Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

JO MORA RENOWNED ARTIST: C.M.T.C. CAMP, DEL MONTE, CALIFORNIA 1920’S


This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


JO MORA RENOWNED ARTIST: C.M.T.C. CAMP, DEL MONTE, CALIFORNIA 1920’S

Citizens Military Training Camp (C.M.T.C.)


Artist Jo Mora was a man of many additional talents, artist-historian, sculptor, painter, photographer, illustrator, muralist, cowboy, and author. Over the course of his life, he traveled throughout the world (often trading his art work for passage) exploring and recording images of numerous cultures and countries. He was able to beautifully render the sights he came upon during his worldwide travels in drawings and paintings. He learned to speak seven languages, an ability that enabled him to understand the people he met on their own terms. (Used only with permission of The Jo Mora Trust - Peter Hiller, curator )


FROM: FRIENDS OF FORT ORD WARHORSE
Friends of the Fort Ord Warhorse recently received an exciting email from Peter Hiller, curator of the Jo Mora Trust Collection, saying he had seen Kevin Howe's The Monterey Herald article on our 2nd Annual Fort Ord Warhorse Day, that he had drawings by Jo Mora of the field artillery and cavalry in the early 20s, and would we like to see them.

Naturally, I stumbled all over myself to say yes. Jo Mora is beloved in Monterey County, where his art has provided exuberant color in the cultural tapestry for many years. His work is always beautifully done, whatever the genre or medium, and what strikes you is the sense of joy, whether it's Father Serra's cenotaph at Carmel Mission or a coloring book for kids; he seems to love the world and every thing he brings to you as an artist, and he invites you to see it and love it too.

Peter scanned the originals—about twenty in all— and sent them along. Every one is a joy. Jo's whimsy, documentary accuracy, and superb technical prowess shine in these playful line drawings. Thank you to Peter Hiller for sharing these warhorse illustrations with FFOW. We're so tickled to see them and honored to play a role in keeping Mora's legacy alive.

Margaret Davis
Executive Director
Friends of the Fort Ord Warhorse



Jo Mora was an officer in the Field Artillery for the Army during WWI. In 1918 he enlisted in the Army, being sent to Camp Zachary Taylor in Kentucky, became a Major in the Field Artillery, worked with the Signal Corps as translator of Native American languages as result of his knowledge and background with Hopi and Navajo. Did not see service overseas. As member of Army's 91st Division served two weeks every summer at the Monterey Presidio. It was at that time that he did his Bear-Cat Musketeer and an heroic bronze Doughboy sculpture which is presently located in San Rafael at the Marin Civic Center on the Ave. of the America's. He continued for four years in the Citizen’s Military Training Camp at Camp Del Monte in Monterey, California – during which time he illustrated the camp’s yearbooks. He was a man of many other talents, artist-historian, sculptor, painter, photographer, illustrator, muralist, cowboy, and author. Later in life, he became quite a renowned artist.- (Used only with permission of The Jo Mora Trust - Peter Hiller, curator )


FROM: PETER HILLER, JO MORA TRUST COLLECTION CURATOR
Imagine a man with a deep sense of the world he lived in who was grounded in the lore of California. Consider a man who was a loving husband and a caring father of a daughter and son. Understand that this same person was an artist of original work who was able to support his family solely through his numerous and varied artistic accomplishments. Combine with those achievements, his being enamored with the past, particularly the history of the western United States, that he continually depicted and referenced in his artwork, and you begin to see the person that was Jo Mora.

Learning about these engaging qualities opens the windows to understanding the life and artistic legacy of Joseph Jacinto (Jo) Mora (1876-1947). Supporting himself and his family strictly through his creative abilities was not easy. Between crafting his artwork to sell, and attracting and completing commissions to generate income to live on, the notion of a predictable paycheck was left on the studio floor. Fortunately, Mora’s artistic gifts ranged over a wide variety of subject areas and media. The consistently high quality and diversity of his work was not only an amazing attainment for one artist, but also enabled him to accept and complete a wide variety of work.

Mora was born in Montevideo, Uruguay to a French mother, Laura Gaillard, and a Catalan father, Domingo, and, when he was a young boy, moved to the eastern United States, eventually settling in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Mora’s father was a successful fine art sculptor, and his elder brother, Francis Luis, became a talented painter of classical styles. After attending grade school and two art schools – the Art Student League in New York and Cowles Art School in Boston, along with training with his father and working for the Boston Herald and Boston Traveler newspapers as both an illustrator and cartoonist and also as a book illustrator for east coast publishers, he followed his childhood dream of exploring the cultures of the West. He spent the rest of his adult life living and working in the western United States, primarily in California.

Jo Mora was one of the few people who were listed in Who’s Who in America each year from the time the publication began, until he passed away in 1947.

Jo Mora was an officer in the Field Artillery for the Army during WWI. In 1918 he enlisted in the Army, being sent to Camp Zachary Taylor in Kentucky, became a Command Major in the Field Artillery, and worked with the Signal Corps as translator of Native American languages as a result of his knowledge and background with Hopi and Navajo people and languages. He did not see military service overseas. As member of the Army's 91st Division, Mora served two weeks every summer for four years in the Citizen’s Military Training Camp at Camp Del Monte, CA. It was during this time that he illustrated the camp’s Bear-Cat Musketeer yearbooks. Soon there after, he created his heroic bronze, Doughboy, sculpture which is presently located in San Rafael at the Marin Civic Center on the Ave. of the America's.

Jo Mora was a man of many additional talents, artist-historian, sculptor, painter, photographer, illustrator, muralist, cowboy, and author. Over the course of his life, he traveled throughout the world (often trading his art work for passage) exploring and recording images of numerous cultures and countries. He was able to beautifully render the sights he came upon during his worldwide travels in drawings and paintings. He learned to speak seven languages, an ability that enabled him to understand the people he met on their own terms.

Additional information about Jo Mora is available on the Jo Mora Trust website - jomoratrust.com. The Jo Mora Trust, upon discovering Friends of the Fort Ord Warhorse through an article written by Kevin Howe in The Monterey Herald, is looking forward to supporting their future projects.

Sincerely,
Peter Hiller
Jo Mora Trust Collection Curator

More information on Peter Hiller’s endeavors please click on the below link:

MISSION STATEMENT
The Jo Mora Trust endeavors to honor the memory and integrity of Joseph Jacinto Mora, and his artistic accomplishments, in the spirit and style of his son Jo N. Mora. The Collection Curator will strive to enlighten and educate the public about Jo Mora as he makes his work available for exhibition and sale.

Goal: To preserve, protect, organize, and grow The Jo Mora Trust Collection. Another of the goals of this website is to provide an opportunity for interested parties and collectors to communicate with each other about Jo Mora. If you are interested in listing a website or address please contact the collection curator.

This website is a new project, with attention paid to it as often as possible, in light of the collection curator having another full time job. Please be patient if it doesn't change on a regular basis, but know that your comments and suggestions are welcome.

Click on link:
Jo Mora Trust



Jo Mora's historic illustrations THE BEAR-CAT MUSKETEER: Civilian Military Training Camp, Del Monte, California, circa 1920's. (Used only with permission of The Jo Mora Trust - Peter Hiller, curator )



THE BEAR-CAT MUSKETEER: Civilian Military Training Camp, Del Monte, California 1924. 124 pages, illustrated (reproducing several full-page drawings by Jo Mora, and with black and white photographs of the troops and training staff). An early example of illustrations by Jo Mora (1876-1947), artist, illustrator, sculptor and photographer. Mora moved to California in the 1920's, living in Carmel. The Bear-Cat Musketeer was "prepared by the Men of the Citizens' Military Training Camp under the direction of Rolin G. Watkins, Major, M.I., ORC and Jo Mora, Major, F.A., ORC.". (Used only with permission of The Jo Mora Trust - Peter Hiller, curator )


NOTE: We are looking for more information of the Civilian Military Training Camp, Del Monte, California and we are curious on the character of the BEAR-CAT, if you have information please contact us.


Click on the below links:

76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion

The 76th Field Artillery’s Role in Cecil B. Demille’s 1923 Movie

American impressionist: Howard Everett Smith, 107th Cavalry lithographs 1942

Veterinary Corps in WW1

Leonard Murphy in WW1

Fort Ord Equestrian Center and Station Veterinary Hospital



U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

Click on the below link:

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group