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U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5 FRANCE WW1


This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5, FRANCE WW1

MAJOR WM. RIED BLAIR


Major Wm. Reid Blair, V.C., was honorably discharged from the Veterinary Corps, May 31, 1919. Major Blair was commissioned in the Veterinary Corps on November 28, 1917, ordered to temporary duty in the Surgeon General�s Office on December 19, 1917, and on December 22 was ordered to Camp Lee, Va., for the purpose of organizing Advance Veterinary Hospital No 5 for duty overseas. This hospital was composed of 311 enlisted men and seven officers.


Greg
Finding your site today is quite a coincidence.

My wife just read the War Horse book last night, and I have been spending some holiday time off cleaning up my office, which uncovered one of my boxes of historical papers and photos of my great uncle, Major W. Reid Blair DVS, who was the IV Corps veterinarian. He went on to become the Director of the Zoological Park of the New York Zoological Society, better known as the Bronx Zoo

I'm attaching a photo of him in his uniform, published in an unknown magazine, I only have the original page, not the entire issue.

There are a number of other documents and even some campaign maps in their original metal map tubes stashed away here. I'll try to get them out and see if anything looks like it might fit in on your site.

Bruce A. Blair
Seattle


Major Wm. Reid Blair, V.C., was honorably discharged from the Veterinary Corps, May 31, 1919. Major Blair was commissioned in the Veterinary Corps on November 28, 1917, ordered to temporary duty in the Surgeon General’s Office on December 19, 1917, and on December 22 was ordered to Camp Lee, Va., for the purpose of organizing Advance Veterinary Hospital No 5 for duty overseas. This hospital was composed of 311 enlisted men and seven officers.

After a period of training at Camp Lee and Camp Hill, Major Blair and his organization sailed from Newport News on May 9, 1918, landing at St. Nazaire, France, the latter part of May 1918. Immediately after landing, his hospital was assigned to duty at Auxiliary Remount No 1, Base Section No 1, at St. Nazaire. Finding no adequate facilities here for quarantine and hospital treatment of the large number of animals suffering from strangles, influenza, pneumonia, etc., a series of barracks occupied by French Colonial Troops were obtained from the French authorities, and after these were vacated the barracks were converted into a modern hospital. This hospital was located about three quarters of a mile from the Remount Station, so that all contagious or infections diseases by the Commander-in-Chief of the A.E.F., with a number of his staff. The arrangement of the hospital and the work of the organization were highly commended by General Pershing.

On August 1, 1918, Major Blair with his organization was ordered to the Headquarters of the 3rd Army Corps, with station at Mezy-on-the-Marne, for the purpose of assisting in the evacuation of animals during operations in that vicinity.

On August 22, 1918, Major Blair with Veterinary Hospital No 5 was ordered in the Headquarters of the 4th Army Corps located at Toul. Here, he was assigned as Corps Veterinarian of the 4th Army Corps, and the command of Veterinary Hospital No 5 was given to Major Nelson.

In his capacity as Corps Veterinarian, Major organized the veterinary service preparatory to the 4th Corps’ participation in the St. Mihiel drive during September 12th to 14th. The veterinary service of the evacuation of animals during this drive received the commendation of the Corps Commander, General Dickman.

On Major Blair’s recommendation, a number of concrete dipping vats for the prevention and treatment of mange were established throughout divisional areas so that animals could be treated without evacuating them to the veterinary hospitals in the rear. This method of treatment was highly successful and met with the hearty approval of the organization commanders who were universally opposed to the complete evacuation on account of no replacements being available during the period.

After the Armistice, Major Blair accompanied the Headquarters of the 4th Army Corps when it became a part of the Army of Occupation in Germany, finally locating at Cochem, Germany, where he remained until relieved by Major English and ordered to the U.S. Major Blair arrived in the U.S. May 22, 1919 on the S.S. “Imperator.” Upon his arrival in the U.S. he was ordered to the office of the Surgeon General for report and was discharged on May 31, 1919.

Major Blair expressed himself as having enjoyed the Army and as having received the very best kind of cooperation during his service in the A.E.F. Having commanded both veterinary hospitals and the veterinary services of Corps Troops, it enabled him to gain a very wide and valuable experience, and his views on reorganizations and the needs of a properly organized veterinary service has been greatly appreciated.


U.S. VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5, HISTORY (National Archive records)

Special note: I would like to thank Dr Sanders Marble (Historian, Office of Medical History, Office of the Surgeon-General of the United States for this joint effort with the Veterinary Corps Website for providing the documentation of Veterinary Hospital No. 5 from the National Archives. –Greg Krenzelok, Veterinary Corps Website.

Note:
Veterinary Hospital No. 5 came to France as two Detachments. Company “A” Headquarters the main body and Company “B” Detached with a 105 men who went to Neufchateau.


COMPANY “A” VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
May 9, 1918

Headquarters consisting of 195 men and Major William R. Blair and 2nd Lt. Lester R. Smith embarked on the S.S. Hercules and landed in St. Nazaire, France on June 3, 1918

Headquarters organized and was in operation at St. Nazaire until August 14, 1918.

When on account of the shortage of evacuation Sections they were ordered to report to Commanding General, 3rd Army Corps and arrived at Mezy near Chateau Thierry August 17th.

Operations having almost ceased in this sector, they were ordered to report to the 4th Army Corps at Toul and located in Jeanne de Arc Caserne, the Per-War home of the 12th Dragoons (French) which has been our station up to the present time.

ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF THE CHIEF SURGEON OFFICE REPORT Advance Veterinary Hospital No. 5 was stationed at Jeanne d’Arc Caserene, near Toul. The First Army had utilized this unit during the St. Mihiel operation. It passed to the control of the 2nd Army and was used as a receiving station for all evacuations from the Second area. From this point, after a rest, the animals were shipped to Service of Supply hospitals. Shortly before the Armistice began the Veterinary Hospital at Jeanne d’Arc Caserene was taken over by the Advance Section, and two Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital units were assigned to take care of Second Army evacuations. These were placed at the advance railheads and were ready to function in the military operation about to take place; however, owing to the cessation of hostilities they did not operate in the manner planned except to receive and evacuate sick animals from organizations held in the area awaiting orders for movement to the rear. These evacuating units were retained at the points where they were originally located and were used for the establishment of temporary hospitals until the Second Army as such passed out of existence


COMPANY “B” VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
May 8, 1918
A Detachment consisting of 105 men and the following named Officers, embarked on the S.S. Itasca:

1st. Lt. James S. Spikes, Veterinary Corps
1st. Lt. Monroe S. Esslinger, V.C.
2nd Lt. Charles N.Wells, V.C.
2nd Lt. John J. Riordan, V.C.
1st. Lt. John F. Stover, Medical Corps

The Detachment of 105 men (Company B) landed in Bordeaux, France June 5, 1918 and on June 10th, 1918, was ordered to report to the Commanding Officer Veterinary Hospital No. 6 for duty at Neufchateau, France.


COMPANY “A” AND “B” REJOINED
Company A and B
All Officers rejoined the organization on its arrival in Toul.

But the Personnel of the Detachment did not rejoin us until November. Shortly after joining the 4th Army Corps the 1st. Army took us over as an Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital first detaching 35 men and two Officers for a Mobile Veterinary Hospital for the 4th Corps.


HISTORY OF VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
(Undated) Sometime after January 1919

Date of Organization January 2nd, 1918, Camp Lee, Va

Enlisted strength 300 men
Sergeants First Class – 1
Sergeants – 6
Corporals – 12
Farriers – 18
Horseshoers – 10
Wagoners – 7
Cooks – 3
Saddlers – 3
Private, First Class – 74

Medical Detachment – 10 men
Sergeants First Class – 1
Sergeants – 1
Privates, First Class – 4

COMMANDING OFFICERS Major William R. Blair – from Jan. 2, 1918 to Sept. 12th, 1918
Major Nelson L. Nelson – from Sept. 12th, 1918 to Oct. 1st. 1918
Captain F. de .M. Bertram – from Oct. 1st. 1918 to Nov. 11th, 1918
Major George A. Hanvey – from Nov. 14th, 1918 to Jan. 25th, 1919
Captain James S. Spikes – from Jan. 25th, 1919 to present time of this report.

NOTE: BELOW FROM THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 1919
Major Wm. Reid Blair, V.C., was honorably discharged from the Veterinary Corps, May 31, 1919. Major Blair was commissioned in the Veterinary Corps on November 28, 1917, ordered to temporary duty in the Surgeon General’s Office on December 19, 1917, and on December 22 was ordered to Camp Lee, Va. for the purpose of organizing Advance Veterinary Hospital No. 5 for duty overseas. This Hospital was composed of 311 Enlisted men and Seven Officers. After a period of training at Camp Lee and Camp Hill, Major Blair and his organization sailed from Newport News on May 9th, 1918, landing at St. Nazaire, France, the latter part of May 1918. Immediately after landing, his Hospital was assigned to duty at Auxiliary Remount Depot No. 1, Base Section No. 1, at St. Nazaire. Finding no adequate facilities here for quarantine and hospital treatment of the large number of animals suffering from Strangles, Influenza, Pneumonia, etc. a series of barracks occupied by French Colonial Troops were obtained from the French authorities, and after these were vacated the barracks were converted into a model hospital. This hospital was located about three-fourths of a mile from the Remount Station, so that all contagious or infectious diseases were removed from the Remount Depot. After the Hospital had been in operation for two months, it was visited and inspected by the Commander-in-Chief of the A.E.F., with a number of his staff. The arrangement of the Hospital and the work of the organization were commended by General Pershing. On August 1, 1918, Major Blair with his organization was ordered to the Headquarters of the 3rd Army Corps, with station at Mazy-on-the-Marne, for the purpose of assisting in the evacuation of animals during operations in that vicinity. On August 22, Major Blair with Veterinary Hospital No. 5 was ordered to the Headquarters of the 4th Army Corps located at Toul. Here, he was assigned as Corps Veterinarian of the 4th Army Corps, and the Command of Veterinary Hospital No. 5 was taken by Major Nelson.

NOTE: BELOW FROM THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE (April 1919)
Major George A. Hanvey, U.S.A., just returned from overseas service, has been ordered to the Veterinary Division, Surgeon General’s Office for temporary duty. Captain Hanvey was assigned to as Division Veterinarian, 84th Division, stationed at Camp Taylor, Ky., on January 14th, 1918. He was promoted to the grade of Major Veterinary Corps, Nation Army on February 20th, 1918. As Division Veterinarian he sailed for France on September 9th, 1918, and arrived in Liverpool, England, September 21st, 1918, and proceeded to Ramsey Rest Camp, England, where the Division stayed three days, then crossed the English Channel from Southampton to Le Harve, France. He remained with the 84th Division until November 8th, 1918, when he was transferred to the Advance Veterinary Hospital No. 5 at Toul, France, as the Commanding Officer. Previous to Major Hanvey’s arrival at Veterinary Hospital No. 5 it was used only for evacuating or as a rest station for shipping animals farther to the rear. On January 27th, 1919, he was transferred to the 88th Division as Division Veterinarian. On April 28th, 1919, he was transferred to Veterinary Hospital No. 6 as Commanding Officer and placed on temporary duty in the Office of the Veterinarian, Advance Sector, S.O.S., until Veterinary Hospital No. 6 prepared to leave France for the United States. This organization sailed from Brest, France, on the U.S.S. Agamemnon, June 10th, 1919, and arrived in Hoboken, N.J., June 18th, 1919. They then proceeded to Camp Upton where the Hospital was demobilized, on the completion of which Major Hanvey was transferred to the Surgeon General’s Office.


ADJUTANTS
2nd Lt. Lester R. Smith – from Jan. 2nd, 1918 to Sept. 12th, 1918.
1st. Lt. James S. Spikes – from Sept. 12th, 1918 to Jan. 25th, 1919, promoted to Captain Nov. 22nd, 1918.
1st. Lt. Monroe S. Esslinger – Jan. 25th, 1919 to present time of this report.

SUPPLY OFFICERS
2nd Lt. John J. Riordan – from Jan. 2nd, 1918 to Sept. 12th, 1918.
Since this time Adjutants have been acting as Supply Officers.

ON DUTY WITH HOSPITAL
Captain James S. Spike – from Jan 2nd, 1918 to present time of this report.
1st. Lt. Monroe S. Esslinger – from Jan 2nd, 1918 to present time of this report.
2nd Lt. Charles N. Wells – from Jan 2nd, 1918 to present time of this report. Detached service from June 22, 1918 to Feb. 25, 1919.
Captain Irvin Myers – from Nov. 27, 1918 to Dec. 27, 1918.
1st. Lt. James A. Austin – from Dec. 3, 1918 to March 11, 1919.
1st. Lt. A.G. Gierke – from Dec. 2, 1918 to present time of this report.
1st. Lt. Rudy C. Mathis – from Dec. 8, 1918 to present time of this report.
1st. Lt. Edward K. Sales – from Nov. 2, 1918 to Jan. 16, 1919.
1st. Lt. George T. Steveson – from Dec. 7, 1918 to present time of this report.
2nd Lt. Daniel L. Campbell – from Sept. 24, 1918 to Jan. 16, 1919.
2nd Lt. Byron E. Green – from Dec. 8, 1918 to present time of this report.

MEDICAL OFFICER
1st. Lt. John F. Stover – from Feb. 23, 1918 to present time of this report.

ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES
Infantry Drill and equipment of organization at Camp Lee, Va. From Jan. 1918 to March 31, 1918.

April 1, 1918
Enroute from Camp Lee, Va to Camp Hill, Newport News, Va.

April 2, 1918 to May 8, 1918
Drill equipment and Detachment at Remount Depot.

May 8, 1918
A Detachment consisting of 105 men and the following named Officers, embarked on the S.S. Itasca:

1st. Lt. James S. Spikes, Veterinary Corps
1st. Lt. Monroe S. Esslinger, V.C.
2nd Lt. Charles N.Wells, V.C.
2nd Lt. John J. Riordan, V.C.
1st. Lt. John F. Stover, Medical Corps

ACTIVITIES IN THE FRANCE, A.E.F.
May 9, 1918

Headquarters consisting of 195 men and Major William R. Blair and 2nd Lt. Lester R. Smith embarked on the S.S. Hercules and landed in St. Nazaire, France on June 3, 1918 (Company A). The Detachment of 105 men (Company B) landed in Bordeaux, France June 5, 1918 and on June 10th, 1918, was ordered to report to the Commanding Officer Veterinary Hospital No. 6 for duty at Neufchateau, France. Headquarters organized and was in operation at St. Nazaire until August 14, 1918, when on account of the shortage of evacuation Sections they were ordered to report to Commanding General, 3rd Army Corps and arrived at Mezy near Chateau Thierry August 17th. Operations having almost ceased in this sector, they were ordered to report to the 4th Army Corps at Toul and located in Jeanne de Arc Caserne, the Per-War home of the 12th Dragoons (French) which has been our station up to the present time. All Officers rejoined the organization on its arrival in Toul but the Personnel of the Detachment did not rejoin us until November. Shortly after joining the 4th Army Corps the 1st. Army took us over as an Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital first detaching 35 men and two Officers for a Mobile Veterinary Hospital for the 4th Corps.

Capacity of the Hospital 1200 animals, Personnel was quartered in concrete Barracks, electric lights, the heating was sufficient, Coal stoves, and Sanitation good, the Barracks and floors being of concrete were easily kept. The ground was covered with a heavy layer of rock almost eliminating mud in the rainy season. Fire protection consisted of Fire Buckets in barracks and feed rooms but were practically unnecessary as the entire caserne was absolutely fire proof. Mess Arrangements were good as a large concrete building was used for this purpose, one end being partioned off for a kitchen, the other as Mess Hall for the men. Ventilation is adequate, cooking good, food supply obtained at Rail head in Toul. Water supply was furnished by a small electric pump from the Moselle River and purified at a pumping plant. No ice, bathing facilities consisted of shower baths. Waste: solids buried, liquids; drainage sufficient. Latrines French squat varieties, adequate. No Canteen, “Y.M.C.A.” Canteen in grounds. One building was arranged for a Theater where pictures or other “Y.M.C.A.” entertainments were held two or three nights a week and Sunday Evenings Religious Services.

Venereal Case: only three venereal cases have developed since arrival in France; Prophylactic Station was always opened and easily accessible. Clothing sufficient, laundering done in washrooms built in Barracks, equipment generally sufficient, requisitions usually were handled promptly. No conscientious objectors alien enemies or deserters, a few A.W.O.LS’s for a few hours of time but not enough to seriously effect the service, a few Summary Court Martials but no serious offences.

VETERINARY ADMINISTRATIONS
While operating as an Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital, Remount Squadron No. 304 was assigned with us to do evacuation service. During September animals were received from practically all Divisions of the First Army thru the Division Mobile Sections and given First Aid treatment and evacuated to Veterinary Hospitals at Neufchateau, Valdahon, Treveray, and Gievres. In October the receivals came from the 2nd Army. November 11th, 1918, we reverted back to our original status as an Advance Veterinary Hospital in concrete buildings divided into five (5) sections each with a total capacity of 760 animals, three (3) large riding halls with a capacity of 125 animals each were used and this could be increased by 300 in an emergency, large doors and windows furnished sufficient ventilation. Shoeing shop was established in a building built for that purpose by the French. Water troughs are of iron in oval shape, grain troughs are iron and were put in buildings at the time of construction, hayracks were of iron construction, these had been removed but most of them were located and replaced. In the riding halls the framework of wood with stretched cross wires were constructed with success. Forage is obtained at the Railhead at Toul about four miles distance. No bedding was used.

FEEDING
Animals were feed hay and grain three times daily, weak and emaciated animals four times a day, bran was fed twice a week and salt three times a week. Manure was carted away daily to nearby dumps. A small electric pump out of a reservoir of the Moselle River, which was sufficient, supplied water and all animals were watered three times a day. Feet and legs were washed when necessary.

GROOMING
Animals were groomed two to three times a day. Grooming kits were disinfected after each horse by washing in a situation of Creolin or lime and sulphur dip, all animals were clipped on entering the Hospital, all animals that were able except in very bad weather were exercised one hour each day. Harness was cleaned daily and oiled once each week. Enough blankets were on hand for animals on picket line, camouflaging of animals was not practiced at this Hospital.

SHOEING SHOP (Blacksmith shop)
Was constructed of concrete equipment consisted of one built with forge and two portable forges. French shoes were obtainable in sufficient quantity other equipment was sufficient, special shoes were made under the supervision of an Officer for special pathological conditions, all shoeing was done under the supervision of an Officer.

GENERAL ROUTINE OF WORK
7 to 7:30 A.M., watering
7:30 to 8:30 A.M. policing the stables
8:30 to 9:30 A.M. exercise
9:30 to 11:00 A.M., grooming
11:00 to 11:30 A.M., water and feed
1:00 to 1:30 P.M., school
1:30 to 2:00 P.M., policing the stables
2:00 to 2:30 P.M., drill
2:30 to 3:30 P.M., grooming
3:30 to 4:00 P.M., policing the stables
4:00 to 4:30 P.M., water and feed

Care was exercised in receival of all infectious diseases to see that they went to proper Wards, Mange especially is easily spread and if rigid care is not exercised all stables will soon be infected. All animals admitted are isolated by the receiving Officer until completion of Mallein Test when they are distributed to proper Wards, all traumatisms were dressed at the dressing station as often as necessary, those requiring medicine frequently were placed in one section where they would receive special care by an Officer, only a few cases of Lymphangitis have been receive that this Hospital, quite a little Influenza was received in September and October but by careful isolation was practically abolished, approximately five percent developed Pneumonia, eight cases of Tetanus have developed in a period of seven months, all animals wounded on the front were supposedly given the prophylactic dose of Antitetanic Serum by unit Veterinarians, any animals receiving deep seated puncture wounds were given a prophylactic dose.

GLANDERS
Only a few cases of Glanders have been received at this Hospital, every animal on being admitted was immediately subjected to the Mallein Test, reactors were immediately destroyed and posted, no outbreaks of this disease occurred. The intrapalpebric test was used in a few doubtful cases it was followed by a subcutaneous test; the intrapalpebral test has proven very accurate at this Hospital. Supply of Mallein was sufficient.

SKIN DISEASES
During September and October being an evacuation Hospital animals were received in such numbers isolation for Mange was almost impossible, all stables became more or less infected, we had no Dipping Vat until January 1919, consequently practically all animals were more or less infected, spraying was done with fair results but gratifying results were not really obtained until the Dipping Vat was ready for use, the time varied in returning animals to duty from four to eight weeks according to the Severity of Dermatitis. Quite a number of cases of Thrush developed during the wet winter months but yielded readily to treatment, quite a few Colic cases resulted from getting weak and emaciated animals feeding too large a grain ration.

Carcasses were taken over by the French except those destroyed for the Glanders, which were buried deeply. No motor ambulances were used; two French horse drawn ambulances were used. Statistic are not available but probably 150 animals were moved with these, in my opinion it is doubtful if horse drawn ambulances are of much value as most animals that are unable to walk a short distance should be destroyed from an economical point of view on the other hand many animals that could not walk twenty or thirty miles if transported to Hospital could soon be restored to the service as good serviceable animals.

SURGICAL CASES
Statistics of all cases are not available but of twenty operations for a quittor eighteen were successful, the French method was used, eight of these operations were done by 1st. Lt. E.K. Sales, eight by 2nd Lt. Byron E. Green and four by 1st. Lt. A.G. Gierke. Amputation of Penis on account of periphymosis fifteen all of which was successful, three of these operations were done by Lt. Sales and seven by Lt. Gierke and five by Lt. Green. Of 22 operations for Fistulas withers 19 were successful.

MEDICAL SERVICE
200 cases of Colic were treated at this Hospital in a period of seven months with a loss of five percent, 100 cases of Pneumonia during the same time were treated with a loss of fifty percent, the large death rate was thought to be due to gas complications, 20 cases of Azotoria were treated with a loss of two percent, no epidemics of serious consequence developed.

SUPPLIES
On arrival overseas from the United States all Hospital equipment which had proceeded us had been salvaged but owing to the fact that we were acting as an Evacuating Section much of the supplies was not absolutely needed and by November we were fairly well equipped some of the supplies coming from the Medical Supply Depot of the 2nd Army at Toul, and others from Medical Supply Depot at “Is sur Tille”, Quartmaster and Ordnance equipment was adequate.

Signed:
James S. Spikes
Captain, V.C.
Commanding, Veterinary Hospital No. 5


VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
(Undated) Sometime after January 1919

This Hospital with accommodation for 1250 patients, deals solely with animals affected with Mange.

It is divided into 5 double sub-divisions, each handling 250 cases.

“A”, “C”, and “D”, sub divisions are employed in treating animals by the Calcium Sulphide method, and “E” sub division in treating animals requiring oily dressing.

“A”, “C”, “D”, and “E”, each have one stable into which they put their cured animals. These are kept under observation for 4-20 days (depending on the form of Mange) before being shown up for inspection for transfer to “B” sub division.

“B” sub division is the Convalescent Ward and all cases cured in other Wards are transferred to “B” and kept there under observation for 3 to 21 days, during which time they are conditioned, polished up, and Malleined before discharge to Remount Service.

Should any cases show signs of being still affected, he is immediately retransferred to his original sub division.

ADMISSIONS
Cases are received in batches of 20 to 50 from the Reception Hospital. They are diagnosed clinically, being classified as under:

a. Advance Sarcoptic
b. Moderate Sarceptic
d. Slight Sarceptic
e. Advance Psoroptic
d. Moderate Psoroptic
f. Slight Psoroptic

An “Advance Sarcoptic Case” may be described as one in which the skin is thickened, corrugated, and rhinoseros like, this being always associated with great loss of hair.

These cases are always treated by oily dressings in the method described later, Calcium Sulphide never being used.

A “Moderate Sarceptic Case” is one showing considerable area affected, but only slight thickening of the skin. The other terms explain themselves. Classes 2-6 are all treated by the C,S.2, method described hereafter.

NUMBERING
The animals admitted is given a Hospital number, a sub division number, and a case card, on which a full description is entered together with the treatment to be carried out. (Sample cards “A” and “B” attached). The sub division letter and number is stamped on a tin tab fastened to the buckle of head collar.

A copy of the entries made in the card is also made at the same time in the Case Book, the front of which is used for Calcium Sulphide cases, and the back portion for cases treated by oily dressings. (Copy of extract from Case Book attached book marked “C”).

By this method one can see the numbers of animals due each day for clipping, dressing or washing.

The Officer in charge of each sub division has a case book showing in a similar manner the dates each of his horses is due for treatment, and he can therefore check the work done each day.

Each Officer renders a daily statement showing the number of each animal clipped, dressed, washed, and discharged to “B” sub division as cured during the day, and the number he has due for treatment tomorrow. This statement also shows the number exercised, the strength of animals, and personnel, and the forage required next day. (Copy attached marked “D”).

CLIPPING OF ADMISSIONS
Every case is clipped the day after admission, this is carried out in a special clipping shed, where clippers from “A”, “C”, “D”, and “E”, sub divisions work under an N.C.O. Each pair of clippers has a blackboard in the stall where they work, and the animal’s number is chalked on this as soon as he enters. Each pair of men clip 8 horses as a day’s work.

The Sarcoptic cases are clipped at one end, and the Psoroptic cases at the other end of the shear. The animals are groomed after clipping, before returning to stables, and all hair, dirt etc. is burnt. All the men wear canvas clothing. The legs are left unclipped unless found to be affected. Clipping is repeated during the treatment, as laid down in the card.

CLIPPING OF CONVALESCENT CASES
Any horse transferred to “B” sub division as cured, if requiring it, is clipped there by a separate staff of clippers in his own lines.

TREATMENT OF ADVANCE SARCOPTIC CASES
These are all treated by the application of Sulphur and Oil, (Sulphur Sub. 2 and a half pounds, OL. Cetacei one gallon)

Various Oily bases have been tried and it is found that OL. Cetacei penetrates well and does the least damage to the skin, and is most easily removed. Lard soon turned rancid and causes severe blistering. Lubricating oil is very sticky causes great loss of condition, and is very difficult to remove. Olive Oil is expense. Linseed Oil dries and causes matting and entire loss of hair.

PROGRAM OF TREATMENT
1st. day – Admit

2nd day – Clip and groom clean, burning clippings and dirt.

3rd day – Dress all over with oil and sulphur, the dressing being well rubbed in with piece of sacking. Pay particular attention to the throat, intermaxillary space, supra orbital fossae, withers elbows and belly. When finished the animal should be oily with a yellow tint, but not “soaking”.

4th day – Keep the dressing moving with an old piece of sacking.

5th day – The thickened parts will be found to be much softer and a large amount of the scaly epidermis can be removed with a currycomb and a dandy brush. Every effort must be made to remove this pile up epidermis or the skin will be left thickened and corrugated, at the same time care should be taken that the skin is not broken.

6th day – Dandy brush well over to remove loose scales, then wash with hard soap, a little soda and hot water. Rinse thoroughly using cooler water, then exercise quietly for 20 minutes, and if cold, rug up.

7th and 8th days - Exercise and groom thoroughly removing as much scale and dirt as possible but taking great care not to break the skin.

9th to 14th days - Repeat treatment of 3rd., to 8th, days.

15th to 19th days - Repeat treatment of 3rd., to 8th, days, except that dressings is only applied to local areas, with patients clipped on 18th day if necessary.

With this treatment the patient can usually be considered to be cured, and it only remains to groom, exercise and condition, the patient being kept under close observation.

It is found that animals remain itchy for some little time after the treatment is finished but it is gradually disappears as the skin gets clean, and resumes its normal condition. Unless this is realized one is inclined to repeat dressings too frequently, and cause serious damage to the skin.

Blistering and loss of hair over large areas is much more likely to result if the hair is long so that it “mats”. The weight of a rug bearing on the hair causes this “matting” and consequent blistering.

The use of too hot water for washing causes mild scalding, chiefly seen on the top of the quarters in the form of cracking of the skin in a “map-like” manner.

Rugs are a necessary evil in cold weather, as patients seem to feel the cold intensely when dressed with an oily dressing.

In the beginning we left the oily dressings on for 6 days, washing on the seventh day, and redressing on the eighth day and so on, but found this caused great damage to the skin which became saturated with oil and never got a rest.

The grooming for three days in between dressings is of great value and shortens the period of treatment considerably.

Individual attention and great care in dressing is very necessary in these cases in order to affect a cure, and at the same time do as little damage to the skin as possible.

TREATMENT OF MODERATE AND SLIGHT SARCOPTIC, AND ALL PSOROPTIC CASES These are all treated by Calcium Sulphide baths for the reason that it is cheaper, causes no loss of condition as oily dressings does, and of its efficiency there is no doubt, provided the skin is not “Rhinoseros” like.

PROGRAM OF TREATMENT
1st day – Admit

2nd day – Clip

3rd day – Complete immersion in a bath (Dipping Vat) of Calcium Sulphide, at temperature of 100 degrees F. the patient being kept there about thirty seconds, while the head, neck and withers are given extra attention with brushes and mops. Patients allowed to drain and then (if cold, rugged up) put into stall.

4th and 5th day – Thoroughly groomed.

6th day - Re-dipped, if a bad case, otherwise groomed.

7th and 8th day - Thoroughly groomed.

9th day - Re-dipped as before.

10th – 12th day – Groomed.

13th day – Washed with soap and warm water.

14th day - Re-dipped as before.

15th and 16th day – Groomed.

17th day - Re-dipped, if it is a bad case.

18th day – Groomed.

19th day – Clipped if necessary.

20th day – Washed.

This concludes the treatment, in the great majority of cases, it only remaining to clean, fatten and condition the animal before discharge.

At the same time he is kept under close observation for any signs of recurrence. Should this occur, extra baths on the lines laid down are given.

PREPARATION OF CALCIUM SULPHIDE SOLUTION

Constituents:
a. Fresh unslaked lime 10 lbs
b. Sulphur Sub. 22 and half lbs
c. Water, 20 gallons

PROCEDURE OF MAKING
Into a boiler, having a capacity of about 30 gallons or over put in 20 gallons of water. On a wooden or cement surface spread the sulphur in a layer about 2 inches thick, the Lime being put in a heap in the center of this. Water taken from the original 20 gallons is poured a little at a time on the Lime, this causes slaking.

As soon as the Lime is powdered more and more water is stirred in until a complete mixture results, having a consistency of a paste.

PREPARATION OF CALCIUM SULPHIDE
The water in the boiler having been brought to the boil, the paste is added, and the mixture kept stirred and boiling steadily until all solid matter is dissolved, and the solution resulting is a dark chocolate color.

DILUTION
To one part of chocolate solution add three parts of water.

THE BATH
The bath used has a capacity of 3200 gallons, and holds seven feet of solution, and is kept at the required temperature of 110 degrees by steam forced directly into it. So far, over 10,000 animals have passed through it, with only one accident.

NOTE: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, April 1919
Dipping appears to be the only practical way of handling manage and other skin troubles in the A.E.F. Usually after a single dipping the animal cease to scratch, gain in flesh rapidly, and are soon really for re-issuing. Line and Sulphur in used and the animals dipped at a temperature of 102 degrees Fahrenheit, allowing the animals to stay in the dip for 2 minutes, giving additional hand treatment to the head and ears and spraying these parts until all evidence of the disease disappears. Some veterinarians find had rubbing and brushing as the animals come out of the dip to be of no advantage and a waste of time where many cases are to be treated.

DISINFECTION OF STABLES
These are fortunately made entirely of iron, and the process of disinfection can be easily carried out. The blow lamp and sprayer are kept in constant use, and bales, heel-posts etc., are scrubbed with disinfectant weekly.

RUGS
These are used in winter and by keeping the Thrash disinfector going continually we are able to disinfect each rug every twelve to fourteen days.

GROOMING KITS
Every groomer has a bucket (made of half a drum) of disinfectant in which his brushes etc., are put after grooming each horse. All kits are thoroughly disinfected and cleaned every Sunday by boiling, and soaking in disinfectant.

EXERCISED
At present 300 to 400 horses are exercised on the road every morning from 6:00 A.M. to 7:00 A.M., and about the same number in the exercising track during the day. Horses undergoing grease treatment are exercised after being washed.

END OF REPORT

Signed:
E. J. Wadley
Major, A.V.C.
Commanding Veterinary Hospital No. 5

MICROSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS OF MANGE
Circular Memo. No. 112
(Undated) Sometime after January 1919

THE TAKING AND PREPARATIONS OF THE SCRAPINGS
The area, from which it is proposed to make a scraping having been decided upon, the hair, particularly if it is at all long, should be clipped and lightly dusted off.

This done, the part to be scraped should be moistened with a five to ten percent solution of KHO. Scraping with a blunt knife over a surface of 1 to 1 half inches square should be carried out till blood oozes, as it is only by reaching the blood that the inclusion of all varieties of Parasites can be ensured.

The material collected on the blade of the knife should be transferred to a Test Tube and shaken up in a 10 percent solution of KHO.

The contents of the tube having been boiled for fully ten minutes should be transferred to a centrifugal machine and centrifuged till all solids are thrown down.

Examination, by a half or two thirds power of the deposit left over, after pouring off the liquid will decide whether Parasites were in the scrapings or not.

The boiling if carried out for ten minutes renders hair and skin debris transparent but has no effect on acari.

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS
It is not uncommon to find acari in horses which have not been satisfactorily groomed or which have been in occupation of dirty billets or stables, and though these acari, at first glance, may be thought to be Pathogenic, it is by no means always the case that they are so.

It is obviously necessary to differentiate between the Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic, and with a view to facilitate this, the following points are mentioned:

a. All Pathogenic varieties are provided with Ambulacral suckers on the legs, while Non- Pathogenic types have hooklets only.
b. The suckers in the three varieties parasitic to horses are so distinctive as to serve, apart from other peculiarities, as a safe and simple means of differentiation, thus:

The SARCOPTIC forms possess a simple cup-like sucker on a fairly strong stem, this stem being invariably found lying at the angle to the direction of the leg.

The PSOROPTIC forms possess a somewhat ornamental sucker on a stem which is distinctly jointed. The position which this bears to the leg is much the same as in the case of the SARCOPTIC varieties.

The SYMBIOTIC forms possess a comparatively large sucker on a short stem having the appearance of a champagne glass. This is always in direct prolongation of the leg itself.

If those points be noted it will be quite impossible to make a mistake even if nothing more than a single leg and its sucker are submitted to examination.

Should parasites be found with suckers of other shape or form than the above. It is probable that those are varieties which are parasitic to animals other than the horse, and this being so, no anxiety need be caused by their presence as they never remain long on a strange host.

The most important of the other points of differential diagnosis are:

THE SARCOPT
The smallest of the varieties met with, the body being as broad as it is long gives the parasite a distinctly round shape. The limbs are short and thick and the head small and rounded. Neither the head nor limbs project very far beyond the body margin. The body itself is covered with rough scales, which can be easily seen standing up in pyramid form. Scattered over the surface there are also well marked thorn like spikes, which, with careful focusing, can be easily seen.

If viewed from the ventral side the groove which marks the division between the head and body can be seen to be prolonged in the middle line, to form a distinct letter “Y”. This forms a very distinctive peculiarity.

THE PSOROPT
This variety is distinctly longer than it is broad, and in comparison with the Sarcopt it is large. The head is long and thin, being drawn to a fine point. The large are long and delicate looking, and both head and legs stand well out from the body.

THE SYMBIOT
Like the Psoropt is large in comparison with the Sarcopt. The length is greater than the breadth. The head stands well out from the body, and is not narrow and pointed like that of the Psoropt. The legs are long and less delicate looking than those of the Psoropt.

END OF REPORT


COMMUNICATIONS VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5

2ND IND.
June 27, 1918

From: C.O. Veterinary Hospital No. 5, Auxiliary Remount Depot, Base Section No. 1, S.O.S.

To: Office Chief Surgeon, Headquarters, Base Section No. 1, S.O.S.

1. Forwarding list of the 105 enlisted men of this organization, men embarking on S.S. “Itasca”. (Note: Company “B”)
2. The 105 soldiers of this Hospital did not disembark at this Base and are not on duty at this Hospital.
3. No report of their arrival in France has been received at this office.
4. Request that these men be returned to this Command, if they can be located.

(Note: Company “A” embarked on the S.S. Hercules and landed at St. Nazaire, France on June 3, 1918 and Company “B” landed at Bordeaux, France June 5, 1918 and on June 10th, 1918, was ordered to report to the Commanding Officer Veterinary Hospital No. 6 for duty at Neufchateau, France. Obviously, Major Blair was not aware at the time of this communication that the Detachment of the 105 men were being sent to Neufchateau and hr was concerned of their return to his Command/)

Signed:
William R. Blair
Major, V.C.N.A. (Veterinary Corps, National Army)
Veterinary Hospital No. 5


334.1 – (OCQM)
July 2nd, 1918

From: Chief Surgeon, A.E.F., Headquarters S.O.S., July 2, 1918

To: Office Chief Surgeon, H.Q., Base Section No. 1, S.O.S.

1. Company “B” Veterinary Hospital No. 5, is now at Neufchateau. Owing to the large number of sick animals at Veterinary Hospital No. 6 at Neufchateau Company “B” was ordered there on arrival in France.

2. After several Veterinary Hospitals now under construction in the Advance Section are constructed, Veterinary Hospital No.5 will be consolidated and sent to an Advance Section Hospital.

By direction:

Signed:
E.M. Welles Jr.
Lt. Col. Medical Corps, N.A.

Note: At this time Company “A” of Veterinary Hospital No. 5 was being called a Mobile Veterinary Hospital or M.V.H. No. 5.


AUXILIARY REMOUNT DEPOT, BASE SECTION NO. 1, S.O.S.
Veterinary Hospital No. 5
July 23, 1918

From: Commanding Officer Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: Sergeant Warren N. Thompson

Subject: Acknowledging Contribution

1. It is gratifying to the Officers of this Command to receive the very generous contribution of 400 francs from the Enlisted personnel to be devoted to the worthy 586 families who have given six sons to the Army during this great War.

2. Please express to the men our keen appreciation of their voluntary gifts to this cause.

Signed:
William R. Blair
Major, V.C.N.A.
Commanding Veterinary Hospital No. 5


HEADQUARTERS THIRD ARMY CORPS
August 20, 1918, A.E.F.

From: Commanding General

To: Commanding Officer, Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5

Subject: Temporary transfer of M.V.H. No. 5

1. The following telegram has been received:

“Headquarters First Army, August 19, 1918, C.G., 3rd Corps Bullard. Number Ninety G One period Referring to your 629-G-1 direct Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5 to proceed to Pagny-sur-Meuse via Is-sur-Tilie for temporary duty with the Fourth (4th) Corps. Signed: BARBER.”

Attached hereto is an order directing you to proceed to Pagny-sur-Meuse.

2. Make your own arrangements with the Railhead Officer at Mezy-sur-Marne relative to getting transportation for your men, and wire the Commanding General, 4th Corps, the time of departure and expected arrival. Get the necessary rations from the Railhead Officer, 3d Corps, Chateau Thierry. Notify this office by telephone the time of your expected departure. Send all of this correspondence through the Adjutant, so that he may issue the necessary orders.

By Command of Major General Bullard

Signed:
G.K. Wilson
A.C. of S., G-1

1 INCL.
Scr/abn.

Copies to:
Railhead Officer, Mezy-su-Marne
Railhead Officer, Chateau Thierry
3d Corps Veterinary Officer, Major Jewell


HEADQUARTERS, FIRST ARMY
A.E.F., France, G-3
August 23, 1918

Special Orders No. 65 (SECRET)

Upon arrival in the First Army, Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5 (M.V.H., No 5) will take station at Pagny-sur-Meuse, and will report for temporary duty to the 4th Corps.

BY COMMAND OF GENERAL PERSHING
Signed:
H.A.Drum
Chief of Staff

Distribution:
Chief of Staff, 2
G-1, 1st Army
G-3, 1st Section
G-3, 2nd Section
G-3, G.H.Q.
G-4, 1st Army 4

Copy to units concerned:
A.C., 1st Army
Chief Surgeon
C.O. Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5
C.O., Fourth Corps

Signed Official:
Stephen O. Fuqua
Lt. Col. General Staff
Assistant, G-3

Chief Signal Officer
C.G., VIII French Army


HEADQUARTERS, FIRST ARMY
A.E.F., France, G-3
September 9th, 1918

Special Orders No. 171 (SECRET)

1. Veterinary Hospital No. 5 is detached from the 4th Corps and is assigned to duty as an Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital, First Army. It will retain its present station at Jeanne-d-Arc Caserne, Toul.

2. The Commanding Officer of Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5 will send two (2) Officers and thirty-five (35) men to report to the Commanding General, 4th Corps, for duty as Corps Mobile Veterinary Hospital. This detachment will remain on duty with the 4th Corps until relieved by order from these Headquarters or until arrival of a regularly organized Mobile Veterinary Hospital, at which, time the detachment will be returned to Veterinary Hospital No. 5 by the Corps Commander.

2. The 304th Remount Squadron will proceed by rail, after arrangements with G-4, 1st Army, from Montier-sur-Saulx to Toul, where, upon arrival, it will take station at the Jeanne-d’-Arc Caserne for duty with the Army Veterinary Hospital now at that place.

BY COMMAND OF GENERAL PERSHING

Signed:
H.A. Drum
Chief of Staff

Signed Official:
Stephen O. Fuqua
Lt. Col. General Staff\
Assistant, G-3

Distribution:
Chief of Staff, 2
G-1
G-2
G-3, G.H.Q.
G-4, (4)

Copy to units concerned:
C.S.O.
A.G.
C.G., VIII French Army
C.O., Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5
C.O., Fourth Corps
C.O., 304th Remount Squadron
Army Veterinary Hospital – Toul


TELEGRAM
September 9, 1918, Tour

C. in C., C-4
HAEF

M-85 – It is requested that orders be issued directing Company “A” of Veterinary Hospital No. 5, now at Pagny-sur-Meuse (Meuse), upon the arrival of Mobile Section No. 102, to proceed to A.P.O. 731, moving all sick animals that can be moved, with them and reporting upon arrival to the C.O., Rebeval Barracks, Veterinary Hospital No. 6, for duty and station period.

HARBORD

Official:
Signed:
H.C. Smither
Asst. Chief of Staff, C-4


HEADQUARTERS 1ST ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Jeanne d’ Arc Caserne, A.P.O. No. 775
September 22, 1918

From: The C.O. Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: The Chief Veterinarian First Army

Subject: Condition of Evacuated Animals

1. The records of this office show that 1491 animals have been received to date, of which 500 have been cases of debility. There have been 90 deaths to date. All the deaths with two exceptions have been from general debility. Most of these deaths have occurred on the day following the animals entry to this Hospital, some have occurred after two or three days and other on the same day of entry to this Hospital. This shows very plainly that debilitated animals are not being evacuated from the organizations soon enough. By evacuating a month or two sooner the animal’s usefulness is lost for that month or two but he could be returned to duty six months sooner and the animals that are now worked until death, could be saved.

2. More than fifty percent of the animals passing thru this Hospital show faulty shoeing and many come in lame from lack of shoes or shoes that have been on for too long of a time. This is plainly cruelty to animals, shows indifference on the part of the responsible party, causes the loss of many animals to the Army and should not be tolerated.

(Unsigned)


HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY
October 12, 1918, A.E.F., France

From: Asst. Chief Veterinarian, 2nd Army

To: C.O. Veterinary Hospital No. 5

Subject: Evacuation of Animals

1. All animals evacuated by you will be through the following channels:
a. First to S.O.S. Veterinary Hospitals
b. Second to the Chief Quartermaster, 2nd Army for recuperation
c. Third to Chief Quartermaster for reissue

2. Animals which need but a short period for recuperation will be handled by 2nd Army Remount Squadron and when ready for issue there destination will be made through the 2nd Army.

3. No animals will be issued to organization except by written order from the Chief Quartermaster 2 nd Army.

Signed:
Chas. H. Jewell
Asst. Chief Veterinarian, A.E.F.


HEADQUARTERS 2ND ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Jeanne d’ Arc Caserne, France, A.P.O. 784, A.E.F.
October 13, 1918

From: C.O., H.Q. 2nd Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: The Army Veterinarian, 2nd Army

Subject: Weekly Report, Oct. 11, 1918

Animals:
Remaining on hand last report – 340
Received since last report – 816
Number evacuated since last report – 816
Number of deaths since last report – 75
Number of animals sold – 20
Number of cases of Influenza on hand – 4
Number cases mange on hand – 5
Number of cases Surgical on hand – 20
Number of cases debility – 10
Available for issue – 207
Total number of cases on hand – 246

Signed:
F. de M. Bertram
Captain, V.C.

Note: Captain F. de M. Bertram Commanded Veterinary Hospital No. 5 from Oct. 1st. 1918 to Nov. 11th, 1918


HEADQUARTERS 2ND ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Jeanne d’ Arc Caserne, France, A.P.O. 784, A.E.F.
October 19, 1918

From: C.O., H.Q. 2nd Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: The Army Veterinarian, 2nd Army

Subject: Weekly Report, Oct. 19, 1918

Animals:
Remaining on hand last report – 255
Received since last report – 432
Number evacuated since last report – 361
Number of deaths since last report – 11
Number of animals sold – 19
Number of cases of Influenza on hand – 26
Number cases Mange on hand – 65
Number of cases Surgical on hand – 150
Number of cases debility – 85
Available for issue – 300
Total number of cases on hand – 326

Signed:
F. de M. Bertram
Captain, V.C.


HEADQUARTERS 2ND ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Jeanne d’ Arc Caserne, France, A.P.O. 784, A.E.F.
October 26, 1918

From: C.O., H.Q. 2nd Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: The Army Veterinarian, 2nd Army

Subject: Weekly Report, Oct. 25, 1918

Animals:
Remaining on hand last report – 326
Received since last report – 607
Number evacuated since last report – 19
Number of deaths since last report – 29
Number of animals sold – 21
Number of cases of Influenza on hand – 50
Number cases Mange on hand – 300
Number of cases Surgical on hand – 255
Number of cases debility – 230
Available for issue – 29
Total number of cases on hand – 864

Signed:
F. de M. Bertram
Captain, V.C


HEADQUARTERS 2ND ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Jeanne d’ Arc Caserne, France, A.P.O. 784, A.E.F.
November 2, 1918

From: C.O., H.Q. 2nd Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: The Army Veterinarian, 2nd Army

Subject: Weekly Report, Nov. 1, 1918

Animals:
Remaining on hand last report – 863
Received since last report – 472
Number evacuated since last report – 543
Number of deaths since last report – 49
Number of animals sold – 0
Number of cases of Influenza on hand – 60
Number cases Mange on hand – 250
Number of cases Surgical on hand – 160
Number of cases debility – 274
Available for issue – 0
Total number of cases on hand – 744

Signed:
F. de M. Bertram
Captain, V.C


HEADQUARTERS 2ND ARMY MOBILE VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Jeanne d’ Arc Caserne, France, A.P.O. 784, A.E.F.
November 9, 1918

From: C.O., H.Q. 2nd Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: The Army Veterinarian, 2nd Army

Subject: Weekly Report, Nov. 8, 1918

Animals:
Remaining on hand last report – 744
Received since last report – 235
Number evacuated since last report – 31
Number of deaths since last report – 26
Number of animals sold – 37
Number of cases of Influenza on hand – 32
Number cases Mange on hand – 423
Number of cases Surgical on hand – 170
Number of cases debility – 230
Available for issue – 30
Total number of cases on hand – 885

Signed:
F. de M. Bertram
Captain, V.C


HEADQUARTERS VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Jeanne d’ Arc Caserne, Toul, France, A.P.O. 784, A.E.F.
January 25, 1918

Summary of work at Veterinary Hospital No. 5, from November 13, 1918 to January 25, 1919

Animals:
Number of horses and mules on hand Nov. 13 – 525
Number of horses and mules received Nov. 13 to Jan. 25, 1919 – 2113
Received since last report – 235
Number of died and destroyed – 113
Number of animals condemned and sold – 226
Number returned to duty – 326
Number evacuated to other hospitals – 943
Total number of animals received at this Hospital to date - 7375
Number evacuated and issued to date - 5502
Number of died and destroyed to date – 530
Number I. C.’d and sold to French – 323
Principal diseases: emaciations, mange, foot troubles, quitters, calk wounds, pricks, etc.
Animals Dipped: Jan. 13 to 23 – 2,500 and Remount Squadron No. 304 - 350

Signed:
Major G.A. Hanvey Command, Veterinary Hospital No. 5


HEADQUARTERS SERVICES OF SUPPLY
Office of the Quartermaster, A.E.F., Remount Division
October 14, 1918, France

Instruction Memorandum No. 23
Extract:
1. Paragraph 3 to 6 inclusive of Instruction Memorandum No. 2, O.C.Q.M., Remount Division, June 20th, 1918, are revoked.

2. A purposed bulletin copy, below, providing for the disposition of all animals condemned and ordered sold has been submitted to G.H.Q. for publication. Pending publication of this bulletin its provisions will be put into effect at once by all Depots.

Proposed Bulletin:
a. An agreement has been entered into with the French authorities whereby all animals condemned and ordered sold will be turned over to the French military authorities.
b. Notification will be sent by the officer concerned, thru the American liaison officer, to the French Commanding General of the region in which the animals are located, or if the Zone of the Armies to the authority designated by the Directeur de L’ Arriere of the French general headquarters, of any animals which have been condemned for sale, and the French authorities will call for them.
c. Receipt in duplicate will be taken from the French authorities for all animals turned over to them; one copy of receipt will be retained with the organization and one forwarded to the C.Q.M., Headquarters, S.O.S.
d. All animals condemned for sale will be branded “I.C.” on the neck, as provided for in paragraph 3059, Manual of the Quartermaster Corps.

3. Animals that are destroyed to prevent suffering or that die thru accident and are fit for butchery purposes will be disposed of locally and the money received deposited disbursing Quartmaster.

4. All horses hair clippings except when there is danger of mange infection will be carefully saved. When less than 100 pounds have been accumulated for shipment, communicate with the Chief of Salvage Service, S.O.S., who will issue instruction for disposal.

Signed:
F.S. Armstrong
Colonel of Cavalry
Chief of Remount Service


HEADQUARTERS SERVICES OF SUPPLY
October 19, 1918, A.E.F.

In replying please refer to file No. C.S. 40415/8876

Memorandum to: C.O., Veterinary Hospital No. 5, A.P.O. No. 731.

1. Enclosed herewith is copy of Proposed Bulletin relating to disposal of unsuitable animals. You will guided in these instructions until further notice.

By direction:
David S. White
Chief Veterinarian, A.E.F.


TELEGRAM
October 23, 1918, Tours

Assistant Chief Veterinarian, 2nd Army, Headquarters 2nd Army.

Your telegram No. 14, G-4 not understood period Veterinary Hospital No. 5 is by virtue of its organization an S.O.S. Hospital period. Its services have been loaned to the 2nd Army until Army Mobile Hospital No. 2 arrives from the States period. It is not intended to deprive the 2nd Army of the use of Veterinary Hospital No. 5 or any other Hospital which may be needed to take care of evacuations but it should be administered in the same manner as other Advance S.O.S. Hospitals period. \

Signed:
McCaw


TELEGRAM
October 24, 1918

Memorandum to Chief Veterinarian, First Army:

1. You will make necessary arrangements to have detachment of Veterinary Hospital Unit. No. 5, which has been acting temporarily as a Corps Mobile Veterinary Hospital, 4th Corps, relieved from this duty and ordered to report to the Commanding Officer of Veterinary Hospital No. 5.

Signed:
David S. White
Lt. Col., V.C.
Chief Veterinarian, A.E.F.


TELEGRAM
October 25, 1918

Neufchateau

C.O. Veterinary Hospital No. 5

Toul

V-13. C.G. Directs that you direct 1 Officer and sufficient personnel of your organization to evacuate approximately 384 sick animals from your Hospital to Base Veterinary Hospital at Gievres Department (Loir et Cher). Upon completion of duties personnel will return to proper station travel directed necessary in public service.

Signed:
IRWIN 1216P


HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY
October 25, 1918, A.E.F.

Special Orders

Extract

One commissioned officer, one non-commissioned officer and 48 enlisted men to be designated by the C.O. Army Mobile Veterinary Hospital No. 5, will proceed from their station to Gievres, (loir et Cher) as attendants with 384 sick animals and will turn the same over to the C.O. Base Veterinary Hospital at that place. Upon completion of this duty, the will return to their proper station.

The necessary forage, water buckets and breast ropes for the proper performance of this journey will be taken. The Quartmaster Corps will furnish rations for four days travel.

The travel directed is necessary in the Military Service.

By Command of Major General Bullard

Signed:
Stuart Heintzelman
Chief of Staff

Official:
A.E. Ahrends
Adjutant General


HEADQUARTERS SERVICES OF SUPPLY
October 30, 1918, A.E.F.

Memorandum to C.G., S.O.S., (G-4)

1. The Hospital in question in telegram of October 28th, signed Moseley, is Veterinary Hospital No. 5, which was organized in the U.S. as an S.O.S. Veterinary Hospital. On account of a great need for an evacuating unit in the Army area and a lack of the proper units for such purpose Veterinary Hospital No. 5 was loaned for that purpose.

2. Two evacuating units consisting of 137 men and 6 Officers have been organized from Casual Troops arriving from the States, and are now on their way to report to Headquarters, 2nd Army.

3. It is against the policy of this office to place S.O.S., Hospitals on the Army area, but on account of the weakened condition of animals evacuated and bad railroad facilities, S.O.S. Veterinary Hospitals have been pushed forward at the request of the C. in C. Three such are now located in the 1st Army area, but are administered by the S.O.S.

4. The Chief Veterinarian has been made responsible for the administration of the entire service and requests that all S.O.S., Hospitals be administered by the S.O.S., even though they may be placed by necessary in the Army area.

Signed:
Walter D. McCaw
Colonel, Medical Corps
Chief Surgeon, A.E.F.


1ST IND.
November 8, 1918
From: GHQ., AEF., 4th Sec., G.S., 8 November, 1918.

To: C.G., S.O.S.

1. Instructions have gone to the Second Army that hereafter this Veterinary Hospital No. 5 will be considered a Services of Supply (S.O.S.) institution and administered accordingly.

2. It was explained to the Second Army that the status of a Veterinary Hospital of this character, located in the Army Area, must be the same as that of a Base Hospital located in the same area.

By order of the C. in C.

Signed:
Geo. Van Horn Moseley
Brigadier General, G.S.
Asst. Chief of Staff, G-4

Copy to A.C.of S., G-4 2nd Army

HEADQUARTERS SERVICES OF SUPPLY
Office of the Inspector General
November 23, 1918, Toul, France

From: Lt. Col. N. H. Davis, Inspector General

To: Commanding General, Services of Supply

Subject: Report of an Inspection of Veterinary Hospital No. 5, Located at Toul, France.

I. Inspection of this unit was made 23 Nov. 1918. The personnel consisted of Veterinary Hospital Unit No. 5, with attached Medical personnel, less 2 Officers and 35 Enlisted men detached for duty with the Third Army, being a total of 6 Officers and 275 Enlisted men, which is reported to be adequate for properly caring for about 800 animals. There is no record of a previous inspection by an Officer of the Inspector General’s Department on file.

II. The Hospital is commanded by Major George A. Hanvey, Jr. V.C. (Note: Major George A. Hanvey Commanded V.H. No. 5 from Nov. 14th, 1918 to Jan. 25th, 1919)

III. The present inspection consisted of a careful personal survey of all buildings, animals, Officers, men and equipment in the entire station, and the following points were noted during the inspection.

1. The soil is clay with some gavel. The buildings consist of 21 stables and 3 riding halls; 3 barracks; 1 kitchen; 1 dining room; 8 buildings used as offices, storerooms, etc., all of which are of permanent cement and tile construction. This unit is located in a permanent French caserne, and all the buildings used by the Americans are turned over to them for their exclusive use, with the exception of the latrines, which are used in common with the French. The latrines are of the French squat pattern and seem to be adequate.

2. The total capacity of stall room at this Hospital is for 1140 animals, and this capacity admits of a 25 percent increase in emergency for a short period. Drainage consists of open ditches and sewers and appears to be satisfactory. This Hospital was established on August 30, 1918.

(Note: Major William R. Blair Commanded V.H. No. 5 from Jan. 2, 1918 to Sept. 12th, 1918)

The transportation facilities consist of a branch line of the Railroad. Animals are led about 3 miles to and from the point of entraining and detraining, at which point there is a platform which admits of loading 48 cars simultaneously.

3. The personnel of this unit are reported by the Commanding Officer as being efficient; to understand and properly perform their duties, animals are not being exercised they are groomed twice daily. The Veterinary work appears to be well done. The Shoeing facilities both in equipment and personnel are adequate, and the work is being well done. The total area of the portions of the caserne occupied by the Americans is about 10 acres. There are no paddocks, corrals, pastures, or fences. There are 2 Enlisted mans’ mess halls which appear to be satisfactory. The ration articles are reported to be sufficient in quantity and of good quality. The food is being well prepared. There is no military drill or theoretical instruction of any character being conducted. The administration and paperwork of this unit appears to be slightly below the standard. Reports are made on proper forms and copies kept on file. All orders appertaining to this service are on file and their contents appear to be understood and complied with.

4. The French have complete equipment for fire defense. The American unit has some hose, but no buckets or Pyrens extinguishers, and neither of these items is due on requisition. They should be asked for and supplied. Cars utilized for shipments going forward have been properly disinfected. Mangers, stables, and feed boxes are properly disinfected. The personal and equipment for horseshoeing is adequate. The shoeing is not all that might be desired, but these shops have recently been organized and it is expected that considerable improvement will be made within a short time. The Veterinary work appears to be well done. There are a number of veterinary instruments, which are not on hand. They have been asked for and have not been supplied. There are two Operating Tables on hand and but one of them installed. This table is being utilized but little and one is reported to be adequate. It would seem desirable to forward one of these tables to a Hospital which require its use. There are no branding irons on hand and no branding is being done at this Hospital. Guard Duty is performed by watchmen from the personnel and it appears to be satisfactory. The regulations for receiving, shipping, and caring for animals are understood and being compiled with. The order files are short several orders. Sick and new animals are properly isolated. Animals are properly classified according to diseases.

5. The Palpebral is the only Mallein Test being used. There are no laboratory facilities at this Hospital. Animals are being inspected twice daily be a veterinarian. Dead animals are turned over to the French Officials in accordance with orders. The water troughs, mangers, and feed boxes are in good condition and appear to be entirely satisfactory. Hair is infected and is not being salvaged. Forage is received from the railhead at Toul and is reported to be good quality and of sufficient quantity. The personnel of the Hospital is required to haul this forage a distance of 5 miles. There is a small supply of forage on hand and it is being well cared for. There is no waste of forage at this station. There is no Dipping Vat or Sulphur Chamber at this Hospital. Animals with Mange are receiving spray and hand treatment.

6. Feeding Times:
6:00 A.M., Grain
7:30 A.M., Hay
11:00 A.M., Grain
1:00 P.M., Hay
4:30 P.M., Grain and hay

Special feeds are also given to emaciated animals. Bran is fed dry mixed with the oats, and bran mashes are fed about twice a week. Salt is being fed twice a week with the short forage. The veterinary medicines on hand appear to be adequate. They are properly shored and well cared for. Veterinary instruments and supplies appear to be adequate. Shipments going forward from this Hospital are accomplished by proper personnel. They are properly equipped and given written orders. An average forage ration of 11 pounds of long and 11 pounds of short forage is being fed. There are no savings on this allotment.

7. There are no individual descriptive cards, pedigrees sheets, or sick reports of animals kept. Grooming kits are disinfected after each animal. There are 4 clipping machines on hand only one of clipping machines should be furnished this station. There are no grinding or chopping mills on hand and no record that any will be furnished.

8. There was one trial by Court Martial during the past month and there were three men in confinement at date of inspection. There were two men absent without leave and none of the personnel had venereal disease at the time of inspection. Daily inspection is made of barracks, kitchens, stables, mess halls, etc. Sanitary and venereal inspection are being held as required by orders.

9. There are no excesses or shortages of clothing and equipment, and that on hand is in good condition and adequate.

10. There is a suitable bathhouse on hand for use of the men, but at date of inspection the heating apparatus was out of order. Report of this situation has been made and repairs are expected to begun the day after this inspection. Manure and kitchen slops are turned over to French civilians. Fecal matter from the latrines is collected and emptied into a covered pit which disposition seems to be satisfactory.

11. Since established this Hospital has received 6168 animals; has evacuated 4265 animals; there have died 439 animals; 7 have been sold and there were on hand at date of inspection 1368 animals. Animals sick at time of inspection are classified as follows:

Minor Injuries – 523
Influenza – 45
Mange – 600
Emaciated – 200

12. From the general lack of activity upon the part of many of the personnel at time of inspection, the conclusion was formed that the personnel of this unit are not working over 65 percent of their capacity.

13. There was no Company Council book being kept by this unit and the Company fund was on hand in the form of a check.

14. Although conditions were not really bad at this Hospital, the situation would admit of considerable improvement. The general state of police was not up to the desired standard. The personnel was short of the number of men necessary for properly caring for animals and maintaining the station in a suitable state of police. Considerable work of this personnel was required in hauling forage, making a trip of 10 miles with the small lots which an escort wagon could carry and the rather poor class of animals which were available for this work at the Veterinary Hospital.

IV. Recommendations
1. That a Sulphur Chamber and Dipping Vat of proper type be furnished this Hospital.
2. That fencing material be furnished this Hospital and that paddocks be constructed and used.
3. That the personnel of this unit be increased by 3 Officers and 150 Enlisted men, in order that animals up to the full capacity of the Hospital may be properly cared for.
4. That a three-ton truck and a motorcycle with sidecar be furnished to this unit.
5. That a line Officer who has had experience with mounted organizations be ordered for duty at this Hospital as Commanding Officer.
6. That one of the Operating Tables at this Hospital be ordered sent to a Hospital where its use is required.
7. That orders be issued requiring this unit to hold a short drill for discipline, and a short period of theoretical instruction covering the special duties upon which this unit is engaged, at least five days each week.

Signed:
Lt. Col. N. H. Davis, Inspector General


OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL
Headquarters, Services of Supply (S.O.S.)
December 2, 1918

To: Commanding General, S.O.S.

1. Forwarded.

2. Attention is invited to attached report of inspection submitted by Lt. Col. N. H. Davis, Inspector General.

3. The conclusion and recommendations are concurred in.

Signed:
T. Q. Donaldson
Brigadier General


3RD IND.
December 9, 1918

From; Office of Chief Surgeon (O.C.S.), Headquarters S.O.S., France

To: Commanding General, S.O.S.

Reference to Par. 1: A Dipping Tank has been requested and approved for this site, and will be built as soon as cement is available.

Reference to Par. 2: It is not believed practical for paddocks to be built at this site. Instructions are being given to have all animals exercised that are physically fit.

Reference to Par. 3: A Labor Company composed of two (2) Officers and 120 Enlisted men are now at this Hospital.

Reference to Par. 4: Instruction has been given in the proper method for this Hospital to procure the necessary motor transportation.

Reference to Par. 5: Major George A. Hanvey who has had a number of years of Army experience, has been at his Hospital only a few days, and it is not believed advisable to change Commanding Officers at this time.

Reference to Par. 6: The Operating Table at this Hospital not in use has been ordered to the Veterinary Hospital at Verdun.

Reference to Par. 7: Lt. Col. K. B. Edmunds, Inf., now attached to this office, will call at this Hospital in the near future to carry out the recommendations of this paragraph.

Signed:
Walter D. McCaw
Colonel, Medical Corps
Chief Surgeon, A.E.F.


HEADQUARTERS SERVICES OF SUPPLY
December 9, 1918, A.E.F.

Memorandum

To: C.O., Veterinary Hospital No. 5, Toul (Mourthe and Moselle)

Subject: Report of Inspector General

1. Enclosed report of Inspector General and our endorsement to the Commanding General, S.O.S. You will take the necessary steps to have the recommendations carried out as outlined in our endorsement.

By direction:

Signed:
B. T. Merchant
Lt. Col. M. C.
Chief Veterinarian, A.E.F.

Copy to Major Reuben Hilty, Assistant Chief Surgeon, Veterinary, Advance Section, H.Q.


HEADQUARTERS SERVICES OF SUPPLY
December 28, 1918, A.E.F.

From: Chief Surgeon, A.E.F.

To: C.O. Veterinary Hospital No. 5, Toul (Meurthe et Moselle) France

Subject: Physical examination of animals

1. You are directed to make a physical examination of all animals in your Hospital for clinical cases of Glanders.

2. It is suggested that a flash-light be used in the examination of the nasal passages.

3. Any clinical cases of Glanders discovered will be reported to this office by wire.

By direction:

Signed:
B.T. Merchant
Lt. Col. Q.M.C.
Chief Veterinarian, A.E.F.


HEADQUARTERS VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Advance Section (A.S.), S.O.S.
Jeanne d’ Arc Caserne, Toul, A.P.O. 784
January 5th, 1919

From: C.O. Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: Chief of Remount Service, A.S., S.O.S.

Subject: Condemnation and Disposal of Animals

1. November 22, 1918 Col W.L. Reed, of Inspector General’s Dept., condemned 67 animals and ordered them sold to the French Gov., per G.H.Q., A.E.F., Bulletin No. 19, par 11, dated Mar. 22, 1918, A.E.F., Hq. S.O.S., Office Chief Q.M., Remount Division. Instruction Memo No. 23 dated Oct. 14th, 1918.

30 animals turned over to the French Authorities at Toul, France, Dec. 9, 1918.

2. November 27, 1918, Lt. Col. William W. West, Q.M.C. condemned 133 animals and ordered them sold to the French Gov. per par. 37, S.O. 174, Hq., S.O.S. dated Sept. 2, 1918, and per Tel. Ins. from Hq., S.O.S., dated Nov. 17, 1918.

15 animals turned over to the French Authorities at Toul, France, Nov. 26, 1918.
15 animals turned over to the French Authorities at Toul, France, Nov. 30, 1918.
16 animals turned over to the French Authorities at Toul, France, Dec. 3, 1918.
40 animals turned over to the French Authorities at Menancourt, France, Dec. 8, 1918.
30 animals turned over to the French Authorities at Toul, France, Dec. 9, 1918.
17 animals turned over to the French Authorities at Toul, France, Dec. 10, 1918.

3. December 21, 1918, Lt. H.W. Stanley, of the Office of the Chief Remount Officer, A.S., S.O.S., condemned 16 animals and ordered them sold to the French Gov. per par. 86, S.O. No. 254, Hq. S.O.S., dated Nov. 21, 1918.

16 animals turned over to the French Authorities at Toul, France, Dec. 23, 1918

Signed
George A. Hanvey Jr.
Major, U.S.A.


OFFICE OF ASSISTANT CHIEF VETERINARIAN
H.Q. Advance Section, A.E.F.
February 1st, 1919

Subject: Memo to all Veterinary Hospitals
1. The following is a list of all Veterinary Hospitals in the Advance Section that have evacuated horses to the Remount Service during the month of January 1919, showing the total number each that has been evacuated during the month:

Vet. Hospital No. 1 – Total Issued 355
Vet. Hospital No. 2B – Total Issued 242
Vet. Hospital No. 3 – Total Issued 456
Vet. Hospital No. 5 – Total Issued 124
Vet. Hospital No. 6, 16– Total Issued 416
Vet. Hospital No. 8 – Total Issued 192
Vet. Hospital No. 10 – Total Issued 178
Vet. Hospital No. 12 – Total Issued 113
Vet. Hospital No. 17 – Total Issued 100
Vet. Hospital No. 19 – Total Issued 118

Signed:
Major Reuben Hilty, Assistant Chief Surgeon, Veterinary, Advance Section, H.Q.


OFFICE OF ASSISTANT CHIEF VETERINARIAN
H.Q. Advance Section, A.E.F.
February 27, 1919

From: Asst. Chief Veterinarian, Adv. Sec., S.O.S.

To: C.O.’s, All Veterinary Hospitals in the Advance Section, S.O.S.

Subject: Sale of condemned animals to butcher.

1. It is requested that you submit promptly to this office, a statement of prices received from Butchers for animals previously inspected and condemned for sale to Butcher. This should show date sold, number of animals, name and address of butcher, and price received for animals and should cover each lot so disposed of after condemnation.

2. In event of no animals having been inspected and condemned at your hospital for sale to butcher, a statement to that effect is desired.

3. In connection with sale of condemned animals, there is enclosed herewith copy of letter from Veterinary Hospital No. 10 with respect to price received from butcher at Bourbonne les Bains for 22 I.C. animals. The information contained therein may prove profitable to you in connection with sale of animals, which may in future be condemned for sale to butcher at your depot, in event you are unable to secure from butchers in your locality prices which, in your judgment, are proper, and it is suggested that you get in touch with M. Gaston Gascuel in such case.

Signed:
F.E. Jones
Captain, V.C.
In absence of Assistant Chief Veterinarian (A.C.V.)


Enclosed herewith copy of letter from Veterinary Hospital No. 10 with respect to price received from butcher at Bourbonne les Bains for 22 I.C. animals:

From: Adjutant, Veterinary Hospital No. 10, Bourbonne les Bains, France, A.E.F.

To: Col. West, Chief Remount Officer, Advance Section, S.O.S.

Subject: Sale of animals to butcher.

1. Report that I have disposed of 22 head of horses to M. Gaston Gascuel, French butcher at Bourbonne les Bains for 500 francs per head.

2. My pervious dealings with said butcher, I was informed by him he would pay 650 francs per head for B.B. horses irrespective of condition and for B.B. horses of better flesh 500 francs per head.

3. Recommend that he be gotten in touch with, as he is at all times anxious to purchase horses of this sort.

4. His name is M. Gaston Gascuel, Hotel Commerce, Bourbonne les Bains, France.

Signed:
Arthur E. Joseph
2nd Lt. V.C.
Adjutant


HEADQUARTERS VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
Advance Section (A.S.), S.O.S.
Jeanne d’ Arc Caserne, Toul, A.P.O. 784
March 1, 1919

From: C.O. Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: Asst. Chief Veterinarian, Advance Section, S.O.S.

Subject: Sale of condemned animals to butcher

1. No animals have been inspected and condemned for sale to butcher at this Hospital.

Signed:
James S Spikes
Captain, V.C.

Note: Captain James S. Spikes Commanded Veterinary Hospital No. 5 starting in January 25, 1919


ROSTERS, VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
May 9, 1918

Headquarters consisting of 195 men and Major William R. Blair and 2nd Lt. Lester R. Smith embarked on the S.S. Hercules and landed in St. Nazaire, France on June 3, 1918 (Company A).

ROSTER VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5
(Note: Not dated probably around June 27 1918. Major Blair Commanded V.H. No. 5 from Jan. 2, 1918 to Sept. 12th, 1918.

COMMANDING
Major William R. Blair, V.C.N.A.

2ND LIEUTENANT
Lester, R Smith

SERGEANTS
Thompson, Warren M.
Jackson, Emmett W.
Beard, Jefferson M.
Pittman, Eugenne E.

CORPORALS
Miles, Edward
Norning, Frank
Robinson, Eddie
Tyler, William F.
Wood, Robert C.P.

COOKS
Branic, John J.
Goodwin, Willie L.

PRIVATES, 1ST CLASS
Anderson, John H.
Banks, Arthur J.
Blake, Joseph
Bowman, James H.
Briggs, Gust
Dorman, John
Henderson, George
Jones, James
Jones, Melvin J.
Jones, William A.
Lightfoot, Joseph
Moore, Robert A.
Sampson, Mitchell
Terry, Charles
Wilson, Paul H.
Woodfolk, Robert

PRIVATES
Allan, Harrison
Allan, John
Allan, Leonard
Amos, John O.
Anderson, Richard P.
Bailey, George
Bailey, Daniel
Banks, Archer
Barber, Alfred B.
Barley, Charles
Barnes, Robert
Bates, Fred
Beech, Horace A.
Blackwell, Charles
Blackwell, Clarence
Boyd, Alfred
Braxton, Southey
Bright, Charlie
Brown, Edward
Brown, James
Brown, Jessie
Brown, Hick
Brown, Richard
Browning, William H.
Buckner, John J.
Burrell, James C.
Butterworth, Nealy
Castle, Ben
Cathran, Wayman
Catton, Vager
Charity, James
Christian, Allen
Christian, Sim
Clory, Alexander
Collins, Frederick M.
Cox, Ezekiel
Depriest, Elijah
Edmerson, Henry J.
Eley, Frank L.
Ellis, Emmett
Eppirson, Ned
Farmer, Moses
Fields, John
Fleming, Claude
Fleming, Floyd
Fletcher, Horrace
Fosque, Howard
Foster, Henry
Frasier, Benjamin
Gaines, George C.
Gaither, Henry
Gillian, Thomas J.
Green, Shadrock
Green, Thomas
Hackley, Byrd
Harman, Elton
Harris, James I.
Harris, John A.W.
Harris, Sam
Haskins, Willie L.
Hill, Andrew A.
Hodges, Earnest
Holmes, Thomas E.
James, Richard
Johnson, Alfred M.
Johnson, Jacob
Johnson, James A.
Johnson, Peter
Jones, Jack
Jordan, William H.
King, Jim
King, Richard
King, William G.
Kyle, Glen
Lee, James D.
Lewis, Edgar
Lightfoot, Daniel
Likely, Archer
Loudon, William
Macklin, John
Major, Charles
Mallory, Percy P.
Martin, Joseph
McMiller, John
McPhearson, Alexander
Miles, Clarence L.
Miles, James H.
Minor, William
Mitchell, Jack
Moody, Lamual
Morgan, Luther
Morton, William
Myers, John
Osborne, Wellington
Overton, Thomas E.
Overton, William H.
Page, (not able to make out first name)
Patrick, John
Pearce, Claiborne
Perkins, Mitchell
Perrine, Robert
Perry, Robert
Perry, Thomas
Pleasant, Harold O.
Poindexter, Frank
Pullman, Levy
Randall, Elijah
Randolph, William H.
Roaves, Elder
Roane, Elder
Roberts, James A.G.
Simons, James
Smith, Junius
Smith, Willie
Tabb, David
Tabb, Garfield
Tabb, Phillip A.
Taliaferro, George
Tanner, Junior
Taylor, Fred
Taylor, George
Taylor, Simon P.
Terry, John B.
Thaniel, Boxley
Thomas, Frederick
Tinweatt, Watt
Townes, Lucius
Trice, Temple
Underwood, Walter
Warrick, Samuel
Washington, James H.
West, William
Whitaker, Henry
White, Frank E.
Wickliffe, James A.
Williams, Fleming P.
Williams, Henry
Witt, John
Wray, Walter
Wyatt, Silas
Wynn, Cornelius
Young, James W.

(Note: not signed or dated.
Probably around June, 27 1918 by signed by Major William R. Blair, V.C.N.A.)


ROSTER VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 5 (105 MEN)
Auxiliary Remount Depot, Base Section 1, S.O.S.
Veterinary Hospital No. 5
June 27, 1918

From: C.O. Veterinary Hospital No. 5

To: S.O.S., A.E.F., O.C.S.
(Note: Services of Supply, A.E.F., Office of Chief Surgeon)

Subject: Report on 105 men.

(Note: Roster, Company B Veterinary Hospital No. 5)

SERGEANTS
Barnes, Joseph

CORPORALS
Edmonds, Sethe E.
Massenburg, George
Parsons, Isaac
Preston, William E.
Waddey, Charles A.

COOKS
Eaton, John J.
Williams, Joe

PRIVATES, FIRST CLASS
Calvin, John W.
Evans, Hezekiah
Fultz, Linwood
Hart, James T.
Mack, John
Mings, Elisha
Perkins, Walter
Perkins, Henry
Redcross, Theodore
Rollins, Charles S.
Scott, John
Wood, Bernard F.

PRIVATES
Baskerville, Robert
Bell, Walter
Betsill, William
Brackenridge, Charles
Bailey, Stephen U.
Briggs, Calvin
Bigger, Franklin
Brinson, Charlie
Brown, Ashton L.
Brown, Otis
Carter, John
Clayton, Carroll J.
Collins, Victor
Coleman, Linsey
Crawley, Clarence
Edwards, James R.
Farmer, Thomas T.
Ferguson, Rogers M.
Forbes, William
Gaines, John W.
Gibson, Arthur L.
Goodall, Moses
Geodrick, Morris
Griffin, William T.
Grevius, Eugene
Gunnells, Mansfield
Gwynn, Findley
Guynn, Henry
Haines, Walter
Hall, Henry
Harris, William Jr.
Harvey, Alfred
Henderson, Lewis
Henry, Thomas L.
Hobbs, Dock
Holmes, Mack
Hilton, Henry
Howard, Herbert E.
Howard, Willie
Howlett, William E.
Hython, Peter
Hubbard, Ollie
James, Other
Johnson, Lee
Johnson, Willie
Jones, Hubert
Jones, Thomas J.
Kenny, Buddy
Lacy, Robert
Latter, Robert
Laws, George R.
Laws, Thomas H.
Lee, Robert A.
Lewis, Harry
Lindsay, William A.
Miller, Vanderbilt
Miller, Wirt
Miner, Willie
Morton, Fred
Morton, Junius
Oliver, Charles
Parker, John Jr.
Payne, Richard
Peeler, Arthur
Powers, Mat W.
Piggott, Wynder
Pryor, George T.
Pryor, Warren R.
Redd, Henry H.
Robertson, Robert
Ryan, Richard W.
Scott, James P.
Simmons, Herbert
Spencer, James E.
Thorn, William
Thurston, Alvah H.
Travis, George F.
Tynes, Alex
Walker, Edward
Weatherless, Johnie H.
Weeden, Charlie
White, James N.
Winnegan, James
Winston, James
Winston, Simon

Signed:
William R. Blair
Major, V.C.N.A. (Veterinary Corps, National Army)
Veterinary Hospital No. 5


OFFICE OF THE SURGEON
December 31, 1918

Veterinary Hospital No. 5
Jeanne d’ Arc Barracks, A.E.F.
A.P.O. No. 784

From: The Surgeon

To: The Statistical Officer, A.E.F.

Subject: Monthly roster

1. Submit monthly Medical Detachment roster for Veterinary Hospital No. 5

1st. Lt. John F.Stover, M.C. - Surgeon, Veterinary Hospital No. 5.

1st. Sgt. Royston, John W., M.D.

Sgt. Killory, John, M.D.

Pvt. 1st. Class Sadler, William B., M.D.
Pvt. 1st. Class Turner, George F., M.D.
Pvt. 1st. Class Waldron, Charles A., M.D.
Pvt. 1st. Class Wynkoop, Harold, M.D.

Pvt. Burke, Edward W., M.D.
Pvt. Dively, Jacob, M.D.
Pvt. Hogan, James, M.D.

Signed:
1st. Lt. John F.Stover, M.C.
Surgeon, Veterinary Hospital No. 5


TAKEN FROM JOHN J. RIORDAN'S BOOK: HORSES, MULES AND REMOUNTS. The memoirs of a World War 1 Veterinary Officer, story told my John Riordan

CAMP LEE
Camp Lee was commanded by Major General Adelbert Cronkhite and was the second largest training camp in the United States the largest being Camp Funston, Kansas. There were approximately 45,000 troops stationed there. The camp was built in the shape of a horseshoe, extending over eight miles through the length of the horseshoe. The training grounds for the infantry, artillery, etc., were inside the horseshoe and constituting a very practical and utilitarian arrangement.

Three Veterinary Hospitals designated numbers, 3, 4 and 5 were being organized at Camp Lee for overseas duty. Each hospital was commanded by a Major and consisted of three hundred enlisted men, eleven enlisted medical personnel, six veterinary officers and on medical doctor. The three hundred enlisted men were black draftees from around the Petersburg, Richmond and Virginia areas. The medical personnel, veterinary officers and medical doctors were Caucasian. I was assigned to Veterinary Hospital No. 5, Major Reid Blair commanding. Major Blair was a prominent member of the Veterinary Profession having formally been Chief Veterinarian of the New York City Zoo.

When the organization of the hospitals were completed we were assigned to the Camp Depot Brigade for training in close order drill, marching and military discipline. This enabled the officers to handle their commands in much the same manner as infantry officers. I was also designated the supply officer for all three hospitals and consequently had to draw all current supplies for the hospitals as well as nearly a shipload of equipment to accompany the hospitals overseas. When our training was complete we received orders to proceed via the Seaboard Railway to Camp Hill, Virginia. We left Camp Lee on April 1 1918.

Camp Hill was located on the James River just above it entry into Hampton Roads and approximately a mile or two from Newport News, a major port of embarkation at the time. Here we waited for a troop transport to take us overseas. After we had been at Camp Hill for some weeks we were cautioned by our Commanding Officer Major Reid Blair to stay close to camp as embarkation orders could come momentarily. On May 8th 1918. We marched about two miles to the troop ship located at Newport News. The procedures for screening the troops going aboard was very thorough the roll was called and each man was passed on by his Commanding Officer. We were on our way over there.

We boarded the S. S. Itasca, Caption Smith commanding. The Itasca was formerly the Sea Toss of the German Merchant Marine. The ship had quite nice staterooms for a freighter.

May 9th at 10:30 A.M. we left Newport News Harbor for New York. It was nice weather passing Cape Henry. At New York a convoy of 32 ships was being assembled. It was foggy and it lasted for about 3 hours and we almost ran down a fishing boat off Long Island Sound. The weather turned bad with heavy seas and the Captain turned the ship around and went about 200 miles away from the coast. We had trouble locating the lightship, which marked the entrance to Gravesend Bay where we later picked a pilot. Coney Island was on our starboard and Brooklyn on the leeboard, there was numerous ships going and coming.

May 12th Sunday: I just missed a visit to Coney Island and New York by a few minutes. The ship HERCULES with the Major and Lieutenant Smith on board anchored a short distance from us. An awful dull day, foggy until 5:00 P. M. we saw the S. S. LEVIATHAN formally the Vaterland of the German Merchant Marines and at the time was the largest ship in the world.

May 14th We went to shore in a motor launch and we went into the heart of New York City. We stayed at the Manhattan Hotel and they were fine accommodations. We saw the Fred Stone show in the Jack O Lanterns and it was wonderful!

May 17t h We raised anchor at 9:45 A. M. and left Gravesend Bay at 9:55. We traveled in an easterly direction all day, weather was fine with a south wind.

May 20th Weather fine, sailing smooth.

May 22nd Rained in the morning until 8 A. M. Real windy and choppy seas.

May 23rd Two ships dropped out of the convoy last night. Very cold and windy all day whales were reported seen.

May 24th Wind blew very hard all day, sea rough. Another ship dropped out of the convoy the ONEIDA was her name. Passed a ship bound for New York an oil tanker and we saw a U.S. Cruiser.

May 26th Sunday: weather fine we are now in the Submarine Zone and we are all on edge sleeping with our clothes on. 1,856 miles traveled and 1,214 miles to go.

May 29th Was brought out of bed by the sounding of the sub warning on the ship. Put on an overcoat, life belt and my gun and I stepped out on deck. All hands were out with life belts on. One of the ships was firing on a periscope of a submarine. We then opened up our two 5 inch guns and more ship joined in. There were 7 ships with 14 guns firing at the same time. A wake a torpedo that was discharged was spotted. Lots of excitement and we will get no sleep tonight. We are 600 miles out.

May 30th The first destroyer sighted and it was a welcome sight. Later 12 more came up. One ship in our convoy rammed another one and she sank, all the crew was saved. May 31st Weather fine 12 or 14 destroyers around. Convoy split and 16 ships left in our convoy on their way to England, about 150 miles to go.

June 1st Sighted land the coast of France below Brest. Cast Anchor in Quiberon Bay it took 15 days, 3 hours and 1 minute from the time we raised anchor in Gravesend Bay, New York. I can see the coast of France lined with houses in the distance. HERCULES went 30 miles up the river to St. Nazaire. We are bound for Bordeaux.

June 2nd Sunday morning and we are still in the bay. Near by lies the POCAHONTAS, formerly the PRINCESS CECILE of the German Fleet. We are going to raise anchor a 4 P. M. and we will stop a La Pallice another port on the way down the coast.

Our convoy consisting of approximately 30 ships of various nations was the largest on to cross the Atlantic up that time. The ships were lined up one behind the other in straight lines with approximately five ships to each line. There were about seven lines well spaced so the convoy covered a large area of ocean. The convoy speed was 14 knots with a right and left zigzag pattern every fifteen minutes. I remember one ship next to ours was loaded with poison gas. There was not a gas mask in the whole convoy.

Our ship was loaded to the waterline and we had a starboard list. Among the manifest were numerous steel rails for constructing approximately 10 miles of track. There were 5 big locomotives, millions of rations. Numerous Nash Quad four wheel drive all steel ammunition trucks were lashed to the deck.

WW I dock on Garrone River Bordeaux France 1918

We raised anchor June 2 1918 for our trip down the coast to the Gironde River and Bordeaux. Warning was received of a submarine sighting in the vicinity of Belle Isle. However our trip was uneventful and we anchored in the Bay of Biscay at the mouth of the Gironde River awaiting a high tide to proceed up river to Bordeaux. We landed at Bassens Landing and were assigned some very old barracks dating from the time of Napoleon.

THE S.O.S. (U.S. SERVICE OF SUPPLY)
A brief description is in order with respect to the organization established to service and the supply the A. E. F. The S.O.S had been established and charged with the responsibility of processing the delivering replacements of men and animals, weapons, ammunition, rations and multiplicity of equipment and supplies to the combat units at the front. For purposes of administrations the S.O.S was divided into six base sections in France Numbers 1, 2, 4, 5 6 and 7. One in England, No. 3 and intermediate and advance sections in France. Bordeaux was headquarters for the Base Section No. 2. Remount depots were located at Bayonne, Besancon, Bourbonne Les Bains, Carbon Blanc, Commercy, Gievres, Hendaye, La Pallice, La Rochelle, Lux, Marseillie, Merignac, Montiers Sur Saulx, Nancy, Selles Sur Cher, Souge Champ De Tir, Sougy and St. Nazaire. Veterinary Hospitals were located at Boubonne Les Bains, Carbon Blanc, Claye Souilly, Coetquidan, Commercy, Gievres, Nevers, Sougy, Toul and St Nazaire.

Bordeaux was a large city situated in the wine belt, with a large public square piled high with barrels full of wine, which emitted a pleasant aroma that could be smelled for a good many city blocks. My first and last impressions of Bordeaux were favorable, the people being very friendly.

In approximately a week orders were received to move our section of the veterinary hospital (The balance was at St. Nazaire with Major Blair and Lt. Smith) consisting of about 160 men to Neufchateau, which entailed quite a long trip. We loaded the men on a troop train comprised of third class cars each compartment having a side door. The cars were old and filthy, full of body lice that could be observed crawling on the cushion, scarcely a very edifying sight.

I drew travel rations consisting of canned tomatoes, beef of a sort, commonly referred to as CORN WILLIE, hard tack in a tin and water. The hard tack looked like crackers and had no flavor and was hard as a rock. Three days rations were issued at one time the rations being placed on the floor of each troop compartment. Officers were issued the same rations as the men. The rations were thrown to railroad section crews s the train passed. What we missed most was something hot to drink, particularly coffee, as we could never find it for sale.

Upon our arrival at Neufchateau we were assigned barracks and the officers attended classes with respect to the treatment of mange and lymphangitis, two diseases that we would have to content with in the field. We had no specific assignment at Neufchateau and were marking tome pending receipt of orders.

In the meantime my commanding Officer Major Blair had requested my transfer and approximately a week after my arrival at Neufchateau I received orders to report to St. Nazaire, headquarters of Base Section No. 1 where the balance of Veterinary Hospital No. 5 was located. I proceeded to St. Nazaire by train and in a few weeks the balance of the hospital at Neufchateau joined us and the hospital was together again.

The Veterinary Hospital No. 5 at St Nazaire occupied 3 big long buildings. We were very busy as we were receiving a large number of crippled horses and mules as well as those infected with mange and other diseases. As these animals were badly needed immediately following their recuperation they were shipped back to the front line units by train. In addition to my veterinary duties I was in charge of the officers mess and I had little spare time on my hands.


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Polk County Wisconsin in WW1


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76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion




U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
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