unit No. 7 November 1918 to August 1919, Unit No. 8 November 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 9 November 1918 to July 1919, IV Corps September 1918 to June 1919.


MOBILE VETERINARY SECTIONS
NOTE; The Mobile Veterinary Units where attached to the Corps and Divisions of AEF. It should be remembered that where ever there where horses and mules there was the Veterinary Corps and Remount Squadrons caring for the horses and mules in a unit or supplying horses and mules to the units and bringing them back to the Veterinary Corps Hospitals and Remount Squadrons Stations, they were the pipeline. Sometimes I find in my research the term No. is use and sometimes Unit is used, it is the same. About half of the horses and mules used in the AEF were used in the Artillery units. The horses and mules were ideal for getting the hardware and shells to the front through the mud and in a lot of cased the only way. NOTE: I deal with the VC Hospitals a lot on this website because my main interest is my grandfather but I want you to remember that many in the Veterinary Corps and Remounts were attached to many other units besides the VC hospitals. A lot of these men were "The Casuals" or men not permanently assigned to a unit but attached to that unit. Sometimes the casuals served all over France in many different units and were transfered often. It is hard to follow ones military service sometimes when doing research because were ever the need was the men would go. If you were apart of a VC hospital or a Remount Squadron from the beginning there would be a good chance that this would be the only unit that you would serve in France in, but anything was possible.

Note: There are 2 listings for the Mobile Veterinary Sections here, the lists have the same units listed with the information being just a little different. These where the Mobile Veterinary Sections attached to each Division, their job was to be to evacuate the animals from the front back to the supply lines for evacuation to the S.O.S. and Base Hospitals. This was sometimes not done by Division Commanders who sometimes use them as a animal hospital to treat the animals from the front so the Division did not lose their animals. At this time of the War there was a huge shortage of available animals for the Divisions. Most of the light artillery used during the war was moved by using horses and in some cases men were used to move the artillery because there were no horses.

Unit No. 1 Active Service, May 1918 to December 1919, Unit No. 2 January 1918 to December 1919, Unit No. 3 March 1918 to December 1919, Unit No. 4 March 1918 to August 1919, Unit No. 5 March 1918 to August 1919, Unit No. 6 July 1918 to July 1919, Unit No. 7 April 1918 to December 1919, Unit No. 8 March 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 9 September 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 10 August 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 11 March 1918 to March 1919, Unit No. 12 August 1918 to January 1919, Unit No. 13 May 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 14 August 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 15 August 1918 to March 1919, Unit No. 16 October 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 17 October 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 18 October 1918 to January 1919, Unit No. 19 October 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 20 October 1918 to January 1919, Unit No. 21 to 100 Never organized, Unit No. 101 January 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 102 February 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 103 March 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 104 June 1918 to May 1919, Unit No. 105 April 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 106 March 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 107 March 1918 May 1919, Unit No. 108 March 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 109 December 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 110 December 1918 to May 1919, Unit No. 111 December 1918 to December 1918 to November 1919, Unit No. 112 March 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 113 May 1918 June 1919, Unit No. 114 February 1918 to January 1919, Unit No. 115 January 1918 to November 1918, Unit No. 116 February 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 117 December 1918 to May 1919, Unit No. 118 to 300 never organized, Unit No. 301 April 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 302 January 1918 to May 1919, Unit No. 303 March 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 304 April 1918 to May 1919, Unit No. 305 March 1918 to May 1919, Unit No. 306 March 1918 to June 1919 with the 81st Divison, Unit No. 307 February 1918 to May 1919, Unit No. 308 January 1918 to October 1919, Unit No. 308 January 1918 to October 1919, Unit No. 309 October 1918 to November 1918, Unit No. 310 January 1918 to February 1919, Unit No. 311 June 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 312 December 1917 June 1919, Unit No. 313 February 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 314 February 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 315 May 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 316 February 1918 to May 1919, Unit No. 317 April 1918 to March 1919, Unit No. 318


MOBILE VETERINARY SECTION UNITS OF THE DIVISIONS DURING WW1
Note: The Mobile Veterinary Section Units are the same units as the above Mobile Veterinary Section listings. Two lists the same units

The service of an infantry division veterinary unit comprised essentially of a division veterinarian, one assistant as a meat inspector, and three enlisted men at headquarters, ten field units consisting of one officer, two farriers and one private to assigned to the various horsed units and a mobile veterinary section of one officer and 21 men. So then the number of men in each Mobile Veterinary Section at full strength for each division consisted of 12 officers and 51 enlisted men, this number did vary from each unit

Mobile Veterinary Section No 1 was with the 1st Division, organized at in France (see notes A and B)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 2 was with the 2nd Division, organized at in France (see notes A and B)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 3 was with the 3rd Division, organized at Camp Green NC, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 14 men, division veterinarian Major C.E. Clayton, Date assigned 1-7-1918, Embarked for overseas on 3-22-1918 at the port of Hoboken
Mobile Veterinary Section No 3 arrived home from the war at New York May 26 1919 on the Transport Tiger coming from St Nazaire

Mobile Veterinary Section No 4 was with the 4th Division, organized at Camp Green NC, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 46 men, division veterinarian Captain R.A. McAuslin, Date assigned 2-20-1918, Embarked for overseas on 5-3-1918 at the port of New York.

Mobile Veterinary Section No 4 arrived home from the war at New York May 26 1919 on the Transport Tiger coming from St Nazaire

Mobile Veterinary Section No 5 was with the 5th Division, organized at Camp Merritt NJ, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 28 men, division veterinarian Major J.B. Blattenberg, Date assigned 1-7-1918, Embarked for overseas on 4-16-1918 at the port of New York.

Mobile Veterinary Section No 6 was with the 6th Division, organized at Camp Wadsworth S.C., VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 39 men, division veterinarian Captain J.J. Connelly, Date assigned 4-4-1918, Embarked for overseas on 7-7-1918 at the port of New York.
Mobile Veterinary Section No 6 arrived home from the war at Newport News June 11 1919 on the Transport Orizaba

Mobile Veterinary Section No 7 was with the 7th Division, organized at Camp McArthur, Tex , VC personnel consisted of officers 13 and enlisted 41 men, division veterinarian Captain C.W. Owinner, Date assigned 3-26-1918, Embarked for overseas on 8-3-1918 at the port of Hoboken N.J.
Mobile Veterinary Section No 7 May 16 this section was assigned to early convoy.
Click on the below link:
7th Mobile Veterinary Section

Mobile Veterinary Section No 8 was with the 8th Division, organized at Camp Fremont, CA, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 51 men, division veterinarian Captain R.C. Musser, Date assigned 3-20-1918, Embarked for overseas on 11-2-1918 at the port of New York City
Mobile Veterinary Section No 8 arrived home from the war at Newport News June 11 1919 on the Transport Orizaba. Veterinary Hospitals No 3, 5. 19 and 20 were on this transport returning home

Mobile Veterinary Section No 9 was with the 9th Division, organized at Camp Sheridan, Ala, VC personnel consisted of officers 13 and enlisted 25 men, division veterinarian Captain Ticehurst, Date assigned 7-16-1918, Embarked for overseas on 11-2-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 10 was with the 10th Division, organized at Camp Funston, Kansas, VC personnel consisted of officers 13 and enlisted 51 men, division veterinarian Captain H.N. Beeman, Date assigned 10-18-1919, Embarked for overseas on 3-15-1918 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 11 was with the 11th Division, organized at Camp Mead, Md, VC personnel consisted of officers 11 and enlisted 49 men, division veterinarian Captain O.C. Salby, Date assigned 7-16-1918, Embarked for overseas on 7-2-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 12 was with the 12th Division, organized at Camp Devens, Mass, VC personnel consisted of officers 11 and enlisted 47 men, division veterinarian Captain P.O. Cooper, Date assigned 7-16-1918, Embarked for overseas on 2-6-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 13 was with the 13th Division, organized at Camp Lewis, Wash, VC personnel consisted of officers 14 and enlisted 51 men, division veterinarian Captain C.H. Carnahan, Date assigned 7-16-1918, Embarked for overseas on 3-5-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 14 was with the 14th Division, organized at Camp Custer, Mich, VC personnel consisted of officers 11 and enlisted 51 men, division veterinarian Captain E.M. Curley, Date assigned 7-16-1918, Embarked for overseas on 2-10-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 15 was with the 15th Division, organized at Camp Logan, TX, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 49 men, division veterinarian Captain P.H. Fulstow, Date assigned 8-16-1918, Embarked for overseas on 2-10-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 16 was with the 16th Division, organized at Camp Kearney, CA, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 42 men, division veterinarian Captain E.C. Jones, Date assigned 8-23-1918, Embarked for overseas on 2-14-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 17 was with the 17th Division, organized at Camp Beauregard, La, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 2 men, division veterinarian Major A.R. Kincaid, Date assigned 8-16-1918, Embarked for overseas on 2-6-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 18 was with the 18th Division, organized at Camp Travis, TX, VC personnel consisted of officers 13 and enlisted 45 men, division veterinarian Major L.E. Trompeter, Date assigned 8-23-1918, Embarked for overseas on 2-15-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 19 was with the 19th Division, organized at Camp Dodge, Iowa, VC personnel consisted of officers 11 and enlisted 50 men, division veterinarian Captain J.F. Crosby, Date assigned 8-21-1918, Embarked for overseas on 3-1-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 20 was with the 20th Division, organized at Camp Sevier, S.C, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 42 men, division veterinarian Major Wm. B. Cook, Date assigned 8-23-1918, Embarked for overseas on 3-4-1919 at the port of New York City (See note C)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 101 was with the 26th Division, organized at Camp Devens, Mass, VC personnel consisted of officers 0 and enlisted 0 men, division veterinarian none assigned, Date assigned 8-23-1918, Embarked for overseas on 9-26-1917 at the port of New York City (See note A and B)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 102 was with the 42nd Division, organized at Camp Mills N.Y., VC personnel consisted of officers 6 and enlisted 0 men, division veterinarian none assigned, Date assigned, Embarked for overseas on 10-18-1917 at the port of Hoboken N.J (see note A and B)
Mobile Veterinary Section No 102 was assigned to early convoy May 5 1919

Mobile Veterinary Section No 103 was with the 41st Division, organized at Camp Green, N.C., VC personnel consisted of officers 6 and enlisted 0 men, division veterinarian none assigned, Date assigned , Embarked for overseas on 12-13-1917 at the port of Hoboken N.J (see note A and B)
Mobile Veterinary Section No 103 was assigned to early convoy May 5 1919

Mobile Veterinary Section No 104 was with the 32nd Division, organized at Fort Clark and Camp McArthur, TX, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 47 men, division veterinarian Major G.H. Koon, Date assigned 1-4-1918, Embarked for overseas on 1-31-1918 at the port of New York City. (see note A and B)
Mobile Veterinary Section No 104 arrived home from the war at Boston on May 14 1919 on the Transport Toloa

Mobile Veterinary Section No 105 was with the 27th Division, organized at Camp Wadworth,S.C., VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 42 men, division veterinarian Captain A.N.Towner, Date assigned 1-1-1918, Embarked for overseas on 5-17-1918 at the port of Newport News, Va.

Mobile Veterinary Section No 106 was with the 28th Division, organized at Camp McClellan, Ala , VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 48 men, division veterinarian Captain E. Wood, Date assigned 12-22-1917, Embarked for overseas on 5-3-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 107 was with the 29th Division, organized at Camp Hancock, Ga , VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 49 men, division veterinarian Captain J.E. Hodge, Date assigned 3-20-1918, Embarked for overseas on 6-15-1918 at the port of Newport News, Va.

Mobile Veterinary Section No 108 was with the 30th Division, organized at Camp Sevier, S.C , VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 50 men, division veterinarian Major N.N. Nelson, Date assigned 10-8-1917, Embarked for overseas on 5-11-1918 at the port of Brooklyn, N.Y.

Mobile Veterinary Section No 109 was with the 31st Division, organized at Camp Wheeler, Ga , VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 42 men, division veterinarian Major E.F. Butler, Date assigned 4-4-1918, Embarked for overseas on 10-5-1918 at the port of Hoboken N.J.
Mobile Veterinary Section No 109 arrived home from the war at Boston June 9 1919 on the Transport President Grant

Mobile Veterinary Section No 110 was with the 33rd Division, organized at Camp Logan, TX, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 47 men, division veterinarian Major B.A. Seeley, Date assigned 11-28-1917, Embarked for overseas on 5-16-1918 at the port of Hoboken, N.J.

Mobile Veterinary Section No 111 was with the 34th Division, organized at Camp Cody, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 49 men, division veterinarian Major C.B Perkins, Date assigned 7-31-1918, Embarked for overseas on 9-17-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 112 was with the 35th Division, organized at Camp Doniphan, Okla., VC personnel consisted of officers 11 and enlisted 47 men, division veterinarian Captain O.P. Davis, Date assigned 2-1-1918, Embarked for overseas on 4-25-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 113 was with the 36th Division, organized at Camp Bowie, TX, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 36 men, division veterinarian Captain T.O. Booth, Date assigned 4-4-1918, Embarked for overseas on 7-18-1918 at the port of Hoboken, N.J.
FINLAND BRINGS WESTERNERS, TIMES HERALD, JUNE 2, 1919
The Finland arrived also yesterday afternoon, bringing the 143rd Infantry complete, of the 66th Division, Texas and Oklahoma men. They numbered 94 officers and 3,104 men, in command of Colonel Irving J. Phillipson, of Portland, Oregon. Also, on the vessel were the 111th Mobile Repair Shop; 113th Mobile Veterinary section and casual companies No's 1 and 2, of the 319th Infantry, with 9 officers and 350 men. There were sixty casuals sent over for duty.
Posted by Brenda Barbian

Mobile Veterinary Section No 114 was with the 37th Division, organized at Camp Sheridan, Ala, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 44 men, division veterinarian Captain H.W. Brown, Date assigned 1-1-1918, Embarked for overseas on 5-15-1918 at the port of Hoboken, N.J.
Mobile Veterinary Section No 114 arrived from the war at Boston June 9 1919 on the Transport President Grant (Needs to be confirmed)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 115 was with the 38th Division, organized at Camp Shelby, Miss, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 38 men, division veterinarian Major H.W. Peter, Date assigned 11-26-1917, Embarked for overseas on 10-2-1918 at the port of New York City
Mobile Veterinary Section No 115 arrived home from the war at Boston June 9 1919 on the Transport President Grant (Needs to be confirmed)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 116 was with the 39th Division, organized at Camp Beauregard, La, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 50 men, division veterinarian Major J.D. Derrick, Date assigned 4-2-1918, Embarked for overseas on 8-18-1918 at the port of Hoboken N.J
Mobile Veterinary Section No 116 arrived home from the war at Boston from Brest on May 31 1919 on the transport Finland
Click on the below link:
316th Mobile Veterinary Section WW1

Mobile Veterinary Section No 117 was with the 40th Division, organized at Camp Kearney, Ca, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 51 men, division veterinarian Major C. Nookolds, Date assigned 11-28-1917, Embarked for overseas on 8-18-1918 at the port of Hoboken N.J

Mobile Veterinary Section No 301 was with the 76th Division, organized at Camp Devens, Mass, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 44 men, division veterinarian Major Burt English, Date assigned 12-17-1917, Embarked for overseas on 7-5-1918 at the port of New York City
Mobile Veterinary Section No 301 arrived home from the war at New York June 14 1919 on the Transport Henderson

Mobile Veterinary Section No 302 was with the 77th Division, organized at Camp Upton, N.Y, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 47 men, division veterinarian Captain J.N.Graves, Date assigned 3-1-1918, Embarked for overseas on 3-29-1918 at the port of Portland Me
Mobile Veterinary Section No 302 sailed home from the war on April 21 1919 on the Transport Louisville

Mobile Veterinary Section No 303 was with the 78th Division, organized at Camp Dix, N.J, VC personnel consisted of officers 14 and enlisted 35 men, division veterinarian Captain P.V. Weaver, Date assigned 3-9-1918, Embarked for overseas on 5-20-1918 at the port of Philadelphia, Pa.
Mobile Veterinary Section No 303 arrived home from the war at New York June 8 1919 on the Transport General Goethals

Mobile Veterinary Section No 304 was with the 79th Division, organized at Camp Meade, Md, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 50 men, division veterinarian Captain E.A. Hogg, Date assigned 3-25-1918, Embarked for overseas on 7-8-1918 at the port of Hoboken, N.J.

Mobile Veterinary Section No 305 was with the 80th Division, organized at Camp Lee,Va, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 33 men, division veterinarian Major C.H. Jewell, Date assigned 12-27-1917, Embarked for overseas on 5-22-1918 at the port of Hoboken, N.J.
Mobile Veterinary Section No 305 arrived home from the war at New York on May 25 1919 on the Transport Troy
Click on the below link to read the History of the 305th Mobile Veterinary Section posted by Bruce W. Smith, Historian, his wife Cecelia M. Smith Secretary and the Descendants of 80th Division Veterans
305th Mobile Veterinary Section

Mobile Veterinary Section No 306 was with the 81st Division, organized at Camp Jackson, S.C, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 39 men, division veterinarian Major Cage Head, Date assigned 1-1-1918, Embarked for overseas on 7-31-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 307 was with the 82nd Division, organized at Camp Gordon, Ga, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 45 men, division veterinarian Captain F.R. Lunn, Date assigned 2-28-1918, Embarked for overseas on 4-25-1918 at the port of New York City
Mobile Veterinary Section No 307 arrived from the war at New York June 8 1919 on the Transport Alphonso X111 with the 82 Division. NOTE: This is not confirmed

Mobile Veterinary Section No 308 was with the 83rd Division, organized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, VC personnel consisted of officers 13 and enlisted 51 men, division veterinarian Major M.E. Knowles, Date assigned 10-29-1917, Embarked for overseas on 6-8-1918 at the port of New York City
Click on the below link:
308th Mobile Veterinary Section WW1

Mobile Veterinary Section No 309 was with the 84th Division, organized at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 45 men, division veterinarian Major G.A. Nanvey Jr, Date assigned 12-19-1917, Embarked for overseas on 10-4-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 310 was with the 85th Division, organized at Camp Custer, Mich, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 47 men, division veterinarian Major W Fraser, Date assigned 12-11-1917, Embarked for overseas on 7-22-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 311 was with the 86th Division, organized at Camp Grant, Ill, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 51 men, division veterinarian Major D.H. Udall, Date assigned 1-22-1918, Embarked for overseas on 9-9-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 312 was with the 87th Division, organized at Camp Pike, Ark, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 49 men, division veterinarian Major T.H. Edwards, Date assigned 11-20-1917, Embarked for overseas on 8-24-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 313 was with the 88th Division, organized at Camp Dodge, Iowa, VC personnel consisted of officers 13 and enlisted 51 men, division veterinarian Major John H. Gould, Date assigned 11-19-1917, Embarked for overseas on 8-17-1918 at the port of Quebec Canada

Mobile Veterinary Section No 314 was with the 89th Division, organized at Camp Funston, Kansas, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 54 men, division veterinarian Captain G.O. Miller, Date assigned 3-7-1918, Embarked for overseas on 6-4-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 315 was with the 90th Division, organized at Camp Travis, TX, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 54 men, division veterinarian Major R. Vans Agnew, Date assigned 5-16-1918, Embarked for overseas on 6-21-1918 at the port of Brooklyn, N.Y.
Mobile Veterinary Section No 315 arrived home from the war at New York on June 6 1919 on the Transport Madawaska

Mobile Veterinary Section No 316 was with the 91st Division, organized at Camp Lewis, Wash, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 45 men, division veterinarian Captain A.E. Donovan, Date assigned 11-28-1917, Embarked for overseas on 7-6-1918 at the port of New York City

Mobile Veterinary Section No 317 was with the 92nd Division, organized at Camp Funston, Kansas, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 22 men, division veterinarian Captain R. Hofford, Date assigned 5-9-1918, Embarked for overseas on 6-10-1918 at the port of Hoboken, N.J.

Mobile Veterinary Section No (see note d) was with the 93rd Division, organized at Camp Stuart, Va, VC personnel consisted of officers 1 and enlisted 0 men, division veterinarian 1st Lt. J.A. Phillips, Date assigned 1-28-1918, Embarked for overseas on 2-18-1918 at the port of Hoboken, N.J.

Mobile Veterinary Section No 320 was with the 95th Division, organized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 15 men, division veterinarian Captain G.B. Huse Date assigned 9-17-1918, Embarked for overseas on 1-20-1919 at the port (see note c)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 321 was with the 96th Division, organized at Camp Wadsworth, S.C, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 11 men, division veterinarian Captain G.A. Jarman Date assigned 9-24-1918, Embarked for overseas on 12-13-1918 at the port (see note c)

Mobile Veterinary Section No 322 was with the 97th Division, organized at Camp Cody, VC personnel consisted of officers 12 and enlisted 35 men, division veterinarian Captain C.S. Chase Date assigned 9-19-1918, Embarked for overseas on 12-17-1918 at the port (see note c)

NOTES:
(A) Mobile Veterinary Section formed later and sent overseas as part of Phase No 1
(B) Division left before complete veterinary personal was assigned
(C) Division did not proceed overseas and was demobilized in the United States and date shows when the division veterinarian was relieved or discharged
(D) Provisional division with incomplete veterinary personnel.


The 1st, 2nd, 26th, 42nd, 41st and the 32nd divisions left for overseas in this order before the veterinary personnel were fully assigned or the Mobile Sections organized. The latter were assembled and sent over as a part of the first phase. There organization is shown below.

Mobile Veterinary Section No 1 was with the 1st Division, organized at Camp Devens on 1-16-1918, Commanding officer is 2nd Lt. I.O. Gladish. Embarked of the port of Hoboken, N.J. on 4-16-1918

Mobile Veterinary Section No 2 was with the 2nd Division, organized at Camp Devens on 1-16-1918, Commanding officer is 1 st Lt. H.P. Flowe. Embarked of the port of Hoboken, N.J. on 4-16-1918

Mobile Veterinary Section No 101 was with the 26th Division, organized at Camp Devens on 1-16-1918, Commanding officer is 2nd Lt. O.J. Counzelman. Embarked of the port of Hoboken, N.J. on 4-16-1918

Mobile Veterinary Section No 104 was with the 32th Division, organized at Fort Clark, TX on , Commanding officer is 2nd Lt. A.A.Lenert. Embarked of the port of Newport News, Va May 1918

Mobile Veterinary Section No 103 was with the 41st Division, organized at Camp Upton on 2-14-1918, Commanding officer is 2nd Lt.R.S. Youmans. Embarked of the port of Hoboken, N.J. on 6-10-1918

Mobile Veterinary Section No 102 was with the 42nd Division, organized at Camp Upton on 1-12-1918, Commanding officer is 2nd Lt.G.W. Swanger. Embarked of the port of Hoboken, N.J. on 6-10-1918

The enlisted men were supplied from the Depot Brigades and from detachments consisting of 500 at Camp Devens, 500 at Camp Upton and 1,000 at Camp Lee which had been assembled for overseas service.

With the forgoing exceptions the veterinary organization of the Regular Army, the National Guard and the National Army divisions was accomplished at the station of the division and preceded overseas with their divisions. Enlisted men were transferred from the Depot Brigades after a moderate military training and the selection of suitable material was largely a matter of chance. All officers were assigned and every effort was made to secure as division veterinarians men of the best qualifications. The great majority of officers in these divisions were necessarily taken direct from civil life.

The veterinary organization of the 9th to the 20th inclusive and the 95th, 96th, and 97th divisions were started on receipt of information that the divisions were to be formed by the assignment of a division veterinarian and the necessary assistants. It has become possible to secure graduates of the veterinary section of the M.O.T.C. at Camp Greenleaf in considerable numbers by this time and practically no officers were assigned to these divisions who had not received this training thereby promising a much more efficient service. Enlisted men were incomplete at the signing of the armistice and their demobilization progressed rapidly.

The time between the organization of the divisional veterinary service and the departure overseas was too short and too much occupied with drilling and training men and in the performance of routine duties to permit of any careful study of the suitability of the organization or the adequacy of the equipment. Some difficulty was experienced in the United States in the establishing the proper function of the mobile veterinary evacuation unit. It was adapted from the British service and was omitted from Pershing's service of the rear project of September 18 1917 which apparently contemplated evacuation by corps and army hospitals. Reports from France which have come to hand thus far are unanimous in stating this unit although to small to be fully effective was an essential part of the veterinary organization of the divisions.

During the period of training in the United States it functioned in many instances as an evacuation unit as contemplated in S.R. 70 taking over sick animals from organizations, giving minor treatments and turning them into the auxiliary remount depot. This required a delay sometimes of days or possible weeks as when the auxiliary remount depot was in quarantine because of glanders, in which case the section established a temporary hospital. These activities also clashed with the purpose of the remount division which was to replace without delay a sick animal from any organization with a sound one from the depot. The work of the section and in fact the efficiency of the camp hospital outside the auxiliary remount depot.


VETERINARY EVACUATION SECTIONS
Unit No. 1 Active Service, December 1918 to September 1919, Unit No. 2 November 1918 to August 1919, Unit No. 3 December 1918 to August 1919, Unit No. 4 to 6 never organized, Unit No. 7 November 1918 to June 1919, Unit No. 8 November 1918 to June 1919.

Veterinary Evacuation Section No 1 at Coblenz have received their orders to entrain to Brest for their return voyage home to the USA


VETERINARY CORPS HOSPITAL ORGANIZATION CHARTS
Click on below link:
Veterinary Hospital Organization Chart for AEF WW1


ANIMAL EMBARKATION DEPOTS

February 18, 2015

Greg,

The following information was sent to me courtesy of the US Army Office of Medical History:

This section from the Annual Report of The Surgeon General, US Army, suggests there was an HQ building at No. 302 Charleston, North Carolina, but that it wasn't used much if at all.

ANIMAL EMBARKATION DEPOTS
The principal depot was located at Newport News, Va. with a capacity of 10,000 animals and a veterinary detachment of 12 officers and 175 enlisted. The depot at Charleston. S. C, of the same capacity was completed and ready for operation when the armistice was signed. These depots were the normal adjuncts of the ports of embarkation, and the veterinary service thereof was analogous to that of an auxiliary remount depot plus the examination and preparation of animals for embarkation. Sanitary conditions at Newport News were extremely bad much of the time because of the congestion of animals and the mud-infested corrals.

Only one port veterinary service was developed, and that at Newport News.

The Newport News depot was several miles outside the city, and given the acreage required for 10,000 animals I expect the Charleston one was as well.

Dana K. Johnson
Librarian
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Wilmington District Technical Library
69 Darlington Ave.
Wilmington, NC 28403


U.S. ANIMAL EMBARKATION DEPOT NO 301 NEWPORT NEWS, VA, WW1
Animal Embarkation Depot No. 301 on the Newport News side of Hampton Roads occupied an area of about 70 acres adjacent to and north of Camp Hill. Camp capacity: 10,000 animals. The former British Remount Depot at Breeze Point, One mile southeast of Port Headquarters provided accommodations for an additional 5,000 animals in an emergency. From October 14, 1917 to November 30, 1918 a total of 47,237 animals were shipped overseas; the total number of animals handled during the existence of the depot was 58,278

No. 301 Newport News, Virginia, 12 commissioned officers 175 enlisted personnel, opened 8-4-1917, Closed 3-31-1919 , Authorized capacity 10,000 animals, average animal strength 8,100

Click on the below link:
U.S. Animal Embarkation Depot No. 301 Newport News, VA, WW1


U.S. ANIMAL EMBARKATION DEPOT NO 302 CHARLESTON, N.C., WW1
No. 302 Charleston, North Carolina, 12 commissioned officers 150 enlisted personnel, opened 5-2-1918, Closed 3-26-1919, Authorized capacity 10,000 animals, average animal strength 2,605

Click on the below link:
Animal Embarkation Depot No 302


ANIMAL TRANSPORTATION UNITS
Note: Here's a new area of research for me the "Animal Transportation Service" I know nothing about this service and I have been able to come up with very little. Obviously they were in charge of transportation of the animals for the Army and it will be interesting to learn about this lost to me unit, we will starts with "bits and pieces" If you can help out with any information please contact me


The above picture is of the 2nd Corps Animal Transportation School, John P. Nev Commanding April 25 1924. The date is a little out of my focus of WW1 but because this is our first lead we will start here. I do not even know the location of this school. Note: Don’t you love the dog!

Below in some information that I have been able to collect:

Base Animal Transport 301 arrived in Boston July 5 1919 on the Battle ship Virginia

Base Animal Transport No 302 arrived at NY Harbor July 16 1919, On the Transport Walter A Luckenbach

Update(I found another listing confirming the above) sailed from St Nazaire on July 1st

Base Animal Transport No 302 arrived at NY Harbor July 11 1919 on the Transport Floridian

Advance Animal Transport No 302 due to arrive at New York on July 23 1919 on the transport Sierra

Advance Animal Transport No 303 due at New York on July 23 1919 on the transport Sierra sailing from St Nazaire on July 13 1919

Advance Animal Transport depot 304 due at Newport New on July 22 1919 on the transport De Kalb sailing from St Nazaire on July 11 1919

Note: It looks like the Animal Embarkation Depot and the Animal Transportation unit numbers are using No 301 and No 302 maybe there is a connection. Hopefully further research will uncover the questions. And it looks like there were Advance Sector units and Base Sector units in France.


ORDER OF BATTLE OF THE VETERINARY SERVICE DURING WW1
Adapted from: Merillat, Louis A. & Delwin M. Campbell. VETERINARY MILITARY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

AMERICAN ARMY OPERATIONS ON THE MARNE

THE VETERINARY OFFICERS HOLDING HIGH POSITIONS WHO PARTICIPATED IN THE SECOND BATTLE OF THE MARNE BE BEFORE CHATEAU THIERRY DURING JULY 1918
Captain Williams, division veterinarian, 1st Division
Lieutenant Moffitt, division veterinarian, 2nd Division
Captain Pollard, division veterinarian, 3rd Division
Major Mitchell, division veterinarian, 42nd Division
Major Steele, division veterinarian, 26th Division
Captain McAuslin, division veterinarian, 4th Division
Captain Wood, division veterinarian, 28th Division
Major Jewell commanded as corps veterinarian of the 1st army corps under which these divisions operated.

BATTLE OF CHATEAU THIERRY
The veterinary service was not only symbolic of the whole, but given little attention in the hasty preparation of the operations. Detailed veterinary history of "The Americans on the Marne" can never be written. There was no service to keep records. Major Charles H. Jewell, of the Regular Army was the corps veterinarian, but made no plans for evacuating animals. There was no American veterinary hospital established in the sector, although the French had vacated the large remount depot at Claye Souilly with the expectation that the Americans would establish on there for the divisions they were mobilizing in the adjacent territory; nor did Jewell know where the French veterinary hospitals were located. Contact with the French hospitals had not been planned.

During the weeks of waiting for the German offensive to open, the units of the various divisions disposed of disabled animals without any central direction, and when the troops went into action against formidable enemy resistance, the animals wrecked beyond redemption were abandoned in the open or dragged over the highways to French hospital and left "unidentified American property" This unfortunate state of affairs was revealed in the inspection of such of these animals as could be located, when a veterinary service was being organized for the First Army and was taking charge of the situation. The battle was then in its closing phase. The scene was distressing from a veterinary corps point of view. Not only the abandoned animals but most of those located in the French hospitals were permanently ruined.

The only conservation service in sight was conducted by detachments of the 2nd Cavalry and by division mobile sections who made matters worse by collecting disabled animals at places where forge and water were scarce, if at all obtainable. For these animals a veterinary hospital was quickly established in the empty remount depot at Claye Souilly by the First Army. (Note go to Leonard Sebastian's webpage on this website under Veterinary Hospital No 8 to listen to a audio tape) This was two months after the Americans took possession of the territory and three weeks after the battle had begun, two months of neglecting animals with precedent. The hospital was manned by a remount squadron and plans started to collect the animals and transport them to it. Before and during the battle the divisions and even their units did as they pleased with their animal causalities.

Thus were the American Expeditionary Forces, after their first major operation, politely reminded that they must establish a veterinary service, and as one of the paragraphs implies, they must also give their animals something to eat!


THE BATTLE OF ST. MIHIEL
The Order of Battle Veterinary Corps

Chief Veterinarian: Major L.A. Merillat
Chief Remount Officer: Major Victor C Mather

I Corps: Major M.E. Knowles, corps veterinarian
82nd Division: Major Frank R. Lunn, division veterinarian
90th Division: Captain Geo. H Koon, vice Major Robert Vans Agnew, relieved, Div vet.
5th Division: Captain Dean S Luce, division veterinarian
2nd Division: Major Joseph W Burby, division veterinarian

IV Corps: Major W Reid Blair, corps veterinarian - Click on the link: Major W. Reid Blair DVM


89th Division: Captain George G Miller, division veterinarian
42nd Division: Major Aquilla Mitchell, division veterinarian
1st Division: Major Herbert S Williams, division veterinarian

V Corps: Major Cha. E. Clayton, corps veterinarian
26th Division: Major Harry F. Steele, division veterinarian
4 th Division: Major Robt. A McAuslin, division veterinarian
15th French Colonial Division: French Service

II Corps: French Army: French Service
2nd Cavalry Division: First Army Service
39 th Division: Division veterinarian not reported

In Reserve:
78th Division: Major Phillip V. Weaver, division veterinarian
3rd Division: Major Jesse D. Derrick, division veterinarian
4th Division (Part of); First Army Service
91st Division: Major Andrew Donavan, division veterinarian
80th Division: Major John L. Wells, division veterinarian

Note; At this time the veterinary service was a branch of the remount division of the Quartermaster Department.

OFFICIAL MEMORANDUM OF THE VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE ST. MIHIEL OPERATION
Click on the below link:
Official Report of Veterinary Service at St. Mihiel


Note: In the study of a service of the First Army, it should be remembered that while the battles of St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne are described as different operations, in point of time they were continuous. The needs estimated for the one applied to both. The two were but an American drive that changed direction for east to north. In the manner of speaking, as the echo of St. Mihiel was fading the rumbling of the Argonne was already heard.


THE MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE
The Order of Battle Veterinary Corps

Commanders
General John J. Pershing
Lieutenant General J. Hunter Liggett

Duration: 47 days from September 26 1918
Strength: 1,000,000 men and 100,000 animals
Army Veterinarian: Major L.A. Merillat
Assistant Army Veterinarian: Major M.E. Knowles

I Corps:
Commanders: Lieutenant General J. Hunter Liggett, Major General Joseph P. Dickman

Corps Veterinarian:
Major M.E. Knowles, Major
Major Burton A Seely

77th Division: Captain R.A. Greenwood, division veterinarian
28th Division: Major A.N. Towner, division veterinarian
35th Division: Captain Ora P. Davis, division veterinarian
78th Division: Captain P. Weaver, division veterinarian
82nd Division: Captain Frank Lunn, division veterinarian
1st Reg Army Major Herbert S. Williams, division veterinarian
42nd Division: Major Aquila Mitchell, division veterinarian

V Corps:
Commanders: Major General Geo H Cameron, Major General Chas. P Summerall

Corps Veterinarian: Major E. Clayton

91st Division: Captain A.E. Donovan, division veterinarian
37th Division: Major Harry W Brown, division veterinarian
79th Division: Captain Ernest W. Hogg, division veterinarian
32nd Division: Captain Walter G. White, division veterinarian
92nd Division: Captain R.M.Hofferd, division veterinarian
90th Division: Captain Geo. H Koon, division veterinarian
89th Division: Captain Geo. G. Miller, division veterinarian

III Corps:
Commanders: Major General Robert L Bullard, Major General J.L. Hines

Corps Veterinarian: Major N.L. Nelson

4th Division: Major Robert A McAuslin, division veterinarian
80th Division: Captain John L Wells, division veterinarian
33rd Division: Major Burton A Seeley, Captain W.A. Decker, division veterinarian
3rd Division: Major Jesse D Derrick, division veterinarian
5th Division: Captain Dean B Luce, division veterinarian

XVII French Corps:
Commanders: General Claudel (French Army)

29th Division: Major Joseph E Hodge, division veterinarian
26th Division: Captain W.C. Van Allstyne, Major Harry F Steele, division veterinarian
2nd Reg Army: Major Joseph S Burby, division veterinarian
7th Reg Army: Major Chas. W Gwinner, division veterinarian
18th French: French Veterinary Corps
26th French: French Veterinary Corps


OFFICIAL MEMORANDUM OF THE VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE
Click on the below link:
Official Report of Veterinary Service at the Meuse-Argonne Offensive


VETERINARY MILITARY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, VOLUMES 1 AND II
(Tribute to Delwin M. Campbell, Lt. Col., Vet.- Res)


Delwin M. Campbell, Lt. Col. in uniform during WW2. Vet.- Res., 1880-1952. Co-author of the "Veterinary Military History of the United States, Volume I and II".

Greg
Here is some information on my grandfather:

Delwin Morton Campbell Sr lived as a boy on a farm in eastern Kansas near a Pottawattomie reservation. He graduated from Kansas City Veterinary College and attended Kansas State College. He worked as head of milk inspection in Topeka, KS after his graduation, and developed regulations for the safe and clean production of milk which were used as a model by a number of cities and states. He began the publication of the magazine, "Veterinary Medicine," in 1908. He was a contract veterinarian for the Army in World War I, and was in the Veterinary Reserve Corp in the interim before WWII. In WWII he served four years active duty in the Army at various posts in the U.S. until reaching retirement age. He was the author of veterinary articles for the Encyclopedia Americana. He co-published the "Veterinary Military History of the United States" (two volumes) in 1935, and six other books on veterinary medicine. Delwin Sr's biography appeared in "Who's Who in America" from the late 20s until his death in 1952. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Delwin Campbell (the III)


Here is a picture of my grandfather’s personal copies of “Veterinary Military History of the United States” Volume I and II. He co-authored the books with Louis A. Merillat, Lt. Col., Vet.- Res.( Chief Veterinarian, First Army, American Expeditionary Forces). Also shown is the burial flag used when he was buried at Arlington National Cemetery in 1952.

Editors note: I cannot begin to tell you what a great honor it is to hear from the grandson of Delwin Morton Campbell, co-author of the most important book ever written about the U.S. Veterinary Service. An example of this is in the two above reports “Official Memorandum of the Veterinary Service During the St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne Offensive”. This book is my main source of information for this Website. It is an incredible complete documentation of the United States Veterinary Service up to post- World War One. We cannot thank his grandson, Delwin Campbell (the III) enough for the decision to contact us. In the future we will have a link here going to a special page on Delwin Morton Campbell. – Greg Krenzelok

Click on the below link:
Tribute to Delwin M. Campbell, Lt. Col., Vet.- Res., 1880-1952



Horse Carrying Ammunition in the mud at Flanders WWI



US ARMY REMOUNT UNITS OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR

US QUARTERMASTER CORPS UNDERTAKINGS ON REMOUNTS (HORSES AND MULES)
The Quartermaster Corps was charged with the duty of providing horses and mules for the US Army. This function is known technically as remount, and the buying of horses was in the hands of the remount division.

There were three permanent remount depots in the United States when the war began in April, 1917 one at Front Royal, Virginia, one at Fort Reno, Oklahoma, and one at Fort Keogh, Montana, an auxiliary remount depot at Fort Bliss, Texas, and a purchasing headquarters at Kansas City, Missouri. When it became certain that the Army would need a large number of horses, some of the most celebrated horsemen and riders in the country offered their services as buyers. Some fifty of them were commissioned as captains in the Quartermaster Reserve Corps and sent to the various purchasing headquarters for short training in the proper types of horses and animals required by the Army. These buyers purchased a large number of excellent animals.

In addition to the three existing remount depots there were established 33 additional auxiliary remount depots and two animal embarkation depots. The horses purchased were shipped to the various remount depots and there trained and conditioned for army use. It required a large number of officers and men to care for the remount establishment. Shortly before the armistice was signed there were approximately 400 officers and 19,000 enlisted men in the American remount service.

Thousands of American animals were shipped to the American Expeditionary Forces in France. Because of the lack of tonnage, there were no animal shipments between March 26, 1918, and August 11. Between the declaration of war and March 26, 1918, a total of 30,329 animals were shipped abroad, and in the August 12 November 30 period 37,619 animals crossed the Atlantic, making a total of 67,948 American horses and mules sent to the American Expeditionary Forces. The service of remounts had been confronted with grave difficulties originating in the lack of sea tonnage and the scarcity of animals on the European markets. A total number of 243,560 horses and mules were delivered to the A. E. F.: 136,114 were bought or requisitioned in France; 21,259 came from Great Britain; 18,462 from Spain; 67,725 had been imported from the United States. As of November II, 1918, there had been imported to France 145,000 tons of hay, 215,000 tons of oats; 17,300 tons of bran.

The total expenditures of the Army, both abroad and at home, for horses and mules during the war period was $115, 957,000 divided about half and half between the United States on the one hand and France, England, and Spain on the other.

The largest remount depot developed during the war was located at Camp Jackson, Columbia, South Carolina. This depot had a capacity of about 10,000 animals, and its construction cost was about $300,000. Soon after the armistice was signed, when it became evident that animals would no longer be needed, thousands of horses and mules at the different remount depots were sold at auction, the auction sales drawing large crowds of buyers.


QUARTERMASTER UNDERTAKINGS OF STORAGE DURING THE WAR
The problem of storing army supplies became great only after hostilities had ceased. Before that time supplies were going through the warehouses and to the ships at the deep-water ports so rapidly that there was no backing up of the tide of them in the vast warehouse facilities that had been provided as a war measure. But as soon as the armistice was signed and the Army no longer grew in size, but rapidly diminished as men were discharged, the manufacturing operations under way, necessarily continued for a time on a scale which had been developed in preparation for an Army nearly double the size of the one that existed on November 11, 1918, soon began filling up the warehouses.

The operation of the Jeffersonville, Indiana, general supply depot was typical of the procedure at all the quartermaster depots. During the war the Jeffersonville depot procured for the Quartermaster Corps of the entire Army all horse-drawn vehicles and harness, and such items as barrack ranges, field ranges, and ovens, pack-train equipment, and other supplies. The war deliveries began at Jeffersonville in the late summer of 1917. Receipts soon outgrew storage space. Adjoining lands were leased; and supplies, covered by paulins, were stored in the open. This early period of the war, prior to the spring of 1918, was a back-up period at all the warehouses, for supplies were produced faster than men were trained and transported to France. In the late spring of 1918 Jeffersonville began making heavy shipments of supplies overseas, and from then on shipments exceeded receipts. For three months before the armistice was signed the Jeffersonville depot's shipments averaged sixty carloads a day and its receipts about twenty- five carloads.

After the armistice was signed, Jeffersonville was designated as the depot for the storage of all surplus horse-drawn vehicles and black harness therefor. Extensive temporary storage sheds were erected. Inbound shipments increased to about eighty cars a day. The depot stored 4,000 rolling kitchens of the trail-mobile type, these kitchens being packed in boxes, each package weighing about 4,300 pounds. The piles of boxes were each 45 feet wide, 30 feet high, and 1,000 feet long. Corrugated-iron roofing was placed on the sides and tops, thus forming waterproof buildings. Crated automobile trailers, weighing about 9,000 pounds a crate, were handled in the same manner. Wagons were stored in galvanized-iron warehouses, each one capable of receiving 2,500 wagons, without wheels. Wagon wheels were stored in specially adapted sheds. Automobile trucks were stored in specially constructed sheds. These trucks were mainly Nash Quads, four-wheel-drive trucks, and G. M. C. ambulance chassis. These chassis were stored on end, resting on the bumpers. The engines of all trucks were well oiled and the magnetos covered with waterproof material.

As the supplies backed up into the warehouses, it became necessary for the Army to know where it stood in the matter of property; and a complete inventory was ordered, there having been no time to take stock during the hurry and bustle of the war period. This inventory in itself was an enormous undertaking. To prepare for it the quartermaster training school at Camp Meigs, D. C., was completely transformed into a school for training experts for taking inventories. A standard scheme was worked out. The experts, after being trained in the standard method, were sent out into every zone in the country as instructors. In each zone they convened the so-called "town meetings." The town meeting was made up of army storekeepers from each depot, post, camp, and station in the zone any place where army supplies were stored. These representatives were schooled in the inventory method and then sent back to their stations with instructions to start the inventory on December 31, 1918. The next operation was to organize an inventory factory in Washington as the consolidating point for all the inventories in the United States. Some idea of the number of articles which Uncle Sam accumulated as a result of the war may be gained from the fact that the inventories received in Washington filled 40,600 sheets of paper, each the size of an ordinary large letterhead, with typewriting single spaced. To take the inventory it required in Washington a force of approximately 100 officers and 400 civilians, and there were probably over 10,000 officers and men engaged in the entire operation throughout the country. The inventory was undoubtedly the largest ever taken. Before the war the standard items of army supplies had been 20,000 in number. The inventory, in the consolidation of its figures in Washington, disclosed the fact that at the beginning of the year 1919 there were 120,000 standard items, many of which stood for large quantities of individual pieces. A catalogue, or standard nomenclature list, of supplies, comprising 120,000 items, was then prepared, to establish throughout the United States one language of supply for all items stored, distributed, and issued under the direction of the Director of Storage.


REMOUNT OFFICERS OF THE FIRST ARMY WHO ABLY ASSISTED IN THE VETERINARY CORPS WORK

ARMY HEADQUARTERS Major Victor C Mather Q.M.C.
Chief Remount Officer G-4, 1st Lt Bryce Wing Q.M.C.
Assistant Remount Officer G-4 I Corps Captain R. S. Waring Q.M.C
Remount Officer (Corps) Captain Bolling Haxall Q.M.C. v Assistant Remount Officer III Corps Major Pierre Lorillard Q.M.C.
Corps Remount Officer V Corps Captain Charles H Kendrick Q.M.C
Remount Squadron No 301 – Captain J. V. Hunt
Remount Squadron No 301 – Captain George B Sheldon
Remount Squadron No 314 – Captain R. J. Meskell

DIVISIONAL REMOUNT OFFICERS 1st Division – 1st Lt J Hunter Lucas
3rd Division – Captain Wallace C Stiles
4th Division – Captain Maurice Campbell
5th Division – 1st Lt John P Healey
26th Division – Captain Nicholas Biddle
32nd Division – Captain W. P. Little
33rd Division – Captain Key Smith
42nd Division – Captain R. A. Mead
77th Division – 1st Lt Bayard Tuckerman
78th Division – 1st Lt L.L.Shannon
80th Division – Captain H. B. Wainright
82nd Division – Captain Fred B Holbert
89th Division – 1st Lt G. M. Kellogg

REMOUNT SQUADRONS WHICH PARTICIPATED IN THE VETERINARY CORPS ACTIVITIES DURING THE MEUSE-ARGONNE OPERATIONS
301st Field Remount Squadron – Army Animal Evacuation Depot - Aubreville
302st Field Remount Squadron – With the III Corps – Souhesmes la Grande
303rd Field Remount Squadron – With the V Corps – Neuilly
312th Field Remount Squadron – With the V Corps – Ville-sur-Cousances
314th Field Remount Squadron – Army Animal Evacuation Depot – Baleicourt



Above picture, Remount Station at Camp Lee during WW1

REMOUNT DEPOT STATIONS PERMANENT IN THE UNITED STATES DURING WW1
Front Royal, Virginia , 2 commissioned officers, 12 enlisted personnel, Permanent station Authorized Capacity 500 animals, Average animal Strength 784 animals
Fort Keogh, Montana , 2 commissioned officers, 20 enlisted personnel, Permanent station Authorized Capacity 2500 animals, Average animal Strength 1737 animals
Fort Reno, Oklahoma , 2 commissioned officers, 12 enlisted personnel, Permanent station Authorized Capacity 2000 animals, Average animal Strength 1253 animals
Fort Robinson, Nebraska , 2 commissioned officers, 12 enlisted personnel, Permanent station Authorized Capacity 1000 animals, Average animal Strength animals unknown


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT STATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES DURING WW1

AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 301
Camp Devons, Massachusetts, , 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-19-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 3437


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 302
Camp Upton, New York, , 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-25-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 3434


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 303
Camp Dix, New Jersey, , 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-8-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 3361

Click on the below link:
Auxiliary Remount Depot No 303


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 304
Camp Meade, Maryland, , 6a commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-3-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4504

Click on the below link:
U.S. Auxiliary Remount Depot


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 305
Camp Lee, Virginia, , 6a commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-22-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4810

Click on the below link:
Remount Depot No 305 WW1


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 306
Camp Greene, South Carolina, , 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-8-1917, Closed 5-10-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 5199


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 307
Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, , 6a commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-20-1917, Closed 5-23-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 5570


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 308
Camp Hancock, Georgia, , 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-13-1917, Closed 6-4-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 2671

Click on the below link:
Auxiliary Remount Depot No 308


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 309
Camp McClellan, Alabama, , 6a commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-19-1917, Closed 7-21-1919, Authorized capacity c5000 animals, average animal strength 4342

Click on the below link
Remount Depot No 309 WW1


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 310
Camp Sevier, South Carolina, , 6a commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-16-1917, Closed 6-1-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 5422

Click on the below link
Remount Depot No 310 WW1


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 311
Camp Wheeler, Georgia, 6a commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-16-1917, Closed 6-6-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4531


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 312
Camp Sheridan, Alabama, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-4-1917, Closed 7-8-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 3394

Click on the below link
Remount Depot No 312 WW1


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 313
Camp Shelby, Mississippi, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-13-1917, Closed 5-31-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4216


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 314
Camp Beauregard, Iowa, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-13-1917, Closed 5-31-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4216


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 315
Camp Jackson, South Carolina, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-6-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity c5000 animals, average animal strength 3373


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 316
Camp Gordon, Georgia 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-7-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4015

The Roster of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 316 that has been posted by Jon B Miller of Fife & Drum Military and Historical Antiques
Click on the below link to read the Roster of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 316
Remount Depot No 316 WW1


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 317
Camp Pike, Arkansas , 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-7-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 3644


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 318
Camp Sherman, Ohio, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-18-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4471


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 319
Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-12-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 3740

Click on the below link
Remount Depot No 319 WW1


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 320
Camp Custer, Michigan, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-6-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 3313


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 321
Camp Grant, Illinois, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-15-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 3365

Click on the below link:
Auxiliary Remount Depot No 321 Camp Grant


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 322
Camp Dodge, Iowa, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-13-1917, Closed, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4208


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 323
Click on the below link to read the Roster of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 323
Remount Depot No 323 during WW1


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 324
Camp MacArthur, Texas, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-9-1917, Closed 5-31-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 5286


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO.325
Camp Logan, Texas, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-7-1917, Closed 3-15-1919, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4897

Click on the below link:
U.S. Auxiliary Remount Depot No. 325


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 326
Camp Cody, New Mexico, 6a commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-11-1917, Closed 9-16-1919, Authorized capacity c5000 animals, average animal strength 5099


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 327
Fort Sill, Oklahoma, 6a commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-9-1917, Closed 8-31-1919, Authorized capacity c5000 animals, average animal strength 4418


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 328
Camp Bowie, Texas, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-8-1917, , Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4500

Click on the below link:
Auxiliary Remount Depot No. 328


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 329
Camp Travis, Texas, 14 commissioned officers 175 enlisted personnel, opened 9-6-1917, , Authorized capacity 10000 animals, average animal strength 9613


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 330
Camp Kearney, California, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-6-1917, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 4614


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 331
Camp Lewis, Washington, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 9-3-1917, Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 3178

Click on the below click to see The Remount Station at Camp Lewis Tacoma Washington around 1917
Remount Station at Camp Lewis Tacoma Washington


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 332
Camp Fremont, California, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 12-4-1917, Closed 3-3-1919 , Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 2258


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 333
Camp Johnston, Florida, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 1-19-1917, Closed 3-10-1919 , Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 2000

Click on the below link to view a picture of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 in the middle of April 1918 at Camp Joseph E. Johnston Florida. This is dedicated to Corporal Alfred H. Phillips by his son Robert Phillips and to all those that served in the Auxiliary Remount Depots in WW1. Bob has posted these wonderful pictures of his father's which has been in storage for many years. We are working on locating his father in the picture of the Remount Depot No 333. Robert has given us a short excerpt from my Father's upcoming autobiography
Remount Depot No 333 during WW1

Click on the below link to view pictures posted by Michael Wragg of his grandfather, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg who was assigned to Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 st Camp Joseph E. Johnston in Florida and sent to France with the 306th Field Remount Squadron during WW1. Robert Phillips from the above link was able to find information on his father Corporal Alfred H. Phillips on a roster that Michael Wragg had in his grandfather's, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg WW1 collection of things. Mike had also posted a ROSTER OF THE FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO 306 on this page. This list of men is not from an official US Army Roster but a list of names that Mike’s grandfather had in some paperwork
Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg Aux Remount Depot No 333, 306 Field Remount Squadron


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 334
Fort Bliss, Texas, 6 commissioned officers 75 enlisted personnel, opened 1-19-1918, Closed 3-10-1919 , Authorized capacity 5000 animals, average animal strength 5653

Index
a – Increased to 9 officers 100 enlisted May 8 1918
b – Increased to 11 officers 150 enlisted May 8 1918
c – Increased to 7500 animals May 8 1918
d – Increased to 10000 animals May 8 1918
e – Weekly average December 29 1917 to January 1 1919. Sales began with rapid reduction in animals
f – 25 Transport veterinarians in addition
g – 300 Enlisted fro duty on transports added August 19 1918


US ARMY FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRONS OF WW1 It was the field remount squadrons that trained at the Auxiliary Remount Stations in the US that went overseas to France to handle the resupplying of Horses and Mules for the Army. There was Field Remount Squadrons in many units of the US Army in France.

VETERINARY DETACHMENTS ASSIGNED TO FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRONS, The Quartermaster Corps organized at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida field remount squadrons No 301 to No 384 (Corps Remount Depots,T. of O No 332) A veterinary detachment 1 officer, 2 farriers and 1 private 1st class was authorized and supplied for units No 301 – 321 and No 339 – 384 inclusive. Of these numbers No 301 – 321 and 339 – 346 went overseas.

NOTE: Farriers were what you could call nurses for animals

NOTE: Veterinary personnel was also sent to France with 4 Cavalry regiments, 6 Engineer regiments, and 29 field remount squadrons.


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 1 TO 300
These units were never organized


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 301
Organized February 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from April 1918 to October 1919, Demobilization October 1919 at Camp Dix, NJ, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Hoboken NJ on April 30 1918, Remarks Corps Troops

Click on the below RS No 301 link:
Remount Squadron No 301


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 302
Organized February 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from April 1918 to October 1919, Demobilization October 1919 at Camp Dix, NJ, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Hoboken NJ on April 30 1918, Remarks Corps Troops

Click on the below RS No 302 link:
U.S. Remount Squadron No. 302, WW1


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 303
Organized February 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from April 1918 to October 1919, Demobilization October 1919 at Camp Dix, NJ, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Hoboken NJ on April 30 1918, Remarks Army Troops


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 304
Organized February 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from April 1918 to September 1919, Demobilization October 1919 at Camp Dix, NJ, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Hoboken NJ on April 30 1918, Remarks Corps Troops

Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Squadron No. 304, A.E.F., WW1


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 305
Organized April 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, Overseas from June 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on June 30 1918, Remarks Army Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 305 assigned for early convoy June 6 1919 arrived Home from the war at Charleston SC on June 26 1919 on the Transport Zeelandia which came from Brest

Click on the below link to view a picture of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 in the middle of April 1918 at Camp Joseph E. Johnston Florida. This is dedicated to Corporal Alfred H. Phillips by his son Robert Phillips and to all those that served in the Auxiliary Remount Depots in WW1. Bob has posted these wonderful pictures of his father's which has been in storage for many years. We are working on locating his father in the picture of the Remount Depot No 333. Robert has given us a short excerpt from my Father's upcoming autobiography. Bob's father was also part of 306th Field Remount Squadron and went overseas to France during the WW1. BOB FATHER AND BELOW MIKE GRANDFATHER WERE IN THE 306TH FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON AND HAVE BEEN ABLE TO EXCHANGE A LARGE AMOUNT OF INFORMATION WITH EACH OTHER FROM THEIR POST ON THE WEBSITE.
Remount Squadron No 333 during WW1

Click on the below link to view pictures posted by Michael Wragg of his grandfather, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg who was assigned to Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 st Camp Joseph E. Johnston in Florida and sent to France with the 306th Field Remount Squadron during WW1. Robert Phillips from the above link was able to find information on his father Corporal Alfred H. Phillips on a roster that Michael Wragg had in his grandfather's, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg WW1 collection of things. Mike had also posted a ROSTER OF THE FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO 306 on this page. This list of men is not from an official US Army Roster but a list of names that Mike’s grandfather had in some paperwork
Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg Aux Remount Depot No 333, 306 Field Remount Squadron


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 306
Organized April 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from June 1918 to October 1919, Demobilization October 1919 at Camp Pike, Arkansas, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on June 30 1918, Remarks Corps Troops


Field Remount Squadron No 306, picture taken in Germany, 1918 from left to right, Lt Warden, Crame, Fisher and Ehrenburg.

Note: I would like to thank Michel Gilbert who is French but lives in Brussels, Belgium for making the above correction of the Field Remount Squadron No 306 picture that was taken in Germany and not St Nazaire.
Click on the below link:
Michel Gilbert's Picture Collection

Remount Squadron No. 306, click on the below link:
Remount Squadron No 306 in WW 1

Click on the below link to view a picture of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 in the middle of April 1918 at Camp Joseph E. Johnston Florida. This is dedicated to Corporal Alfred H. Phillips by his son Robert Phillips and to all those that served in the Auxiliary Remount Depots in WW1. Bob has posted these wonderful pictures of his father's which has been in storage for many years. We are working on locating his father in the picture of the Remount Depot No 333. Robert has given us a short excerpt from my Father's upcoming autobiography. Bob's father was also part of 306th Field Remount Squadron and went overseas to France during the WW1. BOB FATHER AND BELOW MIKE GRANDFATHER WERE IN THE 306TH FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON AND HAVE BEEN ABLE TO EXCHANGE A LARGE AMOUNT OF INFROMATION WITH EACH OTHER FROM THEIR POST ON THE WEBITE.
Remount Squadron No 333 during WW1

Click on the below link to view pictures posted by Michael Wragg of his grandfather, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg who was assigned to Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 st Camp Joseph E. Johnston in Florida and sent to France with the 306th Field Remount Squadron during WW1. Robert Phillips from the above link was able to find information on his father Corporal Alfred H. Phillips on a roster that Michael Wragg had in his grandfather's, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg WW1 collection of things. Mike had also posted a ROSTER OF THE FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO 306 on this page. This list of men is not from an official US Army Roster but a list of names that Mike’s grandfather had in some paperwork
Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg Aux Remount Depot No 333, 306 Field Remount Squadron


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 307
Organized April 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from June 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Devens, Massachusetts, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on June 30 1918, Remarks Corps Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 307 was due home from the war and to arrive at New York July 5 1919 on the Huntington

Click on the below link to view a picture of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 in the middle of April 1918 at Camp Joseph E. Johnston Florida. This is dedicated to Corporal Alfred H. Phillips by his son Robert Phillips and to all those that served in the Auxiliary Remount Depots in WW1. Bob has posted these wonderful pictures of his father's which has been in storage for many years. We are working on locating his father in the picture of the Remount Depot No 333. Robert has given us a short excerpt from my Father's upcoming autobiography. Bob's father was also part of 306th Field Remount Squadron and went overseas to France during the WW1. BOB FATHER AND BELOW MIKE GRANDFATHER WERE IN THE 306TH FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON AND HAVE BEEN ABLE TO EXCHANGE A LARGE AMOUNT OF INFORMATION WITH EACH OTHER FROM THEIR POST ON THE WEBSITE.
Remount Depot No 333 during WW1

Click on the below link to view pictures posted by Michael Wragg of his grandfather, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg who was assigned to Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 st Camp Joseph E. Johnston in Florida and sent to France with the 306th Field Remount Squadron during WW1. Robert Phillips from the above link was able to find information on his father Corporal Alfred H. Phillips on a roster that Michael Wragg had in his grandfather's, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg WW1 collection of things. Mike had also posted a ROSTER OF THE FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO 306 on this page. This list of men is not from an official US Army Roster but a list of names that Mike’s grandfather had in some paperwork
Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg Aux Remount Depot No 333, 306 Field Remount Squadron


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 308
Organized April 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from June 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization June 1919 at Camp Upton, New York, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on June 30 1918, Remarks Corps Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 308 arrived Home from the war at New York on June 19 1919 on the Transport South Bend.

Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Squadron No 308 Thanksgiving Roster 1918 A.E.F.

Click on the below link to view a picture of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 in the middle of April 1918 at Camp Joseph E. Johnston Florida. This is dedicated to Corporal Alfred H. Phillips by his son Robert Phillips and to all those that served in the Auxiliary Remount Depots in WW1. Bob has posted these wonderful pictures of his father's which has been in storage for many years. We are working on locating his father in the picture of the Remount Depot No 333. Robert has given us a short excerpt from my Father's upcoming autobiography. Bob's father was also part of 306th Field Remount Squadron and went overseas to France during the WW1. BOB FATHER AND BELOW MIKE GRANDFATHER WERE IN THE 306TH FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON AND HAVE BEEN ABLE TO EXCHANGE A LARGE AMOUNT OF INFORMATION WITH EACH OTHER FROM THEIR POST ON THE WEBSITE.
Remount Depot No 333 during WW1

Click on the below link to view pictures posted by Michael Wragg of his grandfather, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg who was assigned to Auxiliary Remount Depot No 333 st Camp Joseph E. Johnston in Florida and sent to France with the 306th Field Remount Squadron during WW1. Robert Phillips from the above link was able to find information on his father Corporal Alfred H. Phillips on a roster that Michael Wragg had in his grandfather's, Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg WW1 collection of things. Mike had also posted a ROSTER OF THE FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO 306 on this page. This list of men is not from an official US Army Roster but a list of names that Mike’s grandfather had in some paperwork
Corporal Luther Leonard Wragg Aux Remount Depot No 333, 306 Field Remount Squadron


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 309
Organized June 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Mills, New York, Overseas from July 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Upton, New York, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on July 26 1918, Remarks Corps Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 309 was assigned to early convoy return Home on June 5 1919

Field Remount Squadron No 309 due home from the war at New York on July 5 1919 on the transport Noordam coming from Brest left June 26 1919


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 310
Organized June 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from July 1918 to October 1919, Demobilization October 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on July 31 1918, Remarks Corps Troops

Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Squadron No. 310, WW1


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 311
Organized June 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Overseas from August 1918 to November 1919, Demobilization November 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on August 14 1918, Remarks Army Troops


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 312
Organized June 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Overseas from August 1918 to October 1919, Demobilization October 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on August 6 1918, Remarks Army Troops

Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Squadron No. 312, WW1


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 313
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Overseas from August 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Devens, Massachusetts, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on August 27 1918, Remarks Army Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 313 arrived Home from the war at Boston July 5 1919 on the Battle ship Virginia


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 314
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Overseas from August 1918 to November 1919, Demobilization November 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on August 27 1918, Remarks Army Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 314 was at Treves Germany as of July 11 1919


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 315
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Overseas from August 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Upton, New York, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, and Enlisted 3, embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on August 27 1918, Remarks Corps Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 315 arrived Home from the war at New York on June 25 1919 on the Transport Santa Teresa, which came from St Nazaire


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 316
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Overseas from August 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization June 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on August 27 1918, Remarks Army Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 316 arrived Home from the war at Philadelphia on June 26 1919 on the Transport Santa Barbara


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 317
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Overseas from August 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization June 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on August 27 1918, Remarks Army Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 317 assigned Home for early Convoy Notice: Washington June 5 1919

Field Remount Squadron No 317 is due to arrive from the war at Philadelphia on June 20 1919 on the transport Ohioan

Click on the below link:
Remount Squadron No 317 in WW1


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 318
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Overseas from August 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Devens, Massachusetts, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on August 27 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 318 arrived Home from the war at Boston July 5 1919 on the Battle ship Virginia

Click on the below link:
Remount Squadron No 318 in WW 1


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 319
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Overseas from September 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization June 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Norfolk, VA on August 8 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 319 assigned Home for early Convoy Notice: Washington June 5 1919

Field Remount Squadron No 319 is due home from the war and will arrive at Philadelphia on June 20 1919 on the transport Ohioan

I found a different listing for RMS No 319: arrived in Boston July 5 1919 on the Battle ship Virginia came from Brest June 23 1919 (Note RMS No 318, 319 and 321 were on this ship


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 320
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from September 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Funston, Kansas, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on September 8 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 320 arrived home from the war at New York on June 24 1919 on the transport Alphonso XIII


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 321
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Overseas from September 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Devens, Massachusetts, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of Newport News, VA on September 8 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 321 arrived Home from the war at Boston July 5 1919 on the Battle ship Virginia


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 322
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from September 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Remarks S.O.S. Troops


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 323
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from September 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Bowie, Texas, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 323 due home from the war and to arrive at New York on June 28 1919 on the transport Santa Rosa

Click on the below link:
Remount Squadron No 323


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 324
Organized July 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from September 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Devens, Massachusetts, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 324 arrived Home from the war at Boston July 4 1919 on the Transport Vedic that came from Brest


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 325
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from September 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Upton, New York, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 325 due home from the war at Newport News on June 23 1919 on the Transport DeKalb sailed for St Nazaire June 12 1919


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 326
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from September 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 326 assigned Home for early Convoy Notice: Washington June 5 1919

Field Remount Squadron No 326 due home from the war and arrive at Philadelphia on June 22 1919 on the Iowan from Bordeaux June 10 1919


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 327
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from September 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 327 arrived Home from the war at Charleston July 11 1919 on the Transport Madawaska sailed from St Nazaire


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 328
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from September 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization June 1919 at Camp Bowie, Texas, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 328 arrived Home from the war at New York on June 27 1919 on the Transport Sierra leaving St Nazaire


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 329
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Stuart, Virginia and Camp Mill, New York, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from September 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Upton, New York, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 329 assigned Home for early Convoy Notice: Washington June 5 1919

Field Remount Squadrons No 329 arrived Home from the war on July 5 1919 on the Cruiser Seattle turned Transport. Field Remount Squadrons No 329 and 331 were on the same ship. During the voyage the bark Hugomont of Glasgow was short of food and water and was re- supplied by the Seattle


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 330
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Mill, New York, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from September 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Upton, New York, Remarks S.O.S. Troops


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 331
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, New Jersey in September 1918, and Camp Merritt, New Jersey in July 1919, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from October 1918 to July1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Sherman, Ohio, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 331 arrived Home from the war on July 5 1919 on the Cruiser Seattle turned Transport. Field Remount Squadrons No 329 and 331 were on the same ship. During the voyage the bark Hugomont of Glasgow was short of food and water and was re- supplied by the Seattle


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 332
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, New Jersey in September 1918, and Camp Merritt, New Jersey in July 1919, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from October 1918 to July1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Pike, Arkansas, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 332 arrived Home from the war at New York on July 15 1919 on the Transport St Louis sailed from Brest on July 2 1919


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 333
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, New Jersey in September 1918, and Camp Merritt, New Jersey in July 1919, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from October 1918 to July1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Pike, Arkansas, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 333 due from the war at New York on July 14 1919 on the Imperator

Field Remount Squadrons No 333 arrived Home from the war at New York on July 14 1919 on the Transport Imperator


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 334
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, New Jersey in September 1918, and Camp Stuart, Virginia in June 1919, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from October 1918 to July1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Pike, Arkansas, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 334 assigned to go Home for early convoy June 24 1919. NOTE: Usually it was 7 to 10 later

Field Remount Squadrons No 334 arrived home from the war at Newport New on around July12 1919 on the transport Huron sailed from Bordeaux on June 29 1919


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 335
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia September 1918, and Camp Mills, New York June 1919, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from October 1918 to June1919, Demobilization June 1919 at Camp Upton, New York, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 335 assigned for early convoy Home on June 6 1919. Arrived Home at Newport News on July 6 1919 on the Battle Ship Rhode Island

I found another listing for RMS No 335: due to arrive at New York on June 27 1919 on the transport Santa Paula


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 336
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia September 1918, and Camp Jackson, South Carolina June 1919, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from October 1918 to June1919, Demobilization June 1919 at Camp Bowie, Texas, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 336 arrived Home from the war at Charleston on July 1919 on the Transport Powhatan


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 337
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia September 1918, and Camp Mills, New York June 1919, Point of Embarkation Newport News, VA, Overseas from October 1918 to July1919, Demobilization June 1919 at Camp Pike, Arkansas, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 337 arrived Home from the war Newport News July 18 1919 on the Transport Suwanee or the Transport Floridan (NOTE: I have found both Transports as carrying the 337 NOTE: more research in needed


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 338
Organized August 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia September 1918, and Camp Hill, Virginia June 1919, Point of Embarkation Newport New, Overseas from October 1918 to July1919, Demobilization June 1919 at Camp Bowie, Texas, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 338 arrived Home from the war at New York on June 19 1919 on the Transport South Bend or It may have arrived at Newport News on July 6 1919 on the Battleship Rhode Island. NOTE: more research in needed

I found another listing Field Remount Squadrons No 338: due to arrive at Newport News on July 6 1919 on the Rhode Island came from Brest on June 23 1919

The below is posted by Brenda Barbian

FOUR TRANSPORTS HERE YESTERDAY, THOUSANDS OF TROOPS CELEBRATED FOURTH BY COMING HOME

Daily Press, July 5, 1919

Four transports arrived here yesterday, while two others were just outside of the harbor and making their way to port last night. The General Georgas, Rhode Island, Orizaba and El Oriente arrived, bringing an aggregate of 8,800 men, while the two shops on their way have almost 5,000 other war veterans on board.

The General Georgas sailed from Bordeaux June 30, and is bringing 1,000 men, including Depot Service Company 27, the 44th, 51st, 847th and 166th Company Transportation Corps, Field Remount Squadron 338, 28th and 39th Companies, 20th Engineers, and the 315th Motor Transport Company, making a total of 2,000 men. She was followed by the El Oriente from Bordeaux, June 24, with 76 military prisoners, 346th Service Battalion, Depot Service Company 12, and a number of casuals.

The Orizaba, which arrived late yesterday and discharged her men, at the army base in Norfolk, had on board the 807th Pioneer Infantry, 525th Engineers, and other detachments, making a total of 4,000 men.


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 339
Organized September 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Upton, New York, October 1918, and Camp Merritt, New Jersey in June 1919, Point of Embarkation Hoboken, New York, Overseas from October 1918 to June 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Bowie, Texas, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of New York City on October 27 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 339 due to arrive home from the war at New York on June 28 1919 on the transport Santa Rosa


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 340
Organized September 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey in June 1919, Point of Embarkation Hoboken, New York, Overseas from October 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Dodge, Iowa, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of New York City on October 27 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 340 due home from the war at New York on July 14 1919 on the transport Pueblo sailing from Brest on July 3 1919


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 341
Organized September 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Jackson, South Carolina in June 1919, Point of Embarkation Hoboken, New York, Overseas from October 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Dodge, Iowa, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of New York City on October 27 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 342
Organized September 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Mills, New York in July 1919, Point of Embarkation Hoboken, New York, Overseas from October 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Dodge, Iowa, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of New York City on October 27 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 342 assigned for early convoy Home on June 24 1919

Field Remount Squadrons No 342 due home from the war at New York on July 7 1919 on the Calamares sailed from St Nazaire on June 27 1919


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 343
Organized September 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Point of Embarkation Hoboken, New York, Overseas from October 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of New York City on October 27 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 344
Organized September 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Point of Embarkation Hoboken, New York, Overseas from October 1918 to November 1919, Demobilization November 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of New York City on October 27 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 345
Organized September 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Point of Embarkation Hoboken, New York, Overseas from October 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Devens, Massachusetts Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of New York City on October 27 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadron No 345 assigned Home for early Convoy Notice: Washington June 5 1919


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 346
Organized October 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Stuart, Virginia, Point of Embarkation Hoboken, New York, Overseas from October 1918 to July 1919, Demobilization July 1919 at Camp Grant, Illinois, Veterinary Corps personnel, commissioned officer 1, enlisted 3, Embarked overseas for the port of New York City on October 27 1918, Remarks S.O.S. Troops

Field Remount Squadrons No 346 arrived Home from the war at Newport News July 5 1919 on the Transport El Sol


Early Convoy Notice: From Washington June 5 1919 for Field Remount Squadrons 317, 319, 324, 326 329, 331 and 345 and also No 2nd Cavalry Headquarters


THE BELOW FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRONS I BELIEVE DID NOT GO OVERSEAS AND SOME WERE NEVER ORGANIZED. BUT I HAVE NOT BEEN ABLE TO CONFIRM THIS YET - GREG


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 347
Organized October 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia November 1918, Overseas? , Demobilization February 1919 at Camp Lee, Virginia,

Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Squadron No 347 in WW 1


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 348
Organized October 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Hill, Virginia November 1918, Overseas? , Demobilization January 1919 at Camp Lee, Virginia


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 349
Organized October 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Jackson, South Carolina December 1918, Overseas? , Demobilization January 1919 at Camp Jackson, South Carolina


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 350
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Sherman, Ohio January 1918, Overseas? , Demobilization January 1919 at Camp Sherman, Ohio


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 351
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp McClellan, Alabama February 1918, Overseas? , Demobilization January 1919 at Camp McClellan, Alabama


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 352
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Bowie, Texas January 1918, Overseas? , Demobilization January 1919 at Camp Bowie, Texas

Click on the below link:
Field Remount Squadron No. 352


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 353
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina January 1918, Overseas? , Demobilization January 1919 at Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 354
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp McClellan, Alabama January 1918, Overseas? , Demobilization January 1919 at Camp McClellan, Alabama


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 355
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida, Stationed at Camp McClellan, Alabama January 1918, Overseas? , Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 356
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 357
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 358
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 359
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 360
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 361
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 362
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 363
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 364
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 365
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


FIELD REMOUNT SQUADRON NO. 366
Organized November 1918 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida. Demobilization December 1919 at Camp Joseph E Johnston, Florida


THE REMOUNT SQUADRONS THAT TOOK PART OF EVERY PHASE OF ANIMAL CARE IN THE A.E.F. AND THEIR ORIGINAL STATION LOCATION
These remount squadrons were organized in the United States, the personnel being composed of men experienced in the handling of animals. Request was made by the A.E.F. to have a number of these remount squadrons sent to France, as outlined but there never were sufficient amounts of them on hand to properly care for the animals.

The first four squadrons, numbers 301-302-303-304, under the command respectively of Captains John S. Hunt, A.C. Swenson, F.J. Rosenberg and J.T. Sallee, sailed from Hoboken, April 30, 1918, and arrived at St. Nazaire May 12, 1918

In all, 46 Remount Squadrons were sent to France, the last to come being Squadron No 346, which arrived November 16, 1918

These Squadrons took part in every phase of animal care in the A.E.F. and were in constant demand for duty in Armies, Corps and at Remount Depots. The services rendered by them were invaluable where ever they were placed, and those that were sent to Armies received the commendation of the Army authorities, not only for the Remount work they performed but for the assistance they gave in evacuating debilitated animals. The services rendered by these Squadrons, compared with the conclusively that experienced personnel should be provided for the handling of animals. The following listing shows the Squadrons that arrived in France.

Note: Even know the below is the orginal station location it should be remembered these remount squadrons were re-assigned quite often.

Remount Squadron No 301: Date of Arrival, May 22, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 149; Commanding Officer, Captain J.S. Hunt; Original Station, Coetquidan

Remount Squadron No 302: Date of Arrival, May 22, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 156; Commanding Officer, Captain A.C. Swenson; Original Station, Coetquidan

Remount Squadron No 303: Date of Arrival, May 22, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 157; Commanding Officer, Captain F.J. Rosenberg; Original Station, Coetquidan

Remount Squadron No 304: Date of Arrival, May 22, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 157; Commanding Officer, Captain J.T. Sallee; Original Station, Coetquidan

Remount Squadron No 305: Date of Arrival, July 22, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 151; Commanding Officer, Captain D.T. Dana; Original Station, St. Nazaire

Remount Squadron No 306: Date of Arrival, July 29, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 156; Commanding Officer, Captain D.H. Mordecai; Original Station, St. Nazaire

Remount Squadron No 307: Date of Arrival, July 26, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 131; Commanding Officer, Captain W.H. Hawley; Original Station, Selles-sur-Cher

Remount Squadron No 308: Date of Arrival, July 26, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 148; Commanding Officer, Captain John Mackay; Original Station, Bordeaux

Remount Squadron No 309: Date of Arrival, August 12, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 153; Commanding Officer, Captain J.A. Jackson; Original Station, Merignac

Remount Squadron No 310: Date of Arrival, August 19, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 152; Commanding Officer, Captain L. Martin; Original Station, Coetquidan

Remount Squadron No 311: Date of Arrival, September 3, 1918; Number of officers 4; Number of enlisted men, 131; Commanding Officer, Captain C.R. Baines; Original Station, Carbon Blanc

Remount Squadron No 312: Date of Arrival, August 26, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 131; Commanding Officer, Captain B Thomson; Original Station, Merignac

Remount Squadron No 313: Date of Arrival, September 3, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 153; Commanding Officer, Captain J.J. Minot; Original Station, La Rochelle

Remount Squadron No 314: Date of Arrival, August 31, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 137; Commanding Officer, Captain R.J. Meskill ; Original Station, Gievres

Remount Squadron No 315: Date of Arrival, September 7, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 149; Commanding Officer, Captain C.L. Binns; Original Station, Gievres

Remount Squadron No 316: Date of Arrival, September 6, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 147; Commanding Officer, Captain C.R. Drewry; Original Station, Gievres

Remount Squadron No 317: Date of Arrival, September 6, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 143; Commanding Officer, Captain B.R. Briggs; Original Station, Lux

Remount Squadron No 318: Date of Arrival, September 6, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 136; Commanding Officer, Captain M. Waide; Original Station, Sougy

Remount Squadron No 319: Date of Arrival, September 28, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 157; Commanding Officer, Captain F.A. Thomas; Original Station, Carbon Blanc

Remount Squadron No 320: Date of Arrival, September 28, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 154; Commanding Officer, Captain C.R. Poulson; Original Station, Carbon Blanc

Remount Squadron No 321: Date of Arrival, September 28, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 152; Commanding Officer, Captain B, Henry; Original Station, Carbon Blanc

Remount Squadron No 322: Date of Arrival, September 28, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 152; Commanding Officer, Captain H.E. Reed; Original Station, Carbon Blanc

Remount Squadron No 323: Date of Arrival, September 27, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 150; Commanding Officer, Captain G. Stetekluh; Original Station, La Rochelle

Remount Squadron No 324: Date of Arrival, September 27, 1918; Number of officers 4; Number of enlisted men, 145; Commanding Officer, Captain W.J. Dunn; Original Station, La Rochelle

Remount Squadron No 325: Date of Arrival, October 2, 1918; Number of officers 4; Number of enlisted men, 152; Commanding Officer, 1st Lt. J.O. Mooney; Original Station, St. Nazaire

Remount Squadron No 326: Date of Arrival, September 28, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 149; Commanding Officer, Captain J. VanderVeer; Original Station, Carbon Blanc

Remount Squadron No 327: Date of Arrival, October 1, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 147; Commanding Officer, 1st Lt. L. O’Hair ; Original Station, Grieves

Remount Squadron No 328: Date of Arrival, October 4, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 147; Commanding Officer, Captain J.W. Phillips; Original Station, Lux

Remount Squadron No 329: Date of Arrival, October 25, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 139; Commanding Officer, Captain H. Spencer; Original Station, Selles-sur-Cher

Remount Squadron No 330: Date of Arrival, October 5, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 149; Commanding Officer, Captain J. Chapman; Original Station, Gievres

Remount Squadron No 331: Date of Arrival, November 3, 1918; Number of officers 4; Number of enlisted men, 139; Commanding Officer, Captain 1 st Lt. A.G. Gittings; Original Station, Bourbonne-l- Bains

Remount Squadron No 332: Date of Arrival, November 3, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 125; Commanding Officer, Captain B.N. Ayres; Original Station, Gievres

Remount Squadron No 333: Date of Arrival, October 23, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 136; Commanding Officer, Captain F.V. Hyde; Original Station, Gievres

Remount Squadron No 334: Date of Arrival, October 30, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 118; Commanding Officer, Captain W. Brannon; Original Station, La Rochelle

Remount Squadron No 335: Date of Arrival, October 31, 1918; Number of officers 4; Number of enlisted men, 120; Commanding Officer, Captain A. Robinson; Original Station, Bourbonne-les-Bains

Remount Squadron No 336: Date of Arrival, November 2, 1918; Number of officers 4; Number of enlisted men, 127; Commanding Officer, 1st Lt. C.A. Milentz ; Original Station, St. Nazaire

Remount Squadron No 337: Date of Arrival, November 16, 1918; Number of officers 4; Number of enlisted men, 141; Commanding Officer, Captain L.T. Peale; Original Station, Selles-sur-Cher

Remount Squadron No 338: Date of Arrival, November 27, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 137; Commanding Officer, 1st Lt. B.T. Wilson; Original Station, Lux

Remount Squadron No 339: Date of Arrival, November 16, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 153; Commanding Officer, Captain L.V. Frojent ; Original Station, Merignac

Remount Squadron No 340: Date of Arrival, November 24, 1918; Number of officers 6; Number of enlisted men, 152; Commanding Officer, Captain K.C Ikeler ; Original Station, Merignac

Remount Squadron No 341: Date of Arrival, November 24, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 150; Commanding Officer, Captain T.H. McCreary; Original Station, Carbon Blanc

Remount Squadron No 342: Date of Arrival, November 16, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 156; Commanding Officer, Captain S. Dillingham ; Original Station, St. Nazaire

Remount Squadron No 343: Date of Arrival, November 16, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 150; Commanding Officer, Captain C. Mayer; Original Station, Carbon Blanc

Remount Squadron No 344: Date of Arrival, November 16, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 147; Commanding Officer, Captain W.E. Farrow; Original Station, Verdun

Remount Squadron No 345: Date of Arrival, November 16, 1918; Number of officers 4; Number of enlisted men, 154; Commanding Officer, Captain J.G. Dawson; Original Station, Selles-sur-Cher

Remount Squadron No 346: Date of Arrival, November 16, 1918; Number of officers 5; Number of enlisted men, 141; Commanding Officer, Captain S.O. Macy; Original Station, Lux


CONCLUSION
During the activates of the Remount Service in the A.E.F. from the beginning of operations in France in June, 1917 to the date of the signing of Peace, thirty-eight Remount Depots were operated, one Depot at Argeles was constructed by not used; one temporary Depot was put in operation in the Le Mans area, authority for four more Depots was secured but were not constructed due to the signing of the Armistice and two Remount organization operated sales centers at Toulouse and Miramas, On the date that Peace was signed there two Remount Depots in operation, both which were in Germany for the use of the Army of Occupation.

Conditions under which Remount Depots were established both in France and in Germany did not make for the best results. Depots had to be opened where large numbers of animals were to be held. In peace time it is possible to make long moves with animals but in the A.E.F. it was necessary to forestall every possible movement which involved railways or long delays.

In the early history of the Remount Service in France plans were made to handle animals coming direct from the French civilians. Where there were centers to which animals had to be delivered it was necessary to arrange with the French Government for the procurement of a place to hold these animals. That accounts for the number of little depots, which dotted many sections of France. They were called annexes by the French but they operated as Depots for the American Army. As the need for the smaller depots in various disappeared they were returned to the French Government.

In the Depots established by the U.S. Army in France it was necessary to work out a new method of caring for animals. The personnel that had been trained in the United States and been use to the corral system, but that was inadequate in France as animals had to be trained and conditioned before being issued to combat organizations. During the major portion of operations there was a great shortage of animals which precluded that training which had been prescribed by the Remount Service.

Many innovations were tried out and found successful. The system of exercising animals, the addition of hay cutting and oat grinding machines to the equipment of Depots among other improvements brought about better conditions in the Remount Service. The hay cutting and oat grinding machines, motor propelled, were found to be highly successful and the process of dismantling Depots began permission was secured for the shipment to the United States of twelve of these machines for use in the Depots there.

After nearly two years of work in the field, officers of the Remount Service have worked out various schemes whereby it was possible to obtain a greater degree of efficiency. Standing orders were made up in each Depot for routine work. These orders made it possible for each detail to secure results without a great deal of duplication of effort and lost of motion. By the end of the war the Remount Service and Veterinary Service knew what they were doing, and did it well!


REMOUNT DEPOTS (STATIONS) A.E.F., WW1

Following is a list of Depot Location that operated in France

A.E.F Remount Depot at: St. Nazaire No 1
Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Depot No. 1 St. Nazaire France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: St. Nazaire No 2
Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Depot No. 2 St. Nazaire France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: La Pallice No 5
Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Depot No. 5 La Pallice France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Bayonne

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Bourbonne-les-Bains
Click on the below link:
Remount Depot Bourborn les Bains, Hte. Marne, France

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Montiers-sur-Saulix
Click on the below link:
U.S. Army Remount Depot No. 1 Montiers-sur-Saulix, France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Nancy

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Besancon

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Commercy

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Verdun

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Meucon

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Bellac

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Lavergne

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Gramat

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Valdahon

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Bourges

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Lux
Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Depot No. 31, Lux, France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Selles-sur-Cher

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Merignac No 7 (in the vicinity of Bordeaux)
Click on the below link for more information on the Remount Depot No. 7 at Merignac, France and an very important document posted here.
Remount Depot No. 7, Merignac, France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Sougy No 23
Click on the below link for more information on Remount Depot No. 23 at Sougy France
U.S. Remount Depot No. 23 at Sougy France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: La Rochelle No 4
Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Depot No. 4 La Rochelle, France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Gievres No. 22
Click on the below link for more information on Remount Depot No. 22 at Gievres
Remount Depot No. 22 Gievres Romorantin France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Carbon Blanc (in the vicinity of Bordeaux)
Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Depot No. 8, Carbon Blanc, Bordeaux, France WW1

A.E.F Remount Depot at: La Celle Bruers

A.E.F Remount Depot at: De Souge

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Muret

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Coligny

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Coetquidan

A.E.F Remount Depot at: La Courtine

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Claye-Souilly

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Treveray, Meuse, France
Click on the below link:
Treveray Remount Depot, Meuse, France, November 12, 1918


The following Depots were authorized but not used:

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Pontchateau

A.E.F Remount Depot at: La Rochelle No 2

A.E.F Remount Depot at: St. Sulpice

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Marseilles

A.E.F Remount Depot at: Argeles


U.S. ARMY OCCUPATION FORCE, REMOUNT STATIONS IN GERMANY 1919

U.S. REMOUNT STATION AT WENGEROHR, GERMANY
Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Station at Wengerohr, Germany 1919

U.S. REMOUNT STATION AT KRIPP, GERMANY 1919
Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount Station at Kripp, Germany 1919

U.S. REMOUNT STATION AND VETERINARY HOSPITAL, MONTABAUR, GERMANY 1919
Click on the below link:
U.S. Remount station and veterinary hospital at Montabaur, Germany 1919


Note: When the Remount Service was in charge of the Veterinary Service at the beginning of the war the plan was to have a Remount Depot at each Veterinary Corps Hospital. There was a great many locations with a Veterinary Hospital and a Remount Station stationed together - Greg


OPERATION REPORT OF THE REMOUNT SERVICE DURING WW1 FRANCE
Note: A must to read

Click on the below link:
Operation Report of the Remount Service during WW1


REPORT OF THE OPERATION OF THE REMOUNT SERVICE, A.E.F., FRANCE, WW1
Note: A must to read

Click on the below link:
Report of the Operation of the Remount Service, A.E.F., France, WW1


THE AIM OF THE REMOUNT SERVICE 1921
Click on the below link:
The Aim of the Remount Service 1921



U.S. ARMY CAVALRY UNITS IN FRANCE DURING WW1
It has been my desire to learn about the Cavalry Units of WW1 and honor them too on this website. They are very much connected to this website. Matter of fact it was the first Cavalry Units in France that first cared for the animals until Veterinary Corps Units being traded in the US could be send across the pond. I do have one problem and that is time, there just doesn’t seem to be enough hours in a day any more. So please be patient and if you have information that you would like to share please make it as easy for me as you can by sending me information in e-mails with WORK DOCUMENT attachment for wording. Now if you cannot do that please do not let that stop you. WE NEED YOUR INFORMATION and I will be more than happy to do the write-ups or whatever it takes, but it may take a while to make a post.

NOTE: MY INTENTIONS FROM THE BEGINNING WAS JUST TO COVER THE VETERINARY CORPS BUT AS YOU SEE IT WASN'T THAT SIMPLE AS I HAD HOPED. BUT IT HAS BEEN FASCINATING TO LEARN HOW IT WAS ALL PUT TOGETHER DURING THE WAR. THEY WERE ALL SEPARATE UNITS, BUT ALL CONNECTED IN MANY WAYS. I WILL BE MAINLY COVERING THE CAVALRY UNITS THAT WERE SENT OVERSEAS BUT IF THERE ARE NOT TO MANY I WILL TRY TO COME UP WITH A LIST OF ALL THE UNITS.

NOTE: Veterinary personnel was also sent to France with 4 Cavalry regiments, 6 Engineer regiments, and 29 remount squadrons.

VERY IMPORTANT NOTE: For a long time I have been struggling to understand the connection of the Cavalry with the Remount Service and Veterinary Service. And I think I am beginning to finally understand. The Cavalry was the first on the scene in France during the war; they had always been a horse unit ever since time. They knew horses and their care and at the beginning of the war for the US Army they filled the gap on animal care until the Remount Squadron and Veterinary Units could be formed in the US and sent to France to relieve the Cavalry. Once the Remount and Veterinary were in France working out the details the Cavalry it seems was still working very close the Remount and Veterinary units still filling in the gaps. It seems they work very close with the Army Remount units especially. I keep thinking of them as horse soldiers like I have seen in the movies, and truly they were, but I am thinking to a lesser degree in France as I thought. I still have much to understand but I think I am finally getting the picture. One thing for sure is that they were very closely connected to the Remount and Veterinary Services and the animal care during this war. I have read that one of the things the Cavalry would do was to exercise the recovering horses at Veterinary Corps Hospitals - GREG


THE U.S. CAVALRY IN WORLD WAR 1
The cavalry organization of seventeen regiments in effect when the United States entered the war against Germany was based upon the National Defense Act of 1916. In May 1917 emergency laws called for immediate increase to the full strength authorized by the National Defense Act, and organization of the remaining eight new cavalry regiments began at once. To speed up the process, certain old units in June 1917 transferred two-thirds of their men to the new regiments. The new regiments were numbered the 18th through the 25th. But, one month after their organization was completed, all eight began training as field artillery. On 1 October 1917 Congress acted to make their conversion to field artillery legal, and on 1 November 1917 the 18th through the 25th Cavalry were redesignated as the 76th through the 83d Field Artillery. Although Congress specified that the units would reorganize as cavalry after the emergency, such action was never taken. Hence, the histories of the former 18th through 25th Cavalry are currently perpetuated in a number of artillery units.

An act of Congress on 18 May 1917 provided for twenty National Army (or temporary) cavalry regiments, which were designated 301st through 320th. Fifteen of them, the 301st through the 315th, were organized in early 1918 at various National Army camps, but in August of that year they, too, were converted to field artillery. Thirty field artillery regiments, the 44th through the 72d, and nine trench mortar batteries, the 15th through the 23d, were organized from them. None of those units served outside the United States and all were demobilized in January-February of 1919. The 316th through the 320th Cavalry were not activated during the war years.

By the time the United States entered World War I, the machine gun, together with improved artillery, barbed wire, and elaborate field fortifications, had produced a stalemate on the European Western Front. The Allies and the Germans, with their opposing armies anchored on the sea in the west and on the mountains in the east, repeatedly used waves of infantrymen and heavy artillery barrages in vain efforts to break the deadlock. Their critical need was for mobility and shock action, both traditional roles of horse cavalry, but static trench warfare and the machine gun had made use of the horse impractical.

Four regiments of U.S. cavalry- the 2d, 3d, 6th, and the 15th, nevertheless formed a part of the American Expeditionary Forces, and engaged chiefly in remount duty. That they would have been used otherwise during the latter part of the war had they been available, was implied by General Pershing in 1920. He stated that, once the forces were in the open, cavalry would have been of great value on several occasions, and Allied cavalry trained in American tactics would have been most effective in the pursuit of the enemy northward toward the Meuse.

Since U.S. cavalrymen had been trained to fight dismounted as well as mounted, many of them did see action as foot soldiers. Again, as in earlier wars, many individual awards for gallantry were earned by the dismounted troopers who fought in other arms and services.

Only a very small portion of the U.S. cavalry saw any mounted service in France. In late August 1918, just before the St. Mihiel offensive, a provisional squadron was formed from Troops, B, D, F, and H of the 2d Cavalry. Fourteen officers and 404 enlisted men from those troops with convalescent horses furnished from the veterinary hospital moved to old Camp Jeanne d'Arc, near Neufchateau, for training in mounted action. Lt. Col. Oliver P. M. Hazzard commanded the squadron. Among the troop commanders was Capt. Ernest N. Harmon who, during World War II, was to command the 2d Armored Division and then the XXII Corps.

After about ten days of training, one troop of the Provisional Squadron was detached and marched to Menil-la-Tour, where it reported for courier duty with the 1st, 42d, and 89th Divisions. The remainder of the squadron reported to the 1st Division on the night of 11 September 1918, and by a few minutes past noon of the next day U.S. cavalrymen, mounted, were at Nonsard, about five miles behind the original front line of the enemy. Sent out on reconnaissance duty beyond their capabilities, the cavalrymen met the enemy in considerable force and were routed. Later, in the Meuse-Argonne action, the squadron with three troops maintained liaison between flank divisions and those on the front lines. Among the trenches, which made movement of a whole troop impracticable, small patrols, sometimes riding and sometimes walking, acted as military police and couriers. By mid-October, when withdrawn from the front, the squadron had only 150 mounted effectives, largely because of the evacuation of sick and wounded horses.

After the armistice, Headquarters, Band, and six troops of the 2d Cavalry acted as advance guard for the Army movement into Germany, and afterward were stationed along the Rhine with the American Army of Occupation.

Although few U.S. cavalry regiments went to Europe during World War I, all were well represented there by individual cavalrymen. For example, between May and September 1917, one regiment alone- the new 16th Cavalry- lost most of its original officers by promotion in the National Army; and from May 1917 until November 1918 more than a hundred enlisted members of that regiment received commissions in the National Army. Many of these men saw service in France. After the armistice twenty-six of them returned and reenlisted as non commissioned officers.

Vacancies in cavalry units created by promotion and reassignment were filled by new personnel, and the regiments were moved to the Mexican border, an area well known to the older cavalrymen. Germany's efforts to rekindle trouble between the United States and Mexico were met by the concentration of a cavalry force in the southwest. In December 1917 the 15th Cavalry Division three brigades of three regiments each- was organized in Texas. There were no other cavalry divisions in the Army then, but no explanation for designating this one the 15th has been found. Like the divisions organized during previous emergencies, the life of the 15th was short. Actually, a full division organization was not completed, and it was discontinued in May 1918. The brigade headquarters lasted until July 1919 when they, too, were disbanded.

NOTE: Permission to use the above was granted by:

Donna Everett
Chief, Website Operations Activity
U.S. Army Center of Military History

Visit CMH online they have a wonderful website with lots of informaiton.
Click on the below link:
The U.S. Army Center of Military History


THE 4 CAVALRY UNITS WITH VETERINARY CORPS PERSONAL ATTACH THAT WERE SEND TO FRANCE DURING WW1

2ND CAVALRY REGIMENT - Embarked for Hoboken, New Jersey on March 22 to 29 1918. 2 VC officers, no enlisted men
Posted by: deddygetty, website: http://groups.msn.com/2ndUSCav/2ndcavww1.msnw
In April 1918 the Second Cavalry landed in France and was in the Toul sector within three weeks of leaving home. "I should consider myself fortunate to again have your splendid Regiment a part of my command", wired general Pershing to Colonel West when the Second left Jolo in 1912, and his word was fulfilled, when half a world away, thirty-one of it's troopers landed with him as his escort, first in England, then in France, as Headquarters Troop at Chaumont. The Regiment followed and gained the unique distinction of being the only American Cavalry to remain mounted to reach the firing line. They fought in the Aisne-Marne offensive in July 18 - August 6, 1918, when the American First and Second Divisions smashed in the West face of the German Marne Salient at Soissons. Detachments from the Regiment took part in the Oise-Aisne offensive, August 18 - September 11, but the greatest commendation was gained by the Second Cavalry for it's part in the reduction of the St. Mihiel Salient, Sept. 12-16, when Troops A, B, C, D, F, G and H under Lt. Col. D.P.M. Hazzard were attached to the American First Division of the Fourth Army Corps, making the main effort of the American First Army in France. General Pershing massed six Divisions on an eighteen mile front, so something had to give. The 1st Division jumped off by passing Mont Sec, which the French had assaulted for years in vain, and reached the line Heudicourt-Nosard. Here the Squadron passed through the forest of La Belle Oziere, Nonsard, and Vigneulles, scouted the open country as far as Heudicourt Creue, and Vigneulles, eventually advancing to St. Maurice, Woel, Jonville, pursuing the enemy, fighting his rear guard, capturing numerous prisoners, forcing deployment and delaying his retreat, in fact, doing everything that so small a force could accomplish. This action was followed by the final Allied offensive, the Meuse-Argonne, Sept. 26 to Nov. 11, 1918, with the Second Cavalry being attached to American 35th Division, the left flank of eight Divisions then attacking between the Meuse River and the Argonnes Forest. The plan of the American First Army was to bypass the strong points of Montfaucon and Romagne on both sides and seize the high ground at Barricourt with a converging effort, which would shatter all German positions before Sedan. The 35th Division spearheaded the assault on the left, in an engagement where the troops of the Second Cavalry "during the six days battle at Vauquois, Bois de Rossigny, Quvrage D'Aden, Cheepy, Charpentry, Baulny, Bois de Montre Beau, and Exermont from Sept. 26 to Oct. 2, 1918, accomplished their tasks with fearlessness, courage and disregard of danger and hardship." (quote by P. E. Traub, Major Gen. Commanding 35th Division)With the Germans driven across the Meuse at Sedan the Armistice was signed on Nov. 11 marking the cessation of hostilities. The Second Cavalry remained with the Army of Occupation in Germany at Coblenz until August 1919 when it returned to the States for duty at Fort Riley, Kansas.


THE SECOND CAVALRY IN THE ST. MIHIEL OFFENSIVE, A.E.F., WW1
Click on the below link:
The Second Cavalry in the St. Mihiel Offensive, A.E.F., WW1


3RD CAVALRY REGIMENT - Embarked for Philadeiphia, October 16 1917, attached, 2 VC officers, no enlisted men
In August 1917, the 3rd Cavalry Regiment was alerted for overseas duty. Arriving in France in November, the Regiment was broken up and operated three major remount depots until the war’s end. The only actual 3d Cavalry unit to see action in World War I was K Troop, which was detached from the 3d Squadron and participated in the last three engagements prior to the Armistice of 11 November 1918. After World War I, the Regiment deployed back to the United States and executed a garrison mission until the beginning of World War II.

6TH CAVALRY REGIMENT - Embarked for New York, March 16 1918. 2 VC officers, no enlisted men. NOTE: John J Pershing reported for active duty on September 30, 1886, and was assigned to Troop L of the 6th U.S. Cavalry stationed at Fort Bayard, New Mexico. While serving in the 6th Cavalry, Pershing participated in several Indian campaigns and was cited for bravery for actions against the Apache. Between 1887 and 1890, Pershing served with the 6th Cavalry at various postings in California, Arizona, and North Dakota. He also became an expert marksman and, in 1891, was rated second in pistol and fifth in rifle out of all soldiers in the U.S. Army. On December 9, 1890, Pershing and the 6th Cavalry arrived at Sioux City, Iowa where Pershing played a role in suppressing the last uprisings of the Lakota (Sioux) Indians. A year later, he was assigned as an instructor of military tactics at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Pershing would hold this posting until 1895, but was not promoted, remaining as a Second Lieutenant at the age of 35 years old.

15TH CAVALRY REGIMENT - Embarked for Hoboken, New Jersey on March 14 1918. 2 VC officers, no enlisted men. (Note: I do know no why the enlisted men did not embarked at this time)


Merignac, Remount Depot No. 7. View showing mess hall and barns. Guidons above the doors in the above image are the 15th Cavalry, Troops H and E mess halls (left to right). Merignac, Gironde, France, January 16, 1919

The 15th and the 6th Cavalry saw duty at Veterinary Hospital No. 4. It appears that the cavalry regiments and remount squadrons did move around to serve where needed, more research in needed.

VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 4
Click on the below link:
Veterinary Hospital No 4 at Carbon Blanc and Camp de Souge



US Cavalry Veterinary Corps Farrier WW1 uniform


US Cavalry Veterinary Corps Farrier WW1 uniform with the Veterinary Corps collar disc and USNA collar disc


US Cavalry Veterinary Corps Farrier WW1 uniform shoulder patch


US Cavalry Veterinary Corps Farrier patch WW1 uniform. You could say a Farrier was a nurse for animal instead of people.


CONCLUSION OF THE WAR

Troops of the Base Veterinary Hospital # 2 in France around 1919 Captain Beverly Commanding Officer.

Other units organized which reached France under an additional October phase consisted of corps mobile veterinary hospitals Nos. 7, 8, and 9. Veterinary personnel were also sent to France with 4 Cavalry regiments, 6 Engineer regiments, and 29 remount squadrons.

The 1st, 2d, 26th, 42d, 41st, and 32d Divisions left for overseas before the veterinary personnel was fully assigned or the mobile sections organized, but the latter were assembled and sent over as a part of the first phase.

With the foregoing exceptions, veterinary organization of the first 8 Regular Army, the National Guard, and the National Army divisions was accomplished at the station when each division was organized, and the veterinary units proceeded overseas with their respective divisions

In April 1918, the 132 veterinary officers available in France were quite able to meet all needs, but the situation was quite different in so far as enlisted men were concerned. The first two veterinary hospitals, comprising some 300 men each, arrived in France on April 4, 1918, the delay in their arrival being due to the same cause that delayed other Medical Department organizations; that is to say, shortage of tonnage and the necessity for giving priority to combatant troops. This shortage of men was somewhat relieved, however, by detailing certain squadrons of the remount service to assist the veterinary service.


The Contagions Wards and water call at Veterinary Hospital #9 France around 1919


Several of the units were absorbed by other veterinary organizations in France, and never operated independently. They were demobilized with the units of which they had become a part.

In addition to hospital groups above listed, other personnel was sent over with divisions, corps, and army organizations, until the Veterinary Corps, A. E. F., reached a maximum of 890 commissioned officers and 9,701 enlisted men. The latter were augmented by 2,000 labor troops who were assigned to this service, and at various times temporarily by several hundred men of the remount service. There was no appreciable service diminution until April 1, 1919, when the veterinary service began to be gradually reduced and personnel sent to the United States for demobilization and discharge.

No real veterinary hospitals were established in France in 1917. Such hospitals began to appear in the spring of 1918 so far as records go the first establishments were as follows No. 6, Neufchateau, April 16, 1918, No. 4, Carbon Blanc, May 4, 1918, No. 4, Camp de Souge (detachment from hospital), May 12, 1918, No. 10, Bourbonne-les-Bains, July 8, 1918, No. 8, Claye Souilly, August 8, 1918, No. 9, St. Nazaire, August 8, 1918, No. 7, Coetquidan, August 8, 1918.

When the Medical Department took over the veterinary service on August 29, 1918, there were in operation 11 hospitals, with a total capacity of 11,580 animals. Fifteen had been established, but some had been abandoned.

On November 1, 1918, there were in operation 15 veterinary hospitals throughout the different areas of the American Expeditionary Forces, but not all construction had been completed. The total animal capacity then available was approximately 12,000, but this was inadequate as many more cases than this number had to be cared for, thus necessitating the use of picket lines, corrals, paddocks, and other expedients.

After November 1, however, locations for veterinary hospitals were rapidly secured at Verdun, Longuyon, and Commercy, in the advance section, and construction was rushed to completion at Sougy and Lux, in the intermediate section. Three thousand animals were turned in to the veterinary hospital at Verdun within 24 hours after the personnel arrived there for station in December, though the accommodation of the veterinary hospital there was for less than 1,700 animals.

A determined effort was made to locate new hospital sites and have more labor troops assigned to Veterinary Corps to aid in evacuation and care of sick animals until the veterinary hospital personnel which were on the water or cabled for would arrive.

On November 11, 1918, one army mobile veterinary hospital was in service of the First Army, where it had been for several months and another in that of the Second. At this time mobile veterinary hospitals which had been provided for the First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Seventh Corps, were either assigned or available; furthermore, a mobile-veterinary hospital for each of the three other corps was on the shipping program. Twenty-one veterinary hospitals and two base veterinary hospitals were provided in the Services of Supply, and 10 other veterinary hospitals and 1 other base veterinary hospital were on the shipping program or in process of organization in France when the armistice was signed.

When the Third Army moved to the Rhine, locations were secured for veterinary hospitals at Coblenz and Treves, and personnel to man them was rapidly pushed forward. Stables of knock-down type for 10,000 animals were held in readiness at Verdun for shipment to the Third Army if required.

Veterinary hospitals were established also at Toul, Meucon, Epinal, Sougy, and Treves, in the zone of the armies.

On March 1, 1919, there were 20 veterinary hospitals in operation, exclusive of army veterinary hospitals with an animal capacity of 26,664, and containing about 20,000.

After April 1, 1919, the capacity of veterinary hospitals was gradually reduced, and by May 1, 12 veterinary units had been placed on the priority list for return to the United States, and all labor troops had been relieved from duty with the veterinary service. Only 8 hospitals were then in operation, containing about 4,000 animals. The hospitals could have been evacuated more rapidly but for the fact that the remount depots were receiving animals from troops that were returning home and were crowded to capacity. Therefore animals were held at hospitals until they were in a salable condition.

After June 20, 1919, demobilization proceeded very rapidly and by September practically all members of the veterinary service had been returned to the United States except such as were designated for duty with the American forces in Germany.

IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMEMBER: that the United States on entering the war did a very poor job of organizing the US Veterinary Corps. Very few in the command of the Army really understood the importance of the role of the Veterinary Corps on the battlefields of France in removing wounded animals and caring for the sick. Washington and to many Generals failed to understand the seriousness of the situation and the importance of a Veterinary Corps independent of the Remount Service and at time the army. The Veterinary Corps was just not taken seriously until the French and British command demanded that something be done with the way we were taking care of our animals, now! Going into the Marne our first major battle we did not even have one Veterinary Hospital in France to care for our animals.

More horses and mules in the US Army in 1918 did not mean more transportation in France for the Army but, it meant more waste of animals, time of men and money. The needs of the army could never be met unless animals were returned to service by good medical care and recovery. We could not continue to have such a great loss and waste of animals due lack of care and poor management and keep the Army going.

Orders were given to evacuate the animals but there was nowhere to send them and transportation was a mess. The Cavalry and remount service had to step in and be the first to handle the needs of wounded animals and start up the first animal hospital because of the lack of any Veterinary Corps personnel in France at the time. The French canceled any request for more animals because they were appalled what they were seeing by the Wild West Americans. By the war ended the army was starting get their act together and we had developed a very good Veterinary Corps. Things improved greatly after the Medical Corps took over the Veterinary Corps from the Quartermaster Corps and Remount Service. But it should be remembered that there were many fine men who worked hard to make the needed changes. Slowly things improved on the battlefield and off for our animals in France. The problems were complex and go way be on what I can cover here on the website.


This website is dedicated to remember those fine men who really cared for their animals during WW1 and saw them more than just a piece of equipment and had a great compassion for their animals and men who were wounded and killed right a long side of each other during battle. This war was a terrible thing to witness by man and by animal who suffered so greatly from it. We honor the memory of those who served in the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry of all nations during the Great World War!

Greg Krenzelok - Veterinary Corps Website


List of Veterinary Hospitals in France during WW1
NOTE: Information for some of these locations has not been clear to me yet and I hope to be able to uncover more information in the future. I have tried to make it very clear that I am no expert in this field and it is only because of a lack of information and wanting a better understanding of what my grandfather went through in the Veterinary Corps during WW1 that has motivated me to create this website. I wanted to list these locations so we are a where of them, if anyone can help please contact me. Because of such a lack of information and understanding it has taken me a while to understand the layout of these hospitals. I do not have anyone just to ask questions on these matters. This is where your help with information that is in attics and old boxes has really help to shed a lot of light. I do believe the below is a pretty complete list of VC hospital locations

St. Nazaire animal capacity 3,000 - Veterinary Hospital No 9

Jeanne d’Arc Caserne animal capacity 1,000 - On September 10 1918 Jeanne D’Arc Caserne was opened as an Army Evacuating Station. These barracks were located three miles east of Toul on the Nancy road and have a stall capacity of 1,200 animals and good quarters for a numerous personnel. This station was manned by a detachment of Veterinary Hospital No 5 (four officers and 180 colored troops) and was commanded by Major W. Reid Blair V.C. and several days later the personnel was augmented by Remount Squadron No 304 (six officers and 157 men) commanded by Capt. Sallee, Q.M.C, Major Blair was relieved upon arrival to report to IV Corps as corps veterinarian and command of the station passed to Major N.L. Nelson V.C. on September 14 1918. This station received and delivered to S.O.S. hospitals 2,986 animals during the St Mihiel operation and then was turned over with it full personnel to the Second Army Oct 8 1918 upon the organization of that Army. (Taken from Veterinary Military History Of The United States, Merillat,Campbell 1935)

Click on the below link:
Major W. Reid Blair DVM

Coetquidan animal capacity 2,160 - Veterinary Hospital No 7

Carbon Blanc animal capacity 950 - Veterinary Hospital No 4

Camp de Souge animal capacity 1,000 - (Detachment from Veterinary Hospital No 4)

Gievres animal capacity 2,000 - UPDATE August 30 2007 I have located Veterinary Corps Hospital No 11 here and thanks to Gene Beals who also has located VC Hospital No 15 who was attached to VC Hospital No 11 at Gievres. Gene Beal’s grandfather Thomas Beals was a Horseshoer with VC No 15 NOTE: Gievres was a General Intermediate Supply Depot

Nevers animal capacity 1,000 - Base Veterinary Hospital No 1

Sougy animal capacity 1,200 - Veterinary Hospital No 18

Neuilly L’Eveque animal capacity 1,200 - Veterinary Hospital No 1

Treveray animal capacity 1,000 - Veterinary Hospital No 2A Advance sector Veterinary Hospital

Triconville animal capacity 1,350 - Veterinary Hospital No 2B Advance sector Veterinary Hospital and Advance Veterinary Hospital No 17

Valdahon animal capacity 1,300 - Advance Veterinary Hospital No 3

Neufchateau animal capacity 1,700 - Veterinary Hospital No 6

Claye Souilly animal capacity 1,200 - Veterinary Hospital No 8

Bourbonne-les Bains animal capacity 1,250 - Veterinary Hospital No 10

Commercy animal capacity 750 - UPDATE Oct 8 2007 we now know that Veterinary Hospital No 13 was located here. UPDATE Nov 28 2007: Veterinary Hospital No 12 was stationed at Commercy first until Veterinary Hospital No 13 took over on December 15 1919. VC Hosp No 12 then went to Treves Germany on Dec 24 1918 and became part of the Occupation of Germany force. Note: I would like to thank Daniel Gardner who’s grandfather Lee S. Gardner was with VC Hosp No 12 and has provided this information in his WW1 diary that is now posted on the website under "Veterinary Hospital No 12"

NOTE: Commercy was a motor transport center for the American Expeditionary Forces. Commercy is near Saint-Mihiel

Lux (Cote d’Or) animal capacity 700 - Veterinary Hospital No 14, Veterinary Hospital No 21

Longuyon animal capacity 1,200 - Veterinary Hospital number unknown at this time. NOTE: I believe this may have been close to the front

Verdun animal capacity 2,000 - UPDATE December 10 2007 I have found the location, it was at Verdun and was made up of mostly colored troops

Grosrouvres animal capacity 300 - Veterinary Hospital number unknown at this time

Woinville animal capacity 300 - Veterinary Hospital number unknown at this time

Toul animal capacity unknown at this time - Veterinary Hospital No 5

Meucon (Cher)(Camp de Meucon) animal capacity unknown at this time - Veterinary Hospital number unknown at this time

Epinal animal capacity unknown at this time - Veterinary Hospital No 16

Treves, Germany animal capacity unknown. Veterinary Hospital No 12 came from Commercy, France and went to Treves, Germany on Dec 24 1918 and became part of the Occupation of Germany force of the Third Army


Posted by Gene Beals grandson of Horseshoer Thomas Beals, Veterinary Hosp.15 AEF


VETERINARY CORPS PICTURE ALBUM WW1
Click on the below link to view more pictures of the Veterinary Corps
WW1 Veterinary Corps Picture Album


THE PRINCIPAL UNITS OF THE AMERICAN ARMY OF OCCUPATION IN GERMANY
Third Army was at Coblenz - Chief Veterinarian Colonel John H. Gould
III Corps was at Neuwied
IV Corps was at Cochem - Chief Veterinarian Major Reid Blair
VII Corps was at Wittlich
1st Division was at Montabaur
2nd Division was at Heddesdorf
3rd Division was at Andernach
4th Divsion was at Bad Bertrich
32nd Division was at Rengsdorf
42th Division was Ahrweiler
89th Division was at Kylburg
90th Division was at Berncastel

Each of the Corps and Divisions had a Chief Veterinarian. Major Reid Blair was Chief Veterinarian of the Fourth Corps. Each of the Divisions also had an evacuating unit and a veterinary hospital attached to the command. Additionally a veterinarian was assigned to each of the brigades with the divisions. These units sent their animals to the larger veterinary hospitals, such as the Fourth Corps Unit where we sometimes had as many as 1,500 horses and mules at our hospital, most of them undergoing treatments.

Taken from John J Riordan's book: Horses, Mules and Remounts. The memoirs of a World War 1 Veterinary Officer published 1983

Click on the below link:
Major W. Reid Blair DVM


STARS AND STRIPES NEWSPAPER ARTICLES
I search the world looking for information for the Veterinary Corps Website and I have posted a few interesting articles that I have ran across while doing research in the Stars and Stripes Newspapers that I thought you might find interesting.

Click on the below link
Stars and Stripes Headlines WW1


“PLAY THE GAME BOYS!”
The above expression was a common term used in the A.E.F; many times you will find pictures with signs that say this. A lot of times you would find this sign posted when there was a big mess and tempers were short or that sergeant bearing down on you


NOTE TO YOU: I am constantly working on correcting the information on this website. In so many cases I run across conflicting information and it take a while before I can confirm the information comparing one source with another. Resource in this field is very limited as anyone know who has do research in this area find out.The longer I work on my research the more I uncover and understand how things worked during the War of the units that were involved with animals and their care. I do make mistakes and I truly appreciate those who contact me with corrections. I still have found no experts in this field and so I have had to figure out in many cases the organization of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and the Cavalry. It has been a most enjoyable adventure and I thank all of you who have helped. So please be patience as we uncovering who and what these units did during the Great World War.

Greg Krenzelok – Veterinary Website


QUOTE OF THE DAY:

Greg,

Thanks for the information. It is both helpful and appreciated. The problem we have with the Veterinary Corps history is the same we have in researching family history - in other words, we wait until the people with the answers are dead and then we have to go to the trouble of digging up the information from second hand sources- or in the words of the old Dutchman - "too late smart!".

Again, thanks for the help!

Dave Wigginton son of Pearl Wigginton (12th Advance Veterinary Hospital)


NOTE: IF YOU HAVE ANY VETERINARY CORPS PICTURES OR RELATED ITEMS FOR SALE PLEASE CONTACT. THIS IS A NON-PROFIT WEBSITE AND YOUR DONATION OF PICTURES OR RELATED ITEMS WOULD BE VERY MUCH BE APPRECIATED. MY SOLE INTEREST IS TO PROMOTE THE MEMORY OF THE VETERINARY CORPS, REMOUNT SERVICE AND THE CAVALRY.


CASUALTIES U.S. VETERINARY CORPS A.E.F., WW1
Source: Veterinary Bulletin, Vol. I, No. 4, Feb. 25, 1920. Stimson Library, Fort Sam Houston, TX

A careful search of the available records shows the following:

Name and rank:
Cox, James C., 2nd Lieutenant – Killed in action
Ballou, James R., 1st Lieutenant – Died of disease
Hill, Armstrong, 1st Lieutenant – Died of disease
Hunt, Harry F, 2nd Lieutenant – Died of accident
Kreamer, Wibur C., 2nd Lieutenant – Died of disease
Lee, Jeptha D., 1st Lieutenant – Died of disease
Snyder, Edward, 1st Lieutenant – Died of disease
Weilepp, Harry O., 2nd Lieutenant – Died of disease

Grenfell, F. A., 1st Lieutenant, Severely wounded in action

McNally, Wm. J., Farrier, Killed in action
Warren, Lavery G., Private, Killed in action
Gross, Harold O., Farrier, Missing

Butler, Simon, Private, Died of wounds in action
Harris, William G., Sergeant, Died of wounds in action
Wolf, August, Private, Died of wounds in action
Boyd, Claude S., Farrier, Severely wounded in action
Gordon, Thomas E., Farrier, Severely wounded in action
Martens, Henry, Private, Severely wounded in action
Quigley, John R., Farrier, Severely wounded in action
Whitlock, Abner, Private, Severely wounded in action

Further, 94 men died of disease incurred in the line of duty while in France.

Total fatal casualties, officers and men, 104



HISTORY OF THE VETERINARY SERVICE WITH THE CAVALRY IN THE U.S. ARMY

By Wayne O. Kester, DVM

Note: This article was published in the JAVMA, Vol. 209, No. 3, August 1, 1996

The history of veterinary service with the U.S. Cavalry is a nebulous subject. It is thoroughly entwined and reflected in the overall history of military veterinary service. Specific history on the subject has not been written, and it seems impractical, ever impossible, to attempt such here.

The purpose of this dissertation is to record the history books (there are only three) that deal substantially with the subject and to finally record my observations and experiences. I served 25 years as a veterinary officer, including 4 years (1934-1938) with the First Cavalry Division, Fort Bliss, Texas. There were only 126 officers in the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps at the time. Most were veterans of World War I, and most had served with the cavalry. I knew all of them and conversed with many of them at their home stations. Impressions and facts gained from them also are reflected herein.

This article is accurate and factual. Top priority has been given to recording historical facts as I know them, before time runs out.

EVOLUTION OF VETERINARY SERVICE IN THE U.S. ARMY
Recorded history of the veterinary service for cavalry in the U.S. Army is, at best, sketchy for several reasons. Prior to WWI, there was no U.S. Army Veterinary Corps or organized veterinary service. Each cavalry unit commander was responsible for the health and welfare of the horses and mules in his command. Such as it was, the veterinary service was provided largely by farriers and self-proclaimed veterinarians in the enlisted ranks.

Civilian veterinarians were contacted by some regimental and comparable commands. They were not given military status and drew pay equal to a master sergeant. This was not an attractive situation for a competent veterinarian, and few chose to serve. The few that did serve were limited in training, usually self-educated, and seldom mentioned in history.

A system for procuring and issuing medical supplies and equipment did not exist. There was no plan or thought of a program to prevent diseases, which were accepted as inevitable and largely untreatable, except by the "tincture of time." The single mission was to treat sick and injured animals as best as best as they could with their limited supplies and knowledge.

Following the Civil War, an educated and competent veterinary service rapidly evolved in the civilian economy. However, it was not fully accepted in the army until well into WWI. Repeated political attempts by the profession and National Veterinary Medical Association to establish a competent veterinary service for the army were to no avail. At the time of the Civil War, there were not any veterinary schools or trained veterinarians in this country, except for a few graduates of European schools. Consequently, organized veterinary service to the extent seen in European armies was not possible in the United States at that time. Historians Merillat and Campbell recorded only 6 contract veterinarians in the Union Army. During the first two years of the war, 284,000 horses were issued to Union Cavalry, although there were never more than 60,000 cavalrymen in the field. The average service life for a cavalry mount was less than 5 months because of poor management and lack of disease control.

In the Indian Wars that followed, cavalry units were small and scattered. Few could justify employing a contract veterinarian, even if one was available. Most unit commanders relied on their judgement in veterinary care.

With this background and the fact that replacement horses were generally plentiful and cheap, it is not surprising that the Army did not have a concept of the need for an organized veterinary service when WWI erupted. In fact, the idea was resisted in the field until General John J. Pershing found his troops immobilized on western European battlefields. Records indicate that 234,000 animals were issued to U.S. troops in Western Europe; in less than one year, 42,000 were lost. A quartermaster general's report indicated a total loss of 68,000 animals, and thousands more rendered unfit for service because of disease, malnutrition, and poor management. This situation was caused by failure of the American Expeditionary Forces (A.E.F.) command to recognize the need for an organized veterinary service. Although the War Department had established the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps in October 1917, which was immediately active in the United States, it was nearly a year before it was put into action by the A.E.F. command.

In the meantime, glanders (Pseudomonas mallei infection), mange, respiratory tract diseases as well as numerous other contagious diseases were rampant in the animals of all A.E.F. forces. Further, these diseases had spread into French countryside, disrupting transport and agriculture production. The French government, in mid-1918, after agreeing to issue 80,000 remounts to the U.S. Army, refused to do so until the A.E.F. placed an adequate veterinary service and disease prevention program in operation. Only then, faced with critical animal shortages and immobility, did the A.E.F. command see the light and order full implementation of the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps.

Once in action in the European theater, The U.S. Army Veterinary Corps quickly demonstrated its role and worth and by years end was providing a professional medical service for horses and mules second to none in the world and continued to do so until horses were phased out of the U.S. Army in World War II.

It is unbelievable that the Army of our country built by horsepower could be a half century behind its European counterparts in the management and preservation of military animals. Army planners totally overlooked or ignored medical service for animals. Historians have speculated that an "Indian War mentality," which seemed to prevalent in the general staff, was a factor. It seems that the low standard of horsemanship in General Taylor's army on the Rio Grande might be justifiable; since the supply was more than adequate and horses and mules cost but 8 dollars a head. On the other hand, the same standard 60 years later on the River Marne in France, where animals cost more than $250.00 each and numbers available were insufficient for the army's needs, is quite another matter.

Early in WWI, it became obvious to some in the War Department that a responsible, organized veterinary service must be provided for the thousands of army horses and mules being procured and mobilized and to safeguard the millions of tons of perishable food of animal origin to be procured and issued to troops. Thus, the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps was conceived, but not without controversy.

It was argued that the U.S. Veterinary Corps should be incorporated into the Quartermaster Department, because through its Remount Service, it was responsible for procuring, training, and issue of all rations to troops was a responsibility of the Quartermaster Department.

It also was argued that the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps should be an intergraded part of the cavalry and other mounted commands, where demand for service would be substantial and critical. However, neither approach could provide for a structured professional organization with adequate training logistical and administrative support.

The practical answer was to establish the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps within the Medical Department under the direction of the chief of the Veterinary Corps, who in turn was responsible to the army surgeon general. The U.S. Army Veterinary Corps was composed entirely of college graduates that were licensed doctors of veterinary medicine.

This was a most practical solution. A veterinary medical supply and distribution system was readily established within the medical system. Military medical schools and training programs, with slight modification, were entirely adequate for veterinary personnel. Administrative and channels of communication already existed in the Medical Department. Further, food inspection, which would become a major effort of the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, was, in fact, a public health responsibility of the Medical Department.

A U.S. Army Veterinary Corps of 2,234 active duty officers and 18,000 enlisted technicians was rapidly formed early in WWI. Most provided assistance to the mounted services; the remainder provided food inspection on an army-wide basis. All were in the Medical Department, subject to assignment by the chief of the Veterinary Corps in the office of the Army Surgeon General, Washington D.C. Veterinary detachments were formed, trained, equipped, and assigned where needed. This was usually reflected in tables of organization. Technically, veterinary officers were under the command of the senior medical officer in their organization, who rendered the required efficiency reports of the veterinarians. In practice, veterinarians served on the staff of the unit or station commander, reporting directly thereto.

In conjunction with the rapid reduction of forces following WWI, the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps was reduced to 126 regular army officers. Service was provided by assigning one or more officers to the medical department at posts or stations to serve as station veterinarians. If mounted were present, veterinarian was assigned an additional duty or detail to serve on the mounted unit's staff, who might or might not be the army station or post commander.

An example, at Fort Bliss where I served from 1934-1938, there were usually eight or more veterinary officers assigned to the station medical detachment. The senior officer was assigned as station veterinarian with the additional duty of 1st Cavalry Division veterinarian. Three other veterinary officers were detailed to serve as regimental veterinarians with the 7th Cavalry Regiment, 8th Cavalry Regiment, and the 82nd Field Artillery. Another veterinary officer served headquarters and special troops, another served as commanding officer of the 1st Veterinary Troop 1st Medical Squadron, another served as station hospital commander, assisted by the hospital detachment commander, and finally one veterinary officer served as the station forage and food inspector.

Because of rotation policies, foreign service, and training requirements, few veterinarians ever served a mounted unit more than three years in succession. However, practically all did eventually serve with mounted units. Cavalry rosters did not include any of these officers by name, because there were classified as part of the Medical Department. Consequently, it is impossible to determine who served what unit and when. Medical records, if still available, might show the time and place each officer served, but would not indicate what mounted units he served.

Although its history with cavalry is a bit dim, the U.S. Army Veterinary Corps did provided top-notch service and was an excellent system for the Army. It resulted in a small hard corps of 126 regular Army officers, who were versatile and experienced in army animal medical service, preventive medicine, public health, and research. The U.S. Army Veterinary Corps rapidly and efficiently expanded to 2,500 officers to meet the demands of WWII.

Just prior to WWII, two cavalry divisions and all other cavalry units, including National Guard and Army Reserved units along with competent veterinary personnel, were rapidly brought up to tables of organization strength and placed in training. It soon became obvious that transporting animals from the United States to support overseas forces was impossible. Consequently, all units, except the 1st Cavalry Division, were converted for dismounted service. All mounts, some 33,000 were returned to remount stations for surplus disposal. The 1st Cavalry Division was shipped to Australia with plans for procuring and using local mounts. The turn of the war soon eliminated any use for mounted units in Australia, and all cavalrymen, dismounted, moved north with General McArthur's forces to Tokyo. All veterinary personnel remained with the Cavalry Division and were busily engaged in environmental health, preventive medicine, food safety, security, and related duties. Thus, this ended veterinary service with the horse cavalry.

It did not, however, end veterinary service with cavalry or in the Army. Veterinary officers continued to serve with mechanized, armored, and airborne cavalry units. The veterinary mission of inspecting and safeguarding meat supplies had been expanded in general to include all foods. Veterinary service also was provided to assist the medical corps in public health programs and medical research.

When the new Air Force Medical Department was established in 1949, it included a veterinary corps for the purpose of providing preventive medicine and environmental health programs for troops during the Korean War. The U.S. Army Veterinary also provided research support for efforts that resulted in man functioning in space and on the moon.

CLINICAL VETERINARY SERVICE PROVIDED FOR CAVALRY
Prior to WWI, there was not an overall system for procurement and distribution of veterinary supplies. Each veterinarian was limited in use to whatever his commanding officer was able to procure. Practice was entirely oriented towards treating the sick and injured. Prevention of disease appears to have not been a consideration. Although severely limited in training, supplies, and control of patients, these early veterinarians provided clinical veterinary services for their units comparable to that in the civilian economy. However, it was too limited in scope and localized to be of significant value in a war situation.

Army Veterinary Service, War Department Special Regulations No. 70, December 15, 1917, the first such directive ever published, described in detail the structure and duties of the newly formed veterinary service for the entire army. Veterinary officers of appropriate rank were assigned to units where needed throughout the army. A veterinary supply system was established in the Medical Department. Veterinary hospitals and clinics were provided. Measures for controlling and preventing communicable diseases were spelled out and means for laboratory diagnostic and research support were provided. By war's end, the program had been fully implemented. It then was rapidly reduced in size, but not in scope, and resulted in providing the world's best veterinary service for the U.S. Cavalry between the two wars and through WWII.

All cavalry and horse drawn artillery units were provided a veterinary hospital and clinic and quarantine facility for newly arrived animals. These facilities were operated by the unit or station veterinary officer and enlisted technicians. Sick call was scheduled daily except on Sunday. Stable sergeants were charged with reporting all ailing animals on sick call. Most animals were treated and return to their units. More seriously ill animals were hospitalized for treatment or placed in quarantine if indicated. Lameness and limb injuries were most common problem. Body wounds and colic were of concern but not common. Respiratory and other contagious diseases were seldom a problem, because excellent disease prevention programs were enforced.

On maneuvers and in the field, mounted veterinary officers and technicians accompanied their units. Emergency supplies were carried on the officer's own saddle or that of his reserve mount led by his striker. A squad of up to eight veterinary troopers rode at the tail of the column with a few days of medical supplies on a packhorse or distributed on their own mounts. Additional reserve supplies were carried on the unit wagon or truck train.

The veterinarian maintained close surveillance by observing all animals at every opportunity. On the march, he could stand in a selected spot and observe the entire column trot by. Then, he could pick up and continue the trot until he caught the head of the column. While doing so, he could observe all animals while standing or at a walk. By repeating this exercise, he could see each animal at 30 to 60 minute intervals. Troopers on horses that were developing signs of lameness, exhaustion, or other problems were instructed to fall out and stand or continue at a slow walk until the veterinary squad at the tail of the column arrived to take care of their mount. Ambulances were seldom available or needed. Given a lighter load and slower pace, practically all horses would satisfactorily complete the march.

The unit commander and the veterinarian were the first to reach the edge of camp, where they would pause on their mounts and observe and evaluate the condition and potential of men and mounts as the entire column walked into camp. The ever-present question was, "How much farther can they safely go if need be?"

It was a practice in several cavalry regiments to conclude annual training and maneuver exercises with a 100-mile march in 24 hours. This was not only a test of men and horses, but also a severe test of the veterinarian's ability to anticipate, locate, and relieve problem horses before they became casualties. Surprisingly, practically all finished the march on time. Only a few, 1 or 2 percent, would fall out and come in later with the veterinary slow line behind the column.

In maneuvers were combat units fragmented, the veterinarian stayed with the largest component and detailed his senior technicians to ride with smaller detachments. Emergencies were treated when and where encountered. If needed, severe casualties were evacuated to hospitals by veterinary support units equipped with lead lines and trucks. Sick call was held each day after arrival in camp and after horses had been fed and had a brief rest.

Communicable diseases of horses, which had plagued every army in history, were not a problem because of effective preventive programs developed and implemented by the veterinary service during and immediately following WWI. These programs were based on close observation of all animals and isolation of those suspected of being diseased.

Newly acquired animals or any others on arrival at a new station were held in quarantine under close veterinary observation for a minimum of 21 days. If a disease was detected, animals were held for 21 days following exposure to an infected animal. Animals also were tested for glanders and treated for mange and other external parasites, if such infections were a possible threat.

In garrisons, horses were kept in small groups within small corrals rather than in one large group, thus reducing the number that could be exposed to a single sick horse. In the event of a disease outbreak, animals were promptly separated into affected, suspected, and health group. A few months after WWI, army animals were free and remained free of glanders, mange, dourine, surra (trypanosoma equiperdum and T evansi, respectively), piroplasmosis, eqizootic lymphangitis, stomatitis, and gangrene. A wide range of respiratory tract diseases, influenza, encephalomyelitis, and tetanus also were brought under control. The latter two were subsequently eliminated when vaccines were developed by the Army in the late 1930s. Biologics, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic medicines were not available prior to WWII.

RELATED VETERINARY HISTORY BOOKS
United States Army Veterinary Service in World War II, by Lt. Col. Everett B. Miller, Office of the Surgeon General, Department of the Army, Washington, D.C., 1961. The book describes veterinary service from 1775-1946 as provided for cavalry horses and all other army animals in the Zone of Interior and in all overseas theaters during World War II.

The American Veterinary Profession Its Background and Development by J. F. Smithcors, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, 1963. The book provides a brief overview of the evolution of veterinary service including that of the cavalry from 1775-1946.

Veterinary Military History of the United States, Volumes I and II, by Lt. Col. Louis A. Merillat and Lt. Col. D. M. Campbell. Sponsored by the American Veterinary Medical Association, Haver-Glover Laboratories, Kansas City, Mo, 1935. The book covers the evolution of veterinary medicine and military veterinary service in the United States from the Revolutionary War through World War I. Service (or lack thereof) for cavalry is described in detail, along with infantry, artillery, wagon and pack trains, remounts, and all other units using horses and mules.

Horses and Mules and National Defense, published by the Department of the Army, Office of the Quartermaster General, 1958. The book details the history from World War I to 1958 of the U.S. Army's excellent remount service and its system for breeding, procuring, training, and issuing remounts (horses and mules) for the armed forces.

Note: Veterinary Military History of the United States, Volumes I and II, by Lt. Col. Louis A. Merillat and Lt. Col. D. M. Campbell is the source of all information pertaining to World War I.



THE UNITED STATES ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE

Note: The history and significance of veterinary food inspection

By Brig. General J.A. McCallan, V.C., U.S.A.

Note: This paper was delivered at the Annual Convention of the Ontario Veterinary Association, Niagara Falls, Ontario, January 1952. Published in the Canadian Journal of Comparative Medicine, Vol. XVI. No. 4, April 1952.

It is my understanding, gentleman, that you desire information concerning the United States Army Veterinary Service and the several missions with which the Army Veterinary Corps is charged with. Perhaps the best way to present the subject in a short time is to give you as background a few words relative the veterinary service prior to the formation of the Corps, the history of the Corps since its place in the over-all Army organization.

The first mention of a veterinarian (veterinary surgeon) in the United States appears in an 1848 Act of Congress which provided for the hire of veterinary surgeons. The year 1901 brought provision for 42 veterinarians, two with each regiment of cavalry and one with each regiment of artillery, with the paid and allowances of second lieutenant, and saw the first veterinarians assigned to the office of the Commissary General for the purpose of inspecting meats purchased for the Army. That same year, 1901, the Quartermaster Corps had authority to hire veterinarians for the care of animals and the inspection of meats.

There were, therefore, two groups of veterinarians in the Army from 1901 to 1916; in one group were those with cavalry and artillery regiments, while in the other were those employed as contract veterinarians with the Quartermaster.

The National Defense Act of 3 June 1916 established the Veterinary Corps as a part of the Medical Department of the Regular Army and provided for a Regular Army Veterinary Corps, with grades authorized for the officers from second lieutenant to colonel.

Several subsequent Acts of Congress have modified the grades authorized and the length of time in grade, the latest being the Officer Personnel Act of 1947 which established the grade of brigadier general for the Veterinary Corps.

When in 1949 a separate Medical Service was established for the United States Air Force, a Veterinary Corps was included as part of the Air Force Medical Service. Therefore, the Army Medical Service and the Air Force Medical Service each had its Veterinary Corps. My talk will pertain to the Army Veterinary Corps.

As stated previously, the Veterinary Corps was established by statue in 1916 as a component of the Medical Department of the Army, the latter since 1950 being known as the Army Medical Service.

ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION
It would be rather difficult to present a talk of this nature a detailed account of the organization and operation of the Army Veterinary Service with the many ramifications incident to the over-all Army organization and command responsivity. Veterinary service is provided, within the limits of personnel authorized and available, where required in the United States and overseas.

Matters relating to the Veterinary Service as a whole are administered under the Surgeon General by an officer of the Veterinary Corps assigned to duty in his office as Chief of the Veterinary Division. This does not include command responsibility for the operation of the Veterinary Service in the field. Under Department of the Army organization and policy, command responsibility for practically the entire Veterinary Service is decentralized to continental Army commanders. A senior veterinary officer is assigned to each Army Area headquarters in the United States and to overseas command headquarters in the United States and to overseas command headquarters. This officer is on staff of the Army Surgeon as advisor on veterinary matters: he administers the veterinary service in that Army command and has technical supervision, under the Army commander, over all veterinary personnel engaged in food inspection in that Army Area. The number of veterinary activities in an Army Area or overseas command is governed by several factors, such as geographic location in relation to procurement, general depots of distribution, and the number of military installations or activities.

RESPONSIBILITIES
The Army Veterinary Service is charged with three main responsibilities: namely, the inspection of foods, animal service, and investigation and control of diseases of animals transmissible to man. To the well informed, "Army Veterinary Service" includes food inspection and veterinary medicine in relation to human health as well as activities concerned with the conservation of the Army's animal strength. It is only for those with antiquated ideas and who are thinking in terms of the past – terms of a horse army and the army of World War I – that it is necessary to explain that horses are and have been a minor entity in military veterinary service for nearly three decades. However, the number of people who do think in terms of the past and of an antiquated horse army when considering the Army Veterinary Service is surprising large.

FOOD INSPECTIONS
The purpose of food inspection in our Army is twofold; first is that of safeguarding the health of troops from food-borne sickness and disease; second is that of safeguarding the financial interests of the Government. In accomplishing these tasks the Army Veterinary Service conducts sanitary inspection of commercial and military establishments in which foods of animal origin are produced, processed, prepared, stored, or handled. The award of contracts for food of animal origin is limited to bidders whose plants have been approved by the Veterinary Corps. An approved list of such establishments in maintained by each Army Area Headquarters and the Military District of Washington. Establishments operating directly under the supervision of the Bureau of Animal Industry, United States Department of Agriculture, are accepted as approved sources of supply by the Department of the Army. This also true regarding poultry eviscerating plants operating officially under the Poultry Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture.

Milk plants and dairy farms operating under Federal, state or municipal sanitary inspection agencies which maintain standards of sanitation acceptable to the Army may, upon the recommendation of a veterinary officer and with the approval of the Surgeon, be accepted as sources of supply without being routinely inspected. However, it is the duty of the veterinary officer to determine by subsequent inspections that sources of supply continue to maintain acceptable sanitary standards.

The second task in accomplishing the inspection of foods of animal origin is to assure that all such foods are of the quality and quantity specified, including type, class, and grade, and to determine that they are in an acceptable sanitary condition at time of procurement and delivery. Subsequently, inspections of products are conducted to prevent unnecessary deterioration of foods in storage.

The Veterinary Service also accomplishes the inspection of foods of non-animal origin at destination only for identity and condition.

It may be of interest to know that during the period of 1939 through 1946 over 27 billion pounds of food of animal origin were inspected at time of procurement. Of this 5.3 per cent was rejected. Converted to monetary terms this amount to a saving of over 88 million dollars to the government. Important as this may seem, it is insignificant compared with the health-protection benefits provided by the maintenance of an adequate, safe, and wholesale food supply for the military. Significantly, no serious outbreak of disease traceable to the issue of unwholesome meat, poultry, or dairy products have occurred among our troops in years.

The United States Army veterinary food inspection service is not something that developed during WWII. In World War I our Army used great numbers of horses and mules. With a ratio of three men to one animal, it is readily apparent that medical service for animals was the major veterinary task; however, our food inspection service was in full operation at home and overseas.

In World War II we had a ratio of 134 men to one animal. Obviously, in such an army food inspection was the major task of the veterinary service, and professional service for animals a minor activity. As to the future, unquestionably food inspection will continue to be a major mission.

The significance of veterinary food inspection in overseas commands is generally little understood or appreciated. The American public habitually depends upon the many Federal, State, and local health agencies to safeguard human health, food, and the livestock industry insofar as they may be affected by animal disease, food-borne epidemics, and impure or unsafe foods. The fact that similar acceptable agencies frequently do not exist outside the United States and the fact that the Veterinary Corps must perform all such functions in the absence of these agencies are frequently overlooked.

During WW II foods of all kinds were procured in many foreign countries subject to no sanitary supervision or inspection other than that provided by the Army Veterinary Corps. This included billions of pounds that were procured to support and the slaughter of thousands of cattle, swine, lamb, and poultry for our troops in disease-ridden areas. Veterinary officers conducting ante-mortem and post-mortem inspections in these countries found that many of the 40 or more diseases and conditions for which animal carcasses or parts thereof should be condemned were quite prevalent. Practically all of the many milk-borne diseases were observed, and many, such as milk-borne tuberculosis, brucellosis, and streptococci and diarrhoeal infections, were found to be commonplace in some countries where our troops were stationed.

While foods of animal origin represent approximately 38 per cent of the ration, they represent 60 to 70 per cent of the cost and even a higher percentage of the food value. They are not only the most perishable as a class, but the most difficult to judge for quality and wholeness. These foods, the most nutritious, perishable, and expense components of the ration, are also excellent foods for microorganisms causing spoilage, and those that may transmit disease to man.

It is also these types of food which offer the greatest opportunity for exploitation by unscrupulous dealers, who may easily make huge profits by the simple expedient of dilution, substitution, or masking of inferior, unsound, and even diseased products and delivering them on Government contract undetected.

The Quartermaster Corps continuously conducts exhaustive research for the purpose of developing new and special type rations and improving all rations in general. This in turn makes inspection at time of procurement far more complicated and infinitely more important because no matter how diligent the research in determining the requirements and how accurate and detailed the specification for rations or special items, it is all to no avail unless a competent fully enlightened inspection service interprets and enforces these specifications while such items are being processed, packaged, procured, and delivered.

ANIMAL SERVICE
Professional veterinary medical service must be provided for the animals owned or used by the Army. This responsibility of the Army Veterinary Service involves investigating the hygienic and sanitary conditions that may affect Army animals and making recommendations in this respect; advising as to methods of animal management so far as they concern animal health and efficiency; instructing military personnel in animal management and horseshoeing; examination of forage; the evacuation and care of sick and wounded animals; the physical examination of animals; and the command of veterinary hospitals and other veterinary units. The veterinary animal service was a minor task during World War II and required something less than then 15 per cent of the total number of veterinary personnel. However, the possibility cannot be overlooked that under certain operational conditions mounted or mule pack units may be hastily assembled or pressed into action to meet certain critical situations, as was the case during World War II. The importance of animals in that war was attested by the fact that approximately 8,000 horses and mules were air-lifted several hundred miles to place them in strategic positions for military operations.

Furthermore, the Army veterinary animal service is not concerned with only a few hundred U.S. Army horses and mules. During World War II the Veterinary Corps was responsible for the professional care and supervision of many thousands of war dogs, Signal Corps pigeons, and laboratory, test, experimental, and serum-producing animals, as well as large numbers of livestock of various types. Many diseases new to our troops were encountered and some of the well-known ones took on new importance, especially those which might spread through animals to troops.

Veterinary service with Military Government was a very important new role during World War II. The personnel of the Army Veterinary Corps acted chiefly as a coordinating group in reestablishing the veterinary service in war-devastated countries, stepping up production of biologic and veterinary service in war-devastated countries, stepping up production of biologics and veterinary supplies, and assisting in revitalizing their livestock and food industries.

From the foregoing it is readily apparent that contrary to what one might expect, the virtual elimination of the horse and mule from our active army did not simplify or eliminate any of the animal service problems of the Army. On the other hand it created new problems for the Army Medical Service in planning and training. As to the future, the know-how in organization, function, and operation to insure adequate Army Veterinary Service for horses, mules, dogs, and other animals must be kept alive. Doing so will permit rapid expansion of a nucleus to cope with any Flore Veterans Hospital, conceivable situation.

INVESTIGATION AND CONTROL OF DISEASES OF ANIMALS TRANSMISSIBLE TO MAN
The third responsibility of the veterinary service in the investigation and control of those diseases of animals which are known, or suspected, to be transmissible to man. This is an important function at all times but particularly so in wartime when the spread of any such disease could adversely affect military operations.

In discharging this responsibility, the following procedures are employed: the application of preventive and control measures among the military animals; close liaison with other governmental and state agencies concerning communicable diseases in animals not subject to military control; and collecting and maintaining animals disease data and information in all situations where military personnel may come in contact, directly or indirectly, with diseases of animals transmissible to man.

Other complementary tasks lie in the fields of training, research, development of special food inspection equipment, and operation of a veterinary laboratory service.

Training occupies an important part in the career of the veterinary officer, not only for his current military position but for the future assignments and increased responsibility. The assignment and training of officers are phased into periods beginning with the officer's entry into the Regular Army. There are four periods of training in the Veterinary Corps career pattern follows: namely; basic, specialized, general, and command and staff administrative assignment.

The entry of the officer into each period is governed by his years of service, and, furthermore, his eligibility for specialized training by demonstrated ability, aptitude, and his desire to pursue such study in a specialized field. All officers will be required to take basic training during his first three years of service. This includes the courses given at the Medical Field Service School and at the Army Medical Service Meat and Dairy Hygiene School. Selected officers only will receive training in specialized fields by attending advanced courses given at a civilian college and/or military school. For example: a veterinary officer in the field of laboratory medicine has shown ability and aptitude; further training in a special phase of that field is deemed necessary. He is sent to a civilian institution for a year. Perhaps another officer is sent to a university to take the public health course.

Since the assignment of veterinary officers to fill positions of responsibility in the higher staff and administrative echelons is required, provision exists for such training in the Veterinary Officers Advance Course, the Command and Staff College, etc., in addition to "on-the-job" training. That other opportunities exist for specialized training is evidenced by the fact that the six veterinary officers currently on duty with veterinary R.O.T.C. units are enrolled for graduate work in the college or university to which assigned.

An integral part of the Army Medical Service Graduate School, located in Washington D.C., is the Veterinary Division. That Division has many functions such as conducting the Veterinary Officers Advanced Course; advising the Army Surgeon General on matters pertaining to the veterinary laboratory service; serving as a control or appeal laboratory for other laboratories of the veterinary service; conducting research on specific problems in connection with foods of animal origin; and planning, supervising, and operating a research program on animal diseases in accordance with the general research plan of the veterinary service. In addition the veterinary officers in that Division serve from time to time as members on teams from the Army Medical Service Graduate School to investigate specific disease problems of significance to Army Medical Service. The latter is mentioned only to emphasize that a qualified veterinarian is considered essential as a member of a medical team when investigating certain diseases that affect the health of humans.

The importance of the veterinarian to the public health is being realized more and more. I think it is significant that in the United State Public Health Service more and more veterinarians are being employed; the same is true for the several states where in many State Health Departments a qualified veterinarian is a full-time member of the staff.

It is believed the work of the United States Army Veterinary Corps, particularly in the field of public health, has focused the attention of a great number of people, especially medical and other scientific persons, on the several fields of veterinary medicine related directly and indirectly to human health and welfare.




ARMY MULES AT WEST POINT

Hi Greg
Love your website. I work at West Point with the Army Mules, here are a few pictures.


There is one Raider (brown Mule) and General Scott (black mule) at the last Army/Navy Game in Baltimore


We went to Governors Island in New York City for a Civil War reenactment. I’m Riding General Scott.


This picture is of the three mules in their paddock at the Vet clinic at West Point NY. Raider, General Scott and Rager II (smaller black mule).


This picture is of our unit with the Mule rider cadets


The above picture is of SPC Tami Bair she is a vet tech here at West Point.


WE NEED YOUR HELP ON RESEARCH AND TO SAVE THE VETERINARY CORPS STATION AT THE PRESIDIO MONTEREY AND FORT ORD, CAMP ORD


Above: The Fort Ord Equestrian Center. On the right in the Veterinary Hospital and on the left are the stables. Believe to be built in the 1940's or earlier. Also maybe the buildings used by the 11th Cavalry (Horse) and the 76th Field Artillery (Horse) in the use for medical use of their horses.

THESE BUILDING ARE IN DANGER OF BE TORNED DOWN!

The 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery both horse units ran their maneuvers at Camp Ord and Camp Gigling at the East Garrison area. All the information on this part of Fort Ord in being lost and we need your help. Please contact me if you have any information or pictures that may help us to preserve the history of this part of Fort Ord. We also are looking for the families who had relatives stationed here and at the Presidio at Monterey that were part of the 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery.

Please click on the below link to view more pictures

The Fort Ord Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2


MONUMENT TO MAN AND HORSES IN WW1 AT THE TOWN OF CHIPILLY, SOMME RIVER, AMIENS, FRANCE 2008


Soldier saying Farewell to his dying Horse, 58th London Division dying Horse War Memorial, Chipilly, Somme, France

Greg
I was just visiting the Somme River and Amiens in France and came across a monument to the horses of WWI. Imagine you have seen if before, but found your site very helpful and informative learning more and in the writing up of a little travelogue to my friends and family. Thought perhaps you might enjoy seeing it. It was quite startling as we were barnstorming along the Somme River and came around a sharp bend, I immediately pulled over and both my wife and I wept, a very touching place indeed.

I live locally now (Brussels Belgium, about 2.5 hours away) and it has been quite a discovery finding the different points of interest … this summer I am planning to take several long weekends and do the whole battlefield tours. I need to go back to Verdun as well. Amazing places. And how well the monuments are kept repaired is astonishing, the regions may be poor and rural, but the war and sacrifices are remembered.

My wife’s father was over here in WW2 as part of the signal corps. My grandfather was in Brest France in WW1 as part of the Naval Aero corps and ended up driving truck up into this country as well so is special to be able to visit the country he wrote home about:

Click on the below link to view Patrick Wheeler website on his grandfather

Harry St Clare Wheeler, His Navy Years - World War I, 1917-1919

In mid January 1919 my grandfather writes:
I don't know if I will go back to the States for some time yet. They are shipping most of the regular drivers to Belgium. And I guess I will go after a while myself. It is sure cold up there where they are, lots of snow on the ground. I signed my name on the list to volunteer to go for they sure need the drivers up there to distribute the food among the poor starving Belgium women & children. Their homes are all torn up and their country needs help for there was only four sq. miles that wasn't touched by shells. This war sure ruined the country where the shells flew.

You take a look at the battlefield where there were happy homes once and all you can see is ruined buildings and big shell holes all over the country. Everything is as still as night, not a sound. The smell of the battlefield will make you sick. You see bodies of soldiers that were never buried and some that they do bury have only a thin layer of dirt thrown over them. You see lots of the Yankee boys who have fallen, probably places where they could not be seen easily, and are still laying with their clothes nearly rotted off of them. The Germans they don't bury very good. They just throw them in a shell hole, probably sprinkle some dirt on the top of them. So you can see how awful a place it is. As far as you can see is nothing but ruined country like this. I hope there is no other war like this.

END

When we moved here in 2006 my wife and I decorated our house in part by buying things on eBay. We bought a mantel clock from an elderly gentleman over by the French/Belgium border and when we arrived he and his wife, their son and his wife were there to meet us. They were very formal and asked us to sit and have tea with them. His son explained that his father had asked him over since he could speak a little English, and since they did not see many Americans they wanted to thank us, as representatives of America, for all we had done for Belgium and them personally during the war and especially the years afterward.

As an expat living abroad and hearing the frustration and anger over some of the more recent US interventions it is easy to think that the world does not remember America well and all the good it has done in the past. People here do remember both wars quite well.

Best to you

Patrick Wheeler
LEVI STRAUSS & CO.
IT Manager, Global Audit Europe


AMERICAN EXPOSITION VERDUN, FRANCE 2008 FROM WILLY PERRIER


Willy's son


OTHER AREAS OF RESEARCH WHICH WE ARE ENGAGED:

POLK COUNTY WISCONSIN IN WW1
Click on the below link:
Polk County Wisconsin in WW1


11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
Click on the below link:
11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
Click on the below link:
76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
Click on the below link:
Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2


SERGEANT LEONARD MURPHY VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18, A.E.F., WW1
Click on the below link:
Sergeant Leonard Murphy Veterinary Hospital No. 18, A.E.F., WW1


NOTE: The U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Group covers research in many more areas that the above.


Sign Our Guestbook

Name:
Email:


Can you help us with any information on the Veterinary Corps during WW1? We need your help. Please e-mail me with questions. If you do not want to leave your name or e-mail address in the guest book just make up one. A name and e-mail address must be filled in to leave any comments.





U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

Click on the below link:

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group