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TECHNICIAN FIFTH GRADE (T/5) MARION T. NEABUHR



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TECHNICIAN FIFTH GRADE (T/5) MARION T. NEABUHR

TECHNICIAN FIFTH GRADE (T/5) MARION T. NEABUHR
74th Field Artillery Battalion, Service Battery, 2nd Section, 1941 to 1945

Hi Greg
My father, Marion T. Neabuhr served 4 years in this battalion. He passed away on July 27, 2011.

Jan Neabuhr


Marion Thomas Neabuhr, age 93, of Irvington, Illinois, passed away at 6:35 A.M. on Wednesday, July 27, 2011 at Saint Mary's Good Samaritan Hospital in Centralia, Illinois. He was born January 15, 1918 in Jefferson County near Boyd, Illinois, the 4th son of Amos and Lena Del (Pugh) Neabuhr. He married Helen Marie Anderson on February 11, 1951 at the bride's home on South 10th Street in Mount Vernon, Illinois and she survives in Irvington, Illinois.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by 2 daughters Jan Neabuhr of Irvington, Illinois and Kim Neabuhr of Denver, Colorado, two sisters Anna Ziegler and husband Orville of Belleville, Illinois and Edna Eastman of Nashville, Illinois and many nieces and nephews.

Mr. Neabuhr was preceded in death by his parents, 3 brothers Amos Neabuhr, Jr., Paul Riley Neabuhr and William Gratis Neabuhr, brother-in-law: Herb Eastman and sister-in-law Vada Neabuhr.

He was a decorated disable veteran who served his country during World War II in the U.S. Army 74th Field Artillery Battalion from October 24, 1941 until November 5, 1945. He served in the Rhineland Campaign and Eastern European Theatre. He fought in the Battle of the Bulge throughout Belgium and Germany from December 16, 1944 to January 16, 1945. He engaged in battle during the capture of Cologne, Germany and fought at the Ludendorff railroad bridge at Remagan, Germany. Mr. Neabuhr related defending U.S. Forces from inside the Cologne Cathedral during street battle and firefights. He also like to tell of meeting his cousin, Wilbur Meadows, of rural Boyd, in another battalion at the Remagan Bridge.

Mr. Neabuhr often recounted crossing the Atlantic Ocean to Belgium, December 1944, in a fleet of 18 Liberty Ships and returning to the United States July 5, 1945, passing by the Statue of Liberty via steamship the Queen Mary.

He was decorated with several medals including two Bronze Battle Stars, World War II Victory Medal, Army of Occupation, Germany Clasp, African European Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, American Campaign Medal, American Defense Medal, two Good Conduct Medals and Expert Marksman pin.

Mr. Neabuhr served in the Western Defense from 1941 to 1944. His battalion was stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Papago Park, Arizona, Fort Ord and Camp Roberts, California. He entered the U.S. Army at Camp Grant, Illinois. Prior to World War II service, He was engaged in the Civilian Conversation Corps in Shelbyville, Illinois. As a teenager, he worked for seven years at the Mount Vernon Game Farm prior to CCC Service.

After wartime, Mr. Neabuhr worked at Southern Illinois Ice Company for 22 years with his brother Amos, Jr. and good friend Irvin Joliff. He retired from Warren G. Murray Developmental Center in Centralia, Illinois after 13 years of service. He enjoyed working in his vegetable garden, working on cars, and doing carpentry work. He loved to travel and enjoyed the time he spent with his family. He lived all of his life in Irvington, Illinois.

He attended Fulton School, Bend School and graduated from Springer School on Irvington-Dix Road.

Funeral Services will be held at 11:00 A.M. on Saturday, July 30 , 2011 at the Styninger Queen-Boggs Funeral Home in Centralia, Illinois with Chaplain John Hempen and Reverend Mark Girardin officiating. Interment will follow in the Fouts Cemetery in Jefferson County, Illinois with Military Honors accorded by the V.F.W. Post 2055 and American Legion Post 446. Friends may call on Saturday, July 30, 2011 from 9:00 A.M. until the time of services at 11:00 A.M. at the funeral home. Memorial Contributions may be made in Mr. Neabuhr's honor to the Disabled American Veterans and will be received at the funeral home.


Technician Fifth Grade (T/5) Marion T. Neabuhr,74th Field Artillery Battalion, Service Battery, 2nd Section, 1941 to 1945


My father in the fourth one on the right. Marion T. Neabuhr, Irvington, Illinois.


In this picture my father is the second one on the right. The fourth trooper on the right is Tom Newell of Mt. Vernon, Illinois.


Tom Newell of Mt. Vernon, Illinois, is the second trooper on the right.


Papago Park, Arizona, December 1941.

TAKEN FROM THE BOOK “HISTORY OF THE 74TH FIELD ARTILLERY”:
"We had two rest stops en route, one in Los Angeles and the other in some deserted, long forgotten ghost town in eastern California. There was only one “chute” through which to unload the animals, some 420 in all. There were no corrals and we had to walk the animals in circles all night. When the last car had been unloaded, animals from the first car had been on the ground five hours. Reloading of the animals began immediately. The night was bitter cold; a heavy frost and a hard freeze made it more miserable. Twelve hours after unloading started, all animals were again back on the train and we moved on to Phoenix, arriving at 2300 hours, December 23, 1941. By 0800 Christmas Eve, we started the road march to Papago Park, near Phoenix, where we went into a tent camp".


Return to The 74th Field Artillery Battalion WW2 homepage:

74TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION WW2
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74th Field Artillery Battalion WW2



Click on the below Homepage links:

76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
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76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
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Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2


11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
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11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
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The Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1


SERGEANT LEONARD MURPHY VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18, A.E.F., WW1
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Sergeant Leonard Murphy Veterinary Hospital No. 18, A.E.F., WW1




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