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THE PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY IN THE 1920'S AND 1930’S



This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


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Army Day, Soldier Field, looking northwest, 11th Cavalry, Machine Gun Troop, with 11th Cavalry band and the 76th Field Artillery in the background passing in review. Buildings in the background (north side of Soldier Field) left to right: Post bowling alleys, building no. 105; Regimental band and library, building no. 106; barracks nos:63, 61, 59, 57, 55, 53, 51, and 49. Note: refer to the layout map link on the home page. circa 1933. DLIFLC & POM Archives



DIARY OF A FOUR DAY PRACTICE MANEUVER 11TH CAVALRY 1927
By Norman. J. Boudreau
Corporal Troop "E" 11th Cavalry
Presidio of Monterey, California 1927


Corporal N.J. Boudreau, Troop "B" 11th Cavalry, Presidio of Monterey, California, 1938 Presidio of Monterey Yearbook. Note: In the 1938 Presidio of Monterey yearbook Corporal Boudreau is now in "B" Troop. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Note: Greg, your work on "Camp Indians" reminded me of a report that was found in the attic of one of the barracks on Solder's Field when I was archivist a few years ago --- it details a march into Big Sur area ... no photos accompany this report but it is so detailed I suspect someone could retrace the March today if they were young and in-shape. – DLIFLC & POM Archives



11th Cavalry, "E" Troop in front of barracks, 1930’s, Presidio of Monterey, Ca., (note: probably the early 1930’s), DLIFLC & POM Archives


TROOP "E" 11TH CAVALRY
Presidio of Monterey, California
1927

A diary of a 4 day hike made by Troop "E", 11th Cavalry thru the mountains in 1927.

In compliance with Training Orders No. 6, Headquarters Presidio of Monterey, California, dated April 22/27 which called for each troop to make a two (2) day practice march, to be arranged by Troop Commanders, full equipment including transportation taken. Troop "E" granted an extra two (2) days by the Regimental Commander, Colonel Leon B. Kromer upon the request of its Troop Commander Captain Coe.

The Troop with the exception of 7 men left the Presidio of Monterey, California at 7:30 a.m. on March 16, 1927, for a four day practice march up thru the mountains of California. Accompanying the Troop was the Radio Section of Headquarters Troop.

The trip in compliance with the above orders was taken more as one of pleasure by the Troop, as during the past month or two, we have been pressed very much with work, such as Target (can't read word), maneuvers, several days fatigue at Camp Del Monte (Summer Training Camp), and General Inspections.

In order to follow the trails thru the mountains it was necessary to use pack horses for carrying rations, forage, extra blankets, picket line, apparels, etc. And for this purpose 8 pack horses were used, but, only for the 2nd and 3rd days of the march. Escort wagons being used the first day until camp was reached and the last day from our camp into the post. Headquarters Troop also used pack horses for their radio equipment.

MONDAY
On our way to camp the first day I got a view of some pretty country (I mean pretty homes surrounded by very nice lawns and flowers) this is Carmel sort of a residential district and a suburb of Monterey, also a view of Carmel Mission at a distance and Point Lobos, which is a point of quite some interest to tourists. Captain La Garde, the doctor (acting as our (?) News Man) took his first picture of the trip just a little beyond Point Lobos, he being equipped with a portable movie camera. The Troop continued down from the Monterey-Big Sur Road and before reaching Garapatas our camping place for the first day. I speared some kind of a snake with the Guidon Staff and drew the name of Snake-Charmer.

Reached camp at 12:00 noon pitched tents, picket line, groomed horses and ready for dinner at about 1:00 p.m., which consisted of "Slum" that was cooked back at the post on Sunday and warmed over, saving time waiting for anything else being cooked with this we had bread, butter and coffee. Immediately after dinner the Troop commander loaned several of the men fishing lines, poles and reels to go fishing. We went fishing at Garapatas Creek, and figured by walking up stream would get ahead of the rest of the fisherman, but no luck, didn't even get a bite and walked about 3 miles away from camp and 3 back which has left me sort of tired, don't know what the rest of the boys caught, but, did see one (Sgt. McCarron) on the way back who had caught a little trout about 4 inches long and believe me he was as proud as a dog with two tails. Ran across Lt. Riepe, squatted in mid-stream fishing and by all appearances was no luckier than the majority of us. Some of the boys hung around camp and believed they played wiser than all of us nuts who went fishing. Two of them (Sprinkle and Eller) climbed up the top of a hill about 500 feet high and down again and just saw them ringing wet with sweat, quite a pastime but not for me.

Hanging around the cook shack now waiting supper and made plans with Eller to take a walk about a mile down the road to buy bread, as tomorrow we will be issued hardtack for our trip thru the mountains.

Thought when I left France, I was thru with hardtack but guess not, may also buy some ham and sardines as not being so very good at cooking believe I will fare better if I brought my chow. (Captain, La Garde had the camera going again here).

No potable water here available, our Lister bag has been filled with water from the creek. Don't know what we are to have for supper, but it sure smells good. Supper is over with now, we had roast beef, fried potatoes, gravy, apple sauce, tea and coffee.

Troop is now getting straw for mattresses having to sleep in pup tents, have arranged to sleep in the light wagon with our wagoner. We are drawing straw and enough grain for two meals, noon and night tomorrow, as wagons do not come along. Don't know how cold it will be tonight as it is blowing up cold right now, however, we all are carrying a heavy wool undershirt and an extra pair of woolen socks to wear at night time.

Sgt. McCarron, the one who caught the only fish so far had his picture taken by the Captain, Dr. amid cheers and laughs of the Troop and of our visitors at the time Mrs. Coe, wife of our troop commander and her mother I believe. Haven't seen anything of Lt. Riepe, yet he sure is bent on catching someone before returning. My idea is that all he'll catch is a bad cold. Lt. Riepe just got back and all he caught was a tiny little trout (the size of a peanut) and wanted to turn him into the creek again, but it's too late.

Note: I want to inject the image of E Troop from the 1930's here and Sgt. McCarron name that is on the 1938 yearbook of the Presidio of Monterey. He is still listed in E Troop as Sgt. Neil V. McCarron. I copied an image of Sgt. McCarron from the yearbook, it's not the greatest but I think I'll add this to the webpage.

The boys have just started a twilight ball game and its sure some game. More arguments over being called out, strikes called etc., sort of looks like it might end in a free for all, just about ready to get into this game but Sprinkle and McDonald (Troop Pugs) being over ambitious have put on the gloves and got me to referee their scramble. Wonder if by bed time tomorrow night they will still possess such ambition.

Took a walk down to the store which turned out to be nearer 2 miles than the 1 mile I thought and on our way over got a view of some more pretty country, acres and acres of cultivated land of peas, potatoes, corn, etc. Was talking to a rancher about a colt that had a terrible cut-up leg and swollen to twice its normal size, caused by getting tangled up in some barbed wire, it sure seemed a shame as the colt was but a 2 year old and as pretty as any I have ever seen. Coming back from the store met about 15 of the fellows going there, but mounted and they didn't miss giving us the raspberries for having gone so soon and having to walk.

Back to camp now and our bed (the wagon) with all its curtains down puts me in mind of a covered wagon the likes as seen in movies.

Distance covered today about 20 miles. Horses in good shape. Weather up until about 10:00 a.m., foggy but it cleared and then fair and warm.

TUESDAY
Up at 5:00 a.m. after a good night's rest. Watered and fed grain (horses) and now ready for breakfast. Had creamed sausages, fried potatoes, oatmeal, bread and coffee for breakfast, after which we saddled up. Left camp at 7:20 a.m. headed for the Big Pines where we will camp tonight. Continued along the Monterey-Big Sur road and turning off at Palo Colorado Canyon. Along this canyon we saw some redwood trees of an enormous size, pictures of which I have seen in books, but never before in reality. Saw camps built up on the hill-sides amongst the trees and considerably shaded and very cozy looking, these camps I believe are only used during the hunting season by sportsmen from the surrounding country. Several of these camps are owned by Dr. Hamlin, also got a view of an old saw mill and stables that by appearances have been idle quite some time. A little further up the canyon I saw a place belonging to the Monterey Honey Company, and in the yard about 50 boxes of bees and some fellow working around with enough netting for a mosquito net on a bunk.

Turning off Palo Colorado Canyon trail, which is 150 feet above sea level on to a trail in the Monterey National Forrest leading to Turner's Creek. The trail in most places is about 1 foot in width with worlds of space on one side and the mountains on the other side. We reached Turner Creek which is a promising looking trout stream. Leaving this point proceeded along the trail and crossed the Santa Lucia Range at Devil's Point, this place (Devil's Point) being 4000 feet above sea level, at this height we got a fine view of the surrounding country including Point Sur Lighthouse.

Along the trail, several things occurred worthy of mention. First one of our pack horses just prior to a halt decided to leave the trail and walked on down the hillside and Sgt. Bliss, (our Staole Sgt. and old time Cargodore) was lead a merry chase as just as he was within about 5 yards of catching the horse to lead him back up the hill the old horse turned away and hit back onto the trail leaving Sgt. Bliss, to fight his way back up again, sure was some rough traveling too as the hill was very steep and awfully thick with brush and hard to get thru.

Caught up with Sgt. Ross, who with Lt. Riepe, and several others had started out ahead of the Troop to find the trail on the map. His horse (a remount) I suppose got tired of climbing and just refused to go any further and Henry (Sgt. Ross) tried leading him with the bridle reins, this was not just to Jackie's liking and he reared back down off the trail pulling Henry on the flat of his stomach along with him and Henry yelling whoa!, at the top of his voice, but, this didn't do much good, got Jackie on the trail again for a while and Henry led him a short way and tried riding again and I in the rear persuading the horse with the spear of the Guidon, which didn't last very long either, Jackie again left the trail, this time we unsaddled him and rested him for some time and everything was honkey-dory once more. Wish Captain La Garde could of gotten a picture of poor Henry and Jackie going down the hill.

One of the pack horses laid down along the trail and lucky it was just where if wasn't so narrow, he was fairly well played out, this caused I believe by the man leading him not giving the horse enough rest.

Stopped now with the Troop Commander awaiting news of Cpl. Seiber, as it has been said that his horse fell over backwards off the trail and down some 200 feet. Cpl. Seiber has just arrived and he and horse all ok, not even a scratch on either, rightly lucky for both I must say. Proceeded further along the trail and stopped for about 45 minutes for lunch and to feed grain to the horses.

Just within some 100 yards, of the top of Devil's point, about 2 squads, the rest having passed us while waiting on news of Cpl. Seiber and Gordan's squad met up with part of the first platoon looking for a horse that had bolted down the hill headed for parts unknown, this caused by his refusal to being used as a pack horse, he was caught and packed again, starting to lead him away again refused and I having by this time become quite a lancer with the Guidon staff persuaded him up some 75 or 100 feet where he laid down and quite altogether, another horse was then packed, before this was over with however, Van Leeuween and I hit the trail leading to camp, and got lost in so doing, rode about half a mile beyond the turning point (Vogler's) and arrived at a gate leading into a ranch, then came to the conclusion that we were headed wrong and on riding back saw the Troop Commander and the rest going in the right direction. Never was so tickled at seeing them as it was getting late in the evening and lost up in them mountains was not very pleasant. Arrived at camp in the Big Pines at about 5:00 p.m., horses and men tired. Traveled about 16 miles today over some mighty rough and almost impassable roads in places. Saw several flocks of wild pigeons also. Weather on leaving this a.m. was cool and very windy. Supper consisted of beef steak, potatoes, onions, hardtack, and coffee, our first meal to cook for ourselves.

WEDNESDAY
Got to bed last night at about 8:30 and doubled up with Sgt. Sprinkles. Threw our blankets between two big pine trees along the hillside and some 30 yards away from the picket line, before morning we had slid to within 10 or 15 yards of the picket line, knew we were sliding during the night, but too lazy to get up and move.

Up at 4:45 a.m. about 15 minutes earlier than the Troop, down to the creek to wash, water ice cold. Grazed Sprinkle's horse and mine for a while as Sprinkle drew the long straw and was elected cook. Breakfast consisted of bacon, potatoes, hardtack, coffee, hot cake flour, didn't bother with the hot cake flour as we had brought along beans and fared pretty good for breakfast.

Left camp (Big Pines) place so named from the large and high pine trees surrounding the camp. Hit the trail (Blue Rock Ridge) which lies between Danish and Pine Creeks to Seller's Ranch our last camping place for the trip. Hit some more rough places on the trail, but the ground covered was mostly down grade until we reached Carmel River where we hit the Cachagua Road.

Nothing much to see today, did see several hundred pine trees some 100 or 150 feet in height, also Madrone trees, the last named I have never before seen, they are not very large, but have a sort of red bark underneath the outer one and leaves similar to those on pear trees. Riding along the trail today saw three great big beautiful buck deer, have seen such before in Zoological Parks but never as pretty as those today. Captain La Garde is still taking pictures. Saw whole sides of hills just covered with ferns and quite some sight.

Stopped alongside of Carmel River, in which we watered our horses at Nason's ranch. For dinner another meal we had to cook, Sprinkle and I got along alright. In addition to bacon, potatoes, onions, hardtack, and coffee issued we had canned beans, tuna fish, sardines, and graham crackers that we had brought along. Stopped here for about an hour to continue the rest of the day's march (10 miles) to Seller's Ranch.

Got quite a kick last night and today seeing the Troop Officers and Captain La Garde, cooking their own chow, don't know what was the matter with the Troop Commander's hot cakes, but saw Pat the dog getting fed quite a stack of them.

Saw something else today that was new to me and that was a plant of the Cactus family called a "Spanish Bayonet" name derived I suppose from its leaves which are bayonet shaped, this plant has sort of a stalk about 2 inches in diameter and about 8 or 10 feet high, leaves bayonet shaped and white flowers. Captain La Garde still snapping em up (pictures I mean).

Saw a white cow this morning in the distance at a glance and asked McDonald what it was and being in a joking mood, told me it was a white deer and I like a fool called Captain La Garde, who was riding just ahead of me to come back and take a picture of the white deer. No need to say the joke was on me.

Got in camp at about 4:30 p.m. both men and horses tired as about 8 miles of the distance covered along the trail was ruff and the 10 all O.K.

Horses fed and groomed, tents picked, boys all washed some shaved (myself included) and ready for chow. Imagine the boys will run back for seconds and thirds in the chow line as this is our first regular cooked meal since yesterday at breakfast. Don't know what we have but, even the old proverbial Army "Slum" would taste like turkey tonight. Planning on going fishing after chow, not quite sure then, as one of the wagoners went fishing today and caught several trout that seem too small to bother with, may go to kill time.

Had as good a supper here as we would have had, had we been back in the post. Had beef steak, mashed potatoes, creamed peas, brown gravy, bread and coffee. The steak was brought cut to the cooks who left us on Monday and camped here since by Mrs. Coe. Of all the surprises that were to happen to us the one of getting ice cream and pie was the greatest. The ice cream was brought by our troop commander, we haven't the slightest doubt, but being very modest he says nothing about it, but we know he played Santa Klaus. Captain La Garde is still on the job today with his trusty camera.

Distance covered 18 miles. Weather fair and warm.

THURSDAY
Went fishing last night but got only a couple of bites and them by small trout and quit. Some of the boys went swimming in the creek just below camp, passed up the chance of so doing as the water felt too cold for me.

Slept in the wagon with our wagoner, my bed partner of our 1st day's march. Up at 5 a.m. after a good night's rest and ready to take our day's march which will bring us back in the Post.

Left camp at 7:30, traveled along the Carmel Valley Road to the gate of the 17 mile drive, thru the Del Monte Forest and to the stables arriving there at 11:30. (Note: in 1927 all the troops stables were located up on the hill, as the Lower Presidio stables had not been constructed yet). Rubbed horses legs and backs, groomed and cleaned equipment and down to quarters at 1:00 p.m. for dinner.

Saw some wonderful sites today and know now why Californians are called prune pickers, as I saw some 10 or 12 orchards on nothing but prunes, and this all on the one road, also some mighty fine looking ranches including the Rancho Del Monte, which I believe in a "Dude's" ranch, several areas of oats, hay, corn, potatoes, peas, beets, and from the road these ranches for the most part are somewhat lower than the road and looking mighty fine from this distance.

Distance traveled today 20 miles. Weather very foggy and a light rain also rather cool until 11:00 a.m.

Distance covered on the march about 75 miles. Trip was enjoyed by all I believe, somewhat mingled with plenty of hard work with the pack horses but a wonderful experience, a pleasure in every detail and my one regret is that it did not last at least another 4 days.

Signed:
Norman J. Boudreau
Corporal Troop "E" 11th Cavalry
Presidio of Monterey, California 1927



Diary of a Four Day Hike 1927 POM, by N.J. Boudreau Corporal Troop "E" 11th Cavalry, Presidio of Monterey, California 1927. DLIFLC & POM Archives



Roughly the path of the four day practice march of "E" Troop of the 11th Cavalry as document by Corporal N.J. Boudreau in 1927 (red line).

KEY POINTS ON THE PRACTICE MARCH OF "E" TROOP 1927
Monterey-Big Sur Road - I believe this is Hwy. No. 1.

Garapatas or Garapatas Creek.

Point Lobos.

Left camp at 7:20 a.m. headed for the Big Pines where we will camp tonight.

Turning off at Palo Colorado Canyon.

Several of these camps are owned by Dr. Hamlin.

Monterey Honey Company.

Turning off Palo Colorado Canyon trail, which is 150 feet above sea level on to a trail in the Monterey National Forrest leading to Turner's Creek.

Santa Lucia Range at Devil's Point.

Crossed the Santa Lucia Range at Devil's Point, this place (Devil's Point) being 4000 feet above sea level, at this height we got a fine view of the surrounding country including Point Sur Lighthouse.

Left camp (Big Pines) place so named from the large and high pine trees surrounding the camp. Hit the trail (Blue Rock Ridge) which lies between Danish and Pine Creeks to Seller's Ranch our last camping place for the trip.

Until we reached Carmel River where we hit the Cachagua Road.

Stopped alongside of Carmel River, in which we watered our horses at Nason's ranch.

Left camp at 7:30, traveled along the Carmel Valley Road to the gate of the 17 mile drive, thru the Del Monte Forest and to the stables arriving there at 11:30.

https://www.ventanawild.org/news/fe99/caves.html "McGrew, Dan. 1989."Nason Family Roots Grow Deep and Wide, High on Chews Ridge," "The Nason Family Ranches and Lives" and "The Remarkable Heritage Factor" in the Carmel Valley Sun, July 26, 1989".

Note Big Sur Lighthouse: As the years passed, life became increasingly less isolated at Point Sur, especially following the completion of Highway One in 1937.

NAMES:
Author of article: Corporal Norman J. Boudreau, I found him in "B" Battery in the 1938 Presidio Yearbook.

Regimental Commander, Colonel Leon B. Kromer.


Image source: Col. Roger S. Fitch Papers, O'Donnell Research Library, Monterey California and DLIFLC & POM Archives

In 1925 Kromer assumed command of the 11th Cavalry at the Presidio of Monterey, California. His son later recalled that while regiment commander:

“He rode every day and insisted that all his officers do the same, “declaring, they were in the cavalry weren’t they?”

Leon B. Kromer was born in 1876 and attended the U.S. Military Academy, where he was captain and quarterback of the football team. He graduated in 1899 and fought in the Philippines Insurrection (1899) and served in the Occupation of Cuba (1899-1900). He accompanied General Pershing on the Punitive Expedition into Mexico (1916-17) and with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I (1917-19).

Kromer left Monterey in 1928 to become assistant commandant of the Army War College. In 1934 Army Chief of Staff General Douglas MacArthur selected Kromer to be Chief of Cavalry with the rank of major general. He retired to Vermont in 1938. In 1941 he became Commandant of Cadets at Norwich University. Two of his sons also graduated from the Military Academy, one of who fell in the Battle of the Bugle. Kromer died at age 90 in 1966.

(Source: Assembly, spring 1967, Volume XXVI No. 1, and DLIFLC & POM Archives)


Troop Commander Captain Coe.

Captain La Garde, the doctor.

Sgt. McCarron – is in the 1938 Presidio Yearbook "E" Troop.

Lt. Riepe.

Sgt. Bliss – Private Robert M. Bliss is in the 1938 Presidio Yearbook but I do not think this is him.

Sgt. Ross – not found in the 1938 Presidio Yearbook.

Cpl. Seiber - not found in the 1938 Presidio Yearbook.

Van Leeuween - not found in the 1938 Presidio Yearbook.

Sgt. Sprinkles - not found in the 1938 Presidio Yearbook.

Several of these camps are owned by Dr. Hamlin.


INTERESTING LINKS FOR ABOVE RESEARCH
Click on the below links:
The Building of Highway One
Historical Overview of the Carmel to San Simeon Highway



CAVALRY OFFICER RECALLS PRESIDIO LIFE IN THE 1930'S
Story by Bob Britton

As a youth, he rode 11th Cavalry regimental horses on the Presidio of Monterey from 1937-1940. As an adult, he spent a great deal of time serving with or commanding armored cavalry units during his 35-year Army career.

Growing up as a boy on the Presidio, retired Lt. Gen. John McEnery lived in family quarters along Fitch Avenue when his father, Lt. Colonel Douglas W. McEnery was post surgeon and owned two horses. When his father was stationed at the Presidio of Monterey, there was a small hospital or clinic located next to where the present Presidio Theater exist. In later years, the building became a noncommissioned officers club and was eventually torn down.

“Living on the Presidio was a super place for kids to grow up,” said McEnery. “I went to Pacific Grove Grammar School, which is now the Roberts Downs Elementary School. Children traveled to school riding in the back of an Army one and a half-tom truck with a row of chairs in the back.”

The post’s terrain was similar to what it is today, although the installation wasn’t built up like it is today. Soldier from the 11th Cavalry regiment and the 76th Field Artillery used older wooden buildings on the lower Presidio and some barracks near Fitch Avenue officers quarters. In the late 1930s, Weckerling Center was the old officers” club next to the chapel complex and across from Soldier Field.

Although the Army owned most of the horses, some officers owned their own mounts, McEnery’s father owned two horses and loved to ride. Troopers kept their four-legged friends in stables located near the Pine Street entrance to the Presidio, McEnery mentioned.

“I belong to a mounted Boy Scout troop on post and rode either my father’s horses or the Army’s, “ he said. “We trained on the Presidio, drilled like the cavalry and performed one year at the California Rodeo in Salinas. Sometimes we rode the horses out to Gigling Reservation (the East Garrison part of the former Fort Ord) to practice our riding skills.

“I can remember more horse shows than military reviews on Soldier Field and other places,” he said. “We rode in an open field area where Price Fitness Center is located today. In the late 1930s, Highway 68 or Holman Highway didn’t exist on the backside of the post. Mounted soldiers also used that area as .45 caliber pistol target ranges. We also did trail riding throughout Del Monte Forest without seeing too many houses. Our Boy Scout leaders were high school juniors and seniors, which I was much younger.“

McEnery’s father always had horses wherever he worked. He spent 33 years in the Army Medical Corps and retired as a colonel.

Gen. McEnery comes from a military family. His maternal grandfather was a general officer who commanded the 2nd Cavalry regiment. His father was an Army surgeon. So, it was natural for John McEnery to graduate from West Point in 1948 as a cavalry officer. He later served with or commanded units of the 10th, 11th, and 14th Cavalry regiments and the Air Cavalry Combat Brigade. He also commanded the 3rd Squadron, 11th Cavalry, in Vietnam from 1968-69. This is the same unit stationed on the Presidio in the 1920s and 1930s.

(Note: the article continues on with Gen. McEnery impressive military careers).

(Source: The Globe, date unknown, DLIFLC & POM Archives)



MANEUVER MARCH OF 11TH CAVALRY (THE INDIANS) 1935


Source: U.S. Cavalry Journal c1935, DLIFLC & POM Archives

MANEUVER MARCH OF 11TH CAVALRY (THE INDIANS) 1935
By Colonel Ralph M. Parker
Commanding the 11th Cavalry, Presidio of Monterey, California

An interesting maneuver which was recently conducted by the 11th Cavalry. Leaving the Presidio of Monterey on the morning of November 1st, the regiment marched via Spreckles to the vicinity of Chualar, a distance of approximately thirty miles. This was followed on the 2day, 3day, and 4th by marches varying from twenty-four to twenty-eight miles in length, camps being made for the night on the Arroyo Seco, west of Greenfield, Gamboa ranch nine miles west of King City and The Indians. The Indians is said to have derived its name from having been a favorite campsite for a group of Indians in years gone by. It lies at an elevation of about 2000 feet against the foot of a range averaging in height anywhere between five and six thousand feet. The purpose of the maneuver was to demonstrate the ability of cavalry to execute a pursuit mission through the most difficult section of the coastal range; the idea being that the horse units would leave behind them all wheeled units and proceed with supplies sufficient to last forty-eight hours. The only preparation for the march was the making up of tightly compressed rolls of hay wrapped in raincoats and strapped to the cantles of the saddles. Twelve pounds of grain and one cooked luncheon was carried on the saddles and two uncooked meals were carried in the kitchen packs. Shelter tents and extra blankets were loaded on trucks for return to the post. There was no heavy canvas all officers occupied shelter tents.

After a very cold night during which water four inches thick froze solid, a normal breakfast was provided and the march started at 6:45 a.m. The route had purposely not been reconnoitered but the services of a guide, Mr Leavitt of the U.S. Forestry Service was obtained. In the first two and one-half miles the column marched from an elevation of 2,000 feet to 5,800 feet. Fort the last three-quarters of a mile, the mountain side had to be scaled by a narrow, switch-back trail almost imperceptible before the column passed over it. From the high saddle, the trail descended in a very irregular manner skirting deep canyons and dropping down steep inclines into boulder-covered beds. It was expected that water would be found in the canyon of the Santa Lucia Creek but none was found there. The guide stated that it was the first time in his many years of service in that section that he ever found the place free of water. The trail, which shirted the tops of the canyons were in most places scarcely more than a bare foothold. All along were places where there was scarcely room for more than one foot at a time so that in order to minimize the danger the command was required to lead a great many miles of the way. Below this narrow foothold the depth of the canyon was often from one to two thousand feet, so a slip or the falling of a horse with the rider mounted would have very serious matter.

The column moved quietly and without mishap of any kind for 18 miles through this kind of country when it arrived at the Arroyo Seco, an excellent camp with plenty of good water available. This part of the march was made in six and half hours. Over the whole distance, trotting had not been possible for more than one and one half miles. The hay ration and one-half of the oats were fed at this camp and the noon meal was prepared. The command groomed and rested from 12:45 to 3:00 p.m. when the march to Monterey was resumed. The route was along the county road from Arroyo Seco up Paloma Creek Canyon over the Divide into the Carmel Valley. The distance from Arroyo Seco to the Tularcitos ranch, 28 miles, was covered in five and one-half hours. At this point the regiment was watered, fed, and marching resumed at 10:30 pm. The remaining 24 miles was completed by 3:00 a.m., when the regiment after leading for one and one-half miles, entered the Presidio, having accomplished a very difficult and exacting maneuver march of 70 miles in approximately 20 hours.

From the halt at Tularcitos, two very old horses were permitted to fall out. Other than these two cases there were no ill effects whatever upon man or horse. There was not an accident in coming along the precipitous route and everyone in the command appeared to be enjoying the outing immensely. A very considerable number of horses which took part in this march are well over 20 years of age, which only go to show that one will often underestimate the marching ability of horses on account of their old age.

By forcing the column, as might be required under war conditions, the march could have been made in considerably less time and a similar march could have been repeated by the regiment the day following with perhaps a small number of casualties among the horses. The effect of the march on the regiment has been excellent, and everyone feels that long marches are activities to be looked forward to with more pleasure than alarm. An item which is specially worthy of note in connection with this march is the fact that the Post Surgeon, Colonel A.S. Bowen, Medical Corps, who had not ridden a horse in many years, made the march, proceeding the entire distance by riding and leading in conformity with the procedure of the command and enjoyed it as a purely sporting proposition. Colonel Bowen was the oldest member of the command.

The utmost credit is given to the men charged with leading the pack horses. There were times when the packs striking against the mountain side threatened to push the animals off the trail. It was only by the utmost patience and painstaking care on the part of the men in charge of these pack horses that causalities were prevented. It was often impossible for a driver to lead his mount and pack horse at the same time. Sometimes it was necessary for him to determine which of the two horses could be released with the least danger. At other times it was necessary for him to lead one horse across a difficult section of the trail and go back for the other. The trail was constantly slipping from under the horses' feet making it necessary for the horses to exert constant effort in order to secure new footholds to keep from going down the mountain side.

Comparing this entire march with similar long-distance marches made by organization of this and other regiments in which the writer participated many years ago, it may be said with assurance that the teachings of the Cavalry School regarding matters pertaining to the subject of marches have resulted in a vast increase in the ability of cavalry to cover long distances over difficult terrain in very brief periods of time and with minimum discomfort to both men and horses. The ease and actual pleasure with which this march was made is a tribute to the vastly increasing efficiently of the cavalry, for which the Cavalry School is largely responsible.

END


COLONEL RALPH M. PARKER
At the Presidio of Monterey 30 June 1933 to 5 February 1936.


Source: DLIFLC & POM Archives

Ralph M. Parker was born in 1879. He enlisted in 1899 during the Spanish-American War and accepting a commission in the 11th Cavalry in 1901. He served in the Philippine Insurrection (1902-04) and later in a variety of staff, line and school assignments. While serving in Washington on the War Department General Staff from 1929 to 1933 he earned a Master of Science degree from Norwich University.

Parker commanded the 11th Cavalry from 1933 to 1936. During his tenure the regiment established and supervised several Civil Conservation Corps camps in the Central Coast area. He retired in 1944.

(Source: DLIFLC & POM Archives)


11TH CAVALRY WINDING OUT OF BARLOY CANYON BY CHARLES BRADFORD HUDSON


Painting by Charles Bradford Hudson, of Pacific Grove, California). 11th Cavalry winding out of Barloy Canyon at a gallop with Colonel Ralph M. Parker and staff at the head". Note: Barloy Canyon is on the old Gigling, Camp Ord Military Reservation with is now the Fort Ord National Monument. Note: See the above article of "Maneuver March of the 11th Cavalry" that features this image in the 1935 U.S. Cavalry Journal.

INFORMATION ON CHARLES BRADFORD HUDSON, MONTEREY BAY AREA ARTIST

Hello Greg,
In 2010, Kristin Murphy and I published a biography of the artist Charles Bradford Hudson: http://spo.nmfs.noaa.gov/mfr714/mfr714.html on page 26 of the bio we mention that we were unable to find a painting Hudson had done of the 11th Cavalry that hung in the officer’s club of the Presidio of Monterey, California. During our search we had contacted various people at the Presidio and in U.S. Army archive offices.

Periodically, in searching the web for new information about CBH, I came across your webpage: "The Eleventh Calvary, Commanders of the 11th Calvary 1901 to 1941", Your article, page 12, quotes from a partial article that was in a 1930's U.S. Cavalry Journal, publication source questioned, written by Col. Ralph M.Parker. At the end of that article you appended a note about the Charles Bradford Hudson painting that hung in the Presidio, which indicated that a photograph existed. I was wondering if you could help us locate this painting.

Most appreciatively

Victor G. Springer
Senior Scientist Emeritus
Division of Fishes MRC-159
National Museum of Natural History
Washington, DC

And

Kris Murphy
Smithsonian Institution
Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Museum Support Center

NOTE: The location of where this painting is unknown. If you have information please contact me. - Greg Krenzelok

Click the below link by Victor G. Springer, Senior Scientist Emeritus, National Museum of Natural History and Kristin Murphy, Smithsonian Institution, Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes, biography on the artist Charles Bradford Hudson.
Drawn to the Sea: Charles Bradford Hudson (1865-1939)



11TH CAVALRY MARCH "CAMP INDIANS" 1935


11th U.S. Cavalry on practice march at Camp Indians, November 4-5, 1935. Colonel Ralph M. Parker Commanding. DLIFLC & POM Archives

June 9, 2012
In one of many phone interviews with HQ Troop, 11th Cavalry, Trooper Andy Andreasen (1934-37) told me of a great story that they heard when they were at “The Indians” area in 1935 (Big Sur area). There is an Indian sacred rock in the area that is a gateway to the other world the Indians believed. And at some time a white man stood on this rock and disappeared. A few days later he reappeared old with grey hair. The officers were concerned enough about this legend to order the men not to go by this rock. I tape two phone calls where Andy mentioned this story. – Greg Krenzelok


Practice maneuver march of the 11th Cavalry, November 4-5, 1935. Image source: First Sgt. Andy Andreasen Collection. All rights reserved.


The 11th Cavalry column marched from an elevation of 2,000 feet to 5,800 feet. The last three-quarters of a mile, the mountain side had to be scaled by a narrow, switch-back trail almost imperceptible before the column passed over it. From the high saddle, the trail descended in a very irregular manner skirting deep canyons and dropping down steep inclines into boulder-covered beds. It was expected that water would be found in the canyon of the Santa Lucia Creek but none was found there. The guide, Mr Leavitt of the U.S. Forestry Service stated that it was the first time in his many years of service in that section that he ever found the place free of water. The trail, which shirted the tops of the canyons were in most places scarcely more than a bare foothold. All along were places where there was scarcely room for more than one foot at a time so that in order to minimize the danger the command was required to lead a great many miles of the way. Below this narrow foothold the depth of the canyon was often from one to two thousand feet, so a slip or the falling of a horse with the rider mounted would have very serious matter. Image source: First Sgt. Andy Andreasen Collection. All rights reserved.


11th Cavalry trooper at "Camp Indians" in the Big Sur area, 1935. The first time motor vehicles were used by the 11th Cavalry, their horses in background. Image source: First Sgt. Andy Andreasen Collection. All rights reserved.


11th Cavalry trooper at "Camp Indians" in the Big Sur area, 1935. Image source: First Sgt. Andy Andreasen Collection. All rights reserved.


HQ Troop, 11th Cavalry, Trooper Andy Andreasen (1934-37). Image source: First Sgt. Andy Andreasen Collection. All rights reserved.


THE INDIANS TODAY

November 3, 2014 – email with Dennis Palm – Ventana Wilderness Alliance, Santa Cruz, CA

Ventana Wilderness Alliance
Click on the below link:
Ventana Wilderness Alliance

Hello Dennis,
Gary S. Breschini has given me your name and suggested I contact you. I am a military researcher and I am investigating the 11th Cavalry's practice march from the Presidio of Monterey to the area of "Camp Indians" on November 4-5, 1935, Colonel Ralph M. Parker Commanding. I have an article in the U.S. Cavalry Journal 1935, a panoramic image of "Camp Indians" and I have interviewed a 11th Cavalry trooper who was on this march in 1935.

Trooper Andy Andreasen relayed a story to me in an interview of their stay at Camp Indians:

"June 9, 2012 – Andy told me of a great story that they heard when they were in “The Indians” area in 1935. There is an Indian sacred rock in the area that is a gateway to the other world the Indians believed. And at some time a white man stood on this rock and disappeared. A few days later he reappeared old with grey hair. The officers were concerned enough about this legend to order the men not to go by this rock. I tape two phone calls where Andy mentioned this story".

You can find my online research on this subject at:

MANEUVER MARCH OF 11TH CAVALRY (THE INDIANS) 1935
By Colonel Ralph M. Parker
Commanding the 11th Cavalry, Presidio of Monterey, California
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gregkrenzelok/veterinary%20corp%20in%20ww1/pominthe1930s.html

Please scroll down until you find the above title.

I would like to know if you recognized the rock formation in the background of the 11th Cavalry bivouacked at Camp Indians panoramic image? Their march is documented in the U.S. Cavalry article. And I was wondering if you have ever heard any Indian folklore that is similar to this story.

Please let me know if you can help.

Thank you

Greg Krenzelok – U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group


Reply from Dennis:

Greg,
Very interesting research and yes, I know the rock formation well. It is now within the Ventana Wilderness. See the attached photo of what the rock looks like during a wet Spring. I have a cabin a few hundred yards from the camp area.

The trail to Santa Lucia Peak (Junipero Serra Peak on maps), the highest peak in the coast range, begins at the camp site. The legend you referred to is probably placed at Santa Lucia Peak, which is noted in Salinan creation myths. It is also noted that they marched from an elevation of 2000' to 5800'. The camp is at 2000' and the peak is approx. 5800'.

I'll have to view some old topo maps, but I believe the "Camp Indians" area was on the Hearst Ranch, in 1935.

Have you talked with the cultural resource manager at Hunter Liggett, Lisa Cipolla?

I think I may be able to help with some of your research. Possibly, we can meet at The Indians and we can take a tour.

Happy Trails!

Dennis

Note: Dennis sent 3 great pictures of the Indians


Source: "The Indians today" Dennis Palm, ventanawild.org


Source: "The Indians today" Dennis Palm, ventanawild.org


Source: "The Indians today" Dennis Palm, ventanawild.org



11TH CAVALRY CHUALAR CANYON BIVOUAC CAMP 1939-40
Editors Note: The 11th Cavalry bivouac in Chualar, California quite often on their road marches when going south or going back home to the Presidio of Monterey. In my interviews with 11th Cavalry troopers Andy Andreasen (1934-1937) and Joe Santone (1938-1940) both remember bivouacing in Chualar on road marches.


Photographer, Karl Johnson, contributed by his son, Carl Mark Johnson, circa 1939-40

Greg
We lived in Monterey County on Old Stage Road at Chualar Road, approximately 25 miles from the Cavalry section of Camp Ord. I was six or seven in late summer or early fall of 1939 or '40 when I saw an endless procession of Army trucks, some with trailers, turning from Chualar Road to go south on Old Stage Road and then, in less than a mile, to turn east on Chualar Canyon Road. Why would the Army be here? After what seemed like an hours-long caravan, my two brothers and I learned from our parents that the cavalry was on bivouac on the pasture across from our uncle Frank Johnson's unfinished house--now the house of my brother Harry Johnson, then 11 or 12-years-old.

Whether we learned from conversation from someone who lived on the Johnson Brothers property there or by the magic of the telephone (which we MAY have just gotten in the house), I don't know. But we all had to drive the five miles or so to the pasture. The orderly arrangement of so many horses, tents, and uniformed men was a vision from the movies for us country boys. Immediately, though, I wanted to become a cavalry man. That fantasy, however, was forgotten--until recent years when cousin Carl Mark Johnson showed us the photos his father Karl Johnson had taken. Mark is now happy to share these photos with the War Horse group, and Harry's photo (below) shows the unchanged appearance of that pasture 70-plus years later..

On Karl Wilhelm Johnson. He was never in the military and not even a horseman (though one of his brothers was a horseman/cattle rancher). But he was one of the Johnson Brothers, who farmed and ranched the property where the 11th cavalry bivouacked (as I recall from my 1st grade memory) on that pasture in the late summer or early fall of 1939, '40, and '41. Karl's father (my grandfather) John August Johnson bought that Chualar Canyon property in 1886 or '87. Karl's son, Carl Mark Johnson now of Morgan Hill, preserved and provided the photos.

Dick Johnson Andre (October 2012)


Photographer, Karl Johnson, contributed by his son, Carl Mark Johnson, circa 1939-40. Camp area and picket line.


Photographer, Karl Johnson, contributed by his son, Carl Mark Johnson, circa 1939-40. Horse picket line.


Photographer, Karl Johnson, contributed by his son, Carl Mark Johnson, circa 1939-40. Horse picket line.


Photographer, Karl Johnson, contributed by his son, Carl Mark Johnson, circa 1939-40. Cook tent.


Photographer, Karl Johnson, contributed by his son, Carl Mark Johnson, circa 1939-40


Location of the 11th Cavalry bivouac camp in 1939-40 (red dot)


Location of the 11th Cavalry bivouac camp in 1939-40 (red dot)


Greg - The area you have the pin on is correct. That is a very flat and level field, which is where the cavalry did their exercises at the time they were here. As far as having any particular memories of the event, I only remember that our folks brought us up to see the event which to an 11 or 12 year old was quite impressive. Some of the pictures you already have brought back memories of it.

Harry Johnson



A GOOD DIRT ROAD! PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY TO KING CITY AND JOLON 1920'S
Pre-Highway 101 as traveled by the 11th Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery horse-drawn.


Source: Created by Greg Krenzelok.



BOOK: SOMETHING ABOUT A SOLDIER
By Charles Willeford

THE KNACKERS
A new book has come to light that I found very interesting. The name of the book is "Something About A Soldier" by Charles Willeford. He was a highly decorated, (Silver Star, Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Luxembourg Croix de Guerre) tank commander with the Third Army during World War II. He also served as a horseshoer in Machine Gun Troop of the 11th Cavalry at the Presidio of Monterey in 1939. His unrestrained tell it like it is and revealing writing I found very refreshing.

In Chapter One he talks about shoeing "Old Raz" a nineteen year old horse, with a horse brand number of 136E. Raz was marked "IC" (inspected and condemned) and how this horse was saved from the "knackers" who were civilians that purchased the condemned horses from the Army. When there was enough condemned horses they would arrive with their truck with A-frame mounted on the back. They would take a piece of blue chalk; draw an X from the horse's ears to their eyes and shoot them in the head. At this point his description of the horses is very revealing. The horses were loaded in the truck using the A-frame and were taken for processing somewhere. The description is gruesome but as a historian found it to be an important documentation of the process that was done at the Presidio, or as least according to him.

Raz proved worthy of redemption and was saved by the breaking of the rules by commanding officers and sergeants to save this horse from the knackers.

The author talks about the "enormous pasturage out at the Giglin (Gigling) Military Reservation, where Camp Ord was located, and sick horses, run-down horses, or horses with a bad cannon or something that needed time to rest and heal were taken out there and left. They ate brown grass and ran around loose in the hills. Once a day a truckload of hay was taken out there, dumped, and broken open. The horses would come crowding around and would fill up on hay. They didn't get any oats, of course, because they weren't working. But a month or so out on the range brought most of them up to snuff again, and they could be rounded up and trucked back to the Presidio for duty. If Sergeant Bellows could smuggle Old Raz out there, the condemned horse would be safe from the knackers, and he could run around-or stumble around- in the hills for months before he was discovered again".

The author continues:

"To return to my original point: Here was Old Raz, a decent but useless horse, but still worth $145 to the government on paper. Someone, somewhere, on paper, had to account for Old Raz, so there was no way that he could be shipped out to the Giglin (Gigling) open range without his whereabouts being noted. So his execution was avoided by a conspiracy of the troop commander, the first sergeant, the stable sergeant, and of course, the veterinarian, who was a major in the Veterinary Corps. I should have realized al that, but I just hadn't accepted the idea that there could ever be an kind of cooperation between officers and enlisted men. I think my change in attitude toward the Army began the day we saved Old Raz from the knackers. Old Raz died about three months later, and they buried him where he fell, out on the Giglin range. But three months is three months, and no one ever turned Old Raz into dog food" - Charles Willeford

NOTE: Warning this book is adult context and not suitable for younger readers.



MOVIE MADE AT THE PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY: "TROOPERS THREE" 1930

Note: For years I have been searching for old Horse Soldier movies and I have collected quite a few. Today's review is the movie "Troopers Three" produced in 1930 by Tiffany Studios. This movie was filmed at the Presidio of Monterey, Camp Del Monte, and other locations. The movie appears to be lost except for only a very few short versions of the movie, one which I have found for my collection. Nevertheless it is extremely rare and a real treat to watch.

Here is the synopsis from the video: "Tiffany Studios' all -purpose leading man, heads the cast of Troopers Three. Eddie Haskins and his buddies Bugs and Sunny are washed-up vaudevillians who decide to join the Cavalry, if only for three square meals a day. Once they've filled their bellies, they attempt to bid farewell to the Army, only to learn that they've signed up for a three-year hitch--and this contract is non-negotiable.

Starring:
Rex Lease
Dorothy Gulliver
Roscoe Karns
Slim Summerville

The movie "Troopers Three" shows the boys at the Presidio of Monterey do their stuff, playing, riding, fighting fires, and soldiering. - Monterey Herald c1930.

Colonel Fitch Commander of the Presidio of Monterey states that the picture itself is a "hum-dinger"!



Left: Original movie adverting for "Troopers Three" Source: G.L. Krenzelok Collection. Right: Advertisement in the Monterey Herald March 1930. Being played at the Golden State Theater, Mid-Nite Matinee, and Presidio of Monterey. All talking movie, big deal for its day.


Source: Articles in the Monterey Herald March 1930 and G.L. Krenzelok Collection.

Midnight Matinee Tuesday to Mark Local Premiere of Picture "Troopers Three". The movie "Troopers Three" shows the boys at the Presidio of Monterey do their stuff, playing, riding, fighting fires, and soldiering. This is the film that was taken with the cooperation of the 11th Cavalry. Colonel Fitch states that the picture itself is a "hum-dinger"!

"Local Premiere of Cavalry Film Here Tomorrow". Advance ticket sales are being conducted at the theater, the Officer's Club at the Presidio, and at the Palace Drug Company's stores in Monterey and Carmel".


Source: Articles in the Monterey Herald March 1930.

"Cavalry Film's Proceeds To Aid Charitable Fund". The entire proceeds of five performances will be turned over to two Army charity organizations, the Army Relief association, and the Post Relief Fund of the Presidio of Monterey. Filmed on the Peninsula "Troopers Three" should prove to be very interesting to the people of the Monterey peninsula because of the fact that practically the entire picture was filmed in this community, most scenes being shot at the Presidio of Monterey and at the Del Monte polio grounds"

"U.S. Cavalry Work Shown in "Troopers Three" Film. Brilliant assemblage will attend 'Gala Premiere" at 11:30 tonight. Trooper Three is a story of peace-time cavalry life, crammed with drama, comedy and love interest. Practically every foot of the film, barring only a few interior scenes, was "shot" at the Presidio of Monterey. Many members of "Monterey's own", the 11th Cavalry, have minor parts. In one scene, showing a military field meet, practically every horse and rider at the local post is shown". "U.S. Cavalry Steals Show In "Troopers Three" Film. Local talent supplies bulk of interest but whole picture is good. At the conclusion Colonel Roger Fitch commander of the presidio, expressed his gratification over it all, and introduced the star, Rex Lease, who thereupon made a personal appearance".


Book: Troopers Three by Harry S. Hart. Illustrated with scenes from the Photoplay, A. L. Burt Company 1930. Source: G.L. Krenzelok Collection


Picture from the book Troopers Three by Harry S. Hart. Illustrated with scenes from the Photoplay, A. L. Burt Company 1930. Source: Greg Krenzelok Collection


Picture from the book Troopers Three by Harry S. Hart. Illustrated with scenes from the Photoplay, A. L. Burt Company 1930. Source: Greg Krenzelok Collection


Picture from the book Troopers Three by Harry S. Hart. Illustrated with scenes from the Photoplay, A. L. Burt Company 1930. Source: Greg Krenzelok Collection


Original movie adverting for "Troopers Three" Source: G.L. Krenzelok Collection


VHS copy: very rare short version of the movie "Troopers Three" from my collection. Note: this is the same as the video clip on the below links.


Click on the below link:
TROOPER'S THREE VIDEO - Part 1 of 2. 1930
Troopers Three Movie Part 1 of 2. 1930

TROOPER'S THREE VIDEO – Part 2 of 2 1930
Troopers Three Movie Part 2 of 2. 1930



Return to The 11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940 homepage:

11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
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11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


image description


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76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
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76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
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Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
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The Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1


SERGEANT LEONARD MURPHY VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18, A.E.F., WW1
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Sergeant Leonard Murphy Veterinary Hospital No. 18, A.E.F., WW1





U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group