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THE FORGOTTEN ORD



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THE FORGOTTEN ORD

November 12, 2009 “THE FORGOTTEN ORD” Otter Realm Newspaper of CSU Monterey Bay, Lucas Anthony: Staff Reporter

THE FORGOTTEN ORD

Lucas Anthony, Staff Reporter
lanthony@csumb.edu

For centuries, man and horse have entered in battle, astride. From the Knights of the Round Table to the U.S. Cavalry, man and horse have fought together on the battlefield. This dynamic changed significantly with the mechanization of World War II. Horses were replaced, and vehicles were deemed more efficient.

Some say the significance of history is in the eye of the beholder. As CSU Monterey Bay (CSUMB) was being transferred from the Fort Ord Military Base to a university, the Fort Ord Reuse Authority (FORA) called for a historical review of the old base in order to discover what buildings, if any, would be of historical worth. The Soldiers’ Club or Stilwell Hall, which was deconstructed due to safety and environmental concerns that it might fall into the ocean, was discovered to be the only dwelling with historical significance. No other buildings made the cut.

More than 15 years later, Army Veterinary Corps researcher Greg Krenzelok discovered Fort Ord buildings believed to be the only known, completely intact World War II U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital left standing in the United States. This hospital was accompanied by horse stables and blacksmith shops, all within close proximity of one another.

“It is the only example left of what a World War II veterinary hospital, built uniquely to service horses and mules of the U.S. Army, was like,” said Krenzelok. “The significance of the stables and blacksmith shops on Fourth Avenue is that with the veterinary hospital, they give a complete example of the layout for how the Army stabled and cared for their horses and mules.

“These buildings capture the history of a horse-drawn field artillery unit, and a horse mounted cavalry unit and mark the end of the local history of the 76th Field Artillery Regiment (76th FA) that originally moved from the Presidio of Monterey to Fort Ord in 1940.”

The 76th FA was a horse-drawn unit that originally trained at Camp Giggling and Clayton before permanently calling Fort Ord home. Other horse-based units stationed at Fort Ord were the 107th Cavalry, split between horse mounted and mechanized, the 68th Quartermaster Pack Troop (mules and horses) and the Fort Ord Police Rangers, who patrolled the beaches on horseback once the United States entered World War II. According to Krenzelok, The veterinary hospital and blacksmith shops were originally built to service the more than 1,400 horses of the 76th FA and the 107th Cavalry, while the original 21 stables on Fourth Avenue were meant to house only equines.

The Fort’s intention was short lived, as the horse units became mechanized in May of 1942,” said Krenzelok. “The role of the horse changed during World War II, and Fort Ord was never given the opportunity to live up to the potential of its original blueprints.”

According to the Fort Ord Panorama newspaper in September 1944, an all-black quartermaster pack troop was shown to have trained in East Garrison. Krenzelok also admits there is evidence to support the presence of the Fort Ord Rangers up until 1948.

“When the majority of horses and mules left in 1942, there’s no doubt things changed for the stables and blacksmith shops on Fourth Avenue and the Veterinary Hospital,” said Krenzelok. “The Army converted the horse hospital over to a small animal clinic in 1946, removing the horse stocks, hitching rails and elevating horse-operating table located in the original Surgical Clinic built for horses.”

Today only 12 of the original 21 stables remain, now located on CSUMB property, along with some of the blacksmith shops. The Army Horse Veterinary Hospital is located in the city of Marina and is next to the Equestrian Center.

While some doubt the existence of a large horse presence at Fort Ord and the fact that buildings were used for the housing and care of horses till 1945, Krenzelok stands by his research.

“[The Army] occupied the stables, which were built for horses—not motor vehicles. The hospital was built to service horses and mules and not small animals,” said Krenzelok. “The horses left because mechanization took over their role in the Army. Throughout the country, most Army horse facilities were no longer needed, and many were converted to other uses like at Fort Ord.”


May 2011: “A TRAGIC LOSS OF HISTORY AT FORT ORD, CALIFORNIA” just after Memorial Day the last complete example of our country’s end of the U.S. Army Warhorse which were still being used at the beginning of World War II. The Series 700 temporary type buildings: artillery, cavalry stables along with their blacksmith shops were demolished on the California State University at Monterey Bay Campus, California. Leaving only the Fort Ord Station Veterinary Horse Hospital the only buildings remaining to testify of the memory of the “Fort Ord Horse Soldiers” that were there from 1940 to 1942. President Diane Harrison who I personally hold responsible for this action and the university’s failure or interest to recognize the historical significance is one of the greatest tragedies to fall upon this university, this action ending a two year long battle for their recognition and preservation. The “Honoring” of the history of Fort Ord has not been served by this action.

Greg Krenzelok
U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Preservation Group



Words cannot express what is in my heart at seeing and walking the grounds of where the Fort Ord Field Artillery and Cavalry stables once stood.


DEMOLITION OF THE STABLES AND BLACKSMITH SHOPS MAY 2011
I was in Alaska at the time and was not able to document the buildings being demolished. A friend of mind did, Efren Lopez a military combat photographer did. I would like to thank Efren from sharing these posted images. This is my first real good look at these pictures as a tear rolled down my face. - Greg Krenzelok, U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group


May 2011 Fort Ord horse stables and blacksmith start to come down. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


What's left of T-1442, incinerator, dated completed November 30, 1940, 5- ton. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


Stable being demolished by excavator using demolition bucket "The Jaws of death for this stable", May 2011. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


Overview of the old stable and blacksmith shop area. Demolition is about complete except for T-1672 (SP-14 Motor repair shop). Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


Fort Ord horse stables being demolished, May 2011. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


Fort Ord horse stables and blacksmith are now down and all that is left is clean-up, May 2011. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


FORT ORD STABLES AND BLACKSMITH SHOPS DEMOLITION ON FACEBOOK
Click on the below link:
U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group Facebook Stables



Return to The Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2 homepage:

FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
Click on the below link:
Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2



Click on the below Homepage links:

11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
Click on the below link:
11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
Click on the below link:
76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
Click on the below link:
The Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1


SERGEANT LEONARD MURPHY VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18, A.E.F., WW1
Click on the below link:
Sergeant Leonard Murphy Veterinary Hospital No. 18, A.E.F., WW1




U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

Click on the below link:

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group