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SD-15, T-1463 STABLE HAY SHED, FORT ORD, 1941 WW2



This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


SD-15, T-1463 STABLE HAY SHED, FORT ORD, 1941 WW2

The SD-15 Hayshed (T-1463) for the horses in the stables was located at the north end of the stables and blacksmith shops. Between SD-17 stable (T- 1441) and Blacksmith shop (T-1462), which is now the green building on the left when looking south down the stables and blacksmith shops. It would have been located right on 8th Street. To the west of where the hayshed once stood still stands the 5-ton incinerator made of brick (T-1442).

The exact date when the hayshed was removed is unknown at this time but we can presume that it was taken down not long after the horses were removed from the stables in 1942. We still do not know exactly when the horses were removed. The Hayshed was located in a handy location for the distribution of the hay to the stables.

May 2011: “A TRAGIC LOSS OF HISTORY AT FORT ORD, CALIFORNIA” just after Memorial Day the last complete example of our country’s end of the U.S. Army Warhorse which were still being used at the beginning of World War II. The Series 700 temporary type buildings: artillery, cavalry stables along with their blacksmith shops are being demolished on the California State University at Monterey Bay Campus, California. Leaving only the Fort Ord Station Veterinary Horse Hospital the only buildings remaining to testify of the memory of the “Fort Ord Horse Soldiers” that were there from 1940 to 1942. This action ends a two year long battle for their recognition and preservation.

Greg Krenzelok
U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Preservation Group


Words cannot express what is in my heart at seeing and walking the grounds of where the Fort Ord Field Artillery and Cavalry stables once stood.



This would have been the view looking south and down at the rows of stables (right) and blacksmith shops (left) from the hayshed when it was there. Blacksmith shop (T-1462)is on the left and SD-17 stable (T- 1441) is on the right


(Source: National Archives)


(Source: National Archives)


Part of a blue print show the hayshed, blacksmith shops, stables, and corrals.


The 5-ton incinerator, brick building T-1442 seems to be part of the original layout of the stable area buildings. This is not confirmed but after spending so much time in my research of the stable area it seems to be the only facilities in the area to warrant one so close by nothing else makes sense and the “T” numbering of the buildings seem to connect it with the stables and blacksmith shops. I believed the stables used this incinerator to dispose of their waste materials (manure and old bedding hay which was the approved method of disposal).

NOTE: There is no doubt that the 5-ton incinerator, brick building T-1442 was part of the artillery and cavalry horse stable’s operation – Greg Krenzelok


T-1442 as pictured in November 1941, 5-ton incinerator, brick building. (Source: National Archives)

T-1442: 5-ton incinerator, brick building. Completed November 30, 1941; Total cost to build: 13,102; Total square feet: 756; Size: 23 x 26 feet. Note: You cannot see in the above image but in the background is the picket line for the horses for stable T-1441


HISTORICAL AND ARCHITECTUAL DOCUMENTATION REPORT
For: Fort Ord
September 1993
T-1442 5-ton incinerator, brick building

I would like to thank Erik C. Zaborsky, Archeologist, Bureau of Land Management for supplying me with this report.


May 2011: “A TRAGIC LOST OF HISTORY AT FORT ORD, CALIFORNIA” just after Memorial Day the last complete example of our country’s end of the U.S. Army Warhorse which were still being used at the beginning of World War II. The Series 700 temporary type buildings: artillery, cavalry stables along with their blacksmith shops were demolished on the California State University at Monterey Bay Campus, California. Leaving only the Fort Ord Station Veterinary Horse Hospital the only buildings remaining to testify of the memory of the “Fort Ord Horse Soldiers” that were there from 1940 to 1942. President Diane Harrison who I personally hold responsible for this action and the university’s failure or interest to recognize the historical significance is one of the greatest tragedies to fall upon this university, this action ending a two year long battle for their recognition and preservation. The “Honoring” of the history of Fort Ord has not been served by this action.

Greg Krenzelok
U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Preservation Group


Return to The Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2 homepage:

FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
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Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2



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11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
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11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
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76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
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The Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1


SERGEANT LEONARD MURPHY VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18, A.E.F., WW1
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Sergeant Leonard Murphy Veterinary Hospital No. 18, A.E.F., WW1




U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group