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GROWTH OF CAMPUS MEANS END TO HISTORY



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GROWTH OF CAMPUS MEANS END TO HISTORY

This article was in the April 23, 2009 “GROWTH OF CAMPUS MEANS END TO HISTORY” Otter Realm Newspaper of CSU Monterey Bay, Lucas Anthony: Staff Reporter

Headline: Removal of Condemned Army Barracks
Sub-Head: Growth of Campus means Death for History
Lucas Anthony (Staff Reporter)

The transformation from winter to spring yields new life – a rebirth even.

Much like this change in the seasons, the CSU Monterey Bay (CSUMB) campus has been transitioning from former Fort Ord Army base to budding college campus since 1994.

Growth of the CSUMB campus has required the deconstruction of more than 90 crumbling, contaminated Army buildings. With this contamination, however, also disappears a little California history.

Deconstruction of five World War II Army barrack buildings on Division Hill, at Second Avenue and Divarty Street, began March 9, with the erection of a chain-link perimeter fence.

“These buildings served as officer and enlisted barracks,” said 94-year-old retired Army Maj. Lee R. Stickler, who was part of the horse drawn 76th Field Artillery, stationed at Fort Ord. “They were the first buildings to be finished, along with the horse stables.”

In June, 1940, Maj. Stickler’s unit was housed in tents near The Dunes shopping center until the completion of the barracks in September.

The chain-link-surrounded site now contains overflowing dumpsters, ferocious excavators, hard-hatted workers in protective jumpsuits, and perimeter tape reading: ‘DANGER ASBESTOS.’

“As soon as people hear the word asbestos they become concerned,” said CSUMB Lead Construction Manager Ron Deller. “When in all actuality, after the abatement process, approximately less than one percent of these buildings contains asbestos.”

Once the siding, covered in lead paint, and the majority of the asbestos products are properly disposed of, the vintage barracks contain less asbestos than Serpentine, the shiny, green-and- blue state rock of California.

“The workers are in protective clothing in case they run into contaminants somehow or to prevent cumulative effects to them over time,” said Deller. “We are always monitoring the air quality. We owe it to the faculty, staff and students to do this carefully.”

Although the clearing of this land is beneficial to CSUMB, what about preserving the past, remembering the exploits of Maj. Stickler and the 76th Field Artillery and paying tribute to all the men and women who shed blood, sweat and tears on this historic land?

According to Deller, there was talk of renovating Stickler’s barracks as a monument, but because of the structural damage, he said it would be cheaper to build replicas. “We saved sections of siding,” he said, “and took pictures so if that is something CSUMB decides to do, it will be possible.”

As for Stickler, a soldier who witnessed the life and death of Fort Ord, he recognizes the importance of higher learning and CSUMB’s need for more land. “I’m sorry to see it go,” he said, “but it’s just the facts of life.”


May 2011: “A TRAGIC LOSS OF HISTORY AT FORT ORD, CALIFORNIA” just after Memorial Day the last complete example of our country’s end of the U.S. Army Warhorse which were still being used at the beginning of World War II. The Series 700 temporary type buildings: artillery, cavalry stables along with their blacksmith shops were demolished on the California State University at Monterey Bay Campus, California. Leaving only the Fort Ord Station Veterinary Horse Hospital the only buildings remaining to testify of the memory of the “Fort Ord Horse Soldiers” that were there from 1940 to 1942. President Diane Harrison who I personally hold responsible for this action and the university’s failure or interest to recognize the historical significance is one of the greatest tragedies to fall upon this university, this action ending a two year long battle for their recognition and preservation. The “Honoring” of the history of Fort Ord has not been served by this action.

Greg Krenzelok
U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Preservation Group


Words cannot express what is in my heart at seeing and walking the grounds of where the Fort Ord Field Artillery and Cavalry stables once stood.


DEMOLITION OF THE STABLES AND BLACKSMITH SHOPS MAY 2011
I was in Alaska at the time and was not able to document the buildings being demolished. A friend of mind did, Efren Lopez a military combat photographer did. I would like to thank Efren from sharing these posted images. This is my first real good look at these pictures as a tear rolled down my face. - Greg Krenzelok, U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group


May 2011 Fort Ord horse stables and blacksmith start to come down. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


What's left of T-1442, incinerator, dated completed November 30, 1940, 5- ton. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


Stable being demolished by excavator using demolition bucket "The Jaws of death for this stable", May 2011. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


Overview of the old stable and blacksmith shop area. Demolition is about complete except for T-1672 (SP-14 Motor repair shop). Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


Fort Ord horse stables being demolished, May 2011. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


Fort Ord horse stables and blacksmith are now down and all that is left is clean-up, May 2011. Courtesy photo by Efren Lopez


FORT ORD STABLES AND BLACKSMITH SHOPS DEMOLITION ON FACEBOOK
Click on the below link:
U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group Facebook Stables



Return to The Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2 homepage:

FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
Click on the below link:
Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2



Click on the below Homepage links:

11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
Click on the below link:
11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
Click on the below link:
76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
Click on the below link:
The Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1


SERGEANT LEONARD MURPHY VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18, A.E.F., WW1
Click on the below link:
Sergeant Leonard Murphy Veterinary Hospital No. 18, A.E.F., WW1




U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

Click on the below link:

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group